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1

CHEMISTRY TUTOR LIST 9/15/14 This is an alphabetical listing by last name.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY TUTOR LIST 9/15/14 This is an alphabetical listing by last name. NOTE: The Chemistry them learn chemistry) enrolled in that course. NAME WILL TUTOR FOR CHM COURSES E-MAIL HOURLY RATE Balow, Bobby all general chemistry rbalow@purdue.edu $20 Chowdhury, Azhad all general chemistry except 11500

Jiang, Wen

2

EIA Report 9/15/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15, 4:00 pm See current 15, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/15/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/8/2008 Year Ago 9/14/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 95.71 115.46 -19.75 106.34 79.10 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 256.14 285.42 -29.28 275.03 203.64 Heating Oil (c/gal) 279.12 319.19 -40.07 301.31 220.78 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.37 7.94 -0.57 7.53 6.28 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to be blended with some type of oxygenate, now usually ethanol, to be turned into finished reformulated gasoline (RFG). Ethanol is not blended into the gasoline mixture until just before the gasoline is shipped to the retail stations. Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 15, the Minerals Management

3

NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense July 8-9, 2010 CORRECTED 9/15/10 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense July 8-9, 2010 ­ CORRECTED 9/15/10 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC) Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense CORRECTED MINUTES Meeting Date: July 8 - 9, 2010 AGENDA: · Ad-Hoc Task Force Timeline · Fact Finding Report · Next Generation Ground-Based Search · Space

Waliser, Duane E.

4

9.00 9.15 durch die Veranstalterinnen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gadebusch Bondio (Greifswald) Medical Virtues ­ aktuelle Fragen und alte Vorbilder 19.00 Empfang Gru?wort Deutsch. 14.45 ­ 15.30 Nicole Karafyllis (Abu Dhabi) Virtuous brains: Male and female virtues in the light

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

5

9.15 Landslides in the Fluvial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landslides are among the main contributors of sediment to fluvial systems. The delivery of landslide debris to river channels and on valley floors creates flow obstacles, alters channel geometry, and modulates fluvial sediment flux. This chapter outlines key research trends in geomorphic hillslopechannel coupling; landslide sediment production and delivery; geomorphic imprints of landslides on channel and valley-floor geomorphology; and model approaches to predict such impacts at various scales.

O. Korup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.15 Timely Orders to Operators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TIMELY ORDERS TO OPERATORS TIMELY ORDERS TO OPERATORS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility program and practices for timely orders to operators. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's timely orders to operators program and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1034-93, Guide to Good Practices for Timely Orders to Operators 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the requirements of DOE 5480.19, Attachment I, Chapter XV. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative reviews the facility index and file of orders to operators and observes operator activities to evaluate

7

FEBRUARY Results 24--Danville College Danville, VA 1:00 DH L 9-15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-5 W 13-2 10-- Southern State College Newark, OH 3:00 DH W 8-7 W 18-4 13-- Lorain College Newark, OH 1-- Lorain College Elyria, OH 1:00 DH W 7-0 W 18-5 21-- Miami University Middletown © Newark, OH 1:00 DH W 7

8

COMP R&R RECOMMENDATION FORM ISSUE DATE: 9/15/09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a project or milestone; 4. Exemplary performance in response to an important organizational need; 5. Improvement of quality, efficiency, safety, productivity, etc.; 6. Administrative or management practices that have a positive organizational effect. 7. Achievement in support of Lab's goals or values, e.g., ES

Quigg, Chris

9

2013 Symposium Schedule Grid 8:00 9:15 Registration ~ AD Lobby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Freedom University, Georgia Rey Carvajal Hohmann Transfer Orbit Applications: Spacecraft Approach on Mitochondrial Physiology Britni Hiatt Feminist Environmental Justice: Confronting Legacies of White Supremacy, Charles Powell, David Hall, Steven Arthurs Entomopathogenic Fungus, Isaria fumosorosea Daniel Zengotita

Fernandez, Eduardo

10

Microsoft Word - MOU Between DOE and Germany 9-15-11.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information CARLSBAD, N.M., September 15, 2011 - A high-ranking energy official from Germany formalized a partnership between her country and the United States during a recent...

11

EIA - Daily Report 9/15/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thursday, September 15, 3:00 pm Thursday, September 15, 3:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 15, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 842,091 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 56.14 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which had been 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.411 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 34.11 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas production (which had been 10 billion cubic feet per day). EIA released its monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook on Wednesday, September 7, taking into consideration three Hurricane Katrina recovery scenarios. Petroleum As of the close of trading on Thursday, September 15, crude oil and petroleum product prices were lower, compared to the closing prices from Wednesday, September 14. The gasoline near-month futures price was down by 3.9 cents per gallon from Wednesday, settling at 189.9 cents per gallon, while the heating oil near-month futures price was down 1.3 cents per gallon, settling at 191.2 cents per gallon. The NYMEX West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures price was down $0.34 per barrel from Wednesday, settling at $64.75.

12

INTRODUKTION -Thore Berntsson, Styrkeomrdesledare Energi 9:00-9:15 PAUS -KAFFE 10:35-10:50  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:35-10:50 SOLENERGI Nanoplasmonisk förstärkning av foton-till-elektron-omvandling i fotoelektrolytiska celler Igor

Lemurell, Stefan

13

!"#$%#&'()#*$&+,-,&.)#/&0#%$1*&234)5%#675*& 8%9:15)5;79#)&1;#*&.#)$?1))@&A1%%B&.)#%C@&&  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#*#&E145F(CB& 295)5;79#)&51(H19C@&8**1&I#)5/5*@&& J7%(61*&; Harper and Morris 2004) were examined. All known archaeological site information within the study area selected known archaeological sites within the study area and record any previously undocumented

14

Microsoft Word - Chemetall Foote_Kings Mountain and Silver Peak Final EA 9-15-10-1 _3_  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Final Environmental Assessment For Chemetall Foote Corporation Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and DOE/EA-1715 Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Environmental Assessment Chemetall Foote Corporation, Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Chemetall Foote Corporation (Chemetall) to partially fund: (1) the establishment of a new 5,000 metric ton per year lithium

15

INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 71, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2006); P. N1N9, 15 FIGS. 10.1190/1.2159053  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have very low permeability and fluid mobility (shales, siltstones, tight limestones, etc.), most rocks-fluids. The ratio of rock permeability to fluid vis- cosity defines mobility, which largely controls pore are not in the low- frequency domain, even at seismic frequencies. Only those rocks with high permeability (porous

17

SI LAB Barcoding Protocols 9/15/11 Shipping Address: Amy Driskell, SI LAB, Museum Support Center, 4210 Silver Hill Road, Suitland,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-238-1117; driskella@si.edu SAMPLING TISSUES 0.75mL Alphanumeric Matrix tubes (w/ Ethanol) 1. BLANKS: Remove G12. LABEL: Both the top and bottom of the box. Seems obvious doesn't it? 3. ETHANOL: Add 30-50 uL (that's MICROliters) of 95% ethanol to each tube. Please do not add more. And please be consistent. As we

Mathis, Wayne N.

18

Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Little, John B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

Your Success is Our Compass EAP Navigator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allergy Awareness Week Week of May 9 - 15 National Stuttering Awareness Week May 30 World No Tobacco Day

Burke, Peter

20

The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Quality of Management and of the Science and Engineering at the NNSA National Security Laboratories was presented to CRENEL 9/15/2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ministrio da Educao UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PARAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(uma) N.º DE ORDEM NOME M?DIA 01 Rodrigo dos Santos Machado Feitosa 9,15 02 Marcel Gustavo Hermes 8

Paraná, Universidade Federal do

22

Tractable Reasoning in Knowledge Representation Systems 1 Mukesh Dalal 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 2.3 PCE : Propositional Calculus with Equality and Generalized Connectives : : : : : : : : : : : 9 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 15 2.4 Rewrite Systems for PCE

23

Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photoionization and electronic structure calculations. Olegand a number of electronic structure calculations. 9, 15-18and high-level electronic structure calculations. This work

Kostko, Oleg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Physica D 237 (2008) 216232 www.elsevier.com/locate/physd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of indeterminism (GDI) [9,15,23]. In addition we present a new algorithm, which is a modification of GDI. We refer

Judd, Kevin

25

E-learning? Technology enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/15/2010 1 E-learning? Technology enhanced teaching and learning in symbol-based disciplines? Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 2 #12;9/15/2010 2 An Example: Make t the subject 2 3 Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia 3 HMS111 An Example: Make t the subject 2

Loch, Birgit

26

Free Parking Free Parking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Parking Free Parking Free Parking Free Parking Free Parking FreeParking(9.15-4.30) Free (sites marked P above) is by permit only. Free parking is available on surrounding roads (on Mayfield

Millar, Andrew J.

27

Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 9.15 2.83 2010's 4.76 3.65 --...

28

NERSC Users Group Meeting June 12-13, 2006 Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Physics Laboratory, room B-318 Time (Eastern) Topic Presenter 9:00 Welcome & logistics Stephane Ethier, PPPL 9:15 DOE Update Barbara Helland, DOE MICS 9:45 BREAK 10:00...

29

NERSC Users Group Meeting June 12-13, 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Physics Laboratory, room B-318 Time (Eastern) Topic Presenter 9:00 Welcome & logistics Stephane Ethier, PPPL 9:15 DOE Update Barbara Helland, DOE MICS 9:45 BREAK 10:00...

30

SSRL28 Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9:15 am SLAC Director's Welcome - Jonathan Dorfan, SLAC 9:30 am SSRL Directors Report - Keith Hodgson, SSRL 10:00 am Report from Washington D.C. - Patricia Dehmer, DOE-BES 10:30...

31

The R2R3-MYB Transcription Factors MYB14 and MYB15 Regulate Stilbene Biosynthesis in Vitis vinifera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development. Aust. J. Grape Wine Res. 9 : 15-27. Downey...Aust. J. Grape Wine Res. 9 : 110-121...in transgenic alfalfa increases resistance to Phoma medicaginis...subfamily reveals expanded wine quality-related clades and conserved...

Janine Höll; Alessandro Vannozzi; Stefan Czemmel; Claudio D'Onofrio; Amanda R. Walker; Thomas Rausch; Margherita Lucchin; Paul K. Boss; Ian B. Dry; Jochen Bogs

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Summit on Children's Nutrition and Wellness The Pediatrics Section, OMA and Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario present: Saturday, November 2nd , 2013, President, Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario 9:15 am � 10:00 am Supporting Remarks Dr. Hirotaka Yamashiro, President, Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario

Sokolowski, Marla

33

Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disorders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, CVD, stroke, gall bladder disease, respiratory dysfunction, gout, osteoarthritis, and certain kinds of cancers (8, 9, 15, 16). In 14 studies (each having more than 20... disorders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, CVD, stroke, gall bladder disease, respiratory dysfunction, gout, osteoarthritis, and certain kinds of cancers (8, 9, 15, 16). In 14 studies (each having more than 20...

Bustillos, Brenda Diane

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

2013 Camp Cosmos Week 1 (Solar System Theme)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:15-10:30 am 9:15-10:30 am 9:15-11:00 am w/ Parents Astronomy Phantastic Physics Geology Solar Overview Our Moon Kepler Field Trip 3:00 PM Create your Break 2:00 - 3:00 Lost on the Moon "Cosmic Safari" own:00 Presentations Fri, 6/28-Parents are invited to see student planetarium shows 11:00 AM Starry Galaxies Institute

Baskaran, Mark

35

National Nuclear Security Administration Supplemental Listing of Directives  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Updated 9/15/11 Updated 9/15/11 National Nuclear Security Administration Supplemental Listing of Directives Affecting Nuclear Safety Requirements Last Updated 09/15/11 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: http://hq.na.gov link to NNSA Policies/Supplemental Directives This Page Intentionally Blank. Concurrence on Exemptions or Exceptions Page 1 Updated 9/15/11 ADDITIONAL DIRECTIVES (LATEST VERSION) REQUIRING CENTRAL TECHNICAL AUTHORITY CONCURRENCE PRIOR TO GRANTING EXEMPTIONS, EQUIVALENCIES OR EXCEPTIONS This document is maintained by the NNSA Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety and lists any directives, including Supplemental Directives or other NNSA issuances, for which NNSA

36

Lecture plan and speakers *Skinner/Urban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:30-8:30 S *Brakocevic 9:15-10:30 *Januszewski 10:45-12.00 lunch Kakde 1:30-2:30 coffee Pilloni 3:00-4:00 Skinner/Urban 4:10-5:10 Excursion 5:30- S Skinner/Urban 9:15-10:15 Januszewski 10:25-11.25 Pilloni 11:35-12.35 end *90minutes/75 · Fabian Januszewski (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) p-adic Rankin-Selberg convolutions · Mahesh Kakde

Hida, Haruzo

37

Quebec's tax incentives act as a magnet to research companies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... incentives and other measures introduced in Canada's budget last March appear to be turning Quebec into the country's most attractive province for high-technology companies that carry out research ... and development (R&D). But for foreign-controlled non-manufacturing firms in particular, Quebec's corporate tax rate of 9.15 per cent is well below the average for ...

David Spurgeon

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

York Externally Funded Research Grants and Contracts -July 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011 Researcher Project Title Funder Total Funding Start Date End Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$141,653 10/14/2011 4/30/2012 Etcheverry, Jose International Renewable Energy Agency Policy Advisory Services and Capacity Building International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) $29,604 9/15/2011 4 System NSERC $24,700 9/1/2011 8/31/2012 Bohn, Simone R Brazil Chair 2011 Consulate General of Brazil $11

39

c15.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 113 142 241 100 8,143 9,252 12,649 6,294 13.9 15.3 19.1 16.0 Laser Printers ... 76 104 188 86 7,095 8,463 11,566 5,888...

40

Mobile Netw Appl DOI 10.1007/s11036-011-0311-9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensor scheduling (DSS) scheme, where the tasking sensor is elected spontaneously from the sensors behavior, the previous works can be categorized into two classes: coopera- tive [6­8] and non-cooperative [9, 15]. A cooperative target is part of the network and emits certain forms of physical signals

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Final Technical Report on DOE Awards DE-FG03 94ER61918, DE-FG06 94ER61918 to Oregon Health Sciences University, September 15, 1994 - September 29, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities conducted with DOE funds at Oregon Health Sciences University between 9/15/94 and 9/29/99. The activities fall into four major categories: Information Technology, Information Services and Support, Medical Informatics and Outcomes Research, and collaboration with other institutions. The focus of these activities was to implement and maintain a regional healthcare information network.

Krages, Kathryn Pyle

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 523.8 W 55,047.7 37,327.8 8,909.1 12,968.4 21,877.5 December ... 501.2 W 56,169.7 51,746.6 11,588.9 15,665.5...

43

A Primary User Authentication System for Mobile Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

portion of the licensed spectrum to establish network commu- nications. Essential to the co Cognitive radio technology is expected to increase the spectrum utilization by allowing opportunistic use of the idle portion of the licensed spectrum by Secondary (unlincensed) Users (SUs) [1], [9], [15], [17

Lazos, Loukas

44

Part II Presentations TT/kjh/06.4.10 Part II Presentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNES TRI NG Filling of CNTs with metals 2.45 Evan WANG STC GADB / JHW Fabrication of isolated carbon testing 9.15 James ROBINSON SEH SGR Micromechanics of temper embrittlement 9.30 Hugh TAYLOR STC SS in silicon 11.00 Olufemi FADUGBA STC BWL / SCB Creating a quantum memory system 11.15 Joshua TSANG STA JY / R

Paxton, Anthony T.

45

The 3rd Annual Silicon Valley Social Innovation Leadership Forum April 25th, 2014 (Friday)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3rd Annual Silicon Valley Social Innovation Leadership Forum April 25th, 2014 (Friday) San Jose | Director, Social Innovation Initiative, Global Leadership Advancement Center (GLAC), San José State University 8:40 ­ 9:15am Opening Panel: Social Innovation and Housing Jennifer Loving | Executive Director

Su, Xiao

46

2009 Site Environmental Report Brookhaven National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parts washer ­ Mercury Switch replacement ­ Biodiesel Tank Number of P2 Proposals 2 2 4 5 11 11 9 15 15 all Federal Facilities to: · Reduce Energy · Reduce Greenhouse Gas · Reduce Water · Buy sustainable products 2009 Statistics ­ 257 million kilowatt hours of electricity ­ 2.8 million gallons of fuel oil ­ 36

Homes, Christopher C.

47

Towards Combining Fuzzy and Logic Programming Hung T. Nguyen 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Daniel E. Cooke 2 , Luqi 3 , and Olga Kosheleva 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that such logically unusual fuzzy tech­ niques as Mamdani's approach to fuzzy control become very natural if weTowards Combining Fuzzy and Logic Programming Techniques Hung T. Nguyen 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 consider LP instead of classical logic [9, 15]. What do we gain by adding LP techniques to fuzzy

Kreinovich, Vladik

48

CONTRIBlJTIOK AU COKTRL"'~ lL\\CTb;RIOLOGIQUE DU LAIT 15 BIBLIOGRAPHIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DES CR?MES PAR LA D?TERMINATION DU TAUX D'HUMIDIT? (1) par ANDR}, CAMUS, JACQUELINE BURDIN, ANNIE LE8, Bruxelles, 9-15 ju ille t 1950. #12;A. CAMUS, JACQUELINE BURDIN ET ANNIE LE GUEN.16 Cette méthode

Boyer, Edmond

49

Dgradabilit compare dans le rumen des diffrentes fractions azotes des feuilles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bout de 1, 3, 6, 9, 15, 24 et 48 h. Après lavage et séchage à 60 °C, on a dosé dans le résidu l dégradation des fractions NDF et AFD du foin sont prati- quement identiques. Les cinétiques de dégradation de

Boyer, Edmond

50

California Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Wellhead Price 8.38 3.96 4.87 1967-2010 Imports Price 9.15 2.83 4.76 3.57 -- 3.59 2007-2013 Exports Price 8.06 3.76 4.51 4.18 2.90 3.89...

51

California U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,345 1,953 22,503 2,171 0 23 2007-2013 Import Price 9.15 2.83 4.76 3.57 -- 3.59 2007-2013 Export Volume 109,127 101,422 43,278 94,433 110,656 107,273 1982-2013 Export Price 8.06...

52

Appendix C: Catalog Description and Sample Syllabus for STS 201 STS 201 Catalog Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to science and technology studies. Explores science and technology as important and central such as genetics, environment, internet, surveillance, and nanotechnology. STS 201 Sample Syllabus Where Science Meets Society Science & Technology Studies 201 Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-9:15A.M., 6112 Social

Van Veen, Barry D.

53

09/15/2011! CS4961! CS4961 Parallel Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.out ·Note that editing on water is somewhat primitive ­ I'm using vim. Apparently, you can edit on CADE machines and just run on water. Or you can try vim, too. 09/15/2011! CS4961! 4! #12;9/15/11 2 Today

Hall, Mary W.

54

2008 4th QTR Employment Report .xls  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

30 53 55 55 85 LOCATION TOTALS 1,558 929 767 1,696 57 405 3,716 3,716 4,087 OTHER AREAS CA MD NM VA DC Pacific Other Total U.S. GOVERNMENT NNSANSO 1 1 2 DOIUSGS 6 9 15 Totals 6...

55

Wed. 9 October '13 at 7.00 pm Reception, Room 253, Gilbert Scott Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelvingrove Art Gallery Christmas lunch Mon. 20 January '14 at 7.15 pm for 7.30 pm Eric Flack Garscadden April '14 at 7.15 pm for 7.30 pm Joy Blair #12;Sea Lights Thurs. 15 May '14, 9.15 am for 9.30am, Boyd

Glasgow, University of

56

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,35.7,32.3,9.9,15.7,5.4 "Race of Householder7" "White",89.6,32.5,26.6,11.1,14.5,4.9 "Hispanic",12.8,2.5,2.6,3.9,3.2,0.8...

57

International CeBiTec Research Conference September 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximization of productivity under outdoor conditions 9.50 - 10.25 Liliana Rodolfi - Optimisation of biomass Opening lecture 9.15 - 9.50 Christoph Benning - Learning from algae how to enhance the energy density of biofuel crops Session 2 Systems Design 9.50 - 10.25 Maria Barbosa - Outlook on microalgae production

Moeller, Ralf

58

Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 - 15, 2006, Beijing, China Design of 3D Swim Patterns for Autonomous Robotic Fish Huosheng Hu, Colchester C04 3SQ, UnitedKingdom Email: h s as Abstract: To realise fish-like swim patterns by a robotic that can swim in a 3D unstructured environment, based on observations of fish swim behaviours. Our

Hu, Huosheng

59

Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Integrations in Cervical Tumors Frequently Occur in Common Fragile Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiation hybrid mapping panels. The results demonstrated that the markers with the highest LOD scores (SHGC-20333, SHGC-34186, and SHGC-1841 with LOD scores of 12.53, 11.77, and 9.15, respectively) mapped to chromosomal band 6p22...

Erik C. Thorland; Shannon L. Myers; David H. Persing; Gobinda Sarkar; Renee M. McGovern; Bobbie S. Gostout; David I. Smith

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2013 SPRING SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9:15 AM Jerry Spivey, LSU Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Baton Rouge, LA "Natural Gas to Syngas Using Rh-Substituted Pyrochlore (La2Zr2O7) Catalysts" 9:45 AM Coffee Break 10:05 AM Tushar V

Natelson, Douglas

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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61

Active Oxygen on Au/TiO2 Catalysts DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102062 Active oxygen on a Au/TiO2 catalyst Formation, stability and CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Active Oxygen on Au/TiO2 Catalysts DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102062 Active oxygen on a Au/TiO2 are the activation of molecular oxygen, the active site for this reaction step, and the nature of the catalytically active oxygen species present under working conditions.[3;9-15] Stiehl et al. had shown that molecularly

Pfeifer, Holger

62

Phys1063-Physics of Weather August 23, 2010 S. Boyd Page 1 of 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phys1063-Physics of Weather August 23, 2010 S. Boyd Page 1 of 4 Physics of Weather Credit: 4 credits Time and Place: MWF 9:15-10:20 am, Science Building, Room 2190 Instructor: Sylke Boyd Office requirements. #12;Phys1063-Physics of Weather August 23, 2010 S. Boyd Page 2 of 4 F (or N) -- Represents

Boyd, Sylke

63

Customized ESL Summer Program July 5 (Sat) Arrive Fairbanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9:15-10:30 and 10:45-12:00 English Course Noon Lunch Leave for Chena Hot Springs 7:00 PM Goldpanner/Kayaking down the Chena River 5:30 PM Dinner 7:00 PM Aurora Talk July 16th Wed 7:30 -8:30 am Breakfast 9

Sikes, Derek S.

64

Created on 7/8/2013 10:26:00 AM CFE AUTHORIZATION FOR EVENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Created on 7/8/2013 10:26:00 AM CFE AUTHORIZATION FOR EVENT: OUTDOOR BUSINESS WORKSHOP by the Society of American Foresters, for professional CFE credits as: FULL EVENT (9:15 TO 3:15PM) = 2.5 Contact for each session qualifying for CFE Credit Hours, are required to be signed, along with the individual

65

NCSU Forensic Science Symposium December 6, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4th NCSU Forensic Science Symposium December 6, 2011 Convocation Room, College of Textiles, NCSU:00 Welcome 9:15 The Future of Forensic Human DNA Analysis: From Disaster Response to Crime Scene Processing Dr. Rhonda Roby Associate Professor Department of Forensic and Investigative Genetics University

Langerhans, Brian

66

Engineer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Earned Value (EV) Analysis Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) Presented by: Cathe Mohar and Karen Urschel Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM) MA-60 U. S. Department of Energy January 2013 Achieving Management and Operational Excellence This page intentionally left blank Page 3 Agenda - Day 1 8:00 - 8:15 Welcome / Intro 8:15 - 9:15 PARS II Overview 9:15 - 9:30 Break 9:30 - 10:30 Project Lifecycle in PARS II 10:30 - 11:00 Dashboards 11:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 - 1:00 EVM Overview 1:00 - 2:30 EVMS Surveillance Process Part 1 2:30 - 2:45 Break 2:45 - 3:45 Process Part 2 3:45 - 4:30 EV Common Issues EVMS PREDICTIONS TRENDS PARS II Page 4 Agenda - Day 2

67

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting Agenda Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Building 401 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont, IL 60439 April 17, 2012 8:30 AM-9:00 AM Closed Tour of Advanced Photon Source Eric Isaacs, Director of Argonne National Laboratory 9:00 AM-9:15 AM Welcome & Overview Chairman William Perry Co-Chair Nicholas Donofrio 9:15 AM-10:00 AM Remarks from the Secretary Secretary Steven Chu 10:00 AM-10:45 AM Transformative Role of Computation and 'Big Data' Ian Foster, Director, Computation Institute 10:45 AM-11:45 AM Transportation Technology R&D Presentation Don Hillebrand, Director, Energy Systems 11:45 AM-12:45 PM Materials Solutions for the Energy Economy Peter Littlewood, Associate Laboratory Director 12:45 PM-1:00 PM SMR Subcommittee Report

68

Microsoft Word - Atlanta Agenda FINAL _2_.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel Atlanta, Georgia July 29, 2008 AGENDA 8:00 - 9:00 am Registration 9:00 - 9:15 am DOE Presentation Plans for the 2009 Congestion Study and Objectives of Workshop 9:15 - 10:30 am Panel I Panelists: Cindy Miller, Senior Attorney, Office of General Counsel, Florida Public Service Commission The Honorable Jim Sullivan, President, Alabama Public Service Commission Charles Terreni, Executive Director, South Carolina Public Service Commission Burl D. Till, III, Manager, Transmission Planning Department, Tennessee Valley Authority The Honorable Stan Wise, Commissioner, Georgia Public Service Commission 10:30 -10:45 am Break 10:45 - 12:00 pm Panel II Panelists: George Bartlett, Director, Transmission Planning and Operations, Entergy Services

69

Microsoft Word - FINAL EAC Meeting Agenda 7-12-11.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Agenda July 12, 2011 8:30 am - 4:30 pm EDT 7:30 - 8:30 am Continental Breakfast and Networking (EAC members only) 8:30 - 8:45 am WELCOME and Introductions Richard Cowart, Electricity Advisory Committee Chair Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy 8:45 - 9:15 am U.S. Department of Energy Priorities to Facilitate Development of the Nation's Electric Infrastructure Lauren Azar, Senior Advisor to DOE Secretary Chu 9:15 -10:45 am Roadmap 2050: a Practical Guide to a Prosperous, Low-Carbon Europe Presentation and Discussion of Report by the European Climate Foundation

70

UESC Workshop Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov UESC PROJECTS WORKSHOP Providence, RI April 13 2010 April 13, 2010 UESC Workshop, Providence, RI Agenda 9:00 - 9:15 Welcome - Dan Dessanti, National Grid - David McAndrew, DOE-FEMP 9:15 - 9:45 Federal Energy Management Requirements - FEMP Mission - Energy Requirements 9:45 - 10:45 UESC Basics - Enabling Legislation & Contract Vehicles 10:45 - 11:00 Break 11:00 - 11:30 Project Planning and Identification Phases - Audit & Feasibility 11:30 - 12:00 Contract Development 12:00 - 1:00 Lunch - on your own 1:00 - 1:45 Financing 1:45 - 2:00 Break 2:00 - 2:45 Project Implementation Phase - Design & Construction 2:45 - 3:15 UESC Process Overview 3:15 - 4:00 Project Discussion and Q&A Table of Contents

71

DOE JGI CSP 2012 PI Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agenda Agenda Monday, January 23 8:15am Shuttle bus departs from the Walnut Creek Marriott 8:30 Sign In and Continental Breakfast at JGI 9:00-9:15 Introductions, Workshop Overview and Goals Metagenome Program overview Susannah Tringe 9:15-9:30 JGI Prokaryotic Super Program Overview Nikos Kyrpides 9:30-9:45 JGI Microbial Program Overview Tanja Woyke 9:45-10:00 JGI Fungal Program Overview Igor Grigoriev 10:00-10:15 JGI Sequencing Technologies Feng Chen 10:15-10:30 Questions 10:30-10:45 Break 10:45-11:15 Rhizosphere Grand Challenge and CSP2012 Plant-Microbe interactions projects Susannah Tringe 11:15-11:35 CSP2012: Plant associated metagenomes--Microbial community diversity and host control of community assembly across model and emerging plant ecological genomics systems Jeff Dangl

72

AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting of the Meeting of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee February 20-21, 2007 Bennion Student Union 1784 Science Center Drive Room 109 University Place Idaho Falls, ID 83402 February 20, Afternoon session Time Topic Speaker 3:00 - 3:10 NERAC Kickoff John Boger 3:10 - 3:30 Welcome Dennis Spurgeon 3:30 - 3:45 Opening remarks William Martin 3:45 - 4:45 INL: The 2 nd Year John Grossenbacher 4:45 - 5:45 GNEP: Overview and Status Paul Lisowski 5:45 - 6:00 Announcements 6:00 Adjourn February 21, Morning session Time Topic Speaker 8:30 - 9:15 NE Budget Dennis Miotla 9:15 - 9:35 ANTT update + reports Joy Rempe 9:35 - 10:00 GNEP: Systems Integration & Analysis Phillip Finck 10:00 - 10:10 ***break***

73

Commercial-Scale Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(DRAFT) Learning Objective Understand the process for and potential pitfalls of developing renewable energy projects. Determine how the development of a renewable energy project could further a Tribe's goals. Anticipated Results: Attendees will be comfortable discussing renewable energy project development possibilities with project developers and project financing options with potential investors. Potential tribal roles will be clear and participants will better understand the five-step project development and financing process. Tuesday, July 9 8:30 & 8:45 a.m. Shuttle Pickup at Denver West Marriott 8:45-9:15 a.m. Registration 9:15-9:30 a.m. Welcome Tracey LeBeau and/or Pilar Thomas U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy

74

Microsoft Word - NERAC AGENDA.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting of November 3 and 4, 2003 Crowne Plaza Washington National Airport 1489 Jefferson Davis Highway Crystal City, Virginia Agenda Monday, November 3 9:00 - 9:15 Registration 9:15 - 9:30 Welcome/Opening Remarks Bill Magwood Introduction of Members - All 9:30 - 9:45 NERAC Status and Charter Mark Roth 9:45 - 10:15 NE Program Status and FY04 Budget Bill Magwood 10:15 - 10:30 NERAC, the President's Climate Change Initiative and the Role of Nuclear Power: Setting the Stage William Martin 10:30 - 10:45 Break 10:45 - 11:45 EIA Presentation on Data, Assumptions and Modeling Howard Gruenspecht 11:45 - 12:00 Break 12:00 - 2:00 Working Lunch - Dynamic Simulation of Energy and Environmental Policies: The Role of Nuclear Dr. Arnold Baker

75

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Electric Transmission Congestion Study National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 15, 2011 Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, California 92101 Agenda 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration 9:00 am - 9:15 am DOE Welcome and Presentation David Meyer, US Department of Energy, Session Moderator 9:15 am - 10:30 am Panel I - Regulators * Rebecca D. Wagner, Commissioner, Nevada Public Utilities Commission * Charles Hains, Chief Counsel, Arizona Corporation Commission * Keith D. White, Ph.D., Regulatory Analyst, Energy Division, California Public Utilities Commission 10:30 am - 10:45 am Break 10:45 am - 12:00 pm Panel II - Industry

76

LCC-0029 cover.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 15/11/99 9 15/11/99 NLC Reliability Analysis Notes: Klystron-Modulator System November 15, 1999 Zane Wilson Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: This paper address the reliability and availability issues to be faced in deploying and operating the klystron- modulator assemblies proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The rf power sources are a major system of the NLC and require a high uptime in order to reach the goal of 0.85 availability. Since the NLC is made up of several systems, not just klystron-modulator assemblies, the availability goal for the assemblies must be higher than 0.85. Currently this goal is at least 0.95. This short paper summarizes the analysis currently under way to determine whether the design of the rf power system will meet the design availability

77

Microsoft Word - Las Vegas Agenda FINAL _2_.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atomic Testing Museum Atomic Testing Museum Las Vegas, Nevada August 6, 2008 FINAL AGENDA 8:00 - 9:00 am Registration 9:00 - 9:15 am DOE Presentation: Plans for the 2009 Congestion Study and Objectives of Workshop 9:15 - 10:30 am Panel I Confirmed Panelists: Dave Shelton, Transmission Business Unit, Western Area Power Administration Lisa Szot, Executive Director, New Mexico Renewable Energy Transmission Authority The Honorable Rebecca Wagner, Commissioner, Nevada Public Utilities Commission Lou Ann Westerfield, Director of Policy, Idaho Public Service Commission 10:30 - 10:45 am Break 10:45 - 12:00 pm Panel II Confirmed Panelists: David Barajas, General Superintendent, System Planning, Imperial Irrigation District Jim Filippi, Director of Transmission, NextLight Renewable Power and Co-Chair, TEPPC

78

Microsoft Word - Hartford Agenda as of 6-30-08.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hartford Marriott Downtown Hotel Hartford Marriott Downtown Hotel Hartford, Connecticut July 9, 2008 AGENDA 8:00 - 9:00 am Registration 9:00 - 9:15 am DOE Presentation Plans for the 2009 Congestion Study and Objectives of Workshop 9:15 - 10:30 am Panel I Panelists: The Honorable Garry Brown, Chairman, New York State Public Service Commission The Honorable Donald Downes, Chairman, Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control Phil Fedora, Assistant Vice President, Reliability Services, Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. Lisa Fink, Senior Staff Attorney, Maine Public Utilities Commission Tom Simpson, Vice President, Energy, New York City Economic Development Corporation John Keene, Counsel, Division of Regional and Federal Affairs, Massachusetts Department of Public

79

Meeting Minutes from Automated Home Energy Management System Expert Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Energy Management System Expert Meeting Home Energy Management System Expert Meeting October 1-2, 2009 AGENDA - Day 1 8:30 - 8:45 Welcome and Debriefing of Building America and Home Energy Management Research- Lew Pratsch, DOE 8:45 - 9:15 Utilities Trends- Smart Grid Projects and Integration With Home Controls - Mike Keesee, SMUD 9:15 - 9:45 Thoughts on Controls System Performance Requirements - Rich Brown, LBL 9:45 - 10:15 Efficiency Trends in Consumer Electronics - Kurtis McKenney, TIAX 10:15 - 10:30 Session Break 10:30 - 11:00 Cloud Computing (Web Data Computing, Data Storage) Trends - Troy Batterberry, Microsoft 11:00- 11:30 Cloud Computing (Web Data Computing, Data Storage) Trends - Tom Sly via Net Conference 11:30 - 12:00 Smart Appliance Trends / Home Area Network Trends - David Najewicz, GE

80

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6-13-11 6-13-11 1 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda July 12, 2011 8:30 am - 4:30 pm EST 8:30 - 8:45 am WELCOME and Introductions 8:45 - 9:15 am U.S. Department of Energy Priorities to Facilitate Development of the Nation's Electric Infrastructure 9:15 -10:45 am Roadmap 2050: a Practical Guide to a Prosperous, Low-Carbon Europe Presentation and Discussion of Report by the European Climate Foundation 10:45 - 11:00 am Break 11:00 - 11:45 am White House Grid Modernization Report Presentation and Discussion of Report on Smart Grid 11:45 - 12:00 pm SMART GRID SUBCOMMITTEE Discussion of Subcommittee Deliverables 12:00 - 1:15 pm Lunch 1:15 pm - 2:30 pm Presentation and Discussion on Energy Storage Technology Policy and Financial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Louisville Private Sector Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thursday, December 13, 2007 Thursday, December 13, 2007 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Agenda * Welcome and introductions from the Mayor (9:00-9:15) o The Mayor's energy and climate protection goals for Louisville o Request for private sector input for the upcoming public-private partnership to promote increased energy efficiency in buildings throughout the Louisville community o Highlights from the December 12 meeting of the ENERGY STAR Challenge implementation group o Introduction to Metro's Green Initiative and goals for today's session * Getting started with ENERGY STAR (9:15-10:00) o Introduction to the program and overview of ENERGY STAR resources o Kentucky and regional ENERGY STAR Partners and labeled buildings o Simple steps for energy savings o The benefits of energy savings

82

DRAFT/PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP (TEC) TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP (TEC) February 6 - 7, 2008 San Antonio, TX Wednesday, February 6, 2008 Coronado Ballroom 7:30 - 8:00 a.m. Registration/Continental Breakfast 8:00 - 8:15 a.m. Welcome and Introduction - Welcome: Roger Mulder, Texas State Energy Conservation Office - Introduction: Frank Moussa, Supervisor, Intergovernmental & Operations Division, OCRWM/OLM 8:15 - 9:15 a.m. DOE Program Updates - OCRWM/Office of Logistics Management - Gary Lanthrum, Director - EM/Office of Transportation - Ella McNeil, Acting Director 9:15 - 10:15 a.m. Plenary I - Tribal Cultural Discussion - Richard Arnold, Pahrump Paiute Tribe - Lalovi Miller, Moapa Band of Paiutes 10:15 - 10:30 a.m. Break 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Plenary II - Evaluation of Short Line Railroads

83

Microsoft Word - Changes-to-Schedules _Recovered_  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changes-to-Schedules Changes-to-Schedules REV 5 DOE Administrative Records Schedules Changes Last revised: 12/10/2010 Date DOE Admin Schedule Item(s) Change Authorizing Document 9/15/10 - 12/10/2010 1-6, 9, 11-12, 14, 16-18, 22- 23 Various Removal of items at the end of each schedule for e-mail and word processing copies, which were added to the GRS in Transmittal Number 8. For schedules in which this item is located elsewhere and removal would cause changes in the sequence of item numbers, the item was changed to "Reserved" (Schedules ,4,5, and 14.) GRS Transmittal Number 22 9/15/2010 1 23.b.(3) Deleted citation, 5 CFR 214. GRS Transmittal Number 22 1 25.a. Text deleted "and as described in 29 CFR 1614." GRS Transmittal Number 22

84

Microsoft Word - NERAC AGENDA.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting of November 3 and 4, 2003 Crowne Plaza Washington National Airport 1489 Jefferson Davis Highway Crystal City, Virginia Agenda Monday, November 3 9:00 - 9:15 Registration 9:15 - 9:30 Welcome/Opening Remarks Bill Magwood Introduction of Members - All 9:30 - 9:45 NERAC Status and Charter Mark Roth 9:45 - 10:15 NE Program Status and FY04 Budget Bill Magwood 10:15 - 10:30 NERAC, the President's Climate Change Initiative and the Role of Nuclear Power: Setting the Stage William Martin 10:30 - 10:45 Break 10:45 - 11:45 EIA Presentation on Data, Assumptions and Modeling Howard Gruenspecht 11:45 - 12:00 Break 12:00 - 2:00 Working Lunch - Dynamic Simulation of Energy and Environmental Policies: The Role of Nuclear Dr. Arnold Baker

85

SASSI Breakout Session  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakout Session Breakout Session DOE NPH Conference October 26, 2011 Agenda Time Item 8:30 - 9:00am Overview of DOE path forward 9:00 - 9:15am BREAK 9:15 - 10:30am SASSI code module validation approach & discussion 10:30 - 11:45am SASSI V&V problem approach & discussion Noon - 1:00pm LUNCH October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference 2 Background Subtraction Method Limitation * Modern computational capacity has allowed for SSI analysis of larger embedded structures using the SASSI analysis methodology. * Current guidance now requires higher frequencies of analysis (as high as 50 Hz depending on site conditions). * The current computational capacity, along with the higher frequencies of analysis have identified situations where transfer functions derived with the SM produce anomalously

86

September 14, 2010, Federal Technical Capabilities Panel Face to Face Meeting - Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Augusta Marriott Hotel Augusta Marriott Hotel Augusta, GA September 14, 2010 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 8:00-8:15 am Welcome Karen Boardman, FTCP Chair Jack Craig, Acting SRS Director 8:15-8:45 am FAQS Updates Ali Ghovanlou / Dave Chaney 8:45-9:15 am Expert Level Knowledge Competency Status Debbie Monette / Barry Weaver 9:15-9:45 am FTCP Metrics Karen Boardman 9:45-10:00 am Break 10:00-10:30 am NTC Activities Arnold Guevara 10:30-10:45 am SSO Workshop Update Todd Lapointe 10:45-11:30 am 2010 FTCP Operational Plan (Closeout) Karen Boardman * Goal 1--Identification of Value-Added Training Ali Ghovanlou/Robert Stallman and Linking to TQP Competencies * Goal 2--Accelerate and Expand Implementation of eTQP Allen Tate/Robert Hastings

87

Microsoft Word - NIF Industry Day Agenda  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department of Energy Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC 20585 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Target Fabrication Industry Day at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Agenda 9:00 - 9:15 Welcome and orientation Mr. Roger Lewis, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation (Acting), NNSA Mr. John Post, Assistant Principal Associate Director, NIF and Photon Science, LLNL 9:15 - 9:30 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, current and future status Mr. Roger Lewis 9:30 -10:30 National Ignition Facility (NIF), introduction and overview Mr. John Post 10:30 - 11:30 NIF/ICF Targets - Introduction, current technical requirements, anticipated future

88

VISUALIZATION & CONTROLS PEER REVIEW PRESENTATIONS | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

VISUALIZATION & CONTROLS PEER REVIEW PRESENTATIONS VISUALIZATION & CONTROLS PEER REVIEW PRESENTATIONS VISUALIZATION & CONTROLS PEER REVIEW PRESENTATIONS PROGRAM AGENDA Marriott Crystal City at Reagan National Airport 1999 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, Virginia 22202 October 18, 2006 7:30 - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast Times CONTROL SYSTEMS CONTROL SYSTEMS SECURITY 8:30 - 8:45 Introduction - Phil Overholt philip.overholt@hq.doe.gov Introduction - Hank Kenchington henry.kenchington@hq.doe.gov 8:45 - 9:15 Overview of Reliability and Markets Bob Thomas, PSERC/Cornell Univ. rjt1@cornell.edu Cyber Security Assessments of Control Systems in the Energy Sector Bob Hill, INL robert.hill@inl.gov 9:15 - 9:45 Market Monitoring Tools Bernard Lesieutre, LBNL bclesieutre@lbnl.gov Cyber Security Assessments of Inter Control Center Communications Protocol Implementations

89

September 13, 2011, Federal Technical Capability Program Face to Face Meeting - Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Three Rivers Convention Center Three Rivers Convention Center Room D Kennewick, WA September 13, 2011 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 8:00-8:15 am Welcome Karen Boardman, FTCP Chair Theodore (Ted) Wyka, S&S Deputy 8:15-9:15 am Lessons Learned from Fukushima: Training Insights from The Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami George Mortenson, INPO 9:15-9:30 am FAQS Updates Ali Ghovanlou Accreditations Pat Worthington Recognition of Deputy Secretary Poneman Approval of NSO TQP Accreditation Pat Worthington Steve Mellington 9:30-9:45 am Break 9:45- 10:45 am 2011 DOE Survey of Targeted Engineering Series Fletcher Honemond, CLO 10:45-11:45 am FY 2011 Operational Plan Goals Closeout / Rollover Karen Boardman

90

Microsoft Word - 2013CCISyllabus.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCI/CCRP Syllabus CCI/CCRP Syllabus DOE SC - Community College Internship (CCI)/BNL - Community College Research Internship Program (CCRP) Sunday, June 02 Anytime Arrival of non-local students Anytime Dormitory Check-in 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Welcome with OEP staff at Bldg. 400 (heroes, salads and drinks) June 3-June 7 (Week 1) Students participate in Enrichment Component and work in their laboratories Monday, June 03 8:00 am - 9:15 am All students arrive and check-in at Berkner Hall (Bldg 488) 9:15 a m --- 1 2:15 N oon ORIENTATION: * B NL o verview * B NL p olicies * G ROUP P HOTO * E nvironmental s afety a nd h ealth t raining i nformation * B NL P re---participation s urvey * D eliverable g uidelines * D iscussion o f s tudent a nd m entor r oles * E mergency s ervices i nformation

91

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - San Diego, CA | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diego, CA Diego, CA FUPWG Meeting Agenda - San Diego, CA October 7, 2013 - 2:59pm Addthis FUPWG Fall 2007 - San Diego, California: Clean and Green November 28 - 29, 2007 Hosted by San Diego Gas & Electric Tuesday, November 27, 2007 8:00 - 5:00 Utility Energy Service Contract (UESC) 5:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting - Pacific Ballroom 6:30 pm Networking Dinner - Elephant Castle Restaurant and Pub Hosted by: San Diego Gas and Electric - A Sempra Energy utility logo FEMP logo Wednesday, November 28, 2007 7:45 - 8:30 Registration/Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 San Diego Gas & Electric Welcome Rick Morrow 8:45 - 9:15 FEMP Welcome and Attendee Introductions David McAndrew, FEMP 9:15 - 9:45 Washington Update David McAndrew, FEMP FEMP Updates Legislative Update Strategic Action Plan Update

92

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Agenda Thursday, December 11, 2008 Marriott Crystal City at Reagan National Airport 1999 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, Virginia Potomac Salon D-E (All times are EST) 8:30 - 9:00 am Committee Meeting Registration 9:00 - 9:15 am Welcome and Opening Comments Kevin Kolevar, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Linda Stuntz, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee 9:15 - 10:45 am Discussion and Approval of Energy Storage Technologies Report 10:45 - 11:00 am Break 11:00 am - 12:00 pm Discussion and Approval of Smart Grid Report 12:00 - 12:30 pm Lunch 12:30 - 1:30 pm Discussion and Approval of Recommendations in the Electricity Supply Adequacy Draft Report 1:30 - 3:30 pm Discussion of Year Two Work Plan

93

Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Discussion on Future Needs of the Electricity Grid Discussion on Future Needs of the Electricity Grid (L'Enfant Plaza Hotel in Washington, DC, Ballroom C&D) Tuesday (Nov. 15, 2011) 8:15 - 9:00 Breakfast 9:00 - 9:15 Introduction and Welcome Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 9:15 - 10:45 Grid Tech Team Presentation The Grid Tech Team, established by DOE leadership, will present their vision for the future needs of the electricity grid. The current DOE portfolio, on-going activities, and proposed paths forward will be highlighted. 10:45 - 11:00 Break 11:00 - 12:00 Panel Discussion Industry experts and thought leaders will respond to the Grid Tech Team presentation and also share their views on the drivers and uncertainty facing

94

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Math  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Electrical Energy Consumption 6-9 17 World Electricity Consumption and Carbon Dioxide 6-9 18 Earth-9 11 Electricity - Watts and Kilowatts 5-8 12 Energy in the Home 6-9 13 Energy Consumption in an Empty House! 6-9 14 Annual Electricity Consumption in a Home 6-9 15 Carbon Dioxide Production at Home 6-9 16

95

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16.7 November ... 24.3 25.5 14.7 104.9 25.4 145.1 5.5 5.7 3.5 11.9 - 15.4 December ... 25.1 26.4 14.8 107.4 28.4 150.7 5.8 6.0 3.5 12.6 - 16.1 1997...

96

Microsoft Word - Chapter 13 Index 07-05-11.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4-135-4-138, 4-232, 4-234-4-235, 5-169-5-181, 5-273, 6-52, 6-67, 6-70, 7-10, 9-15, 9-16 natural gas, 3-64, 3-67, 4-14, 4-22, 4-55, 4-127, 4-169, 4-171, 4-180, 4-183, 4-189,...

97

Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

Schlesinger, M. E.

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Klasse 5-7 Klasse 8-9 Klasse 10-13 Lehrer Anreise bis 8:30 Ankunft, Registrierung Hrsaalgebude Chemie, INF 252  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemie, INF 252 9:00-9:15 Begrü?ung GHS Chemie, INF 252 9:30-10:00 Vom Prisma zur schnellsten Rutsche Dr. Martin Rheinländer GHS Chemie, INF 252 9:30-10:15 Wozu brauchen Roboter Mathematik? Prof. Katja Mombaur , Botanisches Institut, INF 360 Teilnahme an einem der Vorträge 10:15-11:30 Team-Speedwettbewerb GHS Chemie, INF

Heermann, Dieter W.

99

Effects of the addition of water-filled bladders or volatile fatty acids to the rumen on the feeding behaviour in lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tests (rumen bladders and VFA infusion) were carried out at 4, 9, 15 and 35 wk after calving in 4) was compared to a bladder-free control. In the second test, a con- tinuous infusion of 20.3 MJ/d volatile fatty- men was compared to a control infusion (7 g NaCl, 3.7 g KCI and 2.4 ml HCI 2 N perI water

Boyer, Edmond

100

Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Model Years Model Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or 17 Years ... 15.2 0.7 0.9 0.9 3.0 3.8 2.8 1.2 0.9 0.9 15.5 Households Without Children ... 92.2 4.2 5.9 6.5 21.8 21.8 14.2 5.9 5.5 6.4 5.5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Password Generation, Protection, and Use  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish minimum requirements for the generation, protection, and use of passwords to support authentication when accessing classified and unclassified Department of Energy (DOE) information systems. DOE N 205.16, dated 9-15-05, extends this Notice until 9-30-06, unless sooner rescinded. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter VI, paragraphs 4j(2), and 4j(6) and Chapter VII, paragraph 12a(2)(a).

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

SUBJ No. Hrs Course Title Topic Comp Sec Mtg Start End Bldg ARCH 3114 3 History and Theories of Architecture 1 LEC 001 TTH 11:00 AM 12:15 PM HUMN 1B50  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING Environmental Design #12;Page 2 SUBJ No. Hrs Course Title Topic Comp Sec Mtg Start End of Architecture 1 LEC 001 TTH 11:00 AM 12:15 PM HUMN 1B50 ARCH 3214 3 History and Theories of Architecture 2 LEC:50 PM ENVD 201 ENVD 1104 3 Introduction to Environmental Design Methods LEC 001 TTH 8:00 AM 9:15 AM MATH

Stowell, Michael

103

Program Day Date Time Room Resumes and Cover Letters Wednesday 9/3 4 p.m. 224 WPU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Day Date Time Room Resumes and Cover Letters Wednesday 9/3 4 p.m. 224 WPU Searching and Applying Friday 9/5 11 a.m. 224 WPU Networking and Social Media Friday 9/5 Noon 224 WPU Resumes and Cover Letters Tuesday 9/9 4 p.m. 540 WPU Resumes and Cover Letters Monday 9/15 4 p.m. 224 WPU Resumes and Cover

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

104

VRF on-site Measurement by Compressor Curve Method of VRF and the applications-APCBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VRF on-site Measurement by Compressor Curve Method and Its Application Sumio Shiochi (Daikin Industries,ltd.) Yurino Kan* (Daikin Industries,ltd.) APCBC presentation in ICEBO (Asia Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning) Sept. 2014..., Beijing, China ESL-IC-14-09-34 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 ICEBO 2014 Beijing + APCBC Meeting 2014.9.15-16 1. Background and Purpose of This Study ?Background...

Kan,Y.; Shiochi,S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Release Date: November 16, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data" 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data" ,,"Nominal dollars per ton",,,,"Annual percent change" "Origin State","Destination State",2008,2009,2010,," 2008-2010"," 2009-2010" "Alabama","Alabama"," $4.31"," $4.36"," $5.01",, 7.9, 15.0 "Alabama","Ohio"," W"," -"," -",," -"," -" "Colorado","Alabama"," W"," -"," -",," -"," -" "Colorado","Florida"," $11.08"," $12.65"," $13.27",, 9.4, 4.9

106

Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Public Meeting L'Enfant Plaza Hotel - Degas Room (2 nd Floor) September 23, 2008 8:00 Continental breakfast 9:00 Opening remarks Bill Martin, Washington Policy & Analysis 9:15 Opening Remarks Dennis Spurgeon, Assistant Secretary, Office of Nuclear Energy 9:30 Facilities subcommittee report John Ahearne, Sigma Xi 10:10 Break 10:30 Facilities report deliberation Bill Martin, Washington Policy & Analysis 11:30 Lunch 12:30 Mo-99 production Tom Cochran, Natural Resources Defense Council 1:30 Policy subcommittee report Dan Poneman, The Scowcroft Group 2:45 Break 3:00 Policy report deliberation Bill Martin, Washington Policy

107

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",20453,21 " Electric Utilities",18945,16 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1507,38 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",98217658,17 " Electric Utilities",97472144,7 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",745514,48 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",249,7 " Nitrogen Oxide",85,7 " Carbon Dioxide",93160,7 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5.6,5 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.9,15 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2091,3

108

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

109

Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Archived Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Archived Projects Archived Projects Ambient PM 2.5 Air Sampling & Analysis - The Upper Ohio River Valley Project ATS-Chester Engineers / Desert Research Institute 9/15/1998 Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Program CONSOL Energy Inc. / Wells Cargo / Air Quality Sciences, Inc. / Wheeling Jesuit University / Saint Vincent College / Franciscan University of Steubenville / Optimal Technologies Inc. / Harvard School of Public Health / Ohio University 3/8/2000 National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographical Information System (NATCARB) University of Kansas Center for Research 9/27/2000 Environmental Regulatory Analysis Argonne National Laboratory 1/15/2003 Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions in Coal Power Plant Plumes Electric Power Research Institute / Frontier

110

UTSR Fellowship Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clark Paterson Clark Paterson In association with UTSR Gas Turbine Industrial Fellowship Program & Woodward Governor Presentation Overview * What is the UTSR Gas Turbine Industrial Fellowship Program ? * Projects I worked on this summer. - Type of project - Experience gained * Continued Benefits * Thanks Program Description "The UTSR Gas Turbine Industrial fellowship offers valuable "work experience" opportunities in research, engineering, and design at participating Industrial Sponsors" * I was selected to participate at Woodward FST under the direction of Kelly Benson. * UTSR Gas Turbine Industrial Fellowship Program Flier, http://www.asme.org/students/utsr.pdf, 9/15/05 Program Description Program Sponsors: University Turbine Systems Research Program South Carolina Institute for

111

A conversational Chinese Tutoring Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAI (LAMBDA NIL (PROG1 (SET PARA) (CAIM07) (CAIM03) (CLRSCRN) (PRINTX '(Thanks for joining the Chinese Tutoring Machine) 9 15) (PRINTX '(bye bye !) 11 35) ) )) t*'0 '0'0************'k 'k*****V '@*It%'**'k**'k****'k**'@**1k *ll 'Nf****'k 0 'kt... **'0 * FUNCTION : CAIM03 This is the main driver function for lesson section. ***4'***1@*'0 4 4 'P * a%****'k 'k****'0**4 *V k*%**%'**%********%'**'I*V 4 4*** (DEFUN CAIM03 (LAMBDA NIL ( PROG1 (CAIM04) (COND ((EQUAL RES 'E) T) (T (CAIM05) (CAIM...

Cheng, Long-Fung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of 64Cu-Labeled Bifunctional ChelateBombesin Conjugates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DOTA-, NOTA-(1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid), PCTA-(3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic ... acid), and Oxo-DO3A-(1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-4,7,10-triacetic acid) peptide conjugates were prepared using H2N-Aoc-[d-Tyr6,?Ala11,Thi13,Nle14]bombesin(614) (BBN) as a peptide template. ... Finally, data were analyzed with GraphPad Prism 5 software to determine the IC50 value. ...

Samia Ait-Mohand; Patrick Fournier; Ve?ronique Dumulon-Perreault; Garry E. Kiefer; Paul Jurek; Cara L. Ferreira; Franc?ois Be?nard; Brigitte Gue?rin

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimation of parameters in the lognormal distribution with censored samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation Procedure 2. 3 Progressive Censoring. SIMULATION RESULTS 6 9 15 18 IV 3. 1 Verification of Tiku's Results 3. 2 Monte Carlo Simulation of Tiku's Method. 3. 3 Monte Carlo Simulation of the Quadratic Method 3. 4 Comparisons Between Methods... ~ and , the ratio of the ordinate f (Z'l f (Z) 1-F (Z) F (Z) and the probability integral of the standardized normal distribution, in (1. 2), (1. 3), and (1. 4) by the approximation u+Bx, where u and 8 are determined as i. n Tiku [9]. An iterative procedure...

Syler, Gerald Wayne

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Infrared-induced single-phonon desorption of HD from LiF (100)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-intensity (10-510-2 watts/cm2) IR radiation at 915 ?m desorbs HD from 1.54.2-K LiF (100) at a rate (maximum 0.001 monolayer/s) proportional to the light intensity. This process is independent of temperature below 4.2 K, the velocity distribution is approximated by a temperature of 21 K, and the desorption efficiency increases with increasing wavelength. Desorption is attributed to single phonons created in a cascade following optical absorption. Thermal desorption is excluded as a possible mechanism except at high surface temperatures and coverages.

Paul M. Ferm; Sarah R. Kurtz; Kathryn A. Pearlstine; Gary M. McClelland

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

The effect of removal of Sigmodon hispidus on microhabitat utilization by Baiomys taylori and Reithrodontomys fulvescens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tats garth- Nay 1981 (mi c rohabi Cats 9-15 ) . fu] vous microhabitat during 1-8) and 12 Recapture radi i for cotton rats, pigmy mice, and fulvous harvest mice on grids 1-4. RecapCure radi i were calculated using all location data from the number... microhabi tats. 29 Configuration of winter mi and 4. Each grid point i s of the microhabi tat to whi i ndi cate grid points not i microhabi tat. See Table 9 descriptions of winter mic crohabi tats on grids 3 represented by the number ch...

Turner, Clarence LaVerne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

2007 SECC Campaign Report College/Division Department GOAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Operations: EHS-Envir. Health & Safety 1,575.00$ 5,376.04$ 341.3% Administration & Finance.00$ 4,193.00$ 636.3% 74,034.60$ 157.4% Architecture College of Architecture 5,622.00$ 5,556.00$ 98.8% 5 Architecture 1,048.00$ 541.08$ 51.6% CASNR Plant & Soil Science 4,487.00$ 2,061.00$ 45.9% 15,325.72$ 73.1% COE

Rock, Chris

117

No Ra Nome PI PII PIII T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 MT Media Ex MF 1 16378 Joo Paulo Rechi Vita 8.5 10 10 2 7 8 0 8.33 5.96E+000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.83 4.80E+000 3 3.9 25 70021 Alex Rodrigo dos Santos Sousa 9.5 10 8 9 10 7 8 10 9.67 9.15E+000 26.33 7.02E+000 29 70383 Carlos Davi Pagels Montenegro 10 8 3 0 10 10 6 0 8.67 6.93E+000 30 70659 ?ber 39 71234 Jennifer Saraiva Santos 5.5 4 2 7.5 8 0 0 7 7.5 4.44E+000 6 5.3 40 71269 João Luiz Nogueira

De Pierro, Alvaro Rodolfo

118

DRAFT/PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP (TEC) MARCH 14-15, 2006 WASHINGTON, DC DAY 1 -Tuesday, March 14, 2006 BALLROOM FOYER 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast and Registration FRANKLIN ROOM 8:00 a.m. - 8:15 a.m. Welcome and Meeting Overview Judith Holm, Director, Operations Development Division, OCRWM/ONT 8:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. Plenary I - DOE Program Updates Office of Environmental Management - Dennis Ashworth, EM/OT Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management - Eric Knox, OCRWM, Gary Lanthrum, OCRWM/ONT ADAMS ROOM 9:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Tribal Topic Group - Jay Jones, OCRWM/ONT Break between 10:15 and 10:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Lunch (on your own) 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Manual Review Topic Group - Ella McNeil, EM/OT

119

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Destin, FL Destin, FL FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL October 7, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis Going coastal for energy efficiency. FUPWG. April 15-16, 2008, Destin, Florida Gulf Power: A Southern Company FEMP logo April 15-16, 2008 Hosted by Gulf Power Monday, April 14, 2008 6:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting & Networking Dinner Ocean Club 8955 US Highway 98 W Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Tuesday, April 15, 2008 7:45 - 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 am Gulf Power Welcome P. Bernard Jacob, Customer Operations Vice President 8:45 - 9:15 am FEMP Welcome David McAndrew, FEMP 9:15 - 10:00 am Washington Update David McAndrew, FEMP 10:00 - 10:30 am Technology Update Paul Kistler 10:30 - 11:00 am Networking Break & New Member Mentor Introductions 11:00 - 11:30 am Gulf Power Success Story - NAS Chiller Replacement

120

Machine and Beam Delivery Updates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MAchine and Beam delivery Updates FY13 MAchine and Beam delivery Updates FY13 Summary of Beam Delivery: FACET Summary Feb_15_22.pdf FACET Summary Feb_15_22.pdf FACET Summary Feb_23_Mar_1.pdf FACET Summary Feb_23_Mar_1.pdf FACET Summary Mar_2_8.pdf FACET Summary Mar_2_8.pdf FACET Summary Mar_9_15.pdf FACET Summary Mar_9_15.pdf FACET Summary Mar_16_22.pdf FACET Summary Mar_16_22.pdf FACET Summary Mar_23_29.pdf FACET Summary Mar_23_29.pdf FACET Summary Mar_30_Apr_5.pdf FACET Summary Mar_30_Apr_5.pdf FACET Summary Apr_6_12.pdf FACET Summary Apr_6_12.pdf FACET Summary Apr_27_May_3.pdf FACET Summary Apr_27_May_3.pdf FACET Summary May_4_10.pdf FACET Summary May_4_10.pdf Emittance Stability in Sector 2_31513.pdf Emittance Stability in Sector 2_31513.pdf FACET beam operations readiness with R56.pdf FACET beam operations readiness with R56.pdf (6/19/2013)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are proposed activities for quarter 2 (9/15/00-12/14/00): (1) Conduct TGA and fuel characterization studies--Task 1; (2) Perform re-burn experiments--Task 2; (3) Fabricate fixed bed gasifier/combustor--Task 3; and (4) Modify the 3D combustion modeling code for feedlot and litter fuels--Task 4. The following were achieved During Quarter 2 (9/15/00-12/14/00): (1) The chicken litter has been obtained from Sanderson farms in Denton, after being treated with a cyclonic dryer. The litter was then placed into steel barrels and shipped to California to be pulverized in preparation for firing. Litter samples have also been sent for ultimate/proximate laboratory analyses.--Task 1; (2) Reburn-experiments have been conducted on coal, as a base case for comparison to litter biomass. Results will be reported along with litter biomass as reburn fuel in the next report--Task 2; (3) Student has not yet been hired to perform task 3. Plans are ahead to hire him or her during quarter No. 3; and (4) Conducted a general mixture fraction model for possible incorporation in the code.

Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Sayeed Mukhtar

2001-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Photoelectron spectroscopy of size-selected transition metal clusters: Fe{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}}, {ital n}=3--24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A higher resolution magnetic bottle photoelectron spectrometer for the study of the electronic structure of size-selected metal clusters is presented. The initial study on Fe{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}} ({ital n}=3--24) is reported at a photon energy of 3.49 eV. The photoelectron spectra of these clusters exhibit sharp features throughout the size range. The spectra for Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 3--8} show large size dependence with many resolved features. The spectra for Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 9--15} exhibit some similarity with each other, all with a rather sharp feature near the threshold. An abrupt spectral change occurs at Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 16}, then again at Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 19} and Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 23}. These photoelectron spectral changes coincide remarkably with changes of the cluster reactivity with H{sub 2}. Extended Hueckel molecular orbital (EHMO) calculations are performed for all the clusters to aid the spectral interpretations. The calculations yield surprisingly good agreement with the experiment for clusters beyond Fe{sub 9} when body-centered cubic (bcc) structures are assumed for Fe{sub 9--15} and a similarly close-packed structure with a bcc Fe{sub 15} core for the larger clusters. The EHMO calculations allow a systematic interpretation of the sharp photoelectron spectral features in Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 9--15} and reproduced the abrupt spectral change taking place from Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 15} to Fe{sup {minus}}{sub 16}. Most importantly, the reactivity changes of the clusters with H{sub 2} are successfully explained based on the detailed electronic structures of the clusters, as revealed from the photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectra and the theoretical calculations. The calculations also correctly predict the existence of magnetism in these clusters and yield reasonable values for the cluster magnetic moments. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Wang, L. [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Cheng, H. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania 18195 (United States)] [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania 18195 (United States); Fan, J. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Section 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 ' 0.606 D 8 & 14.33 L 9 ' 0.556 D 9 & 15.37 Session Papers 9 (1) (2) Calibration of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite Using Satellite and ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment Aircraft Data J. K. Ayers, D. R. Doelling, L. Nguyen, W. L. Smith, Jr. Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data are a key component of the Atmospheric Radia- tion Measurement Program (ARM). They complement the suite of surface measurements taken at the ARM sites in Oklahoma. The data are used to derive cloud properties and the top-of-the atmosphere radiation budget at several time and space scales. Calibration of the GOES narrowband visible

124

3WM08 Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

esrf sp8 anl esrf sp8 anl View Meeting Photos ESRF, SPring-8, APS Three-Way Meeting Program (3WM08) Argonne National Laboratory Building 402 March 17-19, 2008 Co-organizers: Katherine Harkay, Fabio Comin, Yoshiharu Sakurai Monday, March 17, 2008 (see below for Satellite Workshops 1-3) 17:00 Reception (by invitation) 120 Tuesday, March 18, 2008 Building 402, Auditorium Welcome Time Name Facility Title Mins. 8:30 Robert Rosner Argonne Laboratory Director 15 1. Facility status and updates (90 minutes) Chair: Katherine Harkay, APS 8:45 William Stirling ESRF The ESRF: Current Status and the Upgrade Programme 2008-2017 30 9:15 Akira Kira SPring-8 Socialization of SPring-8 30 9:45 J.Murray Gibson APS APS Renewal 30

125

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 200-299 142 49 14 141 242 49 -- 484 1,121 AC 300-399 -- 88 107 95 46 56 80 165 637 AC 400-599 9 3 -- 22 86 -- -- 125 245 AC 600+ -- -- 6 9 -- -- -- -- 15 AC Total 151 140 127 267 374 105 80 774 2,018 DC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 200-299 -- 18 -- -- -- -- -- 5 23 DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 400-499 -- 5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 DC 500-599 -- -- -- 5 -- -- -- 17 22 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

126

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

127

U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote 4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 19, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Adobe Acrobat Reader Version(s): 10.1.1 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe Acrobat/Reader, this vulnerability is being actively exploited against Windows-based systems. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026432 APSB11-30 CVE-2011-4369 JC3-CIRC Tech Bulletin U-054 APSA11-04 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the PRC

128

Microsoft Word - EMAB 31 March 2010 Meeting Agenda.FINAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crystal Gateway Marriott * Salon B-C Crystal Gateway Marriott * Salon B-C 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway * Arlington, Virginia 22202 March 31, 2010 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * G. Brian Estes, EMAB Member 9:15 a.m. EM Update Presentation * Inés Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: G. Brian Estes, EMAB Member 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Energy Park Initiative * James Antizzo, Office of D&D and Facility Engineering Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: Paul Dabbar, EPI Subcommittee Lead 11:30 a.m. Public Comment Period 11:45 p.m. Lunch 1:15 p.m. Acquisition, Project Management, and Quality Assurance Panel * Reggie James, Acting Director, Office of Contract Assistance * Steve Krahn, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Security

129

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

130

Draft AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Adviso Adviso y Committee Meeting r L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room- 1 st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 15, 2011 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:15 a.m. America's Energy Challenges: DOE-QTR Dr. Steven Koonin, S-4 Under Secretary for Science 9:30 a.m. NE FY2011 Budget Dr. Lyons, NE-1 10:00 a.m. Status of NE New Starts Dr. Lyons, NE-1 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Nuclear Reactor Technology Dr. Michael Corridini NGNP Final Report Subcommittee Chair 12:00 noon Lunch (NEAC members and Montcalm Room- 1 st Floor Presenters only) 1:30 p.m. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Report Dr. Burton Richter,

131

March 13-15, 2012 14th Annual Joint DOE/EFCOG Chemical Safety and Worker Safety and Health Program (10 CFR 851) Workshop - Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

/2/12 Page 4 of 11 /2/12 Page 4 of 11 Day 3 - Thursday, March 15, 2012 FORRESTAL MAIN AUDITORIUM (GE-086) 10 CFR 851 Workshop The purpose of this workshop is to foster continuous improvement of the implementation of 10 CFR 851 by sharing implementation experiences and ideas for enhancements gathered over the nearly 5 years since the rule's date for full implementation. 8:00 - 10:00 Registration/Name Tags - Large Auditorium (GE-086) 9:15 - 9:25 Welcome to 10 CFR 851 Workshop Pat Worthington Director, DOE Office of Health and Safety 9:25 - 9 :35 Introduction to HSS Focus Group Bill Eckroade

132

Next Generation of Government Summit | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation of Government Summit Next Generation of Government Summit Next Generation of Government Summit July 25, 2013 9:15AM EDT to July 26, 2013 5:15PM EDT Washington DC GovLoop and Young Government Leaders will hold its 4th Annual Next Generation of Government Summit from July 25 to July 26, 2013, in Washington, DC. The theme for the conference is 2013 Next Generation of Government Training Summit: Developing the 21st Century Government Leader. Next Generation of Government Summit qualifies as training in compliance with 5 U.S.C. chapter 41. The training is open to all Federal employees and will provide training and workshops in such areas as Project Management, Innovation, Analytics and Decision-Making, and Career Development. Before participating, Federal employees and managers should review

133

DOE Announces Webinars on Investment Funds for Clean Energy Programs,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investment Funds for Clean Energy Investment Funds for Clean Energy Programs, EERE's Small Business Innovation Research Program, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Investment Funds for Clean Energy Programs, EERE's Small Business Innovation Research Program, and More December 5, 2013 - 9:15am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars December 5: Live Webinar on Clean Energy Program Financing Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Technical Assistance Program The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Show Me the

134

Agenda 20131219 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Agenda December 19, 2013 Agenda December 19, 2013 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Meetings Agenda December 19, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center 9751 Washingtonian Boulevard Gaithersburg, Maryland December 19, 2013 Agenda .pdf file (10KB) Thursday December 19 9:00 Welcome and Introductions Donald Geesaman 9:15 DOE Office of Science Update Patricia Dehmer .pdf file (3.1MB) 9:45 NSF MPS Update F. Fleming Crim .pdf file (1.8MB) 10:15 DOE Office of Nuclear Physics Overview Timothy J. Hallman .pdf file (2.5MB) 10:45 Break 11:00 NSF Nuclear Physics Overview Bradley Keister .pdf file (286KB)

135

HEPAP December 6-7, 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

High Energy Physics Advisory Panel High Energy Physics Advisory Panel December 6-7, 2013 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Meetings High Energy Physics Advisory Panel December 6-7, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE / NSF icons Agenda .pdf file (93KB) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center 9751 Washingtonian Blvd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878 December 6-7, 2013 Friday, Dec 6, 2013 8:30 DOE OHEP report J Siegrist .pdf file (3.6MB) 9:00 Discussion 9:15 NSF PHY report D Caldwell .pdf file (424KB) 9:45 Discussion 10:00 Break 10:30 OHEP Committee of Visitors: Background M Procario .pdf file (3.9MB) 11:00 Discussion

136

HEPAP Agenda February 14-15, 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

14-15, 2005 14-15, 2005 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Previous Meetings HEPAP Agenda February 14-15, 2005 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE logos U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation NSF logos Agenda High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Hilton Washington Embassy Row 2015 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 February 14-15, 2005 Monday, February 14, 2005 9:15 a.m. Welcome and Introduction F. Gilman 9:30 Human Resources Study .pdf file (157KB) J. Whitmore 10:00 Status on International Linear Collider .pdf file (123KB) M. Tigner 11:00 Report from the National Academy .pdf file (51KB)

137

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

138

FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers October 7, 2013 - 9:15am Addthis The geometrical arrangement of your server rack in a data center to optimize heat removal can dramatically lower cooling and fan power needs. Server rack configuration in the Data Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Research Support Facility. Photo credit: NREL PIX 18784 The waste heat emitted from institutional data center servers can be removed more efficiently when design considerations are evaluated and innovative monitoring sensor networks are installed for verification and measurement. Hot aisle containment system in the Data Center at the NREL Research Support Facility. Photo credit: NREL PIX 18780

139

EMAB Meeting Agenda May 31, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hotel on the Falls Hotel on the Falls 475 River Parkway * Idaho Falls, ID 83402 Teton/Yellowstone Banquet Rooms May 31, 2012 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * Jim Ajello, EMAB Chair 9:15 a.m. EM Update * Tracy Mustin, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: Jim Ajello, EMAB Chair 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Updates on the EMAB FY 2012 Work Plan Assignments * Mark Gilbertson, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: David Swindle, Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee Co-Chair 12:00 p.m. Lunch 1:30 p.m. EMAB 20 th Anniversary Presentation * David Swindle, EMAB Member 2:00 p.m. Idaho National Laboratory Citizens' Advisory Board Presentation

140

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 th Meeting: Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee Hyatt North Houston, Houston, TX Wednesday, September 26, 2012 RPSEA Administered Cost Share Research Overview: Ultra-Deepwater Program rpsea.org James Pappas, P.E. Vice President, Ultra-Deepwater Programs jpappas@rpsea.org (281) 690-5511 rpsea.org 2 Outline * Current UDW Program Status * Technical Accomplishments 2011 - 2012 * Accomplishments * Significant Findings * Safety & Environment Impact * Plan Forward * 2011 Annual Plan Solicitations * 2012 Annual Plan Progress * Current Schedule 2 3 Current UDW Program Status 4 Selected Project Totals 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Universities 5 4 1 3 13 (21%) For Profits 9* 10 9 15 43 (70%) Non Profits 3 0 0 1 4 (7%) National Labs 0 0 1 0 1 (2%) TOTAL SELECTED

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II September 27, 2012 Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 8:00 a.m. Check-in and coffee break 8:45 a.m. Opening remarks by Administrator and introductions of the participants 9:15 a.m. Morning session 1: Price behavior, benchmark spreads, oil futures market participation and trading activities of commodity index traders and physical traders Paper Title: Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the Brent- WTI Spread * Presenter: Michel Robe, American University and CFTC * Discussant: Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan * Questions, answers and discussions by all participants 10:45 a.m. Coffee break 11:00 a.m. Morning session 2: Speculative components and premium in crude oil prices:

142

Microsoft Word - final agenda.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crystal City Marriott at Reagan National Airport Crystal City Marriott at Reagan National Airport 1999 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, Virginia 22202 Potomac Ballroom, Salon D April 21, 2008 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin Assistant Secretary Dennis Spurgeon 9:15 a.m. Assessing Alternatives for Fueling Radioisotope Power Systems Dennis Miotla, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Power Deployment 10:00 a.m. Break 10:20 a.m. Update on NE's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project * Commercialization Activities * Development of Licensing Framework * R&D Activities Thomas O'Connor, Director Office of Gas Reactor Deployment 11:00 a.m. Overview of Nuclear Energy R&D Facility Requirements Study Paul Kearns Battelle Memorial Institute 12:00 Lunch Committee Members

143

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polymer Membrane Process For Polymer Membrane Process For Pre-Combustion CO 2 Capture From Coal-Fired Syngas DE-FE0001124 Tim Merkel, Meijuan Zhou, Sylvie Thomas, Haiqing Lin, Adrian Serbanescu Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. www.mtrinc.com DOE NETL kickoff meeting November 13, 2009 Outline 2 * Project timeline and objectives overview * Membrane technology background * Project approach * Results to date * Project tasks, timeline, success criteria, etc. Project Overview 3 Award number #: DE-FE0001124 Project period: 9/15/09 to 9/14/11 Funding: $950k DOE; $150k MTR and $ 90k Tetramer Technologies DOE program manager: Richard Dunst Participants: MTR, Tetramer Technologies, Eastman Chemical, Southern Co. Project scope: The goal of this project is to develop a new polymer membrane and membrane separation process that will provide cost-effective CO

144

2003 American Solar Challenge Official Starting Lineup  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Solar Challenge Official Starting Lineup American Solar Challenge Official Starting Lineup Starting Team Car # Time 9:00 Kansas State University 28 9:01 University of Minnesota 35 9:02 University of Missouri - Rolla 42 9:03 University of Missouri - Columbia 43 9:04 University of Toronto 11 9:05 University of Waterloo 24 9:06 North Dakota State University 22 9:07 Auburn University 7 9:08 CalSol 254 9:09 Principia College 32 9:10 Queen's University 100 9:11 Western Michigan University 786 9:12 Purdue University 314 9:13 University of Pennsylvania 76 9:14 Iowa State University 9 9:15 Texas A&M University 12 9:16 McGill University 66 9:17 University of Arizona 8 9:18 Stanford University 16 9:19 California Polytechnic State University - SLO 5

145

Three-Way Meeting Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APS, ESRF, SPring-8 Workshop APS, ESRF, SPring-8 Workshop Argonne National Laboratory June 2-3, 2003 Slide show of meeting Bldg. 401, Conf. Rm. A1100 Monday, June 2, 2003 08:00 Coffee Introduction 08:30 Welcome 20-Year Facility Vision and Initiatives Ian McNulty, Chair 08:45 W. Stirling, "ESRF - Current Status, Medium Term Strategy, Long Term Strategy" (1.54Mb PDF) 09:15 J.M. Gibson, "APS Vision and New Initiatives" (9.15Mb PDF) 09:45 A. Kira, "The Boundary Conditions for SPring-8 Future Plans" (937Kb PDF) 10:15 Coffee SR Facility Operational Experience J.M. Gibson, Chair 10:30 J-L. Revol, "Operation and Recent Developments at the ESRF" (2.16Mb PDF) 11:15 R. Gerig, "APS Operational Efficiency and Challenges" (318Kb

146

@ENERGY Tweets: #SOTU | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

@ENERGY Tweets: #SOTU @ENERGY Tweets: #SOTU @ENERGY Tweets: #SOTU January 25, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis Last night, the President presented his vision for an economy that's built on American energy. The Energy Department took to Twitter to share his blueprint for an economy that's built to last - check out the @ENERGY and @EnergyPressSec tweets here and go to twitter.com/ENERGY to follow the full conversation. @ENERGY Thanks for joining us for the President's #SOTU. Visit http://energy.gov to learn about the latest #energy innovations @EnergyPressSec From the coalitions we've built to secure nuclear materials, to the missions we've led against hunger and disease... America is back. #SOTU @ENERGY "In 3 yrs, our partnership w/ the private sector has ... positioned America to be the world's leading manufacturer of hightech

147

Energy Challenge Two: The WeatherizeDC Campaign | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Challenge Two: The WeatherizeDC Campaign Energy Challenge Two: The WeatherizeDC Campaign Energy Challenge Two: The WeatherizeDC Campaign June 14, 2010 - 9:15am Addthis John Lippert In my quest to learn what other local groups are doing to help the environment and hopefully avoid reinventing the wheel, I attended a meeting of the Greenbelt Climate Action Network, a local chapter of the grassroots, nonprofit organization Chesapeake Climate Action Network. There I met two WeatherizeDC field organizers who described the work they are doing. Terrance and Heather explained that WeatherizeDC is a campaign of The DC Project, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., founded by former leaders of the Obama for America campaign around a mission to advance economic and environmental justice by creating clean energy career opportunities for

148

SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRS MEETING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Augusta Marriott Hotel and Suites * Estes Hall Augusta Marriott Hotel and Suites * Estes Hall Two Tenth Street * Augusta, GA 30901 September 30, 2009 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * James Ajello, Chair 9:15 a.m. Savannah River Site Presentation * Jeffrey Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:25 a.m. Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board * Manuel Bettencourt, Chair, Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board 9:30 a.m. EM Program Update * Inés Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management 10:00 a.m. Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: James Ajello, Chair 10:15 a.m. Break 10:30 a.m. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update * Vincent Adams, Director, Savannah River Recovery Act Program 11:00 a.m. Roundtable Discussion Discussion Leader: James Ajello, Chair

149

FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers FEMP Technology Brief: Wireless Sensor Networks for Data Centers October 7, 2013 - 9:15am Addthis The geometrical arrangement of your server rack in a data center to optimize heat removal can dramatically lower cooling and fan power needs. Server rack configuration in the Data Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Research Support Facility. Photo credit: NREL PIX 18784 The waste heat emitted from institutional data center servers can be removed more efficiently when design considerations are evaluated and innovative monitoring sensor networks are installed for verification and measurement. Hot aisle containment system in the Data Center at the NREL Research Support Facility. Photo

150

2012 CERTS Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R&M Review R&M Review August 7-8, 2012 Cornell University Statler Hotel 130 Statler Drive | Ithaca, NY 14853 (607) 257-2500 Day 1: August 7, 2011 The meeting will be held in the Statler Hotel (Yale/Princeton conference rooms) 8:30 Continental Breakfast (Conference Foyer 2) 9:00 Introductions and overview - Bob Thomas 9:15 DOE Vision/Priorities/Future Directions - Phil Overholt 9:30 #1: Transmission Investment Assessment under Uncertainty About Fuel Prices, Technology, Renewables Penetration and Market Responses Using a Multi-Stage Stochastic Model Approach with Recourse Ben Hobbs, Dick Schuler, Francisco Munoz 10:15 #2: Renewable Integration Through Risk-Limiting Dispatch And Distributed Resource Aggregation Pravin Varaiya, Felix Wu, K. Poolla, Anand Subramanian

151

Draft AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1&2, 2 1&2, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 December 9, 2010 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:15 a.m. NE Update Dr. Lyons, NE-1 9:45 a.m. Office of Advanced Reactor Concepts -- Richard Black, NE-74 Small Modular Reactor 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Update on Nuclear Energy Marsha Lambregts (INL) University Program Activities 12:00 noon Lunch (NEAC members and Monet 3 Room, 2 nd Floor Presenters only) 1:30 p.m. International Subcommittee Report Dr. Allen Sessoms, Subcommittee Chair 2:00 p.m. Facility Subcommittee Report Dr. John Ahearne, Subcommittee Chair 2:30 p.m. Break

152

Agenda 20130308 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting March 8-9, 2013 DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting March 8-9, 2013 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Meetings DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting March 8-9, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center Salons F-G 9751 Washington Boulevard, Gaithersburg, Maryland March 8-9, 2013 Agenda .pdf file (11KB) Friday, March 8 9:00 Welcome and Introduction to New Members Appreciation to the Departing Members Timothy J. Hallman 9:15 NSF MPS Update F. Fleming Crim 9:45 DOE Office of Science Update W. F. Brinkman 10:15 NSF Nuclear Physics Overview Bradley Keister .pdf file (499KB)

153

Agenda 20130128 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Agenda January 28-29, 2013 Agenda January 28-29, 2013 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Meetings Agenda January 28-29, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF NSAC Meeting North Bethesda Marriott Hotel/Bethesda Brookside A&B January 28-29, 2013 Agenda Monday, January 28 9:00 Welcome and Introductions Donald Geesaman 9:15 News from NSF Denise Caldwell .pdf file (469KB) 9:45 News from DOE Office of Nuclear Physics Overview Timothy J. Hallman .pdf file (4.7MB) 10:15 Conference Management Karen Talamini 10:30 Break 11:00 Presentation of the Charge on Scientific Facilities Timothy J. Hallman .pdf file (312KB)

154

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > M & O Support Department > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 297 dated 09/30/2013 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 297 dated 09/30/2013 (pdf, 4201 KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB) Y-12 M003 (10/26/00) (pdf, 77KB) Y-12 M004 (10/31/00) (pdf, 865KB) Y-12 M006 (10/31/00) (pdf, 191KB)

155

U-042: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities 42: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities U-042: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities November 21, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: Versions 12.0.0.1701 and prior. ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Mac RealPlayer, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory: SA46963 Secunia Vulnerability Report: Mac RealPlayer 12.x Secunia Advisory: SA46954 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in RealPlayer, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. Successful exploitation of the vulnerabilities may allow execution of arbitrary code. The vulnerabilities are reported in the versions 14.0.7 and prior.

156

U-072:Apache Tomcat Hash Table Collision Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

72:Apache Tomcat Hash Table Collision Bug Lets Remote Users Deny 72:Apache Tomcat Hash Table Collision Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-072:Apache Tomcat Hash Table Collision Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service December 30, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache Tomcat Hash Table Collision Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: apache Tomcat 5.5.34, 6.0.34, 7.0.22; and prior versions aBSTRACT: A remote user can cause performance to degrade on the target server. reference LINKS: Apache Tomcat Security Alert SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026477 nruns Advisory SA-2011.004 Secunia Advisory SA47411 CVE-2011-4084 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A remote user can send specially crafted POST request values to trigger hash collisions and cause significant performance

157

Notes from Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop Summary Notes Workshop Summary Notes Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages II September 27, 2012 Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Session 1: 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Paper Title: Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the Brent-WTI Spread Presenter: Michel Robe, American University Discussant: Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan Presentation: [Presentation materials link in here] Paper Abstract We document that, starting in the Fall of 2008, the benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil has periodically traded at unheard of discounts to the corresponding Brent benchmark. We further document that this discount is not reflected in spreads between Brent and other benchmarks that are directly comparable to WTI. Drawing on extant models linking inventory

158

Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG), September 21, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ICEIWG ICEIWG September 21, 2012 PORTLAND, OREGON Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) 911 NE 11 th Avenue Portland, OR 97232 AGENDA CONFERENCE ROOM C OF BUILDING 911 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2012 9:00am MEET AT BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION (BPA) 911 NE 11 th Avenue Portland, OR 98232 ** Continental breakfast will be provided ** ** Please bring a photo ID to meet BPA's security requirements ** 9:15am - 12:00pm 12:30pm - 1:30pm CLOSED SESSION - TRIBAL ICEIWG MEMBERS, AND OTHER TRIBAL LEADERS AND RELATED STAFF ICEIWG Co-Chair Vice Chairman Suppah of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon will facilitate a closed session to provide ICEIWG tribal members an opportunity to discuss working group

159

file://C:\Documents and Settings\cofield\Desktop\GC-62 Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vinod.k.duggal@cummins.com vinod.k.duggal@cummins.com Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 9:15 AM To: GC-62 Subject: Technology Transfer Practices At DoE Laboratories Cummins response: Cummins involvement with the National Labs is primarily through DOE-funded CRADA projects and the User Facility/Work-for-Others programs. We have no improvement comments related to the latter mechanism. Therefore, we are limiting this response to the CRADAs. Overall, the CRADAs proved to be a successful mechanism for leveraging the unique capabilities and expertise of the National Labs, while ensuring practical relevance of their work to making US industry competitive. The only major issue, which evolved recently, relates to Battelle's increased emphasis on protecting IP developed in the National Labs,

160

Microsoft Word - Draft Agenda for NEAC Meeting 12-13-11 v2.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ballroom A- 1 Ballroom A- 1 st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 December 13, 2011 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:15 a.m. Introduction of New Members Dr. Lyons, NE-1 10:00 a.m. NE FY2012 Budget, Status of SMR Dr. Lyons, NE-1 Program and BRC Recommendations 10:30 a.m. Break 10:40 a.m. NE 2012 Goals R. Shane Johnson, NE-2 10:50 a.m. Facilities Subcommittee Presentation Ahearne, Subcommittee Chair 11:05 a.m. Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Corradini, Subcommittee Chair Presentation 11:20 a.m. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Richter, Subcommittee Chair Subcommittee Presentation 11:35 a.m. International Subcommittee Presentation Sessoms, Subcommittee Chair

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Vehicle Basics Natural Gas Vehicle Basics Natural Gas Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:15am Addthis Photo of a large truck stopped at a gas station that reads 'Natural Gas for Vehicles.' Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs). Dedicated NGVs are designed to run only on natural gas. Bi-fuel NGVs have two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use either natural gas or a conventional fuel (gasoline or diesel). In general, dedicated natural gas vehicles demonstrate better performance and have lower emissions than bi-fuel vehicles because their engines are optimized to run on natural gas. In addition, the vehicle does not have to

162

90915DOE 2010 Plan Comments.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 A B C D E F G H 9/15/2009 DOE URTAC: 2010 DRAFT ANNUAL PLAN COMMENTS (with assigned topic areas) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (& POLICY) TECHNOLO GY TRANSFER 2007, 2008, 2009 PORTFOLIO ASSESSMEN T METRICS & BENEFITS ASSESSMEN T 2010 PROGRAM Environment al and Prior Recommend ation Review ADMIN & EDITORIAL COMMENTS 2007 X X X 2008 X X 2009 X X X 2010 X X X X X X COMMENTS FROM DON SPARKS: The following areas are of importance: Unconventional Resource X 1. Resource Assessment X a. Resource assessment (p. 28) X b. Geosciences (p. 28) X c. Basin Analysis & Resource Exploitation (p. 29) X 2. Early Stage Research or novel concepts.... (p. 30) X 3. Develop and execute innovative approaches .......(p. 30) X Drilling/completion/water management

163

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 rd Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee Meeting NETL Office, Sugar Land, TX Tuesday, September 17, 2013 RPSEA Administered Cost Share Research Overview: Ultra-Deepwater Program rpsea.org James Pappas, P.E. Vice President, Ultra-Deepwater Programs jpappas@rpsea.org (281) 690-5511 rpsea.org 2 Outline o Current UDW Program Status o Technical Accomplishments FY 2013 * Accomplishments * Significant Findings * Safety & Environment Impact o Plan Forward * 2012 Solicitation - Selection Progress * Current Schedule 2 3 Current UDW Program Status 4 Selected Project Totals 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Total Universities 5 4 1 3 0 13 (19%) For Profits 9* 10 9 15 7 50 (74%) Non Profits 3 0 0 1 0 4 (6%) National Labs 0 0 1 0 0 1 (1%) TOTAL SELECTED 17* 14 11 19 7** 68

164

Preliminary Release: April 19, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Total Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 5 Total Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units1","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Billions","Billions","Billions" "Total West",24.8,42.4,34.2,19.9 "West Divisions and States" "Mountain",7.9,15.2,13.4,8.7 "Mountain North",3.9,8.3,7.3,3.6 "Colorado",1.9,4,3.5,1.4 "Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming",2,4.3,3.8,2.2 "Mountain South",4,7,6.1,5.2 "Arizona",2.3,4.1,3.5,3.5 "New Mexico, Nevada",1.7,2.9,2.6,1.7 "Pacific",16.9,27.2,20.8,11.1

165

NERSC Users Group Meeting June 25-26, 1996 Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agenda Agenda Agenda ERSUG Meeting Agenda, June 25-26, 1996 Tuesday June 25th 8:00 Coffee 8:30 View from Washington (Tom Kitchens) 8:45 View from the Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Charles V. Shank) 9:15 Introduction of new NERSC staff (Bill McCurdy) Assign Faces to Functions 9:30 NERSC Overview (Bill Kramer) Transition Progress Staffing Update System Upgrade Schedule HPDC FY 97 Goals 10:15 Break 10:30 J-90 Issues (Jim Craw) J-90 Performance J-90 Interactive response System efficiency J-90 Clustering 11:30 Storage (Keith Fitzgerald) Storage Procurement Requirements CFS Phase out AFS to DFS migration Storage Management - charging for storage 12:00 Lunch and ExERSUG Lunch 1:15 User Services (Francesca Verdier) Information Dissemination Consulting Documentation

166

U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users 7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes March 30, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.31 HP-UX B.11.23 ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. REFERENCE LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03255321 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026869 CVE-2012-0127 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Performance Manager running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code and to create a Denial of Service (DoS).

167

Draft AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2 3, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 April 29, 2010 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Warren "Pete" Miller, NE-1 9:15 a.m. NE Update Dr. Miller, NE-1 9:45 a.m. Summary of NE Reorganization & Dr. Lyons, NE-2 FY 2011 Budget Request 10:00 a.m. New Program Proposal for FY 2011 - Edward McGinnis, NE International Nuclear Energy Cooperation 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling & Alex Larzelere, NE Simulation Activities and its Relation to The Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling & Simulation 11:45 am Update on New NEAC Subcommittees Vice-Chairman Ahearne 12:00 noon Lunch (NEAC members and Marquette Room, 1

168

Microsoft Word - EMAB 15 Sept 2010 Meeting Agenda.090710  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

La Fonda on the Plaza * New Mexico Room La Fonda on the Plaza * New Mexico Room 100 East San Francisco Street * Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 September 15, 2010 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * James Ajello, EMAB Chair 9:15 a.m. EM Update * Inés Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: James Ajello, EMAB Chair 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. Tank Waste Subcommittee Report * Dennis Ferrigno and Lawrence Papay, Tank Waste Subcommittee Co-Chairs 12:15 p.m. Lunch 1:45 p.m. Acquisition and Project Management Panel * Gary Riner, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Project Management * Jack Surash, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Contract Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: G. Brian Estes and David Swindle, Acquisition and

169

U-042: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities 2: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities U-042: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities November 21, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac RealPlayer Multiple Vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: Versions 12.0.0.1701 and prior. ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Mac RealPlayer, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory: SA46963 Secunia Vulnerability Report: Mac RealPlayer 12.x Secunia Advisory: SA46954 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in RealPlayer, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. Successful exploitation of the vulnerabilities may allow execution of arbitrary code. The vulnerabilities are reported in the versions 14.0.7 and prior.

170

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 29, 2010 October 29, 2010 8:00 am - 3:00 pm EST 7:30-8:00 am Continental Breakfast and Networking (EAC members only) 8:00 - 8:30 am Induction of the Special Government Employees (SGEs); SGEs will go to a nearby room for swearing-in and 15-minute ethics briefing EAC Member Group picture to be taken 8:30 - 8:45 am WELCOME Cathy Zoi, Under Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 8:45 - 9:00 am DOE OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND RELIABILITY -- STRUCTURE AND JURISDICTION Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE 9:00 - 9:15 am GOALS OF ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE (EAC) Richard Cowart, EAC Chair and Principal, Regulatory Assistance

171

Microsoft Word - NEAC Meeting Agenda for June 9th v2.DOC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renoir Room, 2 Renoir Room, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary NE 9:15 a.m. Under Secretary Kristina Johnson 9:35 a.m. NE's FY 2009 Budget and FY 2010 Shane Johnson Budget Request 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. University Programs Marsha Lambregts and John Gilligan (INL) 11:45 a.m. Lunch Degas Room 12:45 p.m. Advanced Nuclear Transformation Burton Richter Technology report for approval 1:15 p.m. Pu-238 report John Ahearne, Mike Corridini, and Alice Caponiti 2:00 p.m. ATR Management Assistance Dennis Miotla, Deputy Assist. Secretary, NE Subcommittee

172

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

47 47 North Carolina State University FE SCC/Gasification Division FY13-16/ 9/15/2013 - 9/14/2016 K. David Lyons NCSU Campus, Raleigh, NC ...Metal Oxides for Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal via Coupled Computational-Experimental Study Lab testing to characterize metal oxide oxygen carrier viability followed by molecular-scale computer simulation of material properties and cyclical transition from reduced to oxidized states. Kenneth David Lyons Digitally signed by Kenneth David Lyons DN: cn=Kenneth David Lyons, o=Gasification Division, ou=DOE/NETL, email=k.david.lyons@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2013.06.10 13:31:08 -04'00' 06 10 2013 John Ganz Digitally signed by John Ganz DN: cn=John Ganz, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

173

Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > M & O Support Department > Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories DE-AC04-94AL85000 Operated by Sandia Corporation a Subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation Contract Updated to Modification 515 dated 09/09/2013 View previous Sandia Contract and Mods (M081-A201). BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Updated to Mod 515 dated 09/09/2013) (Unofficial) SNL M202 Section A (Supersedes Basic and all Mods) (pdf, 397KB) SNL M216 (9/15/04) (pdf, 439KB) SNL M202 SecA (Supersedes Basic and all Mods) (pdf, 397KB) SNL Sec B-H (doc, 314KB) SNL M218

174

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Level Waste Corporate Board High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Loews Hotel 1065 West Peachtree St, Atlanta, Georgia November 18, 2010 Time Topic Speaker 7:30 AM Closed Session - ratify Charter Board members 8:30 AM Welcome, Introduction, 2011 focus for HLW Corp Board Shirley Olinger 8:50 AM Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet  Show flowsheet w/ split locations  Describe recycle of LAW concept  Discuss baseline assumptions  Describe subsequent talks using flowsheet figure Gary Smith 9:15 AM Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP)  Tc/I split factors (w/ and w/o recycle)  Water management (w/ and w/o recycle) Albert Kruger 9:45 AM WTP Melter/Offgas Systems Decontamination Factors  Re as a stimulant for Tc  Issues that limit Tc incorporation in LAW glass

175

DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOD-DOE Workshop DOD-DOE Workshop Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction: Can Fuel Cells be a Game Changer? U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 4 th Floor Conference Room (4A-104) September 30, 2010 8:30 am to 5 pm Agenda 8:30 am Welcome, introductions and mtg logistics: Pete Devlin (DOE EERE FCTP) Overall Purpose * To begin discussing collaboration across DOD and DOE in keeping with the MOU * To motivate RD&D for APU applications and identify R&D challenges * To identify the next steps and potential collaboration Background Materials Provided * DOD-DOE MOU * NASA/UTC SOFC APU Feasibility Study for Long Range Commercial Aircraft 9:00 am DOE Perspective - Henry Kelly (US DOE Dep. Principal Asst. Sect. of Energy) 9:15 am MOU Overview - Richard Kidd (DOE EERE FEMP)

176

untitled  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 29, 2009 April 29, 2009 Crystal City Marriott at Reagan National Airport 1999 Jefferson Davis Highway * Arlington, VA 22202 April 29, 2009 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * James Ajello, EMAB Chair 9:15 a.m. EM Program Update * Inés R. Triay, Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management 9:45 a.m. Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: James Ajello, Chair 10:15 a.m. Strategic Initiatives * Discretionary Budgeting and EM Footprint Reduction - Merle Sykes, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget * Energy Parks Initiative - Mark Gilbertson, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Engineering and Technology 10:45 a.m. Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leaders: Dennis Ferrigno, Vice Chair 11:15 a.m. Break 11:30 a.m.

177

Microsoft Word - Final Agenda for NEAC Meeting 6-12-12  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monet Ballroom, (2nd Floor) Monet Ballroom, (2nd Floor) Washington, DC 20024 June 12, 2012 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:15 a.m. Current Events, NE FY2013 Budget Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:45 a.m. Used Fuel Disposition R&D Monica Regalbuto 10:15 a.m. SMR Program Update Rebecca Smith-Kevern 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Accident Tolerant Fuels Frank Goldner 11:30 a.m. International Subcommittee Presentation Dr. Allen Sessoms, Subcommittee Chair 12:00 noon Lunch (NEAC members and Degas Room- 1 st Floor Presenters only) 1:00 p.m. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Report Dr. Burton Richter,

178

Meeting Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AGENDA AGENDA US Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW* Washington, DC 20585 Forrestal Building Room 8E-089 December 3, 2012 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview Dennis Ferrigno, EMAB Vice Chair 9:15 a.m. EM Update Tracy Mustin, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion Discussion Leader: Dennis Ferrigno, EMAB Vice Chair 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Updates on the EMAB FY 2012 Work Plan Assignments Mark Gilbertson, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Roundtable Discussion Discussion Leader: G. Brian Estes, Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee Co-Chairs Discussion Leaders: Jennifer Salisbury and Carolyn Huntoon, Risk Subcommittee Co-Chairs 12:15p.m. Lunch 1:15p.m.

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2001 11, 2001 From Friday, June 1 to Friday, June 8, cash prices fell again, as cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed from midweek on in the northern half of the nation as well as in some areas along the Gulf of Mexico (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Price declines in cash markets ranged from pennies to over $1.00 per MMBtu, with most points down 9-15 cents. At the Henry Hub, the price fell 8 cents to $3.63 per MMBtu. The near-month (July delivery) futures contract lost less than 1 cent for the week, settling on Friday, June 8 at $3.922 per MMBtu. Once again, weekly storage injections topped 100 Bcf, approaching or exceeding regional records for the report week. Prices: It was a week of contrasting price movements in cash markets. Spot prices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Quality assurance in the Brenham Residue Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$. 63 4. 17 8. 64 8. 49 $. 31 1. 83 3. 29 $. 91 4. 85 5. 98 $. 49 1. 57 87. 5$ 82. 9$ 93. 5$ 98. 86 88. 39 B7. 9$ 93. 17 91. 85 92. 35 92. 5$ 85. 7$ 81. 8$ 83. 48 83. 15 84. 71 85. 44 69. 84 91. 2 1$$. 2 9$. 15 87. 78 93. 94 94. $9... . BBBM 84. 888 I 79. $M I 84. 888 I 88. 888 I 89. $88 I 81. 888 I 98. 688 82. 48$ 87. MB I 81, 688 I 86. 588 I 81. 288 I 87, ZSS I 89. 888 IIFSII =. PSSSS Fl'I'I +7- . 836913 PF61 4VER46E '/ RECOVERY = 85. $9 Spike 5 Opt 1666 2 Sd I Sd...

Jackson, Jerry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Basic Parameter Estimation of Binary Neutron Star Systems by the Advanced LIGO/Virgo Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the next five years, it is expected that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will have reached a sensitivity sufficient to enable the routine detection of gravitational waves. Beyond the initial detection, the scientific promise of these instruments relies on the effectiveness of our physical parameter estimation capabilities. The majority of this effort has been towards the detection and characterization of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence, e.g. the coalescence of binary neutron stars. While several previous studies have investigated the accuracy of parameter estimation with advanced detectors, the majority have relied on approximation techniques such as the Fisher Matrix. Here we report the statistical uncertainties that will be achievable for optimal detection candidates (SNR = 20) using the full parameter estimation machinery developed by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo methods. We find the recovery of the individual masses to be fractionally within 9% (15%)...

Rodriguez, Carl L; Raymond, Vivien; Farr, Will M; Littenberg, Tyson; Fazi, Diego; Kalogera, Vicky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Co-Evaporated Cu2ZnSnSe4 Films and Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of vacuum co-evaporation to produce Cu2ZnSnSe4 photovoltaic devices with 9.15% total-area efficiency is described. These new results suggest that the early success of the atmospheric techniques for kesterite photovoltaics may be related to the ease with which one can control film composition and volatile phases, rather than a fundamental benefit of atmospheric conditions for film properties. The co-evaporation growth recipe is documented, as is the motivation for various features of the recipe. Characteristics of the resulting kesterite films and devices are shown in scanning electron micrographs, including photoluminescence, current-voltage, and quantum efficiency. Current-voltage curves demonstrate low series resistance without the light-dark cross-over seen in many devices in the literature. Band gap indicated by quantum efficiency and photoluminescence is roughly consistent with that expected from first principles calculation.

Repins, I.; Beall, C.; Vora, N.; DeHart, C.; Kuciauskas, D.; Dippo, P.; To, B.; Mann, J.; Hsu, W. C.; Goodrich, A.; Noufi, R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

185

U-077: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute 7: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-077: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 9, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 16.0.912.75 ABSTRACT: A remote user may be able to execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: Google Chrome Releases Chromium Security SecurityTracker Alert ID:1026487 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create specially crafted content that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user. Specially crafted animation frames can trigger a use-after-free memory

186

U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote 4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 19, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Adobe Acrobat Reader Version(s): 10.1.1 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe Acrobat/Reader, this vulnerability is being actively exploited against Windows-based systems. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026432 APSB11-30 CVE-2011-4369 JC3-CIRC Tech Bulletin U-054 APSA11-04 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the PRC

187

U-094: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative 4: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-094: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain Elevated Privileges February 2, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: EMC Documentum Content Server 6.0, 6.5, 6.6 ABSTRACT: EMC Documentum Content Server contains a privilege elevation vulnerability that may allow an unauthorized user to obtain highest administrative privileges on the system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026624 EMC Resource Library CVE-2011-4144 bugtraq ESA-2012-009 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: EMC Documentum Content Server contains a security vulnerability that may allow a system administrator to elevate their or other users privileges to

188

1994 SSRL 21st USERS MEETING  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL 21st USERS MEETING SSRL 21st USERS MEETING SSRL 12 Oct 1994 October 17-18, 1994, SLAC Auditorium PROGRAM MONDAY, OCTOBER 17 7:30 Registration and Continental Breakfast - Auditorium Breezeway SESSION I Chair: Louis Terminello 8:30 Welcome - L. Terminello (LLNL) 8:35 SSRL Director's Report - A. Bienenstock (SSRL) 9:15 SSRLUO Report - J. Kortright (LBL) 9:30 Report from Washington - W. Oosterhuis (DOE) 9:45 Coffee Break SESSION II Surface and Reduced Dimensional Studies Chair: Charles Fadley lO:15 Ultra-trace Metal Analysis of Sillcon Wafer Surfaces using Synchrotron Radiation - A. Fischer-Colbrie (Hewlett-Packard) 10:35 Determination of Nanoscale Magnetic Structure from Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Diffraction using Magnetic X-ray Circular Dichroism - J. Tobin (LLNL) 10:55 Quantitative Determination of Magnetic Moments with Circularly

189

National Contract Management Association's 2013 World Congress |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Contract Management Association's 2013 World Congress National Contract Management Association's 2013 World Congress National Contract Management Association's 2013 World Congress July 21, 2013 9:15AM EDT to July 24, 2013 5:15PM EDT Nashville, TN The National Contract Management Association (NCMA) will hold its 2013 World Congress from July 21 to July 24, 2013, in Nashville, TN. The theme for this conference is "Collaborative Contract Management Training: Embracing Change in a Dynamic Environment," and the agenda supports the development and ability of contract management professionals to make sound business decisions. NCMA's 2013 World Congress qualifies as training in compliance with 5 U.S.C. Chapter 41. The training is open to all Federal employees and will feature training and workshops in areas such as Contract Negotiations,

190

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

441 - 450 of 9,640 results. 441 - 450 of 9,640 results. Download NEPA Determination: LM-12-11 Routine and Non-Routine Activities at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Office SiteCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.19, and B5.16Date: 11/02/2012Location(s): Grand Junction, COOffices(s): Legacy Management http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/nepa-determination-lm-12-11 Download Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan, 8/03 Operations at DOE facilities shall be conducted in a manner to assure an acceptable level of safety. (DOE O 5408.19 Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities) http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/conduct-operations-assessment-plan-803 Download OPS 9.15 Timely Orders to Operators 4/18/01 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility program and practices for timely orders to operators. This surveillance provides a

191

Estimation of Energy Baseline by Simulation for On-going Commissioning and Energy Saving Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the building is closed. 0 100 200 300 400 500 0:00 4:00 8:00 12:00 16:00 20:00 0:00 4:00 8:00 12:00 16:00 20:00 0:00 Measured Simulated Cooling Load [kW] Fig. 7 Hourly-integrated cooling load 0 100 200 300 400 500 2005/8/6 2005/8/14 2005/8/22 2005.../8/30 2005/9/7 2005/9/15 2005/9/23 Simulated Estimated using Gas Consumption Daily-integrated Cooling Load [kW] Fig. 8 Daily-integrated cooling load 5.1 Models Of Equipments Used For Air-Conditioning System a) Gas Consumption of Gas-Fired Absorption...

Miyata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Asada, M.; Iwata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Is chytridiomycosis an emerging disease in Asia?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73 0 0 (0.034.86) 0 * no change Philippines 412 33 8.01 (5.7711.04) 1 8.25 (5.9611.28) South Korea 29 1 3.45 (0.8217.22) 1 6.9 (2.1122.07) Sri Lanka 117 0 0 (0.023.10) 10 8.55 (4.3814.51) Vietnam 530 0 0 (00.69) 7 1.32 (0.652.70) Total 3363... | Volume 6 | Issue 8 | e23179 17. Piotrowski JS, Annis SL, Longcore JE (2004) Physiology of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a chytrid pathogen of amphibians. Mycologia 96: 915. 18. Ramsey JP, Reinert LK, Harper LK, Woodhams DC, Rollins-Smith LA (2010...

Brown, Rafe M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

wf01 - Energy_Expenditures.xlsx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-07 6-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 % Change Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 73.6 74.2 79.6 74.7 79.7 65.6 75.2 77.5 3.1 Price ($/mcf) 14.74 15.18 15.83 13.31 12.66 12.23 11.75 13.38 13.8 Expenditures ($) 1,085 1,127 1,260 994 1,010 802 883 1,036 17.3 Midwest Consumption (mcf) 74.5 78.2 80.8 78.6 80.1 65.4 77.5 77.9 0.5 Price ($/mcf) 11.06 11.40 11.47 9.44 9.23 8.96 8.23 9.15 11.2 Expenditures ($) 824 892 927 742 740 586 638 713 11.8 South Consumption (mcf) 45.3 44.8 47.0 53.4 49.5 41.1 46.6 47.5 1.9 Price ($/mcf) 13.57 14.19 14.08 11.52 11.03 11.47 10.69 11.78 10.3 Expenditures ($) 615 635 661 615 546 472 498 560 12.4 West Consumption (mcf) 46.4 48.1 46.2 47.7 47.2 47.6 46.9 46.5 -0.8 Price ($/mcf) 11.20 11.31 10.86 9.91 9.67 9.38 9.15 9.90 8.1 Expenditures ($) 520 544 502 473 457 447 429

194

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.7 29.6 30.3 21.0 19.7 16.7 8.3 12.9 13.3 18.6 12.0 18.7 2002 22.6 19.5 29.3 17.6 15.0 24.0 7.4 8.4 8.8 16.4 18.9 19.6 2003 20.3 22.7 24.9 19.3 17.1 24.1 8.7 9.7 10.9 15.7 17.7 19.4 2004 19.7 21.4 24.7 19.0 18.3 14.2 9.2 10.6 16.5 18.8 16.0 16.6 2005 24.4 20.0 24.6 18.5 19.0 18.2 10.0 8.6 12.9 15.1 14.2 18.3 2006 13.8 15.1 17.1 13.3 13.0 9.8 8.3 7.7 10.5 11.5 10.2 12.4 2007 12.1 13.0 14.5 11.6 9.7 8.9 7.1 6.4 6.9 9.8 8.5 10.5 2008 12.0 13.8 13.2 13.6 12.4 8.5 8.0 7.1 8.6 7.4 8.0 11.4 2009 11.8 12.1 10.5 10.2 8.8 7.6 6.6 6.1 7.3 7.8 9.0 8.7 2010 11.1 11.7 10.5 9.1 7.0 7.8 6.8 6.5 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.5

195

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 19. Energy Intensity, Actual vs. Forecasts (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.6 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.6 AEO 1984 20.1 18.9 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.3 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.1 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.5 12.6 11.8 11.0 10.3 9.6 8.8 8.2 7.7 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.8 13.0 12.2 11.5 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 11.0 10.4 9.7 9.0 8.4 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 AEO 1994 14.1 13.5 13.1 12.6 12.1 11.6 11.1 10.6

196

Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.15 8.67 7.72 5.60 5.08 4.37 2.73 3.89 4.85 4.24 5.59 4.49 2002 5.86 4.93 5.13 4.93 4.22 4.53 4.00 3.63 3.06 3.44 4.38 6.02 2003 5.62 7.50 8.76 5.91 6.16 6.06 5.48 3.93 5.36 4.33 4.87 6.12 2004 7.34 8.26 7.48 6.81 7.48 7.91 8.16 7.84 7.88 7.46 8.87 9.11 2005 9.25 8.69 8.61 8.71 8.23 8.94 9.01 9.08 11.15 13.91 15.02 15.84 2006 13.69 12.50 9.43 9.91 9.43 8.46 8.42 9.04 8.61 7.58 9.03 9.81 2007 9.45 8.98 9.08 9.06 10.06 9.87 9.99 9.06 8.34 8.60 9.66 9.69 2008 10.46 10.16 10.70 11.49 12.65 13.93 15.24 13.57 11.65 10.67 10.29 9.88 2009 9.54 9.15 7.37 7.85 5.61 5.71 6.07 6.13 5.49 5.95 7.91 6.16

197

Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 January ....................... 31.4 32.9 44.3 108.4 22.6 175.3 8.1 8.4 12.1 13.6 0.2 25.9 February ..................... 32.5 34.2 46.7 112.6 21.0 180.2 8.3 8.6 12.2 14.4 0.1 26.7 March .......................... 34.4 36.2 48.0 116.1 21.1 185.3 8.4 8.7 12.8 15.4 0.2 28.4 April ............................ 34.2 35.8 48.0 119.8 24.1 191.9 8.4 8.7 12.9 15.5 0.1 28.6 May ............................. 34.6 36.3 48.2 120.2 24.3 192.7 8.5 8.8 12.9 15.9 0.1 29.0 June ............................ 35.8 37.5 49.2 124.7 24.5 198.4 8.6 8.9 13.3 16.5 0.3 30.1 July ............................. 35.1 36.6 48.4 123.3 21.3 193.0 8.6 8.8 13.0 16.2 0.2 29.5 August ........................ 36.0 37.6 49.0 128.1 25.0 202.0 8.6 8.9 13.0 16.7 0.2 30.0 September .................. 35.1 36.6 47.5 124.8 26.0 198.3 8.3 8.6 12.7 16.0 0.2 28.9 October

198

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

199

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2004.html  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 4-6, 2009 February 4-6, 2009 Wednesday, February 4, 2009 8:30 am Executive Session R. Hawryluk 9:00 am Welcome & Charge M. Porkolab 9:10 am Comments from DoE R. Dagazian 9:15 am Program Overview E. Marmar 10:15 am Break 10:30 am Facilities and Upgrade J. Irby 11:10 am Alternator Status R. Granetz 11:30 am Lower Hybrid RF R. Parker 12:00 pm Lunch (on-site) 1:00 pm ICRF S. Wukitch 1:30 pm Plasma Boundary B. Lipschultz 2:20 pm Pedestal J. Hughes 2:40 pm Break 2:55 pm Transport J. Hughes 3:25 pm Macrostability R. Granetz 3:45 pm Executive Session R. Hawryluk 5:30 pm Feedback and Questions to C-Mod Staff R. Hawryluk 5:45 pm Adjourn 6:30 pm Working Dinner Off-Site (if desired) Thursday, February 5, 2009 8:30 am Executive Session R. Hawryluk 9:00 am

200

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

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201

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

202

TableHC6.6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................ 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Coolling Equipment.................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment...................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it..................... 1.9 0.6 0.5 Q 0.2 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System................................................... 65.9 15.3 22.6 10.7 9.9 7.3 Without a Heat Pump...................................... 53.5 12.5 17.9 8.7 8.2 6.3 With a Heat Pump........................................... 12.3 2.7 4.8 2.0 1.8 1.0

203

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",6633,6610,6642,6648,6675,6647,6794,6850,6937,7254,7269,7479,7603,7883,7954,7955,8034,8008,8142,8454,9114,86.6,66.2 " Coal",4945,4945,4955,4950,4954,4954,4961,4955,4963,4981,4981,4981,4891,4891,4891,4888,4899,4921,4925,4970,5661,59.3,41.1 " Petroleum",221,221,222,222,222,221,177,177,174,180,181,178,193,193,207,181,179,179,181,176,176,2.2,1.3 " Natural Gas",393,387,387,379,369,359,542,541,624,917,917,1142,1333,1612,1662,1684,1752,1704,1832,2105,2078,10.9,15.1 " Hydroelectric",542,524,546,566,598,582,582,615,614,614,614,600,600,601,601,610,609,610,610,610,606,7.3,4.4

204

EIA - Daily Report 9/22/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

23, 5:00 pm 23, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Natural Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% 9/21/2005 1,097,357 70.2% 4,713 45.3% 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison of hurricanes Katrina & Ivan figure data Prices graph of oil and gas prices figure data graph of nymex futures for gasoline & deisel figure data NYMEX Futures Prices 9/23/2005 9/22/2005 change Week Ago 9/16/2005 Year Ago 9/23/2004 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 64.19 66.50 -2.31 63.00 48.46 Gasoline (c/gal) 208.56 213.94 -5.38 178.51

205

EIA - Daily Report 9/20/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0, 3:00 pm 0, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% 9/14/2005 843,725 54.0% 3,518 33.8% 9/13/2005 846,720 54.2% 3,720 35.8% 9/12/2005 860,636 55.1% 3,784 36.4% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison of hurricanes Katrina & Ivan figure data Prices graph of oil and gas prices figure data graph of nymex futures for gasoline & deisel figure data NYMEX Futures Prices 9/20/2005 9/19/2005 change Week Ago 9/13/2005 Year Ago 9/20/2004 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 66.23 67.39 -1.16 63.11 46.35 Gasoline (c/gal) 197.66 204.27 -6.61 189.16 127.45 Heating Oil (c/gal)

206

The Secretary of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Washington. DC 20585 Washington. DC 20585 ACTUAL ^d^ ~SCHEDULE FOR ENERGY SECRETARY ABRAHAM Sunday, May 20, 2001 IHOLD- SEE MAJIDA'S MEMO] 7:45 AM DEPART RESIDENCE EN ROUTE FOX STUDIOS 8:10 AM 400 North Capitol Street 8:10 AM FOX NEWS SUNDAY 8:27 AM 409 NorthCapitol Street / \ // \ Lead & Attending Staff: Lopatto (c J , ) I-opic: tntcw ith Tony Snow and Brit Hume. Whitman will also participate. 12 minutes total for the segment. 8:27 AM DEPART EN ROUTE ABC STUDIOS 8:40 AM 1717 DeSalles Street, NW 9:00 AM LIVE SEGMENT WITH ABC 9:10 AM 1717 DeSalles Stret, NW / Lead & Attending Staff: Lopatto (cell:: i "'inda: Interviewed by Cokie Roberts. Whitman will join you via satellite for this interview as well. 9:15 AM DEPART EN ROUTE CNN 9:30 AM 850 First Street NE 9:30 AM CNN-LATE EDITION WITH WOLF BLITZER

207

HEPAP Agenda July 11-12, 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

11-12, 2005 11-12, 2005 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Previous Meetings HEPAP Agenda July 11-12, 2005 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE logos U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation NSF logos Agenda High Energy Physics Advisory Panel The Madison Hotel 15th & M Streets, N.W. Washington, D.C. July 11-12, 2005 Monday, July 11, 2005 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introduction F. Gilman 9:15 Office of High Energy Physics News Items .pdf file (49KB) R. Staffin 9:45 Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences News Items J. Dehmer 10:15 BREAK 10:30 Status of LHC Program .pdf file (1.4MB) -transition from construction to research

208

HEPAP Agenda May 18-19, 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

18-19, 2005 18-19, 2005 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Previous Meetings HEPAP Agenda May 18-19, 2005 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE logos U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation NSF logos Agenda High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Radisson Hotel 2121 P Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 May 18-19, 2005 Wednesday, May 18, 2005 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introduction F. Gilman 9:15 Office of High Energy Physics News Items .pdf file (45KB) R. Staffin 9:45 Status of B-Factory .pdf file (1.4MB) J. Dorfan 10:15 BREAK 10:30 Status of Tevatron & NuMI .pdf file (1.7MB) M. Witherell 11:00 Report from National Academy of Sciences Study - EPP

209

HEPAP Agenda July 2007 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2007 2007 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Previous Meetings HEPAP Agenda July 2007 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE logos U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation NSF logos Agenda High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Hotel Palomar 2121 P St., N.W. Washington, D.C. July 13-14, 2007 July 13, 2007 8:45 a.m. DOE News and FY07 Budget Update .ppt file (155KB) R. Staffin 9:15 Discussion 9:25 NSF News and FY07 Budget Update J. Dehmer 9:55 Discussion Y.K. Kim 10:05 Status of the Fermilab Steering Group .ppt file (1.8MB) 10:25 Discussion 10:35 BREAK 11:00 NuSAG Report .pdf file (1.3MB) P. Meyers 11:45 Discussion and Action

210

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2004.html  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fusion Technology Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, February 6-8, 2008 Wednesday, February 6, 2008 8:30 am Executive Session Chuck Kessel 9:00 am Welcome & Charge Miklos Porkolab 9:10 am Comments from DoE Rostom Dagazian 9:15 am Program Overview Earl Marmar 10:05 am Transport Martin Greenwald 10:45 am Break 11:00 am ICRF Steve Wukitch 11:30 am LHRF Ron Parker 12:00 pm Lunch (on-site) 1:00 pm Macro-Stability Bob Granetz 1:30 pm Pedestal Physics Jerry Hughes 2:00 pm Plasma-Boundary Bruce Lipschultz 2:45 pm Break 3:00 pm Int. Scen.: ITER H-Mode Baseline Steve Wolfe 3:30 pm Int. Scen.: Advanced Scenarios Amanda Hubbard 4:00 pm Theory and Modeling Paul Bonoli 4:40 pm Executive Session 5:30 pm Adjourn

211

NNSA Service Center -- Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 222 dated 09/30/2010 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 222 dated 9/30/10) (pdf, 7,982KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB) Y-12 M003 (10/26/00) (pdf, 77KB) Y-12 M004 (10/31/00) (pdf, 865KB) Y-12 M006 (10/31/00) (pdf, 191KB) Y-12 M009 (1/22/01) (pdf, 314KB) Y-12 M013 (4/6/01) (pdf, 293KB) Y-12 M015 (5/9/01) (pdf, 266KB) Y-12 M018 (7/2/01) (pdf, 520KB) Y-12 M021 (9/25/01) (pdf, 1,836KB) Y-12 M022 (9/25/01) (pdf, 193KB)

212

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2

213

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1992 9. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1992 (Thousand) Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings All Buildings Using Any Energy Source Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) RSE Row Factor Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Wood 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 1.6 2.2 1.6 2.0 All Buildings ..................................... 4,806 4,620 4,616 2,665 559 95 28 337 103 7.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .................................. 2,681 2,543 2,539 1,331 288 18 Q 218 70 10.8 5,001 to 10,000 ................................ 975 954 954 574 125 11 Q 62 25 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 .............................. 647 628 628 420 62 28 8 32 Q 11.6 25,001 to 50,000 .............................. 280 275 275 181 39 16 9 15 Q 13.0 50,001 to 100,000

214

State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name Average Retail Price (cents/kWh) Net Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (MWh) Total Retail Sales (MWh) Name Average Retail Price (cents/kWh) Net Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (MWh) Total Retail Sales (MWh) Alabama 8.89 32,417 152,150,512 90,862,645 Alaska 14.76 2,067 6,759,576 6,247,038 Arizona 9.69 26,392 111,750,957 72,831,737 Arkansas 7.28 15,981 61,000,185 48,194,285 California 13.01 67,328 204,125,596 258,525,414 Colorado 9.15 13,777 50,720,792 52,917,786 Connecticut 17.39 8,284 33,349,623 30,391,766 Delaware 11.97 3,389 5,627,645 11,605,932 District of Columbia 13.35 790 199,858 11,876,995 Florida 10.58 59,147 229,095,935 231,209,614 Georgia 8.87 36,636 137,576,941 140,671,580 Hawaii 25.12 2,536 10,836,036 10,016,509 Idaho 6.54 3,990 12,024,564 22,797,668 Illinois 9.13 44,127 201,351,872 144,760,674

215

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Percent of U.S. . Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Percent of U.S. Households, 1993 Heated Floorspace Category (square feet) Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total Fewer than 600 600 to 999 1,000 to 1,599 1,600 to 1,999 2,000 to 2,399 2,400 to 2,999 3,000 or More RSE Column Factors: 0.4 1.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.2 RSE Row Factor Total................................................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None........................................... 10.0 16.5 10.2 9.9 9.2 9.4 9.1 6.7 11.42 1 ................................................. 22.9 31.3 30.9 23.5 19.9 15.3 17.9 11.5 6.62 2 ................................................. 28.4 32.3 31.9 28.7 28.7 24.8 26.0 21.5 5.64 3 .................................................

216

Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total........................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.......................... 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Cooling Equipment...................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment....................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it...................... 1.9 0.6 0.5 Q 0.2 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System................................................... 65.9 15.3 22.6 10.7 9.9 7.3 Without a Heat Pump....................................... 53.5 12.5 17.9 8.7 8.2 6.3 With a Heat Pump............................................ 12.3

217

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon gas (Ne) Neon gas (Ne) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 10 Atomic mass 20.1797(6) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 8.39E-04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 137.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.724 MeV g-1cm2 1.446E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 65.7 g cm-2 7.837E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 99.0 g cm-2 1.181E+05 cm Pion collision length 91.8 g cm-2 1.095E+05 cm Pion interaction length 128.7 g cm-2 1.534E+05 cm Radiation length 28.93 g cm-2 3.450E+04 cm Critical energy 67.02 MeV (for e-) 65.47 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.15 g cm-2 1.092E+04 cm Plasma energy 0.59 eV Muon critical energy 907. GeV Melting point 24.56 K -248.6 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 27.07 K -246.1 C

218

Draft AGENDA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quorum Room, 2 Quorum Room, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 December 18, 2009 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Warren "Pete" Miller, NE-1 9:15 a.m. Introduction of New Members Dr. Miller, NE 9:30 a.m. NE's Strategic Goals and Direction Dr. Miller, NE w/ Q&A from Committee 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap Buzz Savage, NE 12:00 noon Lunch Montcalm Room 1:00 p.m. Update on the Next Generation Tom O'Connor, NE Nuclear Plant Project 1:30 p.m. Discussion of NEAC Subcommittees Chairman Martin 2:00 p.m. Nuclear Energy Policy Discussion Chairman Martin 2:15 p.m. Break 2:30 p.m. Nuclear Energy Technology Discussion Vice Chairman Ahearne

219

U-081: McAfee SaaS 'myCIOScn.dll' ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: McAfee SaaS 'myCIOScn.dll' ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users 1: McAfee SaaS 'myCIOScn.dll' ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-081: McAfee SaaS 'myCIOScn.dll' ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 13, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee SaaS 'myCIOScn.dll' ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: McAfee ABSTRACT: A remote user can create HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026513 Zero Day Initiative ZDI-12-012 McAfee Threat Intelligence IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: This vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of McAfee Security-as-a-Service. User interaction is required to exploit this vulnerability in that the target must visit a

220

c18.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 15 24 5 949 1,672 442 16.1 14.4 10.9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8 25 10 642 1,470 650 12.8 16.7 14.8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 8 39 Q 614 2,087 Q 12.3 18.9 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 Q Q 1,072 Q Q 20.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 29 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 25.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5 39 Q 549 2,445 Q 8.8 16.0 Q Food Sales .......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New Jersey Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 10.21 11.42 9.15 8.41 7.53 6.74 1984-2012 Residential 14.48 15.21 14.54 12.84 11.78 11.09 1967-2012 Commercial 12.10 13.38 10.20 10.11 9.51 8.50 1967-2012 Industrial 9.63 12.76 8.96 9.63 9.23 7.87 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- -- 1994-2012 Electric Power 8.17 10.78 5.31 5.66 5.24 3.63 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1996 Withdrawals 1967-1996 Net Withdrawals 1967-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 7,290 5,792 4,919 3,304 5,018 3,483 1980-2012 Withdrawals 5,513 5,971 4,425 3,693 4,404 3,278 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 1,776 -178 494 -390 613 205 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption

222

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2008\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2006-2030 (percent) 2005 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.99 10.80 12.71 13.05 13.76 12.89 12.12 0.5% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.33 2.36 2.21 2.22 2.27 2.24 2.18 -0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.60 19.04 19.61 19.91 20.28 20.24 20.41 0.3% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.19 23.79 23.31 24.33 25.61 28.43 31.16 1.1% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16 8.21 8.31 8.41 9.15 9.68 9.89 0.8% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 2.89 2.92 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.2% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.83 2.97 4.11 4.44

223

" East North Central",12.3,13.2,14.3,15.1,15.1,16.3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years (Millions) " Number of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years (Millions) " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",72.2,77.7,81.3,84.6,84.9,98.9 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",13.9,15,15.2,16,14.7,17.7 " New England",3.8,3.7,3.6,3.9,4.1,5.4 " Middle Atlantic ",10.1,11.3,11.6,12.1,10.7,12.3 " Midwest ",18.3,19.5,20.4,21.1,21.6,23.6 " East North Central",12.3,13.2,14.3,15.1,15.1,16.3 " West North Central ",6,6.4,6.1,6,6.5,7.3 " South",24.7,27,28.3,29.5,30.2,36.2 " South Atlantic",12.2,13.8,14.2,15,15.4,20.4 " East South Central",4.9,5.2,5.4,6,5.4,5.7 " West South Central",7.6,8,8.7,8.6,9.4,10.1

224

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

225

X:\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1997 1997 .................................... 14.84 14.88 15.02 16.44 19.22 17.96 19.27 17.77 15.39 1998 January ........................... 11.67 10.52 10.64 W 15.21 13.88 15.28 13.88 10.34 February ......................... 9.15 8.97 9.11 W 14.36 13.22 14.68 13.04 9.50 March .............................. 8.48 7.79 8.06 W 12.99 12.11 13.49 11.84 8.44 April ................................ 8.14 8.18 8.42 W 12.92 12.52 13.81 12.04 8.88 May ................................. 8.38 8.16 8.37 W 12.97 11.88 13.32 11.85 8.45 June ................................ 7.74 7.50 7.62 W 11.56 10.49 11.83 10.65 7.07 July ................................. 8.25 8.23 8.51 W 11.93 11.12 12.30 11.06 7.73 August ............................ 8.39 8.23 8.46 W 11.53 10.70 11.81 10.73 7.23 September ...................... 8.69 9.19

226

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 6. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Expenditures (million dollars) Natural Gas Expenditures (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................... 3,553 4,844 3,866 2,261 8.56 7.09 8.40 7.28 0.39 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 456 782 599 317 9.84 8.57 9.21 7.94 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 348 427 582 332 9.15 7.54 9.08 7.60 0.56 0.45 0.43 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 502 945 656 422 9.74 7.96 9.41 7.02 0.43 0.39 0.32 0.31

227

Join The Conversation: Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with U.S. CTO Todd Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Join The Conversation: Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with U.S. CTO Join The Conversation: Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with U.S. CTO Todd Park Join The Conversation: Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with U.S. CTO Todd Park April 16, 2012 - 9:15am Q&A Submit your Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A questions for U.S. CTO Todd Park Ask Us Addthis Join our Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A Today (@ENERGY) at 2 PM EDT by following the hashtag #appsforenergy. Join our Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A Today (@ENERGY) at 2 PM EDT by following the hashtag #appsforenergy. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Join us for a live Twitter Q&A (@Energy) this Tuesday, April 17, at 2 PM EDT Submit questions now using hashtag #appsforenergy Have questions about Apps for Energy? Want to know more about government

228

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used elsewhere. 1) 2005 average stock age is for gas- and oil-fired steam and hot water boilers. Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 10 for service and average lifetimes, and units to be replaced; ASHRAE, 1999 ASHRAE Handbook: HVAC Applications, Table 3, p. 35.3 for boilers service lifetimes; and

229

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Total Lighting Technology Electricity Consumption, by Sector (TWh per Year) (1) Incandescent 136 78% 15 4% 0 0% 4 4% 156 22% General (A-type, Decorative) 112 64% 9 3% 0 0% - - 122 17% Reflector 19 11% 5 2% 0 0% - - 24 3% Miscellaneous 5 3% 0 0% 0 0% 4 4% 9 1% Halogen 12 7% 15 4% 0 0% 1 1% 28 4% General 1 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 1 0% Reflector 8 5% 7 2% 0 0% - - 15 2% Low Voltage Display 1 0% 7 2% - - - - 8 1% Miscellaneous 2 1% 1 0% 0 0% 1 1% 4 1% Compact Fluorescent 15 9% 16 5% 0 0% 1 1% 32 5% General (Screw, Pin) 13 7% 13 4% 0 0% - - 26 4% Reflector 1 1% 3 1% 0 0% - - 4 1% Miscellaneous 1 1% - - 0 0% 1 1% 2 0% Linear Fluorescent 10 6% 250 72% 23 40% 10 9% 294 42% T5 0 0% 16 5% 2 4% - - 19 3% T8 1 1% 124 35% 12 21% - - 137 20% T12 7 4% 109 31% 9 15% - - 124 18% Miscellaneous 2 1% 2 0% 0 0% 10 9% 14 2% High Intensity Discharge 0 0% 49 14% 35 60% 98 83% 183 26% Mercury Vapor 0 0% 1 0% 4 7% 4 3% 9 1% Metal Halide 0 0% 43 12% 25 42% 29 25% 97 14% High Pressure Sodium 0 0% 5 1%

230

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Shares of U.S. Buildings Generic Quad (Percent) (1) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Other Total Nuclear Total 1980 39% 12% 31% 7% 4% 11% 7% 100% 1981 38% 11% 32% 7% 4% 11% 8% 100% 1982 37% 10% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1983 35% 10% 34% 9% 4% 13% 8% 100% 1984 35% 10% 34% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1985 34% 10% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1986 32% 10% 36% 7% 4% 11% 11% 100% 1987 32% 10% 37% 6% 4% 10% 11% 100% 1988 32% 10% 37% 5% 4% 9% 13% 100% 1989 32% 9% 36% 6% 5% 11% 12% 100% 1990 32% 8% 36% 7% 4% 10% 13% 100% 1991 32% 8% 36% 7% 4% 10% 14% 100% 1992 33% 8% 36% 6% 4% 10% 14% 100% 1993 33% 7% 37% 6% 4% 10% 13% 100% 1994 33% 7% 36% 5% 4% 9% 14% 100% 1995 33% 7% 36% 6% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1996 33% 7% 36% 7% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1997 33% 6% 38% 7% 3% 10% 13% 100% 1998 32% 6% 38% 6% 3% 9% 14% 100% 1999 32% 6% 38% 6% 3% 9% 15% 100% 2000 32% 6% 38% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2001 32% 6% 38% 4% 3% 7% 16% 100% 2002 33% 6% 38% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2003 32% 6% 38% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2004 32% 6% 38% 5% 3% 8%

231

Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,177.8 2,177.8 33,696.7 41,031.4 115,778.7 25,866.5 182,676.6 9,536.5 9,794.2 12,905.9 15,962.1 - 28,868.0 February ............................. 33,085.6 34,725.7 42,808.2 121,887.8 32,127.0 196,822.9 9,746.2 10,022.4 13,588.9 16,896.7 - 30,485.6 March .................................. 34,978.9 36,685.7 45,070.0 122,489.6 28,845.0 196,404.5 9,984.6 10,254.2 W 16,980.4 W 30,689.3 April .................................... 36,627.7 38,654.6 46,870.7 132,107.0 39,827.2 218,805.0 9,633.1 9,933.5 13,367.1 17,002.1 - 30,369.2 May ..................................... 38,548.0 40,338.1 48,651.6 137,813.8 38,767.1 225,232.5 9,234.8 9,508.1 12,618.4 16,543.3 - 29,161.6 June .................................... 39,265.8 40,954.4 48,139.0 137,339.2 43,089.0

232

Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,177.8 2,177.8 33,696.7 41,031.4 115,778.7 25,866.5 182,676.6 9,536.5 9,794.2 12,905.9 15,962.1 - 28,868.0 February ............................. 33,085.6 34,725.7 42,808.2 121,887.8 32,127.0 196,822.9 9,746.2 10,022.4 13,588.9 16,896.7 - 30,485.6 March .................................. 34,978.9 36,685.7 45,070.0 122,489.6 28,845.0 196,404.5 9,984.6 10,254.2 W 16,980.4 W 30,689.3 April .................................... 36,627.7 38,654.6 46,870.7 132,107.0 39,827.2 218,805.0 9,633.1 9,933.5 13,367.1 17,002.1 - 30,369.2 May ..................................... 38,548.0 40,338.1 48,651.6 137,813.8 38,767.1 225,232.5 9,234.8 9,508.1 12,618.4 16,543.3 - 29,161.6 June .................................... 39,265.8 40,954.4 48,139.0 137,339.2 43,089.0

233

X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 January ............................... 4.4 7.5 14.4 8.6 18.7 16.2 February ............................. 4.4 5.2 12.0 9.8 16.3 15.0 March .................................. 4.1 3.1 11.4 5.9 15.6 9.0 April .................................... 4.4 7.3 10.2 8.8 14.6 16.1 May ..................................... 4.7 5.7 9.2 3.9 13.9 9.6 June .................................... 4.1 3.2 8.3 5.2 12.4 8.4 July ..................................... 4.6 4.4 9.2 6.7 13.7 11.1 August ................................ 4.0 5.2 9.0 4.1 13.0 9.3 September .......................... 2.6 5.8 9.2 5.7 11.9 11.5 October ............................... 3.0 4.3 9.0 6.8 12.0 11.0 November ........................... 2.8 6.6 9.0 4.3 11.8 10.9 December ........................... 3.7 5.5 9.2 5.3 12.9 10.8 1999 .......................................

234

EIA Report 9/22/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

22, 4:00 pm See current 22, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/22/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/15/2008 Year Ago 9/21/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 120.92 115.46 5.46 95.71 81.62 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 270.38 285.42 -15.04 256.14 211.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 304.30 319.19 -14.89 279.12 225.62 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.66 7.94 -0.28 7.37 6.08 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to be blended with some type of oxygenate, now usually ethanol, to be turned into finished reformulated gasoline (RFG). Ethanol is not blended into the gasoline mixture until just before the gasoline is shipped to the retail stations. Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 22, the Minerals Management

235

U-085: OpenSSL DTLS Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: OpenSSL DTLS Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service 5: OpenSSL DTLS Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-085: OpenSSL DTLS Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service January 20, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: OpenSSL DTLS Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: Only DTLS applications using OpenSSL 1.0.0f and 0.9.8s are affected. ABSTRACT: A flaw in the fix to CVE-2011-4108 can be exploited in a denial of service attack. REFERNCE LINKS: CVE-2012-0050 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026548 OpenSSL Security Advisory [18 Jan 2011] OpenSSL News IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in OpenSSL. The fix to correct the Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) vulnerability referenced by CVE-2011-4108 introduced a flaw. A remote user can send specially crafted data to cause denial of service conditions on the target system.

236

index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Introduction to the C-Mod Experiment Introduction to the C-Mod Experiment Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links 2006 Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, January 25- 27, 2006 Wednesday, January 25, 2006 1:00 pm Executive Session Richard Groebner 1:15 pm Welcome & Charge Miklos Porkolab 1:25 pm Comments from DoE Adam Rosenberg 1:30 pm Program Overview Earl Marmar 2:30 pm C-Mod Research for Integrated Scenarios on ITER Amanda Hubbard 3:30 pm Break 3:40 pm C-Mod Facility and Contributions to ITER Jim Irby 4:40 pm Executive Session 5:10 pm Dinner (off-site) Thursday, January 26, 2006 8:30 am Macro-Stability Bob Granetz 9:15 am ICRF Steve Wukitch 10:00 am Lower Hybrid Ron Parker 10:30 am Break 10:45 am Plasma Boundary Bruce Lipschultz 11:30 am Pedestal Physics

237

U-007: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote Users  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote 7: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-007: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code October 10, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Version(s): 7.8, 7.8.0.1, 7.8.0.2, 7.9, 7.9.0.1, 7.9.0.2, 7.9.0.3, 8.0, 8.0.0.1, 8.0.0.2 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in IBM Rational AppScan. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. reference LINKS: IBM Security Advisory Document ID: 1515110 IBM Fix Pack Document ID: 4030774 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026154 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A high risk security vulnerability in the "Import functionality" of IBM

238

c22.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 16 56 31 2,344 3,994 2,047 6.7 13.9 15.3 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 15 58 46 2,060 4,018 2,953 7.5 14.3 15.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 19 69 53 2,113 3,911 2,993 9.2 17.7 17.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 21 57 27 2,030 3,427 1,593 10.5 16.6 17.2 Over 500,000 .................................... 18 65 29 1,566 2,986 1,357 11.4 21.9

239

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2ND SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three horizontal wells have been completed (St. Springdale & Trezil 9-15 HD, St. Springdale 13-14 HD, St. Springdale & Stedronsky 10-15 HD) and three more wells were spudded (St. Springdale & CSX 2-22 HD, St. Springdale & Mann 9-21 HD and St. Springdale 7-22 HD) in the Springdale play this past reporting period. All are horizontal wells in the Brown Niagaran. This brings the total wells in the play to 12 with seven wells contributing to a total daily production exceeding 350 bbls/day. Data from these wells has been converted from drillers logs (footage calls) and converted to Michigan GeoRef coordinates and plotted. The Gamma Ray data along the well bore was available since it was used to steer the tool during drilling and this data was superimposed on the well trajectories in an effort to help distinguish pay zones from unproductive rock. One new geochemical survey was conducted over the projected surface path of the State Springdale & Stedronsky 14-15 HD and a final project survey was planned over one of the unsurveyed wells. This will bring the total surveyed wells to five and should provide enough data to determine if the idea of only sampling along the well bore is a sound strategy.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Infra-Red Absorption of Brucite and Some Sulphates; Isotopic Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of an infra-red spectrometer the structure of the absorption band of brucite [Mg(OH)2] was studied. The region of greatest absorption was found to be at 2.48?. Besides this maximum there were small maxima of absorption located at 2.40?, 2.30?, 2.14?. The maxima at 2.48?, 240?, and 2.30? correspond approximately in position and absorption to the isotopes of Mg24, Mg25, and Mg26 as found by Aston. The small band at 2.14?, corresponds in position to Mg28. However, this isotope is not given. The work of Coblentz has been examined for the isotopic effect. In the reflection spectrum of nickel sulphate in solution there are two maxima located at 9.15? and 9.50?. The second is more intense. These maxima are probably due to Ni58 and Ni60. In the spectrum of potassium sulphate there are two maxima, one at 9.00? and the other at 9.40?. The maxima at 9.40? is much more intense. These two maxima are probably due to K39+41 and KR39 taken twice. Other sulphates in solution showed only one maximum. The sulphates of barium, strontium, and magnesium in the solid state also had complex maxima. As the light was unpolarized, these maxima might be due to pleochroism.

E. K. Plyler

1926-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9-15 9-15 9-15" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Quantum dot based memory devices: Current status and future prospect by simulation perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the simulation of floating gate MOSFET memory performance consists of Si/Ge/Si quantum dots for electronics storage nodes with higk-? material as the tunnel oxide. Heterostructure quantum dot was proposed to maintain the good memory performance without losing the long retention characteristic. As the results, retention time could be increase significantly without deteriorating the writing/erasing speed. By selected the dot size of 915nm and the tunnel oxide thickness of 2nm, the retention characteristic can reach up to 10{sup 9}s while the writing and erasing time at the order of 10{sup ?6}s. By replace the SiO{sub 2} tunnel oxide with high-? material such as HfO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} the leakage current due to the shrinkage of tunnel oxide thickness can be suppressed by the factor of 10 for the EOT lower than ?1nm. Moreover, the charge-trapping that generated by the defect at Si substrate and higk-? material interface are fully considered. We found that, the charge-trapping affects the retention time and memory operation performance. By increasing the charge-trapping depth and width, the memory operation time decrease significantly while the retention characteristic slightly improved.

Darma, Y., E-mail: yudi@fi.itb.ac.id; Rusydi, A., E-mail: yudi@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132, Indonesia and NUSNNI-NanoCore, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 and Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National U (Singapore)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Elastic Scattering of Protons by Deuterium Between 15 and 20 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of protons by deuterium have been measured at laboratory energies of 14.9, 15.5, 16.2, 17.1, 18.5, 19.0, 19.6, and 19.9 MeV. 17 angles between 21.8 and 150.9 c.m. were included in each distribution. Nine of the angles represent the zeros of the Legendre polynomials through l=4. Relative errors were about 0.8% on the average, and absolute errors were about 1.8%. In addition, relative angular distributions were taken at 16.2, 17.1, 18.5, and 19.1 MeV, including 51 angles between 9.8 and 167.0 c.m. These were normalized to the absolute data at c.m. angles between 30 and 54 and are in good agreement at the remaining angles. Smooth curves can be drawn through the data and no indications of strong resonant behavior are found in this energy range.

T. A. Cahill; J. Greenwood; H. Willmes; D. J. Shadoan

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Technetium Applicable to the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general aim of this project is to continue the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers the unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The new sensor concept combines the elements of electrochemistry, spectroscopy and selective partitioning into a single device that provides three levels of selectivity. The specific goal of this project is the development of a sensor for technetium (Tc) that is applicable to characterizing and monitoring the Vadose Zone and associated subsurface water at the Hanford site. The first goal is a sensor that determines technetium in the chemical form pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). This report summarizes work during 6/16/01-6/15/02 of a three-year project that began on 9/15/99. During this period our efforts have focused on four areas that are discussed in the following sections. Electrochemistry of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) at bare ITO and film-coated ITO electrodes; Enhancing sensitivity by increasing analyte absorptivity; Development and characterization of selective films; and Improved field portable spectroelectrochemical sensor.

William R. Heineman; Carl J. Seliskar; Samuel A. Bryan; Timothy L. Hubler

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

244

Seismo-ionospheric effects associated with 'Chelyabinsk' meteorite during the first 25 minutes after its fall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the properties of ionospheric irregularities elongated with Earth magnetic field during the first 25 minutes after the fall of the meteorite 'Chelyabinsk' experimentally observed with EKB radar of Russian segment of the SuperDARN. It is shown that 40 minutes before meteor fall the EKB radar started to observe powerful scattering from irregularities elongated with the Earth magnetic field in the F-layer. Scattering was observed for 80 minutes and stopped 40 minutes after the meteorite fall. During 9-15 minutes after the meteorite fall at ranges 400-1200 km from the explosion site a changes were observed in the spectral and amplitude characteristics of the scattered signal. This features were the sharp increase in the Doppler frequency shift of the scattered signal corresponding to the Doppler velocities about 600 m/s and the sharp increase of the scattered signal amplitude. This allows us to conclude that we detected the growth of small-scale ionospheric irregularities elongated with the Ea...

Berngardt, Oleg I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Landscape Cover and Second Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activities Activities Maintenance Sheet for 2005 Ford Escape 4WD VIN # 1FMCU96H15KE18237 Date Mileage Description Cost 6/7/2005 5,074 Changed oil using synthetic 5W20 $65.43 7/6/2005 10,349 Changed oil and rotated tires $43.96 7/28/2005 16,681 Changed oil $27.95 8/23/2005 21,937 15K service $361.49 9/15/2005 26,894 Changed oil and rotated tires $28.44 9/29/2005 29,329 Replaced windshield $213.20 10/18/2005 32,123 30K service and replaced AC filter and synthetic gear oil $644.44 11/17/2005 37,119 Preventative maintenance $28.44 1/9/2006 46,267 45K service $386.04 2/27/2006 55,266 Changed oil and rotated tires $29.99 4/4/2006 61,195 60K service $274.29 4/4/2006 61,195 Replaced rear left control arm, shield, and alignment $461.19 5/9/2006 67,473 Changed oil $30.28

246

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) June 2013 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2011 2011 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California

247

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2

248

Data:5c389d98-87eb-4270-9ff2-999612380cbe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9d98-87eb-4270-9ff2-999612380cbe 9d98-87eb-4270-9ff2-999612380cbe No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Idaho Power Co Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 98 - Residential and Small Farm Energy Credit Sector: Residential Description: APPLICABILITY This schedule is applicable to the Qualifying Electric Energy, as defined below, delivered to Customers taking service under Schedules 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 15, or 24. The Residential and Small Farm Energy Credit ("Credit") is the result of the Settlement Agreement between the Company and the Bonneville Power Administration ("BPA") Contract No. 11PB-12322. The Settlement Agreement provides for the determination of benefits during the period October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2028. This schedule shall expire when the benefits derived from the Settlement Agreement have been credited to Customers as provided for under this schedule.

249

table1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.2 2.2 77.7 81.3 84.6 84.9 98.9 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 13.9 15.0 15.2 16.0 14.7 17.7 New England........................................................ 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.1 5.4 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 10.1 11.3 11.6 12.1 10.7 12.3 Midwest ................................................................. 18.3 19.5 20.4 21.1 21.6 23.6 East North Central............................................... 12.3 13.2 14.3 15.1 15.1 16.3 West North Central ............................................. 6.0 6.4 6.1 6.0 6.5 7.3 South..................................................................... 24.7 27.0 28.3 29.5 30.2 36.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

250

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 18.8 22.4 37.0 33.4 9.7 -8.5 -17.7 -19.9 -17.0 -13.4 -15.2 -11.2 1992 3.5 -5.5 -31.8 -29.7 -19.1 -4.4 1.5 3.8 2.9 5.0 9.1 6.0 1993 8.3 -16.5 -29.1 -13.2 -5.0 -0.1 5.0 3.1 4.8 0.9 -1.5 -3.3 1994 -21.0 -19.2 13.5 27.9 24.0 18.3 16.9 15.8 5.8 6.1 2.3 5.6 1995 35.1 43.1 48.4 8.5 1.3 -0.3 -7.1 -8.1 -0.4 0.3 -7.1 -19.6 1996 -32.3 -32.6 -49.9 -39.0 -28.4 -18.3 -0.5 4.4 0.7 -0.2 3.9 26.8 1997 31.1 63.7 89.6 41.7 24.2 9.7 -4.5 -6.2 -2.2 -2.4 -0.3 -8.7 1998 5.7 9.8 22.4 52.3 49.3 32.7 23.0 11.1 3.1 4.1 12.5 17.6

251

Wholesale/Spot Henry Hub Spot Price ........  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wholesale/Spot Wholesale/Spot Henry Hub Spot Price ........ 2.52 2.35 2.97 3.50 3.59 4.13 3.66 3.83 3.92 3.67 3.92 4.08 2.83 3.81 3.90 Residential New England ...................... 13.08 14.05 16.86 13.62 13.05 13.88 17.27 14.17 14.04 15.15 18.40 15.22 13.73 13.84 14.91 Middle Atlantic .................... 11.34 13.46 16.92 11.76 10.98 13.32 17.88 13.58 12.80 14.60 18.94 14.39 12.20 12.56 13.95 E. N. Central ...................... 8.30 10.68 15.52 8.57 7.74 10.79 15.82 9.37 8.80 11.38 17.13 10.31 9.20 9.15 10.13 W. N. Central ..................... 8.45 11.99 16.39 9.08 8.10 10.47 17.24 9.38 8.79 11.27 17.99 10.23 9.60 9.35 10.11 S. Atlantic ........................... 12.37 17.68 22.08 12.24 11.10 15.05 22.27 13.49 12.56 18.03 24.66 14.95 13.71 13.12 14.77 E. S. Central ....................... 10.26 14.69 17.56 10.41 9.25 12.36 18.26 11.50

252

Natural Gas Imports Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

87 8.70 4.19 4.52 4.24 2.88 1985-2012 87 8.70 4.19 4.52 4.24 2.88 1985-2012 California -- 9.15 2.83 4.76 3.57 -- 2007-2012 Georgia 6.79 9.71 3.73 4.39 4.20 2.78 1999-2012 Idaho 6.31 7.88 3.86 4.19 3.90 2.59 1989-2012 Louisiana 6.98 9.76 3.89 4.84 7.57 7.98 1989-2012 Maine 7.57 9.77 4.48 4.94 4.40 3.45 1999-2012 Maryland 7.25 9.09 4.05 5.37 5.30 13.82 1999-2012 Massachusetts 7.32 10.34 5.90 4.86 4.77 3.69 1989-2012 Michigan 7.03 9.55 4.50 4.73 4.38 2.88 1989-2012 Minnesota 6.72 8.48 4.21 4.49 4.15 2.87 1989-2012 Mississippi -- -- -- -- 12.93 -- 2007-2012 Montana 6.66 8.22 3.88 4.13 3.75 2.45 1989-2012 New Hampshire 7.52 9.72 5.04 5.48 5.45 4.08 1999-2012 New York 7.43 9.36 4.67 5.43 4.96 3.83 1989-2012 North Dakota 6.75 8.72 3.92 4.41 4.04 2.72 1994-2012

253

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

254

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

255

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations Average Absolute Percent Error Variable AEO82 to AEO98 AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 2.8 2.9 3.0 2.9 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.5 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.0 3.2 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 Total Electricity Sales 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.4 2.5 2.4 Production Crude Oil Production 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.7 Natural Gas Production 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.4 4.4 Coal Production 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 Imports and Exports Net Petroleum Imports 9.5 8.8 8.4 7.9 7.4 7.5 Net Natural Gas Imports 16.7 16.0 15.9 15.8 15.8 15.4

256

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -4.2 -4.0 0.3 4.2 3.5 1.7 1.1 0.4 0.0 2.4 -3.8 -3.3 1992 -4.2 -4.8 -6.4 -12.6 -9.2 -7.2 -5.6 -3.3 -2.3 -2.3 -2.2 -6.6 1993 -24.0 -31.6 -36.3 -30.7 -24.7 -20.2 -17.4 -16.7 -14.3 -13.7 -11.6 -12.9 1994 -3.7 -1.1 10.0 6.3 -2.8 -4.3 -2.6 -1.9 -1.2 -0.2 0.0 4.9 1995 13.3 6.3 -0.8 -4.1 -24.0 -19.8 -17.7 -16.0 -15.8 -12.9 -15.3 -22.1 1996 -32.4 -34.1 -42.5 -37.1 -6.6 -2.1 2.0 3.5 5.3 3.1 3.2 8.3 1997 15.3 24.7 33.5 27.3 14.8 7.4 3.9 3.6 2.9 2.4 8.6 5.5 1998 12.9 22.3 23.5 24.2 18.8 14.7 8.2 4.3 2.2 2.3 -0.8 0.8

257

m019.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

430) 430) I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 + ) See our minireview in the 1994 edition and in this edition under the f 0 (500). K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1427 ± 4 ± 13 1 BUGG 10 RVUE S-matrix pole 1466.6± 0.7 ± 3.4 141k 2 BONVICINI 08A CLEO D + → K - π + π + ∼ 1412 3 LINK 07 FOCS 0 D + → K - K + π + 1461.0± 4.0 ± 2.1 54k 4 LINK 07B FOCS D + → K - π + π + 1406 ± 29 5 BUGG 06 RVUE 1435 ± 6 6 ZHOU 06 RVUE K p → K - π + n 1455 ± 20 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05Q BES2 ψ(2S) → γ π + π - K + K - 1456 ± 8 7 ZHENG 04 RVUE K - p → K - π + n ∼ 1419 8 BUGG 03 RVUE 11 K - p → K - π + n ∼ 1440 9 LI 03 RVUE 11 K - p → K - π + n 1459 ± 9 15k 10 AITALA 02 E791 D + → K - π + π + ∼ 1440 11 JAMIN 00 RVUE K p → K p 1436 ± 8 12 BARBERIS 98E OMEG 450

258

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

259

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 1985 105.4 48.8 22.6 176.8 1986 106.9 44.2 18.1 169.2 1987 108.2 40.9 18.0 167.1 1988 110.3 41.8 18.0 170.1 1989 110.2 42.9 19.7 172.8 1990 110.9 39.0 18.2 168.2 1991 113.7 39.2 17.0 169.9 1992 111.1 39.9 15.6 166.7 1993 117.2 43.2 15.2 175.6 1994 117.1 43.0 14.8 174.9 1995 118.9 39.8 14.0 172.7 1996 120.5 44.2 17.0 181.8 1997 118.7 45.3 16.0 180.0 1998 120.8 40.0 12.7 173.5 1999 119.2 40.3 14.5 174.0

260

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Other Total Nuclear Total (quad) 1980 41% 12% 28% 7% 6% 13% 6% 14.84 1981 40% 10% 29% 6% 6% 13% 7% 14.51 1982 39% 9% 30% 8% 7% 14% 7% 14.95 1983 37% 9% 31% 8% 7% 15% 8% 14.86 1984 37% 10% 31% 7% 7% 14% 8% 15.49 1985 36% 10% 32% 6% 7% 13% 9% 15.69 1986 34% 10% 32% 7% 6% 13% 10% 15.47 1987 34% 10% 33% 6% 6% 12% 10% 15.82 1988 34% 10% 33% 5% 6% 11% 12% 16.62 1989 35% 10% 32% 6% 7% 12% 11% 17.24 1990 34% 8% 34% 6% 5% 11% 13% 16.54 1991 34% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 17.03 1992 35% 8% 33% 5% 6% 11% 13% 17.05 1993 35% 8% 34% 6% 5% 11% 12% 17.89 1994 35% 8% 33% 5% 5% 10% 13% 17.79 1995 35% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 18.31 1996 35% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 19.27 1997 35% 8% 35% 7% 4% 11% 12% 18.71 1998 34% 7% 36% 6% 4% 10% 13% 18.57 1999 34% 8% 35% 6% 4% 10% 14% 19.20 2000 34% 8% 35% 5% 4% 9% 14% 20.06 2001 35% 8% 35% 4% 4% 7% 14% 19.65 2002 34% 7% 35% 5% 4% 8% 14% 20.52 2003 34% 7% 36% 5% 4% 9% 14% 20.75 2004 34% 8% 36% 5% 4% 8% 14% 20.76 2005 34% 7% 36%

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261

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 Federal Government Water Usage 5 Federal Government Water Usage March 2012 8.5.1 Federal Water Consumption Intensity and Costs (Millions of Gallons) Agency Total Source(s): 164,382.9 536,301.9 3,129,134.9 52.5 FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs FY 2007, Table 9, p. 26, Jan. 2010. HUD 21.8 139.1 1,432.0 15.2 RRB 5.5 19.5 346.9 15.9 SSA 125.0 617.1 9,262.0 13.5 Archives 107.9 552.9 4,062.0 26.6 State 169.0 762.2 4,476.7 37.8 EPA 168.1 1,196.0 3,723.3 45.2 Treasury 431.1 1,795.5 12,049.6 35.8 Commerce 352.1 1,571.2 13,627.9 25.8 TVA 733.0 2,248.2 27,969.8 26.2 DOT 464.1 3,002.8 25,722.1 18.0 DHS 1,522.8 12,442.9 45,556.7 33.4 Labor 1,029.0 4,816.3 20,335.8 50.6 NASA 2,036.5 5,085.8 38,896.2 52.4 HHS 1,799.7 11,814.7 31,338.4 57.4 GSA 2,651.2 18,104.9 176,414.5 15.0 USDA 2,150.9 4,876.0 57,480.9 37.4 USPS

262

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 11.0 11.6 2.7% Other (8) 2.7 0.3 7.7 1.2 9.2 27.3 39.2 9.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 6.2 5.2 5.2 11.9 23.4 5.4% Total 86.0 22.3 0.9 18.5 1.8 43.5 0.1 301.6 431.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.6 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($11.0

263

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 272.9 49.0 6.7 18.7 2.6 77.0 6.2 128.2 484.3 21.3% Space Cooling 2.3 340.5 342.8 15.1% Lighting 334.1 334.1 14.7% Water Heating 91.9 9.2 4.6 13.7 98.5 204.1 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 149.8 149.8 6.6% Electronics (6) 143.0 143.0 6.3% Ventilation (7) 95.2 95.2 4.2% Computers 68.2 68.2 3.0% Wet Cleaning (8) 2.9 57.8 60.8 2.7% Cooking 20.9 1.9 1.9 36.5 59.4 2.6% Other (9) 15.8 0.9 19.1 3.8 23.9 158.4 198.1 8.7% Adjust to SEDS (10) 36.2 18.4 18.4 75.4 129.9 5.7% Total 442.9 77.5 6.7 44.3 6.4 134.8 6.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1685.7 2269.6 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions

264

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

265

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2025 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 173.9 27.9 15.2 1.6 44.7 0.6 73.2 292.3 25.1% Space Cooling 0.0 177.2 177.2 15.2% Water Heating 70.2 3.5 2.5 6.0 83.7 159.9 13.8% Lighting 74.1 74.1 6.4% Refrigeration (5) 75.8 75.8 6.5% Electronics (6) 58.7 58.7 5.1% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.3 47.9 51.2 4.4% Cooking 11.7 1.6 1.6 20.8 34.2 2.9% Computers 37.6 37.6 3.2% Other (8) 12.4 12.4 189.1 201.5 17.3% Total 259.1 31.3 31.8 1.6 64.7 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 838.1 1,162.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

266

California Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6.62 8.38 3.96 4.87 1967-2010 6.62 8.38 3.96 4.87 1967-2010 Imports -- 9.15 2.83 4.76 3.57 -- 2007-2012 Exports 6.53 8.06 3.76 4.51 4.18 2.90 1997-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.82 8.11 4.17 4.86 4.47 3.46 1984-2012 Residential 11.57 12.75 9.43 9.92 9.93 9.14 1967-2012 Commercial 10.20 11.75 7.75 8.30 8.29 7.05 1967-2012 Industrial 9.07 10.80 6.56 7.02 7.04 5.77 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 7.72 11.32 7.61 5.55 7.32 7.01 1990-2012 Electric Power 6.72 8.23 4.44 4.99 4.71 3.68 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,740 2,406 2,773 2,647 2,934 1977-2011 Adjustments 33 -6 11 10 923 1977-2011 Revision Increases 355 263 259 548 1,486 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 273 491 189 451 1,889 1977-2011

267

Modeling and Analysis Papers - Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation > Table 1 Evaluation > Table 1 Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for AEO Forecast Evaluation, 1996 to 2002 Average Absolute Percent Error Variable AEO82 to AEO97 AEO82 to AEO98 AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.9 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.8 2.9 2.8 2.9 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.5 Total Coal Consumption 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.3 3.5 3.6 Total Electricity Sales 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.4 2.5 Production Crude Oil Production 4.2 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 Natural Gas Production 5.0 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.4 Coal Production 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.6 Imports and Exports Net Petroleum Imports 10.1 9.5 8.8 8.4 7.9 7.4 Net Natural Gas Imports 17.4 16.7 16.0 15.9 15.8 15.8 Net Coal Exports

268

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 1996 ................................ 24.1 25.4 17.8 108.5 27.1 153.4 5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 1997 January ....................... 20.6 22.0 14.8 98.3 26.4 139.6 4.7 4.9 3.7 11.5 - 15.1 February ..................... 22.1 23.7 15.4 102.9 31.2 149.5 5.0 5.2 3.8 11.9 - 15.7 March .......................... 24.0 25.5 16.8 106.4 27.7 150.9 5.5 5.7 4.0 12.2 W 16.2 April ............................ 25.1 26.9 18.2 111.8 26.9 156.9 5.8 5.9 4.2 12.9 - 17.0 May ............................. 24.7 26.0 17.7 112.7 26.3 156.7 5.7 5.8 4.2 13.0 - 17.1 June ............................ 25.6 26.9 17.7 115.4 22.1 155.2 5.9 6.1 4.2 13.3 - 17.4 July ............................. 27.8 29.1 17.2 123.4 25.2 165.8 6.4 6.6 4.1 14.4 - 18.5 August ........................ 27.3 28.7 17.3 119.9 24.7 161.9 6.2 6.4 4.0 13.5 - 17.6 September ..................

269

Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1998 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999 43.0 55.3 41.7 61.2 59.6 131.5 70.6 38.1 29.2 25.1 16.0 8.6 2000 5.3 -3.2 12.8 21.0 16.7 -19.5 -34.7 -42.4 -50.4 -50.8 -41.4 -27.6 2001 -9.8 9.3 8.4 8.3 41.3 71.7 80.1 97.0 109.6 99.9 12.1 -3.5 2002 3.9 15.1 32.5 54.2 19.0 -2.5 -9.0 -17.3 -22.6 -28.6 -14.4 -14.2 2003 -37.6 -54.6 -65.2 -72.4 -65.7 -53.4 -40.1 -24.0 -23.2 -15.3 -0.8 -12.8 2004 -15.0 -0.5 24.1 74.4 61.1 82.6 24.4 10.6 11.2 6.1 3.7 8.9

270

c26.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,553 3,553 4,844 3,866 2,261 8.56 7.09 8.40 7.28 0.39 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 456 782 599 317 9.84 8.57 9.21 7.94 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 348 427 582 332 9.15 7.54 9.08 7.60 0.56 0.45 0.43 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 502 945 656 422 9.74 7.96 9.41 7.02 0.43 0.39 0.32 0.31 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 408 738 402 317 9.14 6.44 8.60 7.24 0.42 0.33 0.25 0.27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 531 662 493 182 9.08 7.04 8.39 7.26 0.32 0.34 0.23 0.19 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 454 573 555 156 6.94 6.66 Q 6.59 0.27 0.32 0.25 0.17 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 457 423 286 178 7.64 5.97 7.05 6.46 0.29 0.25 0.20 0.18 Over 500,000 ....................................

271

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Basic Parameter Estimation of Binary Neutron Star Systems by the Advanced LIGO/Virgo Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the next five years, it is expected that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will have reached a sensitivity sufficient to enable the routine detection of gravitational waves. Beyond the initial detection, the scientific promise of these instruments relies on the effectiveness of our physical parameter estimation capabilities. A major part of this effort has been toward the detection and characterization of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence, e.g., the coalescence of binary neutron stars. While several previous studies have investigated the accuracy of parameter estimation with advanced detectors, the majority have relied on approximation techniques such as the Fisher Matrix which are insensitive to the non-Gaussian nature of the gravitational wave posterior distribution function. Here we report average statistical uncertainties that will be achievable for strong detection candidates (S/N = 20) over a comprehensive sample of source parameters. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based parameter estimation software developed by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration with the goal of updating the previously quoted Fisher Matrix bounds. We find the recovery of the individual masses to be fractionally within 9% (15%) at the 68% (95%) credible intervals for equal-mass systems, and within 1.9% (3.7%) for unequal-mass systems. We also find that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will constrain the locations of binary neutron star mergers to a median uncertainty of 5.1 deg2 (13.5 deg2) on the sky. This region is improved to 2.3 deg2 (6 deg2) with the addition of the proposed LIGO India detector to the network. We also report the average uncertainties on the luminosity distances and orbital inclinations of strong detections that can be achieved by different network configurations.

Carl L. Rodriguez; Benjamin Farr; Vivien Raymond; Will M. Farr; Tyson B. Littenberg; Diego Fazi; Vicky Kalogera

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine among women free from occupational exposure and their relations to renal tubular function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the relations among total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine, together with potential effects of methylmercury intake on renal tubular function, we determined their levels, and urinary N-acetyl-{beta}-d-glucosaminidase activity (NAG) and {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin (AMG) in 59 women free from occupational exposures, and estimated daily mercury intakes from fish and other seafood using a food frequency questionnaire. Mercury levels (mean+/-SD) in the women were 1.51+/-0.91{mu}g/g in hair, 0.59+/-0.32{mu}g/g in toenail, and 0.86+/-0.66{mu}g/g creatinine in urine; and, there were positive correlations among them (P<0.001). The daily mercury intake of 9.15+/-7.84{mu}g/day was significantly correlated with total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine (r=0.551, 0.537, and 0.604, P<0.001). Among the women, the NAG and AMG were positively correlated with both the daily mercury intake and mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine (P<0.01); and, these relations were almost similar when using multiple regression analysis to adjust for possible confounders such as urinary cadmium (0.47+/-0.28{mu}g/g creatinine) and smoking status. In conclusion, mercury resulting from fish consumption can explain total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine to some degree (about 30%), partly through the degradation into the inorganic form, and it may confound the renal tubular effect of other nephrotoxic agents. Also, the following equation may be applicable to the population neither with dental amalgam fillings nor with occupational exposures: [hair mercury ({mu}g/g)]=2.44x[toenail mercury ({mu}g/g)].

Ohno, Tomoko [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Sakamoto, Mineshi [Department of Epidemiology, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata 867-0008 (Japan); Kurosawa, Tomoko [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Dakeishi, Miwako [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Iwata, Toyoto [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Murata, Katsuyuki [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan)]. E-mail: winestem@med.akita-u.ac.jp

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Prediction of the digestible and metabolizable energy content of wheat milling by-products for growing pigs from chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thirty samples of wheat milling by-products (wheat bran, wheat middlings, wheat shorts, wheat red dog, wheat feed flour), collected from 11 flour mills, were fed to growing pigs to determine their digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) content and to establish equations for predicting their DE and ME content based on chemical analysis. The basal diet was based on corn and soybean meal while the other 30 experimental diets contained 290.4g/kg wheat milling by-products added at the expense of corn and soybean meal. The 31 diets were fed to 96 growing pigs (BW=61.93.2kg) according to a completely randomized design during two successive periods. During each period, the 30 experimental diets were fed to three pigs and the basal diet was fed to six pigs, resulting in 6 replications per experimental diet and 12 replications for the basal diet over the two periods. The chemical composition of the 30 samples was variable, and starch and fiber content had a strong negative correlation (r=?0.96 to ?0.99 for CF and ADF, respectively). The DE content of wheat feed flour, wheat red dog, wheat shorts, wheat middlings and wheat bran averaged 17.4, 16.9, 15.2, 12.5 and 12.0MJ/kg DM, respectively. From the stepwise regression analysis, a series of DE and ME prediction equations were generated. The best fit equations for wheat milling by-products were: DE (MJ/kg DM)=19.2?(0.016aNDF) with R2=0.94, RSD=0.58 and Pcontent varied substantially and various correlated single predictors (aNDF, ash, CF, starch, etc.) can be used to accurately predict the DE and ME content when fed to growing pigs.

Q. Huang; C.X. Shi; Y.B. Su; Z.Y. Liu; D.F. Li; L. Liu; C.F. Huang; X.S. Piao; C.H. Lai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A SEARCH FOR L/T TRANSITION DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 AND WISE: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEARBY OBJECTS INCLUDING TWO CANDIDATE SPECTROSCOPIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present initial results from a wide-field (30,000 deg{sup 2}) search for L/T transition brown dwarfs within 25 pc using the Pan-STARRS1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) surveys. Previous large-area searches have been incomplete for L/T transition dwarfs, because these objects are faint in optical bands and have near-infrared (near-IR) colors that are difficult to distinguish from background stars. To overcome these obstacles, we have cross-matched the Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-IR) catalogs to produce a unique multi-wavelength database for finding ultracool dwarfs. As part of our initial discoveries, we have identified seven brown dwarfs in the L/T transition within 9-15 pc of the Sun. The L9.5 dwarf PSO J140.2308+45.6487 and the T1.5 dwarf PSO J307.6784+07.8263 (both independently discovered by Mace et al.) show possible spectroscopic variability at the Y and J bands. Two more objects in our sample show evidence of photometric J-band variability, and two others are candidate unresolved binaries based on their spectra. We expect our full search to yield a well-defined, volume-limited sample of L/T transition dwarfs that will include many new targets for study of this complex regime. PSO J307.6784+07.8263 in particular may be an excellent candidate for in-depth study of variability, given its brightness (J = 14.2 mag) and proximity (11 pc)

Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deacon, Niall R. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dupuy, Trent J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Redstone, Joshua [Facebook, 335 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10017-4677 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

m019.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 K ∗ 0 (1430) I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 + ) See our minireview in the 1994 edition and in this edition under the NODE=M019 f 0 (500). K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS K ∗ 0 (1430) MASS NODE=M019M NODE=M019M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE 1425 ± 50 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1427 ± 4 ± 13 1 BUGG 10 RVUE S-matrix pole 1466.6 ± 0.7 ± 3.4 141k 2 BONVICINI 08A CLEO D + → K - π + π + ∼ 1412 3 LINK 07 FOCS 0 D + → K - K + π + 1461.0 ± 4.0 ± 2.1 54k 4 LINK 07B FOCS D + → K - π + π + 1406 ± 29 5 BUGG 06 RVUE 1435 ± 6 6 ZHOU 06 RVUE K p → K - π + n 1455 ± 20 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05Q BES2 ψ(2S) → γ π + π - K + K - 1456 ± 8 7 ZHENG 04 RVUE K - p → K - π + n ∼ 1419 8 BUGG 03 RVUE 11 K - p → K - π + n ∼ 1440 9 LI 03 RVUE 11 K - p → K - π + n 1459 ± 9 15k 10 AITALA 02 E791 D + → K - π + π + ∼

278

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.15 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30 2.44 2.60 2.85 3.12 3.47 3.84 4.31 4.81 5.28 5.68

279

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix E Table E2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 46.5 48.1 48.1 48.4 49.4 51.5 0.3 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.0 34.1 36.0 37.8 39.7 41.7 1.1 Coal 21.3 22.5 20.2 20.8 21.2 21.5 22.0 22.4 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 10.8 10.9 0.5 Other 11.9 11.9 13.8 14.9 15.9 16.8 18.1 20.3 1.8 Total 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 28.4 30.0 30.5 31.2 32.0 32.7 0.2 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.6 21.6 22.0 23.5 24.9 26.4 0.9 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.3 12.2 11.9 11.7 11.4 11.1 -0.3 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.5 17.3 18.0 18.7 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia

280

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.12 10.33 10.54 10.73 10.94 11.15 11.32 11.50 11.69 11.89 12.09 12.29 12.47 Electric Other 20.33 20.50 20.66 20.83 21.03 21.25 21.50 21.76 22.04 22.32 22.61 22.90 23.18 Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Natural Gas Other 55.72 56.43 57.18 57.89 58.61 59.33 60.08 60.87 61.68 62.49 63.35 64.23 65.04 Distillate 9.38 9.36 9.34 9.31 9.29 9.26 9.24 9.22 9.20 9.19 9.17 9.15 9.13 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 4.69 4.69 4.70 4.71 4.71 4.70 4.70 4.70 4.70 4.70 4.69 4.69 4.69 Kerosene 0.93 0.92 0.91 0.90 0.88 0.87 0.86 0.85 0.84 0.83 0.82 0.81 0.80 Wood Stoves 2.14 2.13 2.11 2.10 2.09 2.07 2.06 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.00 1.99 1.98 Geothermal Heat Pumps 0.38 0.39 0.40 0.41 0.42 0.43 0.44

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281

New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.42 3.13 3.55 4.16 4.14 4.02 3.92 3.87 4.18 4.69 4.94 5.21 2003 6.29 7.26 8.71 6.18 W 6.77 5.89 5.67 5.54 5.40 5.41 6.11 2004 7.16 6.55 6.06 6.18 6.77 6.87 6.60 6.27 5.72 6.72 7.46 7.88 2005 7.75 7.27 7.54 7.83 7.31 7.58 8.11 9.36 12.19 13.58 12.06 12.17 2006 11.74 9.15 7.95 7.93 7.52 7.35 7.20 8.10 6.62 5.95 8.28 8.48 2007 7.68 8.86 8.65 8.69 8.62 8.52 7.68 7.49 6.80 7.55 8.19 9.52 2008 10.91 10.84 10.70 11.15 12.45 14.25 13.45 10.10 8.93 7.97 7.99 8.52 2009 8.60 6.55 5.38 4.74 4.72 4.77 4.63 4.20 3.83 5.09 5.13 7.08 2010 8.32 7.42 6.01 5.09 5.24 5.71 5.69 5.38 4.82 4.54 4.89 7.07

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2001 1, 2001 From Friday, June 1 to Friday, June 8, cash prices fell again, as cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed from midweek on in the northern half of the nation as well as in some areas along the Gulf of Mexico (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Price declines in cash markets ranged from pennies to over $1.00 per MMBtu, with most points down 9-15 cents. At the Henry Hub, the price fell 8 cents to $3.63 per MMBtu. The near-month (July delivery) futures contract lost less than 1 cent for the week, settling on Friday, June 8 at $3.922 per MMBtu. Once again, weekly storage injections topped 100 Bcf, approaching or exceeding regional records for the report week. Prices: It was a week of contrasting price movements in cash markets. Spot prices responded on Monday to demand-increasing weather extremes (hot weather in Texas and the Gulf Coast; near-winter temperatures in the Rockies) with increases of 20 cents or more at most locations. Further gains of a nickel to a dime occurred on Tuesday as Tropical Storm Allison headed for landfall in the western Gulf. However, gains began to erode Wednesday with the American Gas Association's (AGA) announcement of storage injections of 117 Bcf. Spot prices continued to trend down for the rest of the week. Allison was no threat to production assets, and her heavy rains and persistent cloud cover over much of east Texas, Louisiana, and southern Arkansas eased utility demand significantly. Price drops were most pronounced in California, where moderate temperatures and adequate electricity supplies obliterated early-week gains. Both PG&E and SOCAL issued high-inventory operational flow orders (OFO) on Friday. On SOCAL, prices were down nearly $6 from their Tuesday highs to $3.54 per MMBtu on Friday. This is the first time since May 2000 that the SOCAL price was less than at the Henry Hub. At Rockies price points, where the effects of warming temperatures, lack of demand in California, and major pipeline maintenance projects had gas backing up throughout the region, prices fell under $2.00 per MMBtu at several locations for the first time since early November 1999. The average spot price in the Rockies on Friday was $1.76 per MMBtu.

283

Working Gas % Change from Year Ago  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21.3 -15.2 -9.5 -5.7 -3.5 -2.9 1973-2013 21.3 -15.2 -9.5 -5.7 -3.5 -2.9 1973-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 2013-2013 Lower 48 States -21.9 -15.7 -10.0 -6.3 -4.0 -3.5 2011-2013 Alabama 5.0 -4.8 -4.5 -0.2 15.5 -12.0 1996-2013 Arkansas -42.1 -34.7 -31.2 -24.4 -23.7 -23.0 1991-2013 California -2.0 -3.3 0.1 7.9 9.3 3.4 1991-2013 Colorado 2.8 3.6 4.7 3.9 2.6 3.0 1991-2013 Illinois -16.5 -7.4 -5.2 -6.3 -3.1 -3.2 1991-2013 Indiana -21.2 -17.8 -14.8 -5.0 -0.9 -5.2 1991-2013 Iowa -6.2 16.6 24.3 16.6 5.2 -1.8 1991-2013 Kansas -38.9 -29.7 -17.9 -10.2 -8.3 -7.6 1991-2013 Kentucky -30.6 -24.1 -17.7 -15.8 -12.7 -10.5 1991-2013 Louisiana -26.6 -21.0 -10.2 -4.3 -2.3 1.0 1991-2013 Maryland -40.2 -26.0 -17.1 -4.8 1.5 0.8 1991-2013 Michigan -35.7 -26.7 -19.2 -13.9 -9.7 -6.9 1991-2013

284

Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W 3.61 3.49 3.34 W W W W 2003 5.86 7.31 7.89 5.81 W 6.47 5.74 5.45 5.29 5.20 4.92 W 2004 6.74 6.22 5.99 6.14 6.81 6.91 6.51 6.17 5.49 6.77 7.11 7.48 2005 6.74 6.70 7.20 7.78 7.15 7.46 7.96 9.15 13.07 W 12.25 13.64 2006 11.64 8.69 8.11 7.77 7.25 6.97 6.83 7.95 6.96 5.94 7.94 9.06 2007 6.80 8.49 7.98 8.14 8.25 8.35 7.26 7.07 6.30 7.26 7.76 7.79 2008 8.36 8.95 9.93 10.78 12.26 13.21 12.68 9.71 8.70 7.78 7.20 7.03 2009 6.41 5.09 4.57 4.06 4.03 4.24 4.12 3.71 3.30 4.22 4.38 W 2010 6.43 5.64 5.45 4.27 4.53 4.92 5.00 4.86 4.14 4.01 3.97 4.58 2011 4.75 4.62 4.18 4.51 4.63 4.79 4.68 4.46 4.23 W 3.65 W

285

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 32.2 25.0 16.8 19.7 13.2 12.9 38.9 31.5 31.7 41.7 48.4 68.2 2002 58.3 44.3 59.1 37.8 44.2 40.0 17.5 18.2 19.5 21.2 23.0 28.8 2003 25.6 28.9 20.3 22.8 14.8 13.2 13.6 11.9 12.5 15.8 23.9 21.7 2004 21.4 23.6 14.9 15.1 12.4 11.3 10.7 11.5 13.4 15.9 20.9 22.6 2005 24.3 25.3 17.8 18.4 14.8 14.1 9.6 12.3 13.6 15.9 18.3 19.5 2006 20.9 21.8 22.3 14.7 14.8 11.9 11.7 10.6 11.5 16.9 16.6 23.7 2007 22.1 26.8 17.9 16.6 14.8 11.6 11.3 10.2 10.6 13.6 20.4 25.3 2008 27.5 26.4 21.5 17.5 17.4 9.7 10.4 9.2 8.1 11.3 23.4 26.0 2009 21.4 23.7 19.2 19.9 13.9 11.5 8.7 9.4 11.2 16.2 20.4 26.7 2010 23.5 26.8 23.1 19.6 18.0 13.4 12.7 11.0 10.9 13.6 22.0 22.3

286

Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.06 8.02 7.44 7.27 7.13 6.24 5.24 5.91 5.76 4.85 5.65 6.48 2002 4.76 4.46 4.16 4.65 4.75 4.09 4.55 4.44 4.31 5.33 5.39 6.62 2003 7.22 7.30 7.18 8.70 7.88 8.59 7.80 8.62 8.64 9.10 8.92 9.18 2004 9.08 9.01 9.15 9.19 9.31 9.92 10.11 10.32 9.93 9.97 10.23 10.38 2005 10.29 10.34 10.29 10.43 10.86 11.24 11.49 12.26 11.38 11.18 12.25 13.32 2006 13.48 13.31 13.34 13.64 13.61 13.21 13.76 13.31 13.51 13.52 12.95 12.38 2007 12.42 12.43 12.33 12.45 12.53 12.64 12.96 12.95 12.72 12.81 12.70 12.65 2008 12.62 12.50 12.49 12.75 12.99 13.09 13.23 14.14 14.05 14.14 14.45 13.37 2009 12.38 12.68 12.47 11.64 11.44 12.39 13.40 12.89 13.09 13.94 13.30 12.96

287

West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.80 6.57 5.31 6.25 5.66 4.27 3.80 3.63 3.48 3.63 4.17 5.02 2002 3.58 3.44 3.71 4.37 4.16 4.35 3.99 3.98 3.97 4.59 5.11 5.12 2003 6.19 8.02 10.81 6.04 6.23 6.97 6.29 5.65 5.91 5.62 5.80 6.20 2004 7.68 7.28 6.44 6.79 7.54 8.37 7.29 7.40 6.51 7.04 9.18 9.46 2005 8.04 8.03 7.97 9.03 8.35 7.60 7.84 9.27 12.90 16.67 16.45 13.33 2006 13.72 10.38 9.07 9.15 8.96 7.38 7.35 8.66 8.32 5.66 8.83 10.09 2007 7.56 8.73 9.64 9.38 9.24 9.42 8.74 7.53 6.65 7.88 8.80 8.80 2008 8.84 9.86 10.84 11.54 13.21 13.92 15.57 11.32 10.20 9.29 8.43 8.74 2009 8.11 6.67 5.70 5.20 4.77 4.94 5.16 4.62 4.03 5.02 5.39 5.69

288

Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.25 8.48 12.91 9.81 10.26 9.21 12.67 9.57 5.46 3.85 7.01 3.34 2002 7.27 5.92 4.39 6.85 7.28 5.89 5.22 4.81 4.22 4.17 5.16 5.88 2003 6.85 8.02 10.84 10.03 7.84 10.46 9.36 8.56 5.98 10.73 6.50 9.40 2004 11.18 9.96 7.96 10.35 7.42 9.65 6.55 6.70 5.84 5.87 5.77 7.19 2005 7.83 10.43 8.06 10.90 10.16 8.75 9.36 8.94 10.85 11.53 10.54 13.52 2006 12.44 11.28 10.65 15.01 8.64 8.92 7.89 8.02 7.36 6.01 7.63 8.86 2007 7.75 7.97 13.10 9.15 10.61 9.49 8.90 8.79 6.90 7.32 6.50 8.18 2008 8.95 9.30 10.33 11.57 12.02 13.41 13.89 11.34 10.50 8.04 10.17 10.95 2009 9.90 9.36 10.70 8.06 4.78 5.65 5.39 6.74 4.61 4.57 5.95 5.12

289

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Share of U.S. Primary Energy Consumption (Percent) Total Consumption Total Industry Transportation Total (quads) 1980(1) 20.1% 13.5% | 33.7% 41.1% 25.2% 100% | 78.1 1981 20.0% 13.9% | 33.9% 40.4% 25.6% 100% | 76.1 1982 21.2% 14.8% | 36.0% 37.9% 26.1% 100% | 73.1 1983 21.1% 15.0% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.3% 100% | 72.9 1984 20.8% 14.9% | 35.7% 38.7% 25.7% 100% | 76.6 1985 21.0% 15.0% | 35.9% 37.8% 26.3% 100% | 76.5 1986 20.8% 15.1% | 35.9% 37.0% 27.1% 100% | 76.6 1987 20.5% 15.1% | 35.6% 37.2% 27.2% 100% | 79.0 1988 20.7% 15.2% | 35.9% 37.2% 27.0% 100% | 82.8 1989 20.9% 15.5% | 36.5% 37.0% 26.5% 100% | 84.8 1990 20.0% 15.7% | 35.8% 37.7% 26.5% 100% | 84.5 1991 20.6% 16.0% | 36.5% 37.3% 26.2% 100% | 84.4 1992 20.2% 15.6% | 35.8% 38.0% 26.1% 100% | 85.8 1993 20.8% 15.8% | 36.6% 37.4% 26.0% 100% | 87.5 1994 20.3% 15.8% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.2% 100% | 89.1 1995 20.3% 16.1% | 36.4% 37.4% 26.2% 100% | 91.1 1996 20.7%

290

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Cost of an Electric Quad Used in the Buildings Sector ($2010 Billion) Residential Commercial Buildings Sector 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 11.82 11.82 11.82 11.94 11.68 11.82 10.59 10.83 10.70 11.41 11.58 11.48 11.68 11.33 11.51 11.49 10.77 11.15 11.71 11.67 11.69 11.72 11.52 11.63 10.57 9.76 10.19 10.55 9.73 10.16 11.16 10.35 10.78 10.68 9.90 10.31 10.42 9.48 9.97 10.16 9.20 9.70 10.57 9.73 10.17 10.48 9.62 10.07 9.54 8.46 9.01 9.24 8.11 8.68 9.92 8.97 9.47 9.85 8.78 9.33 9.16 8.44 8.81 9.32 8.58 8.96 9.15 8.16 8.66 9.46 8.64 9.05 10.27 9.34 9.82 10.24 9.27 9.76 9.28 8.48 8.89 9.56 8.77 9.18 11.92 10.52 11.25 11.83 10.40 11.14 10.61 9.76 10.19 10.86 9.60 10.25 11.90 10.08

291

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5 18.19 186.1 1994 98.7 N.A. 105.2 18.08 183.2 1995 100.0 N.A. 104.6 18.49 185.0 1996 101.0 N.A. 110.2 19.48 192.9 1997 102.2 N.A. 104.4 18.94 185.3 1998 103.5 N.A. 98.9 18.93 182.8 1999 104.9 N.A. 101.5 19.53 186.1 2000 105.7 N.A. 105.6 20.37 192.7 2001 107.0 1.7% 102.1 20.01 187.0 2002 105.0 3.3% 106.6 20.75 197.7 2003 105.6 5.2% 109.2 21.07 199.6 2004 106.6 7.1% 106.6 21.06 197.6 2005 108.8 9.0% 105.7 21.59

292

Oregon Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.20 5.92 5.85 5.79 5.78 5.58 5.52 5.58 5.71 6.62 7.25 7.25 2002 7.41 7.39 7.30 7.16 7.24 7.07 6.75 7.19 7.33 6.20 5.83 5.90 2003 5.88 6.20 6.14 6.04 5.59 5.88 5.89 5.70 5.57 5.70 5.82 5.90 2004 5.94 6.03 6.01 5.95 5.48 5.96 5.89 5.97 5.98 7.12 7.21 7.22 2005 7.16 7.31 7.18 7.18 6.86 7.02 7.15 7.05 7.21 9.01 9.20 9.23 2006 9.22 9.08 9.03 9.11 8.67 9.06 8.92 9.15 9.19 9.09 9.67 9.80 2007 9.67 9.75 9.68 9.53 8.78 9.51 9.28 9.27 9.11 9.22 8.85 8.83 2008 8.75 8.99 8.85 8.98 9.22 8.26 9.53 8.92 8.80 8.75 9.86 10.15 2009 9.99 10.06 9.31 10.52 10.47 8.29 10.40 10.46 10.53 10.49 8.26 7.73

293

Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 4.35 4.40 4.46 4.40 5.76 5.77 5.32 5.24 5.18 5.15 5.17 5.14 2002 4.95 5.02 4.99 4.83 4.95 5.13 6.26 5.44 5.26 5.19 5.05 3.71 2003 4.76 4.90 5.31 5.46 5.87 6.51 6.36 6.73 6.59 6.00 5.41 6.42 2004 6.48 6.63 6.32 6.28 6.38 7.41 7.91 7.82 7.63 7.41 7.86 7.74 2005 7.59 7.25 7.34 8.16 8.21 8.95 9.15 9.69 9.91 11.32 10.87 10.74 2006 10.27 9.72 9.79 10.16 10.37 9.78 10.42 10.18 10.21 10.03 9.52 9.33 2007 9.30 9.26 9.47 9.50 9.77 9.85 10.00 9.96 9.72 9.40 9.41 9.41 2008 9.54 9.59 9.72 10.63 11.15 11.52 12.13 12.41 11.49 10.52 10.47 10.10 2009 10.01 10.08 10.10 9.03 8.94 9.31 9.49 9.46 8.95 8.94 9.42 9.25

294

Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.01 6.49 6.19 6.10 5.97 6.00 4.79 7.06 6.23 6.13 6.44 6.71 2002 7.11 7.14 6.87 6.41 6.31 6.17 6.28 6.32 6.35 6.04 6.09 5.91 2003 7.40 5.74 6.85 6.00 6.51 6.28 6.71 6.48 7.11 6.30 6.74 6.34 2004 6.65 6.35 7.20 6.46 7.24 6.92 7.16 7.02 6.77 6.65 7.52 7.19 2005 7.69 7.57 5.69 8.61 8.95 8.26 8.87 8.36 8.95 10.96 9.30 9.87 2006 9.87 9.58 9.47 9.69 9.57 10.01 10.09 10.32 10.29 9.80 10.18 10.13 2007 10.18 10.35 11.15 10.56 10.82 11.62 11.75 11.11 10.21 9.64 9.83 9.70 2008 9.98 10.70 11.35 11.27 12.25 11.93 12.59 11.12 10.23 8.84 7.96 9.15 2009 9.23 8.02 7.86 7.76 8.20 8.36 8.36 8.25 8.01 8.07 8.47 7.68

295

Vermont Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.05 6.35 5.43 4.69 5.03 4.87 4.73 4.40 4.38 4.45 4.31 4.24 2002 4.46 4.40 4.36 4.08 4.41 4.23 4.19 4.04 4.22 4.61 4.47 4.80 2003 4.80 4.56 4.92 5.03 4.67 4.83 4.77 4.73 4.67 4.79 5.32 5.76 2004 6.12 6.04 5.51 5.53 5.48 5.85 5.61 5.61 5.40 6.01 7.01 7.20 2005 7.07 6.72 6.76 6.82 6.88 6.66 6.80 6.82 7.29 8.67 10.31 10.65 2006 10.25 9.42 8.80 9.39 9.22 8.69 8.31 8.76 9.39 8.92 9.35 9.72 2007 9.42 9.56 9.47 9.31 9.48 9.37 9.23 8.50 8.34 8.47 8.58 8.78 2008 8.70 9.08 9.52 9.68 10.31 11.11 12.18 10.46 8.83 9.15 9.19 9.12 2009 9.11 8.69 8.77 8.16 7.69 7.65 7.51 7.18 7.49 7.42 6.96 7.24

296

ch_13  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 13.0 Index Index 13-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 13-2 Index A aesthetics - 3-54, 4-18, 4-35, 5-17, 5-18, 5-214, 5-232, 5-233, 9-9, 10-3, 10-7, C.2-4, C.8-13, C.8-32, C.8-46 airborne releases - 4-32, 4-71, 4-72, 5-48, 5-74, 5-87, 5-184, 5-225, C.2-13, C.2-17, C.8-16, C.8-36 aquifer - 2-30, 2-32, 2-33, 4-40, 4-47, 4-48, 4-49, 4-50, 4-51, 4-53, 4-54, 4-55, 4-56, 4-57, 4-72, 4-79, 5-2, 5-20, 5-44, 5-45, 5-107, 5-121, 5-122, 5-161, 5-165, 5-180, 5-212, 5-221, 5-222, 5-225, 5-227, 5-233, 5-234, 5-235, 6-15, 6-31, 6-32, 6-37, 7-3, 7-20, 7-24, 7-27, 7-29, 9-13, 9-14, 9-15, 11-18, 11-23, 11-24, 11-31, 11-54, 11-65, 11-73, 11-78, 11-79, 11-80, 11-82, 11-83, 11-84, 11-85, A-1, A-3, A-4, A-8, A-12, B-4, B-10, C.4-39, C.4-41, C.6-97, C.8-8, C.8-18, C.8-46, C.9-4, C.9-6, C.9-7, C.9-9, C.9-10,

297

Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.39 3.45 3.59 4.11 4.16 4.11 3.81 3.97 3.93 4.72 4.52 5.75 2003 5.77 7.47 6.88 5.45 W 5.98 5.74 5.41 W W W W 2004 W 5.13 W W 6.40 6.24 5.78 5.43 4.81 5.53 5.38 5.68 2005 5.84 7.22 7.91 8.32 7.23 8.31 8.50 9.82 14.33 14.85 12.48 14.62 2006 10.80 9.15 8.53 8.88 7.41 7.55 6.88 8.55 6.97 6.17 8.91 8.19 2007 8.21 9.47 8.79 8.66 8.89 8.78 7.64 7.44 6.94 7.70 8.03 8.44 2008 10.03 10.71 11.17 11.91 12.90 14.46 12.97 10.41 8.68 8.21 8.05 9.30 2009 9.33 7.25 5.96 5.38 5.33 5.19 4.76 4.19 4.07 5.33 5.59 6.64 2010 9.44 8.45 6.28 5.33 5.34 5.75 5.89 5.53 4.60 4.99 5.03 7.60 2011 11.12 6.74 5.42 5.08 5.14 5.73 5.58 5.07 4.64 4.91 4.80 4.63

298

sup_rci.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Residential Sector Equipment Stock and Efficiency (1 of 2) 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.23 10.58 10.86 11.14 11.44 11.72 11.93 12.14 12.36 12.57 12.77 12.98 13.18 13.37 13.56 13.76 13.96 14.17 14.38 14.59 14.78 1.9% Electric Other 20.12 20.18 20.20 20.24 20.29 20.33 20.39 20.46 20.53 20.60 20.67 20.73 20.79 20.84 20.89 20.95 21.00 21.07 21.14 21.22 21.29 0.3% Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.08 0.08 0.09 0.09 0.10 0.10 0.11 0.11 10.2% Natural Gas Other 55.78 56.39 57.14 57.85 58.57 59.32 60.12 60.93 61.74 62.57 63.42 64.28 65.11 65.91 66.71 67.52 68.34 69.17 70.02 70.87 71.74 1.3% Distillate 9.41 9.38 9.35 9.33 9.31 9.29 9.27 9.25 9.23 9.21 9.19 9.17 9.15 9.12 9.10 9.07 9.04 9.02 8.99

299

Synergistic Effect of Combination Topotecan and Chronomodulated Radiation Therapy on Xenografted Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the in vivo chronomodulated radiosensitizing effect of topotecan (TPT) on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and its possible mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Xenografted BALB/c (nu/nu) NPC mice were synchronized with an alternation of 12 hours of light from 0 to 12 hours after light onset (HALO) and 12 hours of darkness to establish a unified biological rhythm. Chronomodulated radiosensitization of TPT was investigated by analysis of tumor regrowth delay (TGD), pimonidazole hydrochloride, histone H2AX phosphorylation, (?-H2AX) topoisomerase I (Top I), cell cycle, and apoptosis after treatment with (1) TPT (10 mg/kg) alone; (2) radiation therapy alone (RT); and (3) TPT+RT at 3, 9, 15, and 21 HALO. The tumor-loaded mice without any treatment were used as controls. Results: The TPT+RT combination was more effective than TPT or RT as single agents. The TPT+RT combination at 15 HALO was best (TGD = 58.0 3.6 days), and TPT+RT at 3 HALO was worst (TGD = 35.0 1.5 days) among the 4 TPT+RT groups (P<.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a significantly increased histone H2AX phosphorylation expression and decreased pimonidazole hydrochloride expression in the TPT+RT group at the same time point. The results suggested that the level of tumor hypoxia and DNA damage varied in a time-dependent manner. The expression of Top I in the TPT+RT group was also significantly different from the control tumors at 15 HALO (P<.05). Cell apoptosis index was increased and the proportion of cells in S phase was decreased (P<.05) with the highest value in 15 HALO and the lowest in 3 HALO. Conclusions: This study suggested that TPT combined with chronoradiotherapy could enhance the radiosensitivity of xenografted NPC. The TPT+RT group at 15 HALO had the best therapeutic effect. The chronomodulated radiosensitization mechanisms of TPT might be related to circadian rhythm of tumor hypoxia, cell cycle redistribution, DNA damage, and expression of Top I.

Zhang, YanLing; Chen, Xin; Ren, PeiRong; Su, Zhou; Cao, HongYing; Zhou, Jie; Zou, XiaoYan; Fu, ShaoZhi; Lin, Sheng; Fan, Juan; Yang, Bo; Sun, XiaoYang [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yue [Department of Medical Imaging, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Yang, LingLin, E-mail: yanglinglin2003@tom.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, JingBo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

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301

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jul-2013 Jul-2013 1,480.0 700.0 180.0 110.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,090.1 574.8 70.9 Aug-2013 1,430.0 550.0 195.0 120.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,026.4 415.2 54.4 Sep-2013 1,270.0 320.0 165.0 110.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 899.8 196.8 30.4 Oct-2013 1,070.0 270.0 125.0 105.0 23.8 13.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 739.2 151.2 27.5 Nov-2013 1,105.0 150.0 100.0 85.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 796.6 49.4 8.6 Dec-2013 1,175.0 130.0 100.0 95.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 866.4 19.0 3.0 Jan-2014 1,155.0 140.0 100.0 95.0 26.0 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 847.0 29.0 4.6 Feb-2014 1,180.0 140.0 30.0 15.0 26.7 15.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 941.3 110.0 17.4 Mar-2014 1,210.0 190.0 55.0 30.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 948.3 145.3 20.6 Apr-2014 1,320.0 230.0 50.0 30.0 23.8 13.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,064.2 186.3 24.3 May-2014 1,425.0 510.0 70.0 50.0 21.9 13.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,151.1 446.1 52.1 Jun-2014

302

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1, 1998 1, 1998 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 2 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o t e : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r i c e is f r o m t h e G A S D A IL Y a n d i s t h e m i d p o i n t o f t h e i r h i g h a n d l o w p r i c e f o r a d a y . 0 . 0 0 M A Y - 9 8 J U N E - 9 8 J U L - 9 8 A U G - 9 8 S E P T - 9 8 T e n - Y e a r A v e r a g e o f H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s , a n d D a ily H ig h e s t a n d L o w e s t H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s f o r 6 C itie s , M a y- S e p te m b e r ( D a l la s /F t W o r th , H o u s to n , L o s A n g e le s , M i a m i, N e w O r le a n s , N e w Y o rk ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 8/18/98 8/19/98 8/20/98 8/21/98 8/22/98 8/23/98 8/24/98 8/25/98 8/26/98 8/27/98 8/28/98 8/29/98 8/30/98 8/31/98 9/1/98 9/2/98 9/3/98 9/4/98 9/5/98 9/6/98 9/7/98 9/8/98 9/9/98 9/10/98 9/11/98 9/12/98 9/13/98 9/14/98 9/15/98 9/16/98 9/17/98 9/18/98 Degrees Fahrenheit 6 - C ity D a ily A

303

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Table 6. Energy-intensity by state (2000 - 2010) thousand Btu per dollar of GDP Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al aba ma 18.3 17.1 17.4 17.2 16.9 16.4 16.3 16.2 15.9 15.3 16.0 -12.6% -2.3 Al as ka 21.7 20.6 19.8 20.2 20.3 21.1 18.7 17.8 15.9 14.1 14.2 -34.5% -7.5 Ari zona 8.7 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.3 7.6 7.2 7.3 7.6 7.5 7.6 -12.6% -1.1 Arkans a s 14.4 14.2 14.0 13.6 13.1 12.2 12.3 12.6 12.5 12.4 13.0 -9.9% -1.4 Ca l i forni a 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 -17.8% -0.9 Col orado 6.3 6.7 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.4 6.3 6.1 6.2 -1.8% -0.1 Connecti cut 4.6 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.7 -19.9% -0.9 Del a wa re 5.0 4.7 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.4 4.1 4.3 4.3 3.3 3.3 -34.6% -1.7 Di s tri ct of Col umbi a 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 -39.4% -0.4 Fl ori da 6.9 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 6.1 -11.4% -0.8

304

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jun-2013 Jun-2013 1,560.0 640.0 55.0 35.0 23.9 12.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,299.1 592.1 63.3 Jul-2013 1,465.0 690.0 125.0 70.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,130.1 604.8 71.9 Aug-2013 1,400.0 500.0 170.0 95.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,021.4 390.2 51.4 Sep-2013 1,235.0 310.0 165.0 110.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 864.8 186.8 30.0 Oct-2013 1,040.0 270.0 125.0 100.0 23.8 13.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 709.2 156.2 29.6 Nov-2013 1,145.0 150.0 100.0 85.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 836.6 49.4 8.2 Dec-2013 1,190.0 120.0 100.0 95.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 881.4 9.0 1.4 Jan-2014 1,130.0 140.0 100.0 95.0 26.0 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 822.0 29.0 4.7 Feb-2014 1,145.0 130.0 30.0 15.0 26.7 15.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 906.3 100.0 16.4 Mar-2014 1,185.0 190.0 55.0 25.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 923.3 150.3 21.9 Apr-2014 1,330.0 220.0 45.0 30.0 23.8 13.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,079.2 176.3 22.7 May-2014

305

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8, 1998 8, 1998 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 2 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r ic e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o te : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r ic e is fr o m th e G A S D A I L Y a n d is th e m id p o in t o f th e ir h ig h a n d lo w p r ic e f o r a d a y . 0 . 0 0 M A Y - 9 8 J U N E - 9 8 J U L - 9 8 A U G - 9 8 S E P T - 9 8 T e n - Y e a r A v e r a g e o f H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s , a n d D a ily H ig h e s t a n d L o w e s t H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s fo r 6 C it ie s , M a y - S e p t e m b e r (D a lla s /F t W o r th , H o u s to n , L o s A n g e le s , M ia m i, N e w O rle a n s , N e w Y o rk ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 8/25/98 8/26/98 8/27/98 8/28/98 8/29/98 8/30/98 8/31/98 9/1/98 9/2/98 9/3/98 9/4/98 9/5/98 9/6/98 9/7/98 9/8/98 9/9/98 9/10/98 9/11/98 9/12/98 9/13/98 9/14/98 9/15/98 9/16/98 9/17/98 9/18/98 9/19/98 9/20/98 9/21/98 9/22/98 9/23/98 9/24/98 9/25/98 Degrees Fahrenheit 6 - C ity D a ily A v e r a g e H ig h D A L L A S /F T W

306

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nov-2013 Nov-2013 1,165.0 150.0 85.0 75.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 871.6 59.4 9.5 Dec-2013 1,345.0 130.0 100.0 115.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 1,036.4 0.0 0.0 Jan-2014 1,100.0 120.0 100.0 115.0 26.0 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 11.0 0.0 792.0 0.0 0.0 Feb-2014 1,120.0 140.0 30.0 15.0 26.7 15.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 881.3 110.0 18.6 Mar-2014 1,275.0 190.0 35.0 20.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,033.3 155.3 20.2 Apr-2014 1,560.0 310.0 45.0 25.0 23.8 13.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,309.2 271.3 28.8 May-2014 1,550.0 410.0 55.0 35.0 21.9 13.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,291.1 361.1 37.6 Jun-2014 1,585.0 540.0 45.0 30.0 23.9 12.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,334.1 497.1 51.7 Jul-2014 1,470.0 500.0 115.0 65.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,145.1 419.8 49.3 Aug-2014 1,270.0 420.0 135.0 80.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 926.4 325.2 47.2 Sep-2014 1,105.0 310.0 140.0 90.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 759.8 206.8 37.8 Oct-2014

307

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6, 1997 6, 1997 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 3 . 2 5 3 . 5 0 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o t e : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r i c e i s f r o m t h e G A S D A I L Y a n d i s t h e m i d p o i n t o f t h e i r h i g h a n d l o w p r i c e f o r a d a y . . 0 0 0 J U N - 9 7 J U L - 9 7 A U G - 9 7 S E P T - 9 7 O C T - 9 7 H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e fo r F o u r S e le c t e d C itie s 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 1 0 0 9/13/97 9/14/97 9/15/97 9/16/97 9/17/97 9/18/97 9/19/97 9/20/97 9/21/97 9/22/97 9/23/97 9/24/97 9/25/97 9/26/97 9/28/97 9/29/97 9/30/97 10/1/97 10/2/97 10/3/97 10/4/97 Degrees in Fahrenheit A tla n ta C h ic a g o H o u s to n N e w Y o rk W o r k i n g G a s I n S t o r a g e 1 9 9 7 1 4 8 3 1 8 0 0 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 6 1 9 1 5 1 2 9 2 2 3 0 8 1 9 9 3 1 7 4 2 2 3 9 6 2 0 6 3 1 6 5 5 2 1 2 8 1 3 8 6 2 5 5 6 1 8 6 0 1 5 5 9 2 4 6 9 2 0 1 8 1 7 3 1 1 8 7 8 2 5 9 7 1 4 9 9 0 3 0 0 6 0 0 9 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 5 0 0 1 8 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 4 0 0 2 7 0 0 6/6 6/13 6/20 6/27 6/30 7/4 7/11 7/18

308

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2, 1997 2, 1997 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o t e : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r i c e i s f r o m t h e G A S D A I L Y a n d i s t h e m i d p o i n t o f t h e i r h i g h a n d l o w p r i c e f o r a d a y . . 0 0 0 J U N - 9 7 J U L - 9 7 A U G - 9 7 S E P - 9 7 H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e fo r F o u r S e le c t e d C itie s 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 1 0 0 8/31/97 9/1/97 9/2/97 9/3/97 9/4/97 9/5/97 9/6/97 9/7/97 9/8/97 9/9/97 9/10/97 9/11/97 9/12/97 9/13/97 9/14/97 9/15/97 9/16/97 9/17/97 9/18/97 9/19/97 9/20/97 Degrees in Fahrenheit A tla n ta C h ic a g o H o u s to n N e w Y o rk W o r k i n g G a s I n S t o r a g e 1 9 9 7 1 4 8 3 1 8 0 0 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 6 1 9 1 5 1 2 9 2 2 3 0 8 1 9 9 3 1 7 4 2 2 3 9 6 2 0 6 3 1 6 5 5 2 1 2 8 1 3 8 6 1 8 6 0 1 5 5 9 2 0 1 8 1 7 3 1 1 8 7 8 2 5 9 7 1 4 9 9 0 3 0 0 6 0 0 9 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 5 0 0 1 8 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 4 0 0 2 7 0 0 6/6 6/13 6/20 6/27 6/30 7/4 7/11 7/18 7/25 7/31 8/1 8/8 8/15 8/22 8/29 8/31 9/5

309

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feb-2013 Feb-2013 1,165.0 260.0 105.0 75.0 26.7 15.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 851.3 170.0 29.7 Mar-2013 1,280.0 310.0 125.0 110.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 948.3 185.3 26.3 Apr-2013 1,330.0 380.0 50.0 30.0 23.8 13.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,074.2 336.3 43.5 May-2013 1,560.0 530.0 75.0 50.0 21.9 13.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,281.1 466.1 48.9 Jun-2013 1,745.0 640.0 120.0 85.0 23.9 12.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,419.1 542.1 53.1 Jul-2013 1,780.0 650.0 210.0 145.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,360.1 489.8 48.4 Aug-2013 1,670.0 500.0 190.0 135.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,271.4 350.2 37.0 Sep-2013 1,445.0 380.0 145.0 100.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,094.8 266.8 33.9 Oct-2013 1,225.0 330.0 180.0 140.0 23.8 13.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 839.2 176.2 28.2 Nov-2013 1,340.0 200.0 170.0 140.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 961.6 44.4 6.4 Dec-2013 1,255.0 180.0 130.0 105.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 916.4

310

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 1.0 0.0 22.0 19.2 0.4 0.4 1.9 13.0 Houston 2A 4.6 1.8 15.5 14.7 0.5 0.5 1.5 12.8 Phoenix 2B 4.0 0.7 17.5 19.4 0.4 0.4 1.9 15.0 Atlanta 3A 7.8 4.3 10.1 10.4 0.6 0.5 1.4 13.9 Los Angeles 3B 4.1 0.3 8.0 3.5 0.5 0.5 1.4 10.9 Las Vegas 3B 5.6 1.4 13.2 14.6 0.5 0.5 1.8 14.5 San Francisco 3C 5.8 1.7 2.9 1.2 0.6 0.6 1.1 8.9 Baltimore 4A 12.1 9.6 8.0 7.8 0.6 0.6 1.3 12.8 Albuquerque 4B 8.0 4.6 6.7 6.9 0.6 0.6 1.6 14.4 Seattle 4C 11.8 7.3 2.5 1.3 0.6 0.6 1.2 11.1 Chicago 5A 17.8 14.2 5.5 4.5 0.7 0.6 1.4 11.4 Boulder 5B 11.6 8.3 4.4 3.9 0.7 0.6 1.5 12.6 Minneapolis 6A 23.6 22.4 4.8 3.8 0.7 0.7 1.4 11.0 Helena 6B 18.1 15.0 2.9 2.3 0.7 0.7 1.4 12.9 Duluth 7 28.9 29.4 2.4 1.7 0.8 0.7 1.4 10.3 Fairbanks 8 52.8 56.4 1.6 1.2 0.8 0.8 1.7 13.2 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

311

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mar-2013 Mar-2013 1,475.0 220.0 30.0 20.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,238.3 185.3 20.1 Apr-2013 1,400.0 380.0 45.0 30.0 23.8 13.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,149.2 336.3 40.6 May-2013 1,455.0 550.0 65.0 45.0 21.9 13.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,186.1 491.1 55.7 Jun-2013 1,650.0 610.0 100.0 65.0 23.9 12.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,344.1 532.1 55.0 Jul-2013 1,590.0 630.0 195.0 135.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,185.1 479.8 54.4 Aug-2013 1,560.0 480.0 175.0 115.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,176.4 350.2 40.0 Sep-2013 1,290.0 360.0 145.0 110.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 939.8 236.8 35.0 Oct-2013 1,090.0 290.0 170.0 140.0 23.8 13.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 714.2 136.2 25.6 Nov-2013 1,115.0 170.0 125.0 105.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 781.6 49.4 8.8 Dec-2013 1,195.0 150.0 145.0 125.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 841.4 9.0 1.4 Jan-2014 1,180.0 150.0 100.0 95.0 26.0 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 872.0 39.0

312

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3, 1998 3, 1998 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 2 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t le m e n t P r i c e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o t e : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r i c e i s f r o m t h e G A S D A I L Y a n d i s t h e m i d p o i n t o f t h e i r h i g h a n d l o w p r i c e f o r a d a y . 0 . 0 0 J U L - 9 8 A U G - 9 8 S E P T - 9 8 O C T - 9 8 T e n -Y e a r A v e ra g e o f H ig h T e m p e ra tu re s , a n d D a ily H ig h e s t a n d L o w e s t H ig h T e m p e ra tu re s fo r 6 C itie s , M a y -S e p te m b e r (D a lla s /F t W o r th , H o u s to n , L o s A n g e le s , M ia m i, N e w O rle a n s , N e w Y o rk ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 9/8/98 9/9/98 9/10/98 9/11/98 9/12/98 9/13/98 9/14/98 9/15/98 9/16/98 9/17/98 9/18/98 9/19/98 9/20/98 9/21/98 9/22/98 9/23/98 9/24/98 9/25/98 9/26/98 9/27/98 9/28/98 9/29/98 9/30/98 10/1/98 10/2/98 10/3/98 10/4/98 10/5/98 10/6/98 10/7/98 10/8/98 10/9/98 Degrees Fahrenheit 6 -C ity D a ily A v e ra g e H ig h D A L L A S /F T W

313

week1007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,1996 7,1996 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X P r i c e F u t u r e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e H e n r y H u b S p o t J U N E - 9 6 N o t e : T H e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r i c e i s f r o m t h e G A S D A I L Y a n d i s t h e m i d p o i n t o f t h e i r h i g h a n d l o w p r i c e f o r a d a y . J U L Y - 9 6 . 0 0 A U G - 9 6 S E P T - 9 6 O C T - 9 6 H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e f o r F o u r S e l e c te d C i t ie s 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 1 0 0 9/15/96 9/16/96 9/17/96 9/18/96 9/19/96 9/20/96 9/21/96 9/22/96 9/23/96 9/24/96 9/25/96 9/26/96 9/27/96 9/28/96 9/29/96 9/30/96 10/1/96 10/2/96 10/3/96 10/4/96 10/5/96 Degrees in Fahrenheit A tla n ta C h ic a g o H o u s to n N e w Y o rk W o r k i n g G a s I n S t o r a g e 1 9 9 6 1 1 5 9 1 2 5 0 1 3 4 3 1 4 3 3 1 5 2 7 1 6 1 7 1 6 9 8 1 8 6 2 1 9 5 5 2 0 2 6 2 1 2 0 2 2 1 8 2 3 0 2 2 3 9 1 2 4 7 5 1 8 9 5 2 4 9 9 1 0 7 2 1 7 8 2 1 4 9 9 1 8 7 8 2 7 9 0 2 2 4 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 3 0 0 0 6/7 6/14 6/21 6/28 6/30 7/5 7/12 7/19 7/26 7/31 8/2 8/9 8/16

314

Western Area Power Administration Starting Forecast Month: Sierra Nevada Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May-2013 May-2013 1,460.0 520.0 95.0 55.0 21.9 13.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,161.1 451.1 52.2 Jun-2013 1,580.0 620.0 55.0 40.0 23.9 12.9 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,319.1 567.1 59.7 Jul-2013 1,510.0 730.0 160.0 105.0 27.9 15.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,140.1 609.8 71.9 Aug-2013 1,590.0 510.0 150.0 95.0 26.6 14.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,231.4 400.2 43.7 Sep-2013 1,275.0 350.0 165.0 115.0 23.2 13.2 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 904.8 221.8 34.1 Oct-2013 1,070.0 270.0 125.0 120.0 23.8 13.8 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 739.2 136.2 24.8 Nov-2013 1,090.0 160.0 105.0 100.0 26.4 15.6 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 776.6 44.4 7.9 Dec-2013 1,170.0 140.0 105.0 120.0 26.6 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 856.4 4.0 0.6 Jan-2014 1,155.0 140.0 100.0 110.0 26.0 16.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 847.0 14.0 2.2 Feb-2014 1,210.0 130.0 55.0 25.0 26.7 15.0 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 946.3 90.0 14.1 Mar-2014 1,240.0 190.0 60.0 30.0 24.7 14.7 182.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 973.3 145.3 20.1 Apr-2014

315

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 1998 5, 1998 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 2 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t l e m e n t P r ic e H e n r y H u b S p o t N o t e : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r ic e is f r o m t h e G A S D A IL Y a n d is t h e m id p o in t o f t h e ir h ig h a n d lo w p r ic e fo r a d a y . 0 . 0 0 M A Y - 9 8 J U N E - 9 8 J U L - 9 8 A U G - 9 8 S E P T - 9 8 O C T - 9 8 T e n -Y e a r A v e ra g e o f H ig h T e m p e ra tu re s , a n d D a ily H ig h e s t a n d L o w e s t H ig h T e m p e ra tu re s fo r 6 C itie s , M a y -S e p te m b e r (D a lla s /F t W o r th , H o u s to n , L o s A n g e le s , M ia m i, N e w O rle a n s , N e w Y o rk ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 9/1/98 9/2/98 9/3/98 9/4/98 9/5/98 9/6/98 9/7/98 9/8/98 9/9/98 9/10/98 9/11/98 9/12/98 9/13/98 9/14/98 9/15/98 9/16/98 9/17/98 9/18/98 9/19/98 9/20/98 9/21/98 9/22/98 9/23/98 9/24/98 9/25/98 9/26/98 9/27/98 9/28/98 9/29/98 9/30/98 10/1/98 10/2/98 Degrees Fahrenheit 6 - C ity D a ily A v e r a g e H ig h D A L L

316

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8, 1999 8, 1999 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r ic e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 . 3 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 1 0 4 . 3 0 4 . 5 0 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t le m e n t P r ic e H e n r y H u b S p o t W T I in $ / M M B t u N o te : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r ic e is fr o m t h e G A S D A IL Y a n d is t h e m id p o in t o f th e ir h ig h a n d lo w p r ic e f o r a d a y . T h e d a te s m a r k e d 0 . 0 0 M O N T H N Y M E X D e liv e r y M o n t h ( n e a r - m o n t h c o n t r a c t ) H o l i d a y S E P T E M B E R 8 /2 7 /9 9 O C T O B E R 9 /2 8 /9 9 N O V E M B E R 7 /2 8 /9 9 A U G U S T T e n -Y e a r A v e r a g e o f H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s , a n d D a il y H i g h e s t a n d L o w e s t H i g h T e m p e r a t u r e s fo r 6 C it i e s , M a y - S e p t e m b e r ( D a lla s / F t W o r t h , H o u s t o n , L o s A n g e le s , M ia m i, N e w O r le a n s , N e w Y o r k ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 8/22/99 8/24/99 8/26/99 8/28/99 8/30/99 9/1/99 9/3/99 9/5/99 9/7/99 9/9/99 9/11/99 9/13/99 9/15/99 9/17/99 9/19/99 9/21/99

317

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z