National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 800 700 600

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of alloys 690, 800, and 600 in acid environments containing copper oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, E.; Stubbe, J.; Deny, G.

    1996-10-01

    Secondary side stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator (SG) tubes may be due to the formation of an acid environment in crevices, as demonstrated for several Belgian PWR plants. The susceptibility of alloys 600 and 800 in this type of environment, which had been partially evidenced by several laboratory works, has been confirmed by capsule tests performed at Laborelec, whereas the SCC resistance of alloy 690 always appeared excellent. Capsule tests have been recently conducted at 320 C with the same heats of tubings in the same acid solutions (cationic resins + magnetite + sodium silicate, with or without lead, and sodium sulfate + iron sulfate, with or without lead oxide) containing CuO and Cu{sub 2}O. It appeared that the SCC resistance of the three alloys was generally reduced by the addition of copper oxides, at least when the cover gas did not contain hydrogen. The situation was particularly dramatic for the capsules made of alloy 690 tubing: most of them developed deep cracks, sometimes throughwall (the shortest time to failure being less than 50 h) whereas the same solutions without copper oxides had produced no cracking at all in alloy 690 capsules exposed during more than 2,000 h. Although the corrosion is reduced in presence of hydrazine or at lower concentration, copper oxides probably contribute significantly to the degradation of the tubes in alloy 600, at least in SG`s forming acid sulfate crevice environments. This is also an issue for the new SG`s, especially for those equipped with tubes in alloy 690 TT, particularly for the top of the tubesheet which is a critical deposit area since the high stresses and strains resulting from the expansion of the tube in the tubesheet lead to a risk of circumferential cracking at the transition.

  2. Effectiveness of 700{degrees}C thermal treatment on primary water stress corrosion sensitivity of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes: Laboratory tests and in field experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cattant, F.; Keroulas, F. de; Garriga-Majo, D.; Todeschini, P.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    In France, the steam generators of some 900 MWe reactors, and of all the 1 300 MWe reactors in service are equipped with heat treated Alloy 600 tubes. The purpose of the heat treatment, performed at 700{degrees}C, is to relieve the residual stresses. Generally, it also increases the SCC resistance of the alloy. A laboratory study has been carried out in order to gain a better understanding of the metallurgical factors influencing the PWSCC resistance of Alloy 600 after heat treatment. It has been shown that there are two kinds of tubes for which the heat treatment does not produce a microstructure having a potentially high resistance to SCC: tubes with a high carbon content (over 0.032%) or tubes mill-annealed at high temperatures and heavily cold-worked by the straightening. The analysis of the behaviour of french steam generators reveals that the heat treatment generally had the expected beneficial effect. However, the early cracking in service of some treated tubes led EDF (national power company) to proceed with removals. The majority of the cracked pulled-out tubes exhibit microstructures having a potentially high PWSCC sensibility in laboratory tests. It has been shown that these microstructures can be correlated to a high carbon content.

  3. Obama Administration Announces Additional $14,003,800 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... WV Wheeling City 137,800 WV Berkeley County 329,600 WV Cabell County 206,900 WV Harrison County 219,100 WV Jefferson County 207,900 WV Kanawha County 583,400 WV Mercer ...

  4. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  5. Trace 700 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 AgencyCompany Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations...

  6. 100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Decai

    2010-10-31

    An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramica and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumileds LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

  7. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection ...

  8. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen ...

  9. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection January 20, ...

  10. 36CFRPart800_as_amended2004_web.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    36 CFR PART 800 -- PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES (incorporating amendments effective August 5, 2004) Subpart A -- Purposes and Participants Sec. 800.1 Purposes. 800.2 Participants in the Section 106 process. Subpart B -- The Section 106 Process 800.3 Initiation of the section 106 process. 800.4 Identification of historic properties. 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. 800.7 Failure to resolve adverse effects. 800.8 Coordination with the National

  11. File:600.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    600.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:600.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  12. The 800-meter sample toroidal field conductor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    800-meter sample toroidal field conductor was transferred to a container ship at the port of Charleston, S.C., on May 28, 2014 for its voyage to La Spezia, Italy. Photo: US ITER INSIDE: ITER Site Progress View from DOE US ITER Systems Update Hearing on Fusion Energy Disruption Mitigation Team Reviews Progress Engaging Industry, Universities and Labs Central Solenoid Fabrication Upcoming Events US ITER Ships Over 30,000 Pounds of Magnet System Hardware to Europe ITER is a unique international

  13. Alkaline intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagano, N.

    1996-12-31

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC), often termed IGA, and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) have continued to occur on mill-annealed (MA) Alloy 600 tubing in the secondary side of steam generators, which are still serious corrosion instances in operating pressurized water reactors. The IGC and IGSCC phenomena have occurred on MA Alloy 600 at the crevice between the tube and tube support plate, in which a high concentration of caustic solution is formed under dry and wet conditions at high temperature. A review of technical articles has been performed concerning environmental and metallurgical factors affecting the IGC and IGSCC, and their mechanistic aspects. A combination of IGC and IGSCC, one of the most common modes of corrosion on the secondary side of steam generators, occurs in a specific potential region, at the active-passive transition potential, in a concentrated caustic solution at elevated temperature. The anodic dissolution of Alloy 600 increases as the temperature of caustic solutions is increased. The corrosion rate for each constituent of Alloy 600 such as nickel, chromium, iron or chromium carbide is influenced differently by temperature, resulting in various effects on the characteristics of corrosion protective surface films. Increase in chromium content and thermal treatment at 700 C are beneficial for IGC and IGSCC resistance. IGC is intergranular corrosion, and IGSCC is initiated above a critical applied stress. Grain boundary chromium carbides such as Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} and Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} have been formed to increase resistance to IGC and IGSCC. Several theories have been proposed concerning the roles of chromium carbides at grain boundaries. Some specific theories are focused on in this paper with supporting data.

  14. 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation PDF icon 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation More Documents & Publications WPN 10-12: Historic Preservation Implementation Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section 106 Review (ACHP, 2011) Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP,

  15. MHK Projects/Oyster 800 Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Project Details Operational testing of Oyster 800 commenced in June 2012 when the machine produced first electrical power to the grid. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 1...

  16. Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Georgetown 34,700 AK Native Village of Goodnews Bay 42,500 AK Native Village of Hamilton 34,500 AK Native Village of Hooper Bay 70,300 AK Native Village of Kanatak 34,500 ...

  17. Departs La Fonda Hotel at 7:00 AM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day 4 Participant and Companion Event Field Trip - Geology of Note in the Santa Fe Area Thursday September 11, 2014 Departs La Fonda Hotel at 7:00 AM Returns to La Fonda Hotel at...

  18. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. ...

  19. Charitable Giving by EM Employees, Contractors Tops $800,000...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    donated more than 800,000 and other gifts to people in need in recent months. ... residents who are in need of food, unemployed or uninsured and requiring medical care. ...

  20. Fact #800: October 21, 2013 Characteristics of New Light Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 800: October 21, 2013 Characteristics of New Light Vehicles over Time From model years 1980 to 2012, there have been significant gains in automotive technology. For new light ...

  1. Title 36 CFR 800 Protection of Historic Properties | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PropertiesLegal Abstract Part 800, Protection of Historic Properties under Title 36: Parks, Forests, and Public Property of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, current as of...

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra, E.

    1981-11-01

    The stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing has affected the performance of several pressurized water reactor steam generators. The purpose of this report is to summarize the research which has followed that reviewed by D. van Rooyen in 1975. Although several papers and reports have been published there still is not a general model that can explain the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in deaerated or aerated high-temperature pure water or in the environments that might exist in the primary and secondary coolant of a steam generator. Such a model, if it exists, must cover the complex interaction of the environmental, metallurgical, and mechanical variables which control the susceptibility of Alloy 600 to stress corrosion cracking. Each of these classes of variables is discussed in the text.

  3. 800,000 Jobs by 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    800,000 Jobs by 2012 800,000 Jobs by 2012 August 16, 2010 - 6:21pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? ZBB Energy is a clean energy manufacturing company specializing in the production of advanced zinc bromide flow batteries and intelligent power control platforms for renewable energy storage. It's also a prime example of how the Recovery Act is helping new clean energy industries bolster the manufacturing economies of

  4. Replacement of alloy 800H superheated steam line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbier, R.A.; Bullock, J.W. [Sterling Chemicals, Texas City, TX (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Sterling Chemicals utilizes alloy 800HT (UNS N08811) piping for superheated steam service in its styrene dehydrogenation unit. An engineering project to replace these lines was recently completed. Material acquisition, shop fabrication, inspection requirements, and field erection will be highlighted in this paper.

  5. Long-Term Oxidation of Candidate Cast Iron and Advanced Austenitic Stainless Steel Exhaust System Alloys from 650-800 C in Air with Water Vapor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brady, Michael P; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N; Haynes, James A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherentmore » from 700-800 C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 C compared to 650-700 C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  6. Long-Term Oxidation of Candidate Cast Iron and Advanced Austenitic Stainless Steel Exhaust System Alloys from 650-800 C in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N; Haynes, James A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherent from 700-800 C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 C compared to 650-700 C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND95-2049 UC-700 Unlimited Release

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -2049 UC-700 Unlimited Release Printed August 1995 c CHAPARRAL: A Library for Solving Large Enclosure Radiation Heat Transfer Problems Micheal W. Glass Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 for the United S t a t e s Department of Energy under Contract DE-Am-94AL85000 , I , - Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOnCE: This report was prepared as an

  8. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  9. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  10. EPA-600/4-84-040

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPA-600/4-84-040 DOE/DP/05 39-05 1 J u l y 1984 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT R a d i a t i o n M o n i t o r i n g Around U n i t e d States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1983 compiled b y R. G. Patzer, S. C. Black, R. F. Grossman, D. D. Smith, and Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n prepared f o r t h e U. S. Department o f Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-AI08-76DP00539 ' ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

  11. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Hospital to save $71,800/year burning trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-01-01

    A waste-to-steam dual-fuel boiler system will save the Geisinger Medical Center in Pennsylvania $71,800 a year in avoided natural gas, trash-hauling, and incinerating costs. In operation less than a year, the system currently generates 6.3% of hospital steam for an anticipated three-year payback. A waste-heat-recovery system, with a net cost of $360,000, will pay for itself in an estimated five years. The case-history report describes how the system fits into hospital operations. (DCK)

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of welded Alloy 600 penetration mockups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarver, J.M.; Pathania, R.S.; Stuckey, K.; Fyfitch, S.; Gelpi, A.; Foucault, M.; Hunt, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 in components other than steam generators is a problem of increasing concern for nuclear power plants. Of greatest concern at the present time is the PWSCC of Alloy 600 vessel head penetrations. The common elements of these components are threefold: (1) the Alloy 600 material has a susceptible microstructure, (2) the Alloy 600 material is either a thick-walled tube or a bar which has been machined into a thick-walled tube, and (3) the Alloy 600 material has been welded into a structure such that high residual welding stresses exist in the postwelded Alloy 600 material. The objectives of the present program were to evaluate the PWSCC behavior of various configurations of welded Alloy 600 penetrations, and possible remedial measures which would prevent or retard PWSCC in these components. Mockups were instrumented to permit instantaneous remote sensing of through-wall cracking and were autoclave tested along with control C-rings in a doped steam environment. Following the test exposures, the mockups were split and examined to characterize the cracking morphology and the material microstructure. A Weibull distribution was used to analyze the time-to-failure results, and the observed cracking locations were compared to residual stress levels predicted by an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the mockups.

  14. ARRA Program Celebrates Milestone 600,000 Smart Meter Installations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 11, 2012, DOE Recovery Act funding recipient Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) celebrated a major milestone in the development of a regional smart grid in California: the installation of over 600,000 smart meters.

  15. Energy Department Announces Major Recovery Act Milestone: 600...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the goal of weatherizing more than 600,000 low-income homes- including more than 125,000 multi-family homes like apartment buildings - more than three months ahead of schedule. ...

  16. Primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600: Effects of processing parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seman, D.J.; Webb, G.L.; Parrington, R.J.

    1993-10-22

    Correlations of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data in deaerated water with temperature, stress, metallography, and processing for laboratory test specimens are presented. Initiation time data show that a low temperature anneal and resulting absence of grain boundary carbides result in a material having increased susceptibility to SCC. Data also show that hot worked and annealed Alloy 600 is more resistant than cold worked and annealed material, both having carbide decorated grain boundaries. In absence of grain boundary carbides, both materials are equally susceptible. Low temperature thermal treatment (1100F) reduces SCC susceptibility with or without grain boundary decoration. Weld metal data and data correlations developed from 700 double U-bends are presented. Data demonstrate the effect of increased carbon content to improve SCC resistance. The data shows that the general relation of time, temperature and strain for wrought material is followed for the weld metal. The weld process used did not affect the SCC susceptibility of EN-82 which showed a greater resistance to SCC than EN-62. Stress relief of weld deposits showed an improvement for wrought material. Heat affected zone resistance was improved if the starting material received a high temperature anneal (1850 to 2000F). Range of SCC initiation times for weld metal is comparable to the range of initiation times for wrought material.

  17. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Cost Projection | Department of Energy February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection February 17, 2016 - 2:27pm Addthis The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Strategic Analysis

  18. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Cost Projection | Department of Energy 6: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection January 20, 2016 - 3:02pm Addthis The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Strategic Analysis will present results

  19. Motor System Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of $700,000 at Chevron

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery | Department of Energy System Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of $700,000 at Chevron Refinery Motor System Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of $700,000 at Chevron Refinery Chevron, the largest U.S. refiner operating six gasoline-producing refineries, completed a motor system efficiency improvement project in 1997 at its Richmond, California, refinery that resulted in savings of $700,000 annually. This two-page fact sheet describes how they achieved the savings. PDF icon Motor

  20. Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada | Department of Energy Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions

  1. Energy Department Invests $600,000 in University-Industry Partnerships...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    600,000 in University-Industry Partnerships to Enhance Building Efficiency Energy Department Invests 600,000 in University-Industry Partnerships to Enhance Building Efficiency ...

  2. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.9

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.9 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  3. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  4. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  5. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  6. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.7

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.7 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.6 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.8

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.8 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.4 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.5 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  12. Motor System Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of $700,000 at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Motor Systems Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of 700,000 at Chevron Refinery (January 1999) More Documents & Publications Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful ...

  13. Kahuku Wind to Power 7,700 Oahu Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kahuku Wind to Power 7,700 Oahu Homes Kahuku Wind to Power 7,700 Oahu Homes July 27, 2010 - 4:52pm Addthis Turbine blades being delivered to Kahuku. | Courtesy of First Wind Turbine blades being delivered to Kahuku. | Courtesy of First Wind Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Today, the Department of Energy's Loan Programs Office announced a $117 million loan guarantee through the Recovery Act for the Kahuku Wind

  14. Obama Administration Announces Additional $16,956,700 for Local Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvements in Idaho | Department of Energy 6,956,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Idaho Obama Administration Announces Additional $16,956,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Idaho March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON DC - Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native American tribes.

  15. Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvements in Alaska | Department of Energy Additional $13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON DC - Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native

  16. Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvements in Wisconsin | Department of Energy 7,157,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Wisconsin Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Wisconsin March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native American

  17. Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2008-11-15

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Secretary Chu Highlights More Than 1,800 Electric Vehicle Chargers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Installed Under the Recovery Act | Department of Energy More Than 1,800 Electric Vehicle Chargers Installed Under the Recovery Act Secretary Chu Highlights More Than 1,800 Electric Vehicle Chargers Installed Under the Recovery Act May 13, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis LOS ANGELES - As part of the Obama Administration's comprehensive plan to address rising gas prices and reduce oil imports one-third by 2025, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that to date, more than 1,800 electric

  19. Obama Administration Announces Additional $14,003,800 for Local Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvements in West Virginia | Department of Energy 003,800 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in West Virginia Obama Administration Announces Additional $14,003,800 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in West Virginia March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native

  20. Analysis of Alloy 600 and X-750 stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.D.; Lewis, N.; Krasodomski, H.

    1993-06-01

    A few months ago, KAPL evidence supported the view that Primary or Pure Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 results from a hydrogen mechanism. Figure 1 shows an Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) analysis of a stress corrosion crack (SCC) crack in an A600 split tube U-bend specimen exposed to primary water at 338{degree}C (640{degrees}F) for 462 days. The features which appear to confirm a hydrogen mechanism are: (1) A very narrow (< 200 {angstrom}) crack with a sharp tip, nearly free of deposits. (2) No evidence of severe plastic deformation in the region immediately ahead of the crack tip. (3) A line of small voids preceding the main crack tip, of which the largest is about 5 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm in length. Shen and Shewmon proposed that PWSCC of Alloy 600 occurs due to small microvoids ahead of a main crack tip. The hypothesis is that such voids result from pockets of methane gas formed by the reaction of atomic hydrogen with carbon in the base metal. The voids are about 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm diameter, approximately a factor of 2 larger than the largest voids.

  1. Predicting susceptibility of alloy 600 to intergranular stress corrosion cracking using a modified electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, M.K.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, J.H.

    1995-06-01

    Modified double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) tests were applied to evaluate the degree of sensitization (DOS) for alloy 600 aged at 700 C. Results of the modified DL-EPR test were compared to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibilities determined in deaerated 0.01 M sodium tetrathionate under deformation at a constant strain rate of 0.93 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/s. By analyzing the effects of solution concentration, temperature, and scan rate on the electrochemical response in the EPR tests and the morphologies, the optimal modified DL-EPR test condition for alloy 600 was obtained in 0.01 M sulfuric acid + 10 ppm potassium thiocyanate at 25 C and at a scan rate of 0.5 mV/s. The standard DL-EPR test, performed under conditions of 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M KCNS at 30 C and a scan rate of 1.67 mV/s, provided very poor discriminating power for various DOS of alloy 600 because general and pitting corrosion occurred, in addition to intergranular corrosion. The modified test, however, was highly discriminating because of its highly selective corrosion attack at grain boundaries. IGSCC occurred in samples of alloy 600 aged for < 20 h, and susceptibility to IGSCC{sub s} increased with decreasing aging times up to 1 h, showing maximum IGSCC{sub s} in the sample aged for 1 h. IGSCC{sub s} for the alloy was found to be associated closely with the chromium-depleted profile across grain boundaries. The deeper and narrower chromium-depleted zone produced greater IGSCC{sub s}. It was demonstrated that DOS measured by the modified DL-EPR test was correlated more closely with IGSCC{sub s} than was DOS measured by the standard EPR test. This correlation resulted from the fact that the modified EPR test selectively attacked the more deeply chromium-depleted regions in comparison to the standard EPR test.

  2. Ford Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Powered F-700 May Set Sales Records

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    he introduction in 1992 of an American-made truck with a fully factory-installed/war- ranted liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) engine represents another "Ford first" in the alternative fuel arena. Now the company has introduced an LPG- powered F-700, a medium/heavy- duty truck. According to Tom Steckel, Ford's medium-duty marketing man- ager, Ford's latest sales figures already prove the alternative fuel F-700's popularity. With a little more than 10 months of the model year finished, Ford

  3. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    down" "PSTRE","'Parts1-2'F25","-","-" ... "PZIP4","'Parts1-2'R26","AND(LEN(PZIP4)4,ISNUMB... 1 - 31." "DBA","'Parts1-2'H21","-","-" ...

  4. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Email: Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 City: State: Zip: - Secure File Transfer: Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Questions? ...

  5. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Residual Fuel Oil 511 Asphalt and Road Oil 931 * Includes propane, propylene, ethane, ethylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, isobutylene, and pentanes plus. Quantities ...

  6. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm sulfur (incl.) 466 Greater than 500 ppm sulfur 467 Total 999 * Includes propane, propylene, ethane, ethylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, ...

  7. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Other Oxygenates 445 Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG): EthaneEthylene, TOTAL 108 Ethane - LRG 641 Ethylene 631 PropanePropylene, TOTAL 246 ...

  8. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG):" "EthaneEthylene, TOTAL",108,,,... "Ethane - LRG",641 "Ethylene",631 "PropanePropylene, TOTAL",246,,,... "Propane - ...

  9. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...Parts1-2'O29","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  10. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...arts1-2'R29","AND(LEN(zip4)4,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip4)))","Enter a valid zip code ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  11. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...arts1-3'R27","AND(LEN(zip4)4,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip4)))","Enter a valid zip code ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  12. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other ...

  13. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  14. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar has been postponed until further notice. The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  15. Y-12 helps more than 600 kids for the holidays | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Y-12 helps more than 600 kids for ... Y-12 helps more than 600 kids for the holidays WATE...

  16. Title 50 CFR 600 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50 CFR 600 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 50 CFR 600...

  17. Coming: 12,600 megawatts at Itaipu Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Moraes, J.

    1983-08-01

    This paper describes the hydroelectric plant being constructed jointly by Brazil and Paraguay on Itaipu Island in the Parana River. The planned generating capacity of 12,600 MW will make the Itaipu plant the world's largest. It will employ the most powerful hydrogenerators and turbines yet built, the world's largest concentration of 500-kilovolt gas-insulated switchgear, the highest dc transmission voltages and power--600 kV and 6300 MW--ever used, about 1000 kilometers of 765-kV ac transmission, and an extensive computer-based digital supervisory system in which continuous diagnostic evaluation of equipment is emphasized. To maintain national standards, nine generators will operate at 60 hertz for Brazil and nine at 50 hertz for Paraguay. Initially, any excess electricity available from the Paraguay generators will be routed to Brazil, but Paraguay is ultimately expected to share in half the Itaipu generation. The paper discusses the plant from its original feasibility studies to the newly created technologies which its size necessitated. The environmental impact on forests, farmlands and wildlife resulting from the construction of the Itaipu dam and the loss of the 1400 square kilometers which it flooded--including the popular Seven Waterfalls--is addressed. References to other papers as well as a symposium on the Itaipu project are cited.

  18. 36 CFR Part 800: Protection of Historic Properties (2000, amended 2004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties and afford the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) a reasonable opportunity to comment on these undertakings. The ACHP's regulations at 36 CFR Part 800 establish the process that federal agencies must follow to comply with Section 106.

  19. Relative fluorescent efficiency of sodium salicylate between 90 and 800 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, G.C.; Samson, J.A.R.; Williams, G.

    1986-01-01

    The relative fluorescent quantum efficiency of sodium salicylate was measured between 90 and 800 eV (138 -15 A) by the use of synchrotron radiation. A general increase in efficiency was observed in this spectral range except for abrupt decreases in efficiency at the carbon and oxygen K-edges. Beyond the oxygen K-edge (532 eV) the efficiency increased linearly with the incident photon energy to the limit of the present observations.

  20. Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $800 Million from Recovery Act to Accelerate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Research and Commercialization | Department of Energy 0 Million from Recovery Act to Accelerate Biofuels Research and Commercialization Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $800 Million from Recovery Act to Accelerate Biofuels Research and Commercialization May 5, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the ongoing effort to increase the use of domestic renewable fuels, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced plans to provide $786.5 million from the American

  1. 10 CFR 600.325 - Intellectual Property Provisions (GDLB-1003) Grant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 10 CFR 600.325 - Intellectual Property Provisions (GDLB-1003) Grant 10 CFR 600.325 - Intellectual Property Provisions (GDLB-1003) Grant Special Data Statute Research, Development, or Demonstration Large Businesses, State and Local Governments, and Foreign Entities PDF icon 10 CFR 600.325 - Intellectual Property Provisions (GDLB-1003) Grant More Documents & Publications Intellectual Property Provisions (GDLB-115) Grant - Special Data Statute Research, Development, or

  2. Preliminary Results Of A 600 Joules Small Plasma Focus Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-07-07

    Preliminary results of a 600 J (3.7 muF, 18 kV) Mather type plasma focus device operated at low pressure will be presented. The discharge is formed between a solid anode with length of 6 cm and six symmetrically and coaxially arranged cathode rods of same lengths. The cathode base is profiled in a knife-edge design and a set of coaxial plasma gun are attached to it in order to initiate the breakdown and enhance the current sheath formation. The experiments have been performed in argon gas under a low pressure condition of several microbars. The discharge current and the voltage across the electrodes during the discharge are measured with high voltage probe and current coil. The current and voltage characteristics are used to determine the possible range of operating pressure that gives good focusing action. At a narrow pressure regime of 9.0+-0.5 mubar, focusing action is observed with good reproducibility. Preliminary result of ion beam energy is presented. More work will be carried out to investigate the radiation output.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congleton, J.; Parkins, R.N.; Hemsworth, B.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests have been performed on specimens cut from four separate heats of alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Material was tested in the mill annealed and thermally stabilized conditions and after various low temperature aging treatments. Only limited cracking was observed, even for tests at 340/sup 0/C, but the initiation of intergranular cracking was easier on the inner than on the outer surfaces of the tubing. Polarization data has been obtained in high temperature water and in saturated boric acid and saturated lithium hydroxide at the atmospheric boiling points, and slow strain tests were performed at controlled potentials in these environments. Again, only very short cracks formed during the slow strain rate tests which were performed at a strain rate of about 10/sup -6/ s/sup -1/. The data is discussed in terms of the probable crack tip strain rates that would exist in these tests and at other strain rates. It is argued that if cracking occurs, the main role of very low strain rate tests is to provide time for initiation and crack growth, so that cyclic loading or intermittent loading long tests are likely to be more successful in sustaining crack growth in this alloy.

  4. DOE/NV/11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES by Daryl J. Thomé Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193-8521 Bruce W. Hurley, Ph.D. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193 ABSTRACT The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) to coordinate all off-site radiological response

  5. New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 2003 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 2004 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 89,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 2005 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 2006 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,800 83,124 83,124 83,124

  6. DOE/NV--471 UC-700 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    471 UC-700 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office on on on on : ed : 2 Approved for public release; further distribution is authorized. E nv i r onm ent a l R es t or a t i D i v i s i N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i P r oj ect C or r ect i v e A ct i on D eci s i D ocu m ent , S econd Ga s S t a t i on, Tonopa h Tes t R a nge, N ev a da ( C or r ect i v e A ct i on U ni t N o. 403) C ont r ol l ed C opy N o.U ncont r ol l R ev i s i on N o. N ov em ber 1997 This report

  7. Effect of lithium hydroxide on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacko, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) studies were performed on Alloy 600 in simulated PWR high lithium primary water. Tests were conducted at 330{degree}C with Li concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM in solutions containing boric acid and dissolved hydrogen. Highly stressed, Alloy 600 reverse U-bend specimens (RUBs) were predominantly used for tests. Both mill-annealed (MA) and thermally treated (TT) Alloy 600 were tested. The large number of specimens tested allowed the use of rigorous statistical techniques to interpret the variability of PWSCC performance. Results of tests of MA 600 RUBs at 2 stress levels show no effect of chemistry on the time to initiate PWSCC cracks over the range from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM Li. However, results for TT 600 RUBs and in MA 600 RUBs at a third stress level show the tendency for a shorter time to initiate PWSCC cracks at a Li concentration of 3.5 ppM. Analysis suggests that certain Alloy 600 components may experience an increase in PWSCC by using the higher LI content primary water due to a subtle influence of chemistry on PWSCC. 5 refs. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A Comparison of New TATBs, FK-800 binder and LX-17-like PBXs to Legacy Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

    2009-05-01

    Two newly synthesized versions of the insensitive high explosive (IHE) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzenes (TATBs) were compared to two legacy explosives currently used by the Department of Energy. Except for thermal analysis, small scale safety tests could not distinguish between the different synthetic routes. Morphologies of new TATBs were less faceted and more spherical. The particle size distribution of one new material was similar to legacy TATBs, but the other was very fine. Densities and submicron structure of the new TATBs were also significantly different from the legacy explosives. Pressed pellets of the new explosives were less dense. New FK-800 binder was used to prepare LX-17-like plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) from new and wet aminated TATB. Some mechanical, thermal and performance characterization of the new binder and LX-17-like PBXs was done. Significant differences were found. The reason for a number of these differences is not well understood.

  9. Processing results of 1,800 gallons of mercury and radioactively contaminated mixed waste rinse solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesen, B.P.

    1993-01-01

    The mercury-contaminated rinse solution (INEL waste ID{number_sign} 123; File 8 waste) was successfully treated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This waste was generated during the decontamination of the Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment 3 (HTRE-3) reactor shield tank. Approximately 1,800 gal of waste was generated and was placed into 33 drums. Each drum contained precipitated sludge material ranging from 1--10 in. in depth, with the average depth of about 2.5 in. The pH of each drum varied from 3--11. The bulk liquid waste had a mercury level of 7.0 mg/l, which exceeded the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) limit of 0.2 mg/l. The average liquid bulk radioactivity was about 2.1 pCi/ml, while the average sludge contamination was about 13,800 pci/g. Treatment of the waste required separation of the liquid from the sludge, filtration, pH adjustment, and ion exchange. Because of difficulties in processing, three trials were required to reduce the mercury levels to below the RCRA limit. In the first trial, insufficient filtration of the waste allowed solid particulate produced during pH adjustment to enter into the ion exchange columns and ultimately the waste storage tank. In the second trial, the waste was filtered down to 0.1 {mu} to remove all solid mercury compounds. However, before filtration could take place, a solid mercury complex dissolved and mercury levels exceeded the RCRA limit after filtration. In the third trial, the waste was filtered through 0.3-A filters and then passed through the S-920 resin to remove the dissolved mercury. The resulting solution had mercury levels at 0.0186 mg/l and radioactivity of 0.282 pCi/ml. This solution was disposed of at the TAN warm waste pond, TAN782, TSF-10.

  10. Wind Energy Supporting 600,000 Jobs by 2050 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supporting 600,000 Jobs by 2050 Wind Energy Supporting 600,000 Jobs by 2050 March 12, 2015 - 12:20pm Addthis Wind Energy Supporting 600,000 Jobs by 2050 Jose Zayas Jose Zayas Office Director, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Supporting thousands of jobs at manufacturing facilities and in supporting services throughout the country, the wind industry is already a major contributor to America's clean energy economy. A new Energy Department report highlights how the growth of the U.S.

  11. Description of the OSU APEX test facility to assess AP600 passive safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Lau, L.K.; Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Groome, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to describe the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility, which is a new integral system test facility located at Oregon State University (OSU) specifically scaled, designed, and built to simulate all of the important geometrical details of the Westinghouse AP600. The APEX facility has been designed and constructed to develop a database that can be used to validate the thermal hydraulic safety analysis codes that will be used in the AP600 design certification process. The test facility has been specifically designed and scaled to model small break loss-of-coolant and long-term cooling transients, which utilize the AP600 passive safety systems.

  12. Energy Department Announces Major Recovery Act Milestone: 600,000 Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherized Three Months Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy Major Recovery Act Milestone: 600,000 Homes Weatherized Three Months Ahead of Schedule Energy Department Announces Major Recovery Act Milestone: 600,000 Homes Weatherized Three Months Ahead of Schedule December 15, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that states and territories across the nation have reached the goal of weatherizing more than 600,000 low-income homes-

  13. Energy Department Invests $600,000 in University-Industry Partnerships to Enhance Building Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced $600,000 in funding to help American universities to establish stronger partnerships with industry and business in the area of building efficiency, supporting...

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloys 600 and 182 in BWR environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Hofling, C.G.; Sahlberg, A.; Moeller, J. )

    1992-05-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and weldments of Alloy 182 are being tested for initiation and propagation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Crack initiation is tested on compact tension (CT) specimens with U-notches of various radii under enhanced crevice conditions, in a test loop in a Swedish BWR. After one year exposure there was initiation of IGSCC in a large portion of the Alloy 182 specimens, but nearly no initiation in Alloy 600. Crack propagation was measured in a laboratory loop on CT specimens under constant or cyclic load. Low carbon Alloy 600, or Alloy 182 high in titanium and niobium versus carbon, cracked at lower rates than material with high carbon activity. Materials with low concentrations of phosphorus and sulfur cracked slower than those high in these elements in clean environment, but no such effect was found in environment with sulfate. Alloy 182 weld metal generally cracked at higher rates than Alloy 600.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloys 600 and 182 in BWR environments. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Hofling, C.G.; Sahlberg, A.; Moeller, J.

    1992-05-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and weldments of Alloy 182 are being tested for initiation and propagation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Crack initiation is tested on compact tension (CT) specimens with U-notches of various radii under enhanced crevice conditions, in a test loop in a Swedish BWR. After one year exposure there was initiation of IGSCC in a large portion of the Alloy 182 specimens, but nearly no initiation in Alloy 600. Crack propagation was measured in a laboratory loop on CT specimens under constant or cyclic load. Low carbon Alloy 600, or Alloy 182 high in titanium and niobium versus carbon, cracked at lower rates than material with high carbon activity. Materials with low concentrations of phosphorus and sulfur cracked slower than those high in these elements in clean environment, but no such effect was found in environment with sulfate. Alloy 182 weld metal generally cracked at higher rates than Alloy 600.

  16. Department of Energy Awards $600,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development Council Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $600,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development Council Community Reuse Organization

  17. A Combustion Model for the TWA 800 Center-Wing Fuel Tank Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1998-10-02

    In support of the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the TWA Flight 800 accident, a combined experimental/computational effort was conducted that focused on quarter-scale testing and simulation of the fuel-air explosion in the Boeing 747 center wing fuel tank. This report summarizes the modeling approach used at Sandia National Laboratories. In this approach approximations are introduced that capture the essential physics associated with turbulent flame propagation in multiple compartment fuel tanks. This model efficiently defines the pressure loading conditions during a jet-fuel air explosion in a fuel tank confinement. Modeling calculations compare favorably with a variety of experimental quarter-scale tests conducted in rigid confinement. The modeling describes well the overpressure history in several geometry configurations. Upon demonstrating a reasonable comparison to experimental observations, a parametric study of eight possible ignition sources is then discussed. Model calculations demonstrate that different loading conditions arise as the location of the ignition event is varied. By comparing the inferred damage and calculated impulses to that seen in the recovered tank, it maybe possible to reduce the number of likely sources. A possible extension of this work to better define tank damage includes coupling the combustion model as a pressure loading routine for structural failure analysis.

  18. Stress relief to prevent stress corrosion in the transition region of expanded Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    The feasibility of preventing primary side roll transition cracking has been investigated, using induction heating to attain stress relief of expanded Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Work on rolled tubing and U-bends has shown that temperatures with which stress relief can be obtained range from 700 to 850/sup 0/C, with lower temperatures in this range requiring longer times at temperature to provide the requisite reduction in residual stresses. No work has yet been done outside this range. Preliminary tests, using induction heating, have been carried out on a mock tube sheet assembly, designed to the dimensions of a typical steam generator, and have identified the type of heating/cooling cycle that would occur in the tube sheet during a stress relief operation. Preliminary results show that the times to reach the higher temperatures in the range observed to give stress relief, of the order of 850/sup 0/C, can be as short as 8 seconds, and less with optimum coil design and power control.

  19. Surface and grain boundary segregation, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue of Inconel 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smialowska, S.; Cragnolino, G.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1985-03-01

    The stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 in environments related to nuclear power systems was studied in relation to the role of segregation in the alloy. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the surface segregation of different impurities in Inconel 600 as a function of heat-to-heat variation and heat treatment. The degree of segregation of various elements (S, P, N, Ti, Si, and C) on the fracture surface of nickel was also evaluated as a function of the heat treatment employed, temperature, and cooling rate. The effects of alloying elements, added to nickel with the aim of reducing sulfur segregation to grain boundaries, was also studied. The susceptibility of nickel to intergranular corrosion in acidic and alkaline solutions at different potentials was measured as a function of sulfur segregation to the grain boundaries. The effect of heat treatment and applied potential on the caustic stress corrosion cracking susceptibiliy of Inconel 600 was studied in concentrated NaOH solutions at 140/sup 0/C using the slow strain rate technique. The corrosion fatigue resistance of Inconel Alloy 600 in concentrated NaOH solutions at 140/sup 0/C was evaluated as a function of heat treatment conditions using smooth bar specimens. The results have shown that the stress corrosion behavior of Inconel 600 in caustic solutions differs greatly from that in acidic and nearly neutral environments. Furthermore, sensitization by heat treatment was found to be beneficial under caustic corrosion conditions but detrimental in acidic environments.

  20. Primary water stress corrosion crack growth rates in Alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, R.G.; Jacko, R.J.; Gold, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    Direct measurements of SCC crack growth rates have been used to determine the effects of changes in PWR primary water chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Reversing current DC potential measurement techniques have been adapted for use on thin walled tubing containing through-wall circumferential cracks. These techniques have been used to monitor crack rates in Alloy 600 tubing exposed to typical PWR primary water chemistries at 330{degrees}C. Crack growth rate studies, conducted under well defined stress intensity conditions, provide a sensitivity in the assessment of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility that is not possible using more traditional techniques. Preliminary studies have been conducted to determine the effects of B and Li concentrations on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of Alloy 600 tubing.

  1. Primary water stress corrosion cracking inspection ranking scheme for Alloy 600 components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, P.H.; Gangadharan, A.; Ramalingam, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    Palisades Nuclear Plant has developed a comprehensive inspection program to support safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of all Alloy 600 nozzles and safe ends in the primary coolant system (PCS). As a part of the Palisades Alloy 600 Project, an inspection prioritization scheme was developed to help the plant focus its resources on high risk components and plan appropriate inspection activities for the other components. The inspection prioritization scheme is based on the susceptibility of the components to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC), component failure consequences, component leak detectability and component radiation exposure. The scheme provides a simple, systematic and technical base for selecting Alloy 600 components for inspection. The scheme, however, could be used to develop an inspection schedule or to select the highest priority components for mitigation or replacement.

  2. Results from the NRC AP600 testing program at the Oregon State University APEX facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Bessette, D.E.; DiMarzo, M.

    1996-03-01

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU) is performing a series of confirmatory tests for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These tests are being conducted in the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) facility which is a 1/4 length scale and 1/192 volume scale integral system simulation of the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe (AP600) plant. The purpose of the testing program is to examine AP600 passive safety system performance, particularly during long term cooling. Thus far, OSU has successfully performed ten integral system tests for the NRC. This paper presents a description of the APEX facility and summarizes the important results of the NRC test program at OSU.

  3. Comparative Study of Station Blackout Counterpart Tests in APEX and ROSA/AP600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafi, Abd Y.; Reyes, Jose N. Jr.

    2000-05-15

    A comparison is presented between station blackout tests conducted in both the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) facility and in the modified Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA/AP600) Large-Scale Test Facility. The comparison includes the depressurization and liquid-level behavior during secondary-side blowdown, natural circulation, automatic depressurization system operation, and in-containment refueling water storage tank injection. Reasonable agreement between the test results from APEX NRC-2 and ROSA/AP600 AP-BO-01 has been observed with respect to the timing of depressurization and liquid draining rates. This indicates that the reduced height and pressure scaling of APEX preserves the sequence of events relative to the full-height and pressure ROSA/AP600.

  4. Comparison of SPES-2 and APEX tests to examine AP600 integral system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Reyes, J.N. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a series of tests in the SPES-2 facility (Simulatore Per Esperienze di Sicurezza--Simulator for Safety Experimental Analysis) in Piacenza, Italy and in the APEX (Advanced Plant Experiment) facility, at Oregon State University. These testing programs are designed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic performance of the passive safety systems (gravity driven injection, natural convection, and passive cooling) of the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe pressurized water reactor (AP600). They are also designed to obtain data that can be used to assess and validate the safety analysis techniques and computer codes being used to predict the transient system behavior of the AP600. This paper presents a comparison of the two test facility designs and the results of counterpart tests.

  5. Evaluation of the 2008 Lexus LS 600H Hybrid Synergy Drive System (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Evaluation of the 2008 Lexus LS 600H Hybrid Synergy Drive System Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of the 2008 Lexus LS 600H Hybrid Synergy Drive System × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  6. Performance of Diffusion Aluminide Coatings Applied on Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Deepak; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Zhang, Ying; Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Armstrong, Beth L; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    High performance cast stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, is a low cost alloy with prospective applications ranging from covers and casings of small and medium size gas turbines to turbocharger housing and manifolds in internal combustion engines. Diffusion aluminide coatings were applied on this alloy as a potential strategy for improved oxidation resistance, particularly in wet air and steam. In this paper the performance of the aluminide coatings evaluated by cyclic oxidation experiments in air containing 10 vol.% H2O at 800 C and conventional tension-compression low-cycle-fatigue tests in air at 800 C with a strain range of 0.5% is presented. The results show that specimens coated by a chemical vapor deposition process provide better oxidation resistance than those coated by an Al-slurry coating process. The application of a coating by pack cementation reduced the fatigue life by 15%.

  7. Predicting Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 using Phase Properties Characterized by In-Situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2010-05-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is a typical representative of 1st generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) which exhibits a combination of high strength and excellent ductility due to its multiphase microstructure. In this paper, we study the crack propagation behavior and fracture resistance of a TRIP 800 steel using a microstructure-based finite element method with the various phase properties characterized by in-situ high energy Xray diffraction (HEXRD) technique. Uniaxial tensile tests on the notched TRIP 800 sheet specimens were also conducted, and the experimentally measured tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were used to calibrate the modeling parameters and to validate the overall modeling results. The comparison between the simulated and experimentally measured results suggests that the micromechanics based modeling procedure can well capture the overall complex crack propagation behaviors and the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. The methodology adopted here may be used to estimate the fracture resistance of various multiphase materials.

  8. Stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel alloy 600 in high-temperature water: an update. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    Inconel 600 has been tested in high-temperature aqueous media (without oxygen) in several tests. Data are presented to relate failure times to periods of crack initiation and propagation. Quantitative relationships have been developed from tests in which variations were made in temperature, applied load, strain rate, water chemistry, and the condition of the test alloy.

  9. A study of the mechanism of primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourgues, A.F.; Andrieu, E.; Scott, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Two aspects of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water have been studied in detail. Results are presented showing that grain boundaries of Alloy 600 are embrittled to a depth of several microns by exposure to primary water in an unstressed condition. It has been established that this embrittlement is not reversible by high temperature degassing and cannot be directly due to hydrogen. The results seem to support the hypothesis that oxygen atom penetration of grain boundaries is possible. However, no evidence of formation of grain boundary gas bubbles or oxides has been found. It is envisaged that this embrittlement process could sequentially act at the tip of a growing stress corrosion crack. The second phenomenon under study has been the plastic deformation behavior of Alloy 600 since it is known that cold work and stress have an important effect on stress corrosion cracking sensitivity. Results of plastic deformation during cyclic straining at various controlled strain rates are presented showing that Alloy 600 is not very sensitive to loading history and that cold work is of an essentially kinematic nature.

  10. Laser Peening of Alloy 600 to Improve Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Rankin, J; Hackel, L; Frederick, G; Hickling, J; Findlan, S

    2004-04-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surface of metals or alloys. This treatment can reduce the rate of intergranular stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracking in structural metals or Alloy 600 needed for nuclear power plants.

  11. Lead-induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, T.; Senjuh, T.; Aoki, K.; Shigemitsu, T.; Kishi, Y.

    1992-12-31

    Lead is one of the potential contributing impurities to the degradation of PWR steam generator tubing. Recent laboratory testing has shown that lead is a corrosive material for Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. However, it is still unknown how lead influences the corrosion of steam generator tubing, including the effect of lead concentration, solution pH, stress level and material characteristics. In this study, two kinds of experiments were performed. One was to investigate the thin film characteristic and selectively dissolved base metal elements of Alloy 600MA in high temperature solutions of different lead concentrations and pH. The other investigated the dependency of degradation of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT on lead concentration and stress level in mild acidic environment, at 340{degrees}C for 2500 hrs. It was firstly demonstrated that lead-enhanced selective dissolution of nickel from alloy base metal, as a result of electrochemical reaction between lead and nickel, might cause the initiation and propagation of corrosion. Secondly, we showed that Alloy 690TT, generally very corrosion resistant material, also suffered from Pb-induced corrosion. The difference of the lead-induced stress corrosion morphology of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT was also clarified.

  12. Influence of product type on stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Briceno, D.; Blazquez, F.; Hernandez, F.

    1999-03-01

    Grain-boundary carbide coverage obtained from metallographic replications has been considered as an estimation of SCC susceptibility of alloy 600 components in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) primary water. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation tests were carried out on alloy 600 (UNS N06600) in primary water at 325 C and 360 C and in steam with hydrogen at 400 C to gain some insight into the SCC behavior of different alloy 600 products. Forged bars, thick-walled tubes (cold-worked and hot-worked), and steam generator (SG) tubing with different thermomechanical histories were tested. As expected, materials with a high density of intergranular carbide were more resistant to cracking in high-temperature water than materials with few carbides in the grain boundary. However, materials with similar microstructures but different thermomechanical histories presented different SCC susceptibilities. In general, forged bars were more resistant than thick-walled materials with similar grain-boundary carbide coverage. Cold-worked materials (thick-walled tubes and SG tubing) presented similar behaviors. However, appearance of intergranular fractures at high magnification seemed to be related to the SCC behavior of alloy 600 in steam and in primary water. More resistant materials exhibited pseudointergranular fractures.

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750800C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750800C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  14. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  15. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in all volatile treated water at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theus, G.J.; Emanuelson, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes a continuing study of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Inconel alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile treated (AVT) water. Specimens of alloys 600 and 690 are being exposed to AVT water at 288/sup 0/, 332/sup 0/, 343/sup 0/, and 360/sup 0/C. Alloy 600 generally resists SCC in high-purity water under normal service conditions but is susceptible under other specific conditions. In general, mill-annealed alloy 600 is more susceptible than stress-relieved material. Susceptibility to SCC increases rapidly with increasing exposure temperature. Very high stresses (near or above yield) are required to induce cracking in AVT or other high-purity waters. Most of the data presented in this report are for alloy 600; alloy 690 has not yet cracked. However, the program is being continued and will subsequently characterize the high-purity water cracking behavior, if any, of alloy 690.

  17. The Department of Energy's $700 Million Smart Grid Demonstration Program Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, OAS-RA-13-08

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    $700 Million Smart Grid Demonstration Program Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 OAS-RA-13-08 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 17, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's $700 Million Smart Grid Demonstration Program Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department

  18. Stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel alloy 600 in high-temperature water - an update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Van Rooyen, D.

    1984-08-01

    An experimental program on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) aimed at the development of a quantitative model for predicting the behavior of Inconel 600 tubing in high temperature water is described. Empirical data are gathered to relate factors that influence SCC. Work involves U-bends, constant extension rate tests (CERT), and constant load. Plots are made of failure time and crack velocity vs temperature, and also of SCC time vs stress, using a variety of environments related to the ingredients of primary or secondary water. Cold work of Alloy 600 is also included. The effect of temperature is found to yield-semi-log (Arrhenius) curves, and log-log plots of failure time vs stress are presented. Curves of this type are being evaluated for use in extrapolating accelerated test data to operating conditions for predictive purposes. 5 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Stress corrosion crack detection in alloy 600 in high temperature caustic. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, B.W.

    1996-06-01

    Alloy 600, the material used for pressurized water reactor steam generator tubing, is susceptible to environmentally assisted stress corrosion cracking. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) attacks the tubes in areas of high residual stress, and in crevice regions. No method has been successfully developed to monitor steam generator tubing in-situ for crack initiation and growth. Essentially all available published IGSCC crack growth data for alloy 600 is based on non-tubing material. Although it is very likely that the current data base is applicable to tubing processing, differences between tube and other geometries make a comparison between tubing and other data important for verification purposes. However, obtaining crack initiation and growth data from tubing is difficult due to the geometry and the thin wall thickness.

  20. About the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Alloy 600 is a material commonly used to construct the tubing in the steam generators (SG) of pressurized light water reactors (PWR) and of CANDU heavy water reactors. It is well established which variables and to which extent they influence the crack growth rate (CGR) in Alloy 600 exposed to high temperature (deaerated) water (HTW), especially in very aggressive conditions. There is evidence that the same variables that influence CGR also control the crack induction time. However, there are only a few data on crack induction time and no detailed explanation of the events that lead to the nucleation of a crack on an apparent smooth tube surface. In this paper, a critical review of the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is given and, an interpretation of the events occurring during the long ({approx} 15 y) induction times observed in plant is postulated.

  1. Observations and insights into Pb-assisted stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2005-08-15

    Pb-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (PbSCC) of Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing in high-temperature-water service and laboratory tests were studied by analytical transmission electron microscopy of cross-sectioned samples. Examinations of pulled tubes from many pressurized water reactors revealed lead in cracks from 11 of 17 samples. Comparisons of the degraded intergranular structures with ones produced in simple laboratory tests with PbO in near-neutral AVT water showed that the PbSCC characteristics in service tubing could be reproduced without complex chemistries and heat-flow conditions that can occur during plant operation. Observations of intergranular and transgranular cracks promoted by Pb in the test samples also provided new insights into the mechanisms of PbSCC in mill-annealed and thermally treated Alloy 600.

  2. Critical analysis of alloy 600 stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in primary water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rios, R. |; Noel, D.; Bouvier, O. de; Magnin, T.

    1995-04-01

    In order to study the mechanisms involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 in primary water, the influence of the relevance of physicochemical and metallurgical parameters was assessed: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, microstructure, and local chemical composition. The obtained results show that, even if the dissolution/oxidation seems to be the first and necessary step responsible for crack initiation and if hydrogen effects can also be involved in cracking, neither a dissolution/oxidation model nor a hydrogen model appears sufficient to account for cracking. Moreover, fractographic examinations performed on specimens` fracture surfaces lead to the fact that attention should be paid to a cleavage like microcracking mechanism involving interactions between corrosion and plasticity at the vicinity of grain boundaries. A corrosion-enhanced plasticity model is proposed to describe the intergranular and transgranular cracking in Alloy 600.

  3. Effect of silicon compounds on stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in caustic solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navas, M.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Garcia-Mazario, M.; McIlree, A.R.

    1999-07-01

    Silicon compounds are abundant in both steam generator tube deposits removed from operating plants and in the hideout return analyses performed during plant operation. Despite their abundance, the effect of these compounds on the susceptibility to intergranular attack (IGA) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) has not been established clearly in laboratory tests or under operating conditions. The present work studied the effect of different compounds of silicon, such as silica (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium metasilicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}), on the susceptibility to IGA/SCC of alloy 600 in caustic solutions, with and without impurities. Experimental work included measurement of potentiodynamic polarization curves and development of stress corrosion tests with potentiostatic control at 315 C. Results of both tests indicated an inhibiting effect of silicon compounds on stress corrosion of mill-annealed (MA) alloy 600. Polarization curves in solutions with silicon compounds showed a wider range of passivation and a reduction in passive current density and anodic dissolution compared to the curves obtained in sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In corrosion tests performed in solutions containing silicon compounds, cracking appeared at only some of the potentials tested and with much reduced depth. Judging by the results obtained from analyses of the surface deposits, the inhibiting effect appeared to be related to the incorporation of silicon in the oxide layer. Regarding the effect of impurities, these have been observed not to be harmful for the response o alloy 600MA to IGA/SCC, and would appear even to improve this response in solutions containing silicon compounds, probably caused by the formation of insoluble silicates.

  4. Conceptual design features of the Kalimer-600 sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Dohee; Kim, Yeong-Il; Kim, Seong-O; Lee, Jae-Han; Lee, Yong-Bum; Jeong, Hae-Yong

    2007-07-01

    An advanced sodium cooled fast reactor concept, KALIMER-600, has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to satisfy the Gen-IV technology goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economics and proliferation resistance. The concept enables an efficient utilization of uranium resources and a reduction of the radioactive waste. The core design has been developed with a strong emphasis on a proliferation resistance by adopting a single enrichment fuel without blanket assemblies. In addition, a passive residual heat removal system, shortened intermediate heat-transport system piping and seismic isolation have been realized in the reactor system design as enhancements to its safety and economics. The inherent safety characteristics of the KALIMER-600 design were verified through a safety analysis of its bounding events. The results for various unprotected events imply that the KALIMER-600 design can accommodate all the analyzed ATWS events. This self-regulation capability of the power without a scram is mainly attributed to the inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms implemented in the metal fuel core design and completely passive decay heat removal system. (authors)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Sensitization and SCC (stress corrosion cracking) study on thermally treated inconel 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kai, J-J.; Huang, T.A.; Tsai, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was recently discovered to be the major cause of failure in Inconel 600 used in steam generator (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The failure of the Three Mile Island SG tubes has been attributed to low-temperature SCC in the sulfur-contaminated environment under cold shutdown conditions. Bandy et al. found that even in the 10{sup {minus}6} M Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} (or N{sub 2}S{sub 4}O{sub 6}) environment, the SCC would still be observable. This study investigates the effect of thermal treatment on the sensitization of Inconel 600 and studies the SCC behavior of this alloy in a sulfur-contaminated environment (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup {minus}2}) using constant load test. The results of this study can be used to correlate the SCC susceptibility to the degree of sensitization of Inconel 600 by defining a critical chromium concentration under the test conditions.

  7. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - diffusion capacitance C T (V) - transition capacitance V ac - arcing AC voltage - signal frequency -8.00E+03 -7.00E+03 -6.00E+03 -5.00E+03 -4.00E+03 -3.00E+03 -2.00E+03...

  8. LA-2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... V n VALUES OF P V R T FOR METHANE CALCULATED FROM THE BEATTIE-BRIDGEMAN EQUATION P , atmospheres 0,5 1 2 5 10 20 50 100 200 500 1000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 000 ...

  9. Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - National Training Program 8:00AM to 6:00PM EDT Multi-Agency Veterans Hiring Event 1:00PM to 5:00PM EDT 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2015 Women's Policy STEM Fair 5:00PM to 7:00PM EDT...

  10. Characterization of the Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 Sheet Steels Using Microstructure-Based Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, several studies conducted by automotive industry revealed the tremendous advantages of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is one of the typical representative of AHSS. This kind of materials exhibits high strength as well as high formability. Analyzing the crack behaviour in TRIP steels is a challenging task due to the microstructure level inhomogeneities between the different phases (Ferrite, Bainite, Austenite, Martensite) that constitute these materials. This paper aims at investigating the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. For this purpose, a micromechanical finite element model is developed based on the actual microstructure of a TRIP 800 steel. Uniaxial tensile tests on TRIP 800 sheet notched specimens were also conducted and tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were determined. The comparison between simulation and experimental results leads us to the conclusion that the method using microstructure-based representative volume element (RVE) captures well enough the complex behavior of TRIP steels. The effect of phase transformation, which occurs during the deformation process, on the toughness is observed and discussed.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile-treated water at elevated temperatures: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miglin, B.P.; Theus, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes stress corrosion (SCC) tests of Inconnel alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile treated (AVT) water. Specimens of alloys 600 and 690 were exposed to AVT water at 288/degree/, 332/degree/, 343/degree/, and 360/degree/C. Alloy 660 generally resists SCC in high-purity water at normal sevice temperatures, but is susceptible to SCC at higher temperatures. In general, mill-annealed alloy 600 is more susceptible than high-treated material with fine lacy grain boundary carbides. Very high stresses (near or above yield) are required to induce cracking of alloy 600 in AVT or other high-purity waters. For alloy 600, 78 of 520 alloy 600 specimens eventually cracked. Although exposed for less total time than alloy 600 specimens, no alloy 690 specimens cracked. Three alloy 600 specimens cracked in the same autoclave tests in less time than those accumulated by the alloy 690 specimens. Longitudinally-oriented ID cracks became evident on alloy 690 split-tube U-bend specimens after autoclave exposures. These cracks on the 690 specimens were from three to ten times longer after exposure than similar defects found on unexposed alloy 690 specimens. The longitudinal crack lengthening on the alloy 690 split-tube U-bend specimens may have been a stress relaxation process or possibly a crack opening process of pre-existing, partially closed, longitudinal defects. Similar cracks were present in alloy 600 specimens, but in at least one case SCC did initiate from these shallow, blunt cracks.

  12. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-30

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  13. Stress relief treatment of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Rooyen, D.; Cragnolino, C.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 tubing in the primary side of operating steam generators is the subject of this investigation. The objective of the program was to examine the feasibility of heat treatment to alleviate the IGSCC problem. In addition to this, tests were also performed to examine the IGSCC susceptibility of nuclear grade Alloy 600 tubing obtained from various sources. Examination of temperature-time combinations that may hold potential for improved IGSCC resistance of the transition regions of tubes expanded into tube sheet holes was done. The combinations fall in two categories. One is of short duration and relatively high temperature, where induction is the best method of heating because the treatment only lasts from some tens of seconds to a few minutes. The other is carried out in a lower temperature range and lasts for several hours. This latter combination of temperatures and times is considered for the so-called global heat treatment of entire tube sheet. To assess the effect of these treatments, reverse U-bend testing in high purity deaerated water containing an overpressure of hydrogen was employed and several heats of Alloy 600 were compared in tests at 365{degrees}C, which is well above actual operating temperatures of steam generators, but provides an accelerated test procedure. Results of furnace heating in the range of 550-610{degrees}C indicated improvement in IGSCC resistance, with best performance after a heat treatment at 610{degrees}C for nine hours. In addition to stress relief, carbide precipitation can also occur, and their relative contributions to the improvement is discussed.

  14. Energy Provisions of the ICC-700, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR Mapped to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Sullivan, Robin S.; Kora, Angela R.; Makela, Eric J.; Makela, Erin

    2011-05-06

    This document provides the results of a comparison of building energy efficient elements of the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR versions 2, 2.5, and 3.0 to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (2009 IECC). This comparison will provide a tool for states and local municipalities as they consider adoption of these programs. The comparison is presented in a series of appendices. The first appendix provides a summary chart that visually represents the comprehensive comparison of the programs to the 2009 IECC topic areas. Next there are a series of individual tables (one appendix for each program) that include the specific program mapping to the 2009 IECC elements with comments that briefly discuss how well the elements mapped. Finally, a comprehensive table is included that shows all five of the programs mapped to the 2009 IECC elements to allow a detailed comparison.

  15. EPA-600/4-82-061 DOE/DP/00539-046

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EPA-600/4-82-061 DOE/DP/00539-046 August 1982 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981 compiled by S. C. Black, R. F. Grossman, A. A. Mullen, G. D. Potter and D. D. Smith Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 and J. L. Hopper Reynolds Electrical igF;;ineering Company, Inc. Las Vegas, Nevada prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Memorandum of Understanding Number

  16. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  17. In-situ stress relief of expanded Alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.; McIlree, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is the most common cause of defects in steam generator tubing. Methods of averting tubing damage are constantly under review. This paper concentrates on the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking, initiated on the primary side, in the expansion transition region of roller expanded Alloy 600 tubing. In general it is believed that residual stresses, arising from the expansion process, are the cause of the problem. The work reported here discusses the identification and implementation of an optimal, in-situ stress relief treatment.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulischeck, T.S.; Van Rooyen, D.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear grade production tubing of Alloy 600 was evaluated for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high purity water at 365, 345, 325, and 290 C. Reverse tube U-bend specimens provided crack initiation data and constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in th crack propagation stage. Initial results indicate that a linear extrapolation of data received from high temperature tests can be used to predict the service life of steam generator tubing that has been plastically deformed or is continually deforming by ''denting.''

  19. Characteristics of acoustic emission during stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, K.Y.; Kim, I.S.; Yoon, Y.K.

    1997-10-15

    It is possible to detect by use of the acoustic emission (AE) technique the dynamic processes in stressed materials. In this study, the AE technique is applied to SCC of Inconel 600 due to depletion of chromium at grain boundaries to investigate the AE capability of detecting crack growth and to obtain the relation between AE characteristics and crack mechanisms such as fracture mode and crack growth rate during SCC. In addition, the generation of initial cracks was detected, and minimum crack size detectable with AE was determined to assess the potential of AE as a non-destructive method.

  20. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah J.; Saunders, Alexander

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomography on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.

  1. The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

    2003-04-05

    Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

  2. The relationship between observed stress corrosion cracking fracture morphology and microstructure in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symons, D.M.; Burke, M.G.; Foster, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructure is known to influence the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 600 in both hydrogenated water and steam environments. This study evaluated the relative SCC response of a single heat of Alloy 600 as a function of microstructure in a hydrogenated doped-steam environment. The 400 C doped-steam environment was selected for the SCC tests to accelerate cracking. The material was evaluated in three conditions: (1) as-received (2) as-annealed, and (3) as-annealed + 26% deformation. Microstructural characterization was performed using analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques for the evaluation of carbide type and morphology, and general structure. Constant displacement (bolt-loaded) compact tension specimens were used to induce SCC. The as-annealed and as-annealed plus cold worked samples had two fracture morphologies: a rough intergranular SCC fracture morphology and a smooth intergranular fracture morphology. The SCC fracture in the as-received specimens was characterized by a classic intergranular morphology at low magnification, consistent with the microstructural evaluation of cross-sectional metallographic samples. More detailed examination revealed a pseudo-intergranular fracture morphology. This pseudo-intergranular morphology appears to be comprised of very fine cleavage-like microfacets. These observations may assist in understanding the difference in SCC fracture morphologies as reported in the open literature.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Influencing factors, mechanisms and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; Rebak, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed critical review of the multiple variables affecting stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of in high temperature (deaerated) aqueous solutions is given. Most of the data in the literature deals with the cracking susceptibility in the primary side; however, it is clear that similar factors and to a similar extent influence the SCC susceptibility in both primary and secondary sides. Some factors such as alkalinity of the solution or presence of lead (Pb) may be more in the secondary side and others such as partial pressure of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the primary side. Even though the effect of the variables on SCC susceptibility is more or less established, in models, in most of the cases there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved. The different mechanisms and models proposed to explain the SCC of alloy 600 are briefly reviewed and their validity to explain the influence of the variables and to predict the crack growth rate (CGR), is assessed. It is concluded that several of the proposed models seem to give a fair estimate of the CGR values under certain conditions; however, it appears that a single mechanism cannot explain in detail the complex case of alloy 600 SCC. 113 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of heat treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, J.K.

    1999-12-01

    Constant elongation rate tests (CERT) were conducted to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of alloy 600 (UNS NO6600) in 140 C and 50% caustic solution at {minus}900 mV vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE). Results showed: (1) Heat treatment at low temperature for a long time (600 C for 260 h) led to a material that was not susceptible to caustic intergranular (IG) cracking. Increase in heat treatment temperature enhanced IG cracking susceptibility. Caustic IGSCC susceptibility was at maximum near the carbon solubility limit. However, when the heat treatment temperature was higher than the carbon solubility limit, a significant decrease in crack growth rate was observed. (2) Grain boundaries acted as a preferential crack path when grain boundary carbon segregation was likely. Thermodynamic considerations suggested that severe caustic IGSCC susceptibility near the carbon solubility limit could be explained in terms of carbon segregation at the grain boundaries. (3) IGSCC in caustic solution did not seem to be caused by chromium depletion. (4) Although formation of semi-continuous IG carbides and IGSCC resistance seemed to exhibit a similar chronological response with heat treatment, it was unlikely that grain boundary IG carbides played a role in caustic IGSCC susceptibility.

  5. Results from Alloy 600 And Alloy 690 Caustic SCC Model Boiler Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Frederick D.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2009-08-03

    A versatile model boiler test methodology was developed and used to compare caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690. The model boiler included simulated crevice devices that efficiently and consistently concentrated Na2CO3, resulting in volatilization of CO2 with the steam and concentration of NaOH at the tube surfaces. The test methodology also included variation in tube stress, either produced by the primary to secondary side pressure differential, or by a novel method that reproducibly yields a higher stress condition on the tube. The significant effect of residual stress on tube SCC was also considered. SCC of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were evaluated as a function of temperature and stress. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) evaluations of the cracks and the grain boundaries ahead of the cracks were performed, providing insight into the SCC mechanism. This model boiler test methodology may be applicable to a range of bulkwater secondary chemistries that concentrate to produce aggressive crevice environments.

  6. Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for Inconel 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huddleston, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. The new theory provided significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions than obtained using the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankins (maximum principal stress), for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel tested at 593 and 600{degrees}C respectively under different biaxial stress states. Additional results for Inconel 600 specimens tested at 816{degrees}C under tension-tension and tension-compression stress states are presented in this paper and show a factor of approximately 2.4 reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed lives as compared to the classical theories of von Mises and Tresca and a factor of about 5 as compared to the Rankins theory. A key feature of the theory, which incorporates the maximum deviatoric stress, the first invariant of the stress tensor, and the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, is its ability to distinguish between life under tensile versus compressive stress states.

  7. INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CUMMINS GD

    2010-11-11

    As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending preferential flowpath with several minor units running along a similar trend. This presumed path of preferential flow is compared with the tritium concentration levels observed for the 600 Area. Analysis of the magnetic field data shows the location of potential bedrock faults and lineaments which may influence the horizontal and vertical flow of water. Faults lying within, or in the vicinity of preferential groundwater flow paths may allow flow into or out of the otherwise confined basalt layers.

  8. Search for the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in {sup 68}Ni at 600 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Nicolini, R.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J.; Kmiecik, M.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Aumann, T.; Banu, A.; Beck, T.

    2009-03-06

    The {gamma} decay from Coulomb excitation of {sup 68}Ni at 600 MeV/nucleon on a Au target was measured using the RISING setup at the fragment separator of GSI. The {sup 68}Ni beam was produced by a fragmentation reaction of {sup 86}Kr at 900 MeV/nucleon on a {sup 9}Be target and selected by the fragment separator. The {gamma} rays produced at the Au target were measured with HPGe detectors at forward angles and with BaF{sub 2} scintillators at backward angles. The measured spectra show a peak centered at approximately 11 MeV, whose intensity can be explained in terms of an enhanced strength of the dipole response function (pygmy resonance). Such pygmy structure has been predicted in this unstable neutron-rich nucleus by theory.

  9. EPA-600/4-82-061 DOE/DP/00539-046

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPA-600/4-82-061 DOE/DP/00539-046 August 1982 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT R a d i a t i o n m o n i t o r i n g around U n i t e d States n u c l e a r t e s t areas, c a l e n d a r y e a r 1981 compiled by S. C. Black, R. F. Grossman, A . A . Mullen, G. D. P o t t e r and D. D. Smith Envi ronmental M o n i t o r i n g Systems Laboratory Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 and J. L. Hopper Reynolds E l e c t r i c a l & Engineering Company, Inc. Las Vegas, Nevada 89102 prepared f o r t h e

  10. Residual and applied stress analysis of an alloy 600 row 1 U-bend: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, C.O.

    1987-09-01

    Residual stresses in Inconel alloy 600, row 1, U-bend tubes, used in heat exchanges in nuclear reactors, were studied using an advanced x-ray diffraction instrument. Both axial and circumferential (hoop) stresses on the extrados, intrados, and flanks on the O.D. surface of several U-bends were mapped. The I.D. surface residual stresses at the extrados of the U-bend were mapped on one tube and subsurface stress measurements were made on the I.D. and O.D. surfaces of that tube. Service loads were simulated on one tube to ascertain combined effect of residual and applied stresses. Data from wall thickness and profilometry measurements were also correlated with residual stress measurements. 21 refs., 42 figs.

  11. A model of caustic stress corrosion crack initiation and growth in Alloy 600. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eason, E.D.; Nelson, E.E.

    1994-06-01

    In this project, data previously generated by Westinghouse on the stress corrosion of Alloy 600 in caustic environments were analyzed to produce a model of the initiation time and crack growth rate. The model is valid over the range of the data, which included one (1), ten (10) and fifty (50) percent caustic solutions, at temperatures ranging from 550 to 650{degrees}F (288 - 343{degrees}C). The specimens were {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} ring specimens, with an initial strain that ranged from slightly below yield to approximately 3%. The model has two parts, a probabilistic model of time to initiation, and a deterministic model of crack growth rate given that initiation has occurred. Both parts of the model depend on heat treatment, caustic concentration, temperature, and strain. The model provides a reasonable representation of the material behavior over the range of data that were available for calibration.

  12. Rapid identification of conditions causing intergranular corrosion or intergranular stress corrosion cracking in sensitized alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.

    1984-12-01

    In 1973, Seys and van Haute introduced a technique for measuring pitting potentials. They called this technique the Static Potential Band Method. A metal wire was mounted in a corrosion cell with counter and reference electrodes, and an electrical connection made to one end. A potential was applied with a potentiostat. At the same time, a constant current was passed through the wire to create a potential gradient in the metal phase; the result was the creation of a gradient in the electrode potential along the wire. This technique has many applications in corrosion studies. In this work, it has been applied to the intergranular corrosion (IGC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized Alloy 600 in a sulfur-containing environment.

  13. Analysis of large scale tests for AP-600 passive containment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sha, W.T.; Chien, T.H.; Sun, J.G.; Chao, B.T.

    1997-07-01

    One unique feature of the AP-600 is its passive containment cooling system (PCCS), which is designed to maintain containment pressure below the design limit for 72 hours without action by the reactor operator. During a design-basis accident, i.e., either a loss-of-coolant or a main steam-line break accident, steam escapes and comes in contact with the much cooler containment vessel wall. Heat is transferred to the inside surface of the steel containment wall by convection and condensation of steam and through the containment steel wall by conduction. Heat is then transferred from the outside of the containment surface by heating and evaporation of a thin liquid film that is formed by applying water at the top of the containment vessel dome. Air in the annual space is heated by both convection and injection of steam from the evaporating liquid film. The heated air and vapor rise as a result of natural circulation and exit the shield building through the outlets above the containment shell. All of the analytical models that are developed for and used in the COMMIX-ID code for predicting performance of the PCCS will be described. These models cover governing conservation equations for multicomponents single phase flow, transport equations for the {kappa}-{epsilon} two-equation turbulence model, auxiliary equations, liquid-film tracking model for both inside (condensate) and outside (evaporating liquid film) surfaces of the containment vessel wall, thermal coupling between flow domains inside and outside the containment vessel, and heat and mass transfer models. Various key parameters of the COMMIX-ID results and corresponding AP-600 PCCS experimental data are compared and the agreement is good. Significant findings from this study are summarized.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (<925 C) and final anneals at 1010-1065 C developed both large cracks (similar to those in CWA materials) and small intergranular microcracks detectable only by destructive metallography. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (>980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

  15. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 1. Integrated report. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This burn test program was conducted during the period of August 1982 to February 1983 to demonstrate that Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) products can displace petroleum as a boiler fuel in oil- and gas-designed boilers. The test program was performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Three forms of SRC (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) and No. 6 Fuel Oil were evaluated in the 700-hp (30 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour) watertube, oil-designed boiler facility at PETC. The test program was managed by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and sponsored by the Department of Energy. Other organizations were involved as necessary to provide the expertise required to execute the test program. This final report represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at PETC. More detailed information with preliminary data can be obtained from separate reports prepared by PETC, Southern Research Institute, Wheelabrator-Frye, Babcock and Wilcox, and Combustion Engineering. These are presented as Annex Volumes A-F. 25 references, 41 figures, 15 tables.

  16. UC-700 Envi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    125727 U235: A Gamma Ray Analysis Code for Uranium Isotopic Determination DeLynn Clark December 1996 may not be those of the Laboratory. Work performed under the auspices of the U S . Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48. DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees,

  17. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; et al

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomographymore » on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.« less

  18. Mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic and pure water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have been conducted on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular attack (IGA) of Alloy 600. A combination of SCC and IGA has been observed in Alloy 600 tubing on the hot leg of some operating steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, and sodium hydroxide along with several other chemical species have been implicated in the tube degradations. SCC has been observed above and within the tube sheet, whereas IGA is generally localized within the tube sheet. Alloy 600 is also susceptible to SCC in pure and primary water. Various factors that influence SCC and IGA include metallurgical conditions of the alloy, concentrations of alkaline species, impurity content of the environment, temperature and stress. The mechanisms of these intergranular failures, however, are not well understood. Some of the possible mechanisms of the SCC and IGA in high temperature water and caustic are described in this paper.

  19. Effects of carbides on susceptibility of alloy 600 to stress corrosion cracking in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Xia, Z.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1993-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of sensitized, carburized, and mill-annealed alloy 600 (UNS N06600) was studied in hydrogenated, aerated, and high-temperature (250 to 350 C) dilute aqueous solutions. In high-temperature water at high anodic potentials, the current density (DC) from carbide dissolution was higher than DC from matrix dissolution. In oxidizing environments, intergranular stress corrosion cracking propagated in alloy 600 by dissolution of continuous or semicontinuous carbides at the grain boundary, in sensitized and non-sensitized materials. These studies have been conducted in environments similar to those in the steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in nuclear power plants.

  20. United States Enwronmental Monitoring EPA-600/4-84-040 Environmental Protectlon Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/0539-051

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring EPA-600/4-84-040 Environmental Protectlon Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/0539-051 Agency P.O. Box 15027 July 1984 Las Vegas NV 89114-5027 Research and Development 4 / ,. Offsite Environmental @a Monitoring Report 93270 Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Cal'endar Year 1983 prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under interagency Agreement Number DE-Al08-76DP00539 EPA-600/4-84-040 DOE/DP/0539-051 July 1984 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radiation

  1. Effect of spray parameter on containment depressurization during LOCA in KAPP 3 and 4, 700 MWE IPHWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S. K.; Bhartia, D. K.; Mohan, N.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    KAPP 3 and 4 is an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) of 700 MWe capacities. It is a pressure tube type reactor with heavy water as moderator and coolant and natural Uranium Dioxide as fuel. It consists of 392 horizontal fuel channel assemblies and surrounded by three separate water systems i.e. primary coolant, moderator and calandria vault water system. Containment of Indian PHWR is an ultimate barrier, which is designed to envelope whole reactor systems, to prevent the spread of active air-borne fission products in accident condition. Containment Spray System has been provided for energy as well as activity removal from the Containment system. This paper discusses about the studies done to assess the effect of spray parameters such as spray flow rate, droplets diameter and height of fall on containment peak pressure and temperature, long term containment depressurization and energy removal from the containment during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The spray flow rate and droplets diameter play an important role in removing residual energy from containment atmosphere, which influences depressurization of containment. It is obvious that faster depressurization of containment during postulated LOCA helps in limiting radiological consequences. From radiological considerations, droplets diameter is required to be kept to the lowest practically possible value and flow rate of spray should be high. Spray water droplets fall height governs the exposure time of droplets, which is the direct indication of energy removal rate. However, it is observed from the sensitivity studies that for a height of spray droplet fall more than 16.5 m, for the range of spray water flow rate and droplets sizes considered in the analyses, there is no significant change in heat removal. (authors)

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of AP600 standard plant shield building roof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greimann, L.; Fanous, F.; Safar, S.; Khalil, A.; Bluhm, D.

    1999-06-01

    The AP600 passive containment vessel is surrounded by a concrete cylindrical shell covered with a truncated conical roof. This roof supports the passive containment cooling system (PCS) annular tank, shield plate and other nonstructural attachments. When the shield building is subjected to different loading combinations as defined in the Standard Review Plan (SRP), some of the sections in the shield building could experience forces in excess of their design values. This report summarized the three-dimensional finite element analysis that was conducted to review the adequacy of the proposed Westinghouse shield building design. The ANSYS finite element software was utilized to analyze the Shield Building Roof (SBR) under dead, snow, wind, thermal and seismic loadings. A three-dimensional model that included a portion of the shield building cylindrical shell, the conical roof and its attachments, the eccentricities at the cone-cylinder connection and at the compression ring and the PCS tank was developed. Mesh sensitivity studies were conducted to select appropriate element size in the cylinder, cone, near air intakes and in the vicinity of the eccentricities. Also, a study was carried out to correctly idealize the water-structure interaction in the PCS tank. Response spectrum analysis was used to calculate the internal forces at different sections in the SBR under Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). Forty-nine structural modes and twenty sloshing modes were used. Two horizontal components of the SSE together with a vertical component were used. Modal stress resultants were combined taking into account the effects of closely spaced modes. The three earthquake directions were combined by the Square Root of the Sum Squares method. Two load combinations were studied. The load combination that included dead, snow, fluid, thermal and seismic loads was selected to be the most critical. Interaction diagrams for critical sections were developed and used to check the design adequacy. The results demonstrated that provided area of steal on each face of several sections of the AP600 SBR was inadequate. This was also noticed when comparing the total provided area of steel per section, i.e., the area of steel on both faces. The discrepancy between Westinghouse results and these reported herein could have resulted from the different finite element mesh sizes and the assumption used in Westinghouse design.

  3. Effect of cold work and processing orientation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshier, W.C.; Brown, C.M.

    2000-03-01

    Cold work accelerates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates in Alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, the variation in crack growth rates generated from cold-worked material has been significant, and the effect has been difficult to quantify. A study was performed in hydrogenated water adjusted to pH 10.2 to evaluate systematically the effect of cold work on Alloy 600 as a function of temperature, amount of cold work, stress intensity factor, and processing orientation. Cold work was introduced into the material by tensile prestraining or cold-rolling plate product. Crack growth rates were determined between 252 C and 360 C, stress intensity factors between 21 MPa{radical}m and 55 MPa{radical}m, and yield strengths between 201 MPa and 827 MPa. The material with the highest yield strength was cold-rolled and tested in the longitudinal-transverse (LT) and short-transverse (ST) orientations. Crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, stress intensity factor, and yield strength. Furthermore, crack growth rates were a strong function of the processing orientation in the cold-rolled plate, with growth rates approximately an order of magnitude greater in the ST orientation compared to the LT orientation. Crack growth rates in the LT orientation were measured between 0.003 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 1.95 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and between 0.066 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s in the ST orientation. Activation energies were slightly greater in the ST orientation, ranging from 154 kcal/mol to 191 kcal/mol, compared to activation energies between 126 kJ/mol and 157 kJ/mol in the LT orientation. Results of this study demonstrated that, although cold work can be used to accelerate SCC, the orientation of crack growth significantly can affect the results and must be taken into account when analyzing data from cold-worked material.

  4. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} and subsequent steam treatments of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. For each mole of UF{sub 6} converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance.

  5. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekinen, A.; Tikkala, H.; Aksela, H.; Niskanen, J.

    2013-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  6. Modeling of stress distributions on the microstructural level in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Petrovic, B.G.; Ruud, C.O.; Mcllree, A.R.

    1995-04-01

    Stress distribution in a random polycrystalline material (Alloy 600) was studied using a topologically correct microstructural model. Distributions of von Mises and hydrostatic stresses at the grain vertices, which could be important in intergranular stress corrosion cracking, were analyzed as functions of microstructure, grain orientations and loading conditions. Grain size, shape, and orientation had a more pronounced effect on stress distribution than loading conditions. At grain vertices the stress concentration factor was higher for hydrostatic stress (1.7) than for von Mises stress (1.5). The stress/strain distribution in the volume (grain interiors) is a normal distribution and does not depend on the location of the studied material volume i.e., surface vs/bulk. The analysis of stress distribution in the volume showed the von Mises stress concentration of 1.75 and stress concentration of 2.2 for the hydrostatic pressure. The observed stress concentration is high enough to cause localized plastic microdeformation, even when the polycrystalline aggregate is in the macroscopic elastic regime. Modeling of stresses and strains in polycrystalline materials can identify the microstructures (grain size distributions, texture) intrinsically susceptible to stress/strain concentrations and justify the correctness of applied stress state during the stress corrosion cracking tests. Also, it supplies the information necessary to formulate the local failure criteria and interpret of nondestructive stress measurements.

  7. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  8. Intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature caustic solutions containing contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Roberge, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-06-01

    Concentrated caustic is a primary cause of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack of Alloy 600 tubing in PWRs. However, temperature, electrochemical potential, stress, and metallurgical state all play a role. This study provides the quantitative evidence needed to develop models of crack growth and to devise effective countermeasures.

  9. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Non-Destructive Examination of Dissimilar Metal Welds and Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Deborah A.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted research since 1977 in the areas of environmentally assisted cracking and assessment and reliability of non-destructive examination (NDE). Recent occurrences of cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds and Alloy 600 base metal at several domestic and overseas plants have raised several issues relating to both of these areas of NRC research. The occurrences of cracking were identified by the discovery of boric acid deposits resulting from through-wall cracking in the primary system pressure boundary. Analyses indicate that the cracking has occurred due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 82/182 welds. This cracking has occurred in two different locations: in hot leg nozzle-to-safe end welds and in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle welds. The cracking associated with safe-end welds is important due to the potential for a large loss of reactor coolant inventory, and the cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal and welds, particularly circumferential cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal, is important due to the potential for a control rod to eject resulting in a loss of coolant accident. The industry response in the U.S. to this cracking is being coordinated through the Electric Power Research Institute's Materials Reliability Project (EPRI-MRP) in a comprehensive, multifaceted effort. Although the industry program is addressing many of the issues raised by these cracking occurrences, confirmatory research is necessary for the staff to evaluate the work conducted by industry groups. Several issues requiring additional consideration regarding the generic implications of these isolated events have been identified. This paper will discuss the recent events of significant cracking in domestic and foreign plants, discuss the limitations of NDE in detecting SCC, identify deficiencies in information available in this area, discuss the USNRC approach to address these issues, and discuss the development of an international cooperative effort. (authors)

  11. Experimental Determination of Phase Equilibria in the System H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl at 0.5 Kb from 500 to 800C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, L.M.

    2001-01-09

    An understanding of activity-composition (a/X) relations and phase equilibria for halite-bearing, mixed-species supercritical fluids is critically important to many geological and industrial applications. The authors have performed experiments on the phase equilibria of H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl fluids from 500 C to 800 C at 500 bars, conditions of significant importance in studies of magma-hydrothermal systems, geothermal reservoirs and some ore deposits, to obtain highly accurate and precise data for this ternary system. These experiments are conducted using a double capsule technique. An excess of NaCl is placed in an inner Pt capsule, which is crimped shut and placed in an outer capsule containing H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. During the experiment NaCl dissolves out of the inner capsule, and is deposited in the outer capsule during the quench. After the experiment the capsule is opened, and the amount of NaCl remaining in the inner capsule determined by dissolution. The difference between the initial and final amounts of NaCl in the inner capsule yields the solubility of NaCl at the P-T conditions of the experiment. At 500 C data from these experiments suggest that the vapor comer of the three-phase field lies near X(H{sub 2}O) = 0.760, X(NaCl) = 0.065, which is a significantly more water-rich composition than suggested by previous models. As expected, increasing temperature increases the solubility of NaCl in the NaCl-vapor field. For example, at intermediate H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2} ratios the vapor field extends from approximately near X(H{sub 2}O) = 0.66, X(NaCl) = 0.06 at 500 C to near X(H{sub 2}O) = 0.65, X(NaCl) = 0.08 at 600 C.

  12. Microstructural effects on microdeformation and primary-side stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Microdeformation characteristics in Alloy 600 tubing have been examined after various tensile deformations. Microstructure developed during processing was found to control subsequent microdeformation behavior. Grain boundary carbides were the most effective source of dislocations, activating at lower macro-strains and continuing to operate at higher macro-strains than other sources. Ledges within grain boundaries, twin boundaries and matrix carbides also acted as dislocation sources. Most dislocation activity at low strains was confined to planar arrays. A conceptual model is presented to account for the effects of interfacial and matrix microstructure on microdeformation and primary-side SCC of Alloy 600 tubing. Microstructure is linked to IGSCC resistance through its influence on microdeformation behavior and the resultant crack-tip stress state. Dislocation source activity at grain interfaces is proposed to be a critical aspect controlling IGSCC susceptibility. Effective sources such as grain boundary carbides promote crack blunting, decrease the crack-tip stress state and increase resistance to cracking.

  13. The influence of dissolved hydrogen on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 at PWR steam generator operating temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacko, R.J.; Economy, G.; Pement, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    PWR primary coolant chemistry uses an intentional dissolved hydrogen concentration of 20 to 50 ml (STP)/kg of water to effect a net suppression of oxygen-producing radiolysis, to minimize corrosion in primary loop materials and to maintain a low redox potential. Speculation has attended a possible influence of dissolved hydrogen on the kinetics of initiation of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Three series of experiments are presented for conditions in which the level of dissolved hydrogen was intentionally varied over the hydrogen and temperature ranges of interest for steam generator operation. No significant effect of dissolved hydrogen was found on PWSCC of Alloy 600.

  14. Initiation and propagation of stress-corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature water. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of stress-corrosion cracking data are presented for Inconel 600 steam-generator tubing. U-bend, constant-load, and slow extension-rate tests are included. Arrhenius plots are presented for failure times vs inverse temperature for crack initiation and propagation. Effect of applied load is expressed in terms of log-log curves for failure times vs stress, and variations in environment and cold work are included. Microstructure and composition of oxide films on Inconel 600 surfaces were examined after exposure to pure water at 365/sup 0/C, and stripping with the bromine-methanol method. Results are discussed in terms of transient creep, film rupture and a mass-transport-limited anodic process.

  15. Effects of shot peening on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behaviors of sensitized Alloy 600 in thiosulfate solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, W.T.; Chang, C.S.; Lee, J.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    Effects of shot peening on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of sensitized alloy 600 (UNSN06600) were studied. Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests in 0.01 M sulfuric acid (H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) + 0.001 M potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) solution and immersion tests in boiling 25% nitric acid (HNO[sub 3]) solution were used to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the degree of sensitization of alloy 600. Potentiodynamic polarization tests in 0.01 M sodium thiosulfate (Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 3]) solution at 95 C revealed shot peening increased the anodic current density (CD) of the alloy. However, SCC tests using U-bend specimens indicated shot peening substantially increased the crack initiation time in the same environment. The delayed crack initiation of SCC for shot-peened alloy 600, which is potentially dependent, was attributed to the presence of compressive residual stresses and the severely deformed surface microstructure.

  16. The mobility of Nb in rutile-saturated NaCl- and NaF-bearing aqueous fluids from 1–6.5 GPa and 300–800 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanis, Elizabeth A.; Simon, Adam; Tschauner, Oliver; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Burnley, Pamela; Cline II, Christopher J.; Hanchar, John M.; Pettke, Thomas; Shen, Guoyin; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-08-26

    Rutile (TiO₂) is an important host phase for high field strength elements (HFSE) such as Nb in metamorphic and subduction zone environments. The observed depletion of Nb in arc rocks is often explained by the hypothesis that rutile sequesters HFSE in the subducted slab and overlying sediment, and is chemically inert with respect to aqueous fluids evolved during prograde metamorphism in the forearc to subarc environment. However, field observations of exhumed terranes, and experimental studies, indicate that HFSE may be soluble in complex aqueous fluids at high pressure (i.e., >0.5 GPa) and moderate to high temperature (i.e., >300 °C). In this study, we investigated experimentally the mobility of Nb in NaCl- and NaF-bearing aqueous fluids in equilibrium with Nb-bearing rutile at pressure-temperature conditions applicable to fluid evolution in arc environments. Niobium concentrations in aqueous fluid at rutile saturation were measured directly by using a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) at 2.1 to 6.5 GPa and 300–500 °C, and indirectly by performing mass loss experiments in a piston-cylinder (PC) apparatus at ~1 GPa and 700800 °C. The concentration of Nb in a 10 wt% NaCl aqueous fluid increases from 6 to 11 μg/g as temperature increases from 300 to 500 °C, over a pressure range from 2.1 to 2.8 GPa, consistent with a positive temperature dependence. The concentration of Nb in a 20 wt% NaCl aqueous fluid varies from 55 to 150 μg/g at 300 to 500 °C, over a pressure range from 1.8 to 6.4 GPa; however, there is no discernible temperature or pressure dependence. The Nb concentration in a 4 wt% NaF-bearing aqueous fluid increases from 180 to 910 μg/g as temperature increases from 300 to 500 °C over the pressure range 2.1 to 6.5 GPa. The data for the F-bearing fluid indicate that the Nb content of the fluid exhibits a dependence on temperature between 300 and 500 °C at ≥2 GPa, but there is no observed dependence on pressure. Together, the data demonstrate that the hydrothermal mobility of Nb is strongly controlled by the composition of the fluid, consistent with published data for Ti. At all experimental conditions, however, the concentration of Nb in the fluid is always lower than coexisting rutile, consistent with a role for rutile in moderating the Nb budget of arc rocks.

  17. Search for neutrino oscillations by detecting UNK-1 600-GeV neutrino beams at Gran Sasso (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasil`ev, P.S.; Kuznetsov, A.E.; Kuznetsov, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    The possibility of formation of neutrino beams from the 600-GeV UNK-1 accelerator toward Gran Sasso (Italy) and of study neutrino oscillations with the ICARUS detector is demonstrated. The proposed experiment is sensitive to {Delta}m{sup 2} values down to 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} at maximum neutrino mixing and to sin{sup 2}2{theta} values down to 6 x 10{sup -3} at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approximately} 2 x 10{sup -2} eV{sup 2}. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Stress corrosion of alloys 600 and 690 in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, J.F.

    1983-10-01

    EPRI project RP 1171-1 demonstrated that alloy 600 was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in sulfate environments during constant extension rate testing. The current project has extended that investigation to determine the influence of alloy grain size, sensitization, solution pH and temperature. Stress corrosion in very dilute sulfate solutions and the susceptibility of alloy 690 have also been studied. Data have been obtained chiefly by constant extension rate testing using tensile specimens, and by the constant displacement testing of C-rings.

  19. Manhattan Project buildings and facilities at the Hanford Site: A construction history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-09-01

    This document thoroughly examines the role that the Hanford Engineer Works played in the Manhattan project. The historical aspects of the buildings and facilities are characterized. An in depth look at the facilities, including their functions, methods of fabrication and appearance is given for the 100 AREAS, 200 AREAS, 300 AREAS, 500, 800 and 900 AREAS, 600 AREA, 700 AREA, 1100 AREA and temporary construction structures.

  20. Appendix 6 of 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 of 6 Federal Fiscal year 2002 budget related documentation 1. ORP budget requirements 2. President's approved FY2002 budget - Conference Committee Report 3. November 27, 2001 letter from Assistant Secretary Roberson (FY2002 budget allocation) OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION FUNDING REQUIREMENTS AS OF FEBRUARY, 2002 Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Requirements per approved BNI Baseline (Dollars in Millions) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Beg. Balance Carryover 0 175 281 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  1. The effects of chemical factors on stress corrosion of Alloy 600 exposed to the cooling medium in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, Ph.; Keroulas, F. de; Menet, O.; Rocher, A.; Pitner, P.; Gelpi, A.; Pinard-Legry, G.

    1992-12-31

    The effects of chemical factors in reducing stress corrosion of Alloy 600 in a primary coolant medium were investigated in France as part of a test program undertaken by three laboratories (EDF, FRAMATOME and CEA) on tubes with differing sensitivity to corrosion. Studied parameters were type of Alloy 600 material, temperature, lithium concentration and pH. The effect of each parameter was first estimated separately by qualitative analysis and the parameter groups which best describe the corrosion phenomenon were then defined. The preponderant effect of increasing the temperature (by 40{degrees}C) and the type of material were confirmed, as was that of the boron and lithium concentrations. The risk of cracking increases with lithium content but the phenomenon reverses at high concentrations. The effect of pH variations is mainly reflected in variations in the lithium content. A quantitative study was then carried out to assess the effect of each parameter in terms of risk and time to cracking in a given reference medium. A model of the chemical effects is proposed, based on the mechanism involving dissolution-repassivation of the metal after failure of the passive film during the phase when cracks propagate slowly. This allows a quantitative approach to the effects of hydrogen and the other chemical parameters involved and the results are compared with those of the statistical model.

  2. Mechanisms of hydrogen-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature water/steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in high-temperature deaerated water or steam has been termed Hydrogen Induced IGSCC. It is suggested here that these cracks are initiated by the nucleation of a high density of bubbles on the grain boundary under the combined action of the applied stress and high-pressure methane formed from carbon in solution reacting with hydrogen injected by corrosion. The bubbles then grow together by grain-boundary diffusion to give local failure. This agrees with the observations made using the electron microscope and two-stage replicas, namely the subsurface formation of closely spaced (0.2 {mu}m) bubbles along boundaries, and the growth of these into fine cracks before they open up to communicate with the corroding atmosphere. The kinetics of this process are examined and shown to be in quantitative agreement with several experimental observations. This mechanism involves no dissolution of the metal, the only role of corrosion being the injection of hydrogen at a high fugacity. It also predicts an activation energy essentially equal to that for grain-boundary diffusion of nickel in the Alloy 600 grain boundary. The activation energy for grain-boundary self-diffusion in nickel is 115 kJ/mol.

  3. Tests with Inconel 600 to obtain quantitative stress-corrosion cracking data for evaluating service performance. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1982-09-01

    Inconel 600 tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators form a pressure boundary between radioactive primary water and secondary water which is converted to steam and used for generating electricity. Under operating conditions the performance of alloy 600 has been good, but with some occasional small leaks resulting from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), related to the presence of unusually high residual or operating stresses. The suspected high stresses can result from either the deformation of tubes during manufacture, or distortion during abnormal conditions such as denting. The present experimental program addresses two specific conditions, i.e., (1) where deformation occurs but is no longer active, such as when denting is stopped and (2) where plastic deformation of the metal continues, as would occur during denting. Laboratory media consist of pure water as well as solutions to simulate environments that would apply in service; tubing from actual production is used in carrying out these tests. The environments include both normal and off chemistries for primary and secondary water. The results reported here were obtained in several different tests. The main ones are (1) split tube reverse U-bends, (2) constant extension rate tests (CERT), and (3) constant load. The temperature range covered is 290 to 365/sup 0/C.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600 and 690 and compatible weld metals in BWRs: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R. A.; McMinn, A.

    1988-07-01

    The relative susceptibilities of alloy 600 and 690 base metals and I-82, I-182, R-127 and R-135 weld metals to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in either pure water or a simulated resin intrusion environment at 288/degree/C were evaluated. Alloy 600, I-182, and I-82 weld metals were susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all pure water conditions. Alloy 500, alloy 690, I-182, and I-82 were all susceptible to cracking in the simulated resin intrusion environment, although alloy 690 exhibited the greatest resistance to SCC. The high chromium experimental weld alloy were immune to cracking under all conditions examined. The IGSCC susceptibility of seven different weld metals used to weld alloy 600 and A508 were also evaluated in the resin intrusion environment at 288/degree/C. Weldments made with I-625, I-182, and I-82 (GTAW) were the most susceptible, whereas welds made with I-132 were the least susceptible. Most of the weldments failed at the fusion line between the weld metal and the A508 steel, and the SCC susceptibility increased with increasing hardness measured at the fusion line. There was no effect of crevice condition or heat treatment on SCC susceptibility. The SCC susceptibility of Type 316 NG stainless steel welded with R-127, R-135, I-72 and Type 308L weld metals was evaluated in pure water and resin intrusion environments at 288/degree/C. All of the materials were immune to SCC in the pure water environment. In the resin intrusion environment, both the I-72 and R-135 weld metals were immune to SACC, but the R-127 and Type 308L weld metals exhibited SCC. The Type 316 NG stainless steel was susceptible to transgranular SCC in the resin intrusion environment, except when welded with I-72, in which case it was immune. 36 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation and growth in mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing in high-temperature caustic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, B.W.; Ballinger, R.G.; McIlree, A.R.

    1998-07-01

    Historically, pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator (SG) reliability has been dominated by degradation of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubing material. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack initiation and crack growth rates (CGR) were measured in mill-annealed alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubing as a function of the stress intensity factor (K) in 10% caustic at 315 C. Tests were conducted using internally pressurized smooth and precracked tubing. Samples were polarized to 150 mV (precracked tube test) or 225 mV (initiation test) with respect to a nickel electrode. Crack initiation and growth from the external tube surface were monitored using a multifrequency alternating current (AC) potential drop system. The AC potential drop system allowed detection of initiation from a smooth surface as well as the monitoring of crack extension in real time. In the case of precracked sample tests, the sample was precracked in fatigue from a sharp v-notch. CGR were obtained over the K range between 4 MPa{radical}m and 18 MPa{radical}m. Values for K were estimated based upon fractographic analysis of samples after testing and an estimate of the K-solution for a thin-walled tube. Average CGR ranged from 2 mm/y to 14 mm/y. CGR determined in this investigation represent the first SCC CGR data obtained in high-temperature caustic using actual steam generator tubing. Growth rates obtained fell within the overall range of the existing database for CGR (da/dt) in alloy 600. The data and analysis suggested a threshold value of K for K-driven crack growth of {approx} 4 MPa{radical}m. However, since the scatter in existing data is very large and the conditions for most of the data are poorly known or not known at all, this was surprising. More importantly, from the standpoint of life prediction, it was observed that da/dt responded to and was a function of K for cracks as small as 0.2 mm in depth, and probably smaller.

  6. Examinations of Oxidation and Sulfidation of Grain Boundaries in Alloy 600 Exposed to Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Saxey, David W.; Kruska, Karen; Moore, K. L.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution characterizations of intergranular attack in alloy 600 (Ni-17Cr-9Fe) exposed to 325 C simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water have been conducted using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, NanoSIMS, analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The intergranular attack exhibited a two-stage microstructure that consisted of continuous corrosion/oxidation to a depth of ~200 nm from the surface followed by discrete Cr-rich sulfides to a further depth of ~500 nm. The continuous oxidation region contained primarily nanocrystalline MO-structure oxide particles and ended at Ni-rich, Cr-depleted grain boundaries with spaced CrS precipitates. Three-dimensional characterization of the sulfidized region using site-specific atom probe tomography revealed extraordinary grain boundary composition changes, including total depletion of Cr across a several nm wide dealloyed zone as a result of grain boundary migration.

  7. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  8. Irradiation Creep and Swelling from 400 C to 600 C of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Gelles, David S.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Abe, Katsunori

    2004-04-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications. As part of an extensive study performed at PNNL on the ODS steel MA957 [1], irradiation creep tests were performed on pressurized tubes made from MA957 by two different methods. The tubes were made either by gun drilling alone or by a combination of rod drawing and gun drilling. The different fabrication methods were explored because ODS steels have been difficult to form. The pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The effective stresses resulting from the pressurization of the tubes ranged from 0 MPa to 175 MPa.

  9. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  10. US/German Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  11. New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 94,600 94,600 1990's 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 2000's 96,600 97,000 89,800 83,800 83,800 83,124 82,652 78,424 80,000 80,000 2010's 84,300 84,300 89,100

  12. Mechanisms of intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 by high-temperature caustic solutions containing impurities: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanisms of intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 are investigated in high temperature sodium hydroxide environments contaminated with impurities such as carbonate, sulfate, silicate, magnetite, and chromic oxide. Results show that caustic alone can cause both IGA and SCC. The effects of electrochemical potential, stress, time, temperature and the metallurgical state of Alloy 600 on the IGA and SCC are discussed. It appears that both IGA and SCC are manifestations of a general intergranular failure process. In the presence of adverse potential, stress, strain rate and temperature, the slower IGA process is generally replaced by the faster SCC process.

  13. Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

    2011-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

  14. Qualification of the Lasentec M600P Particle Size Analyzer and the Red Valve Model 1151 Pressure Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JR Bontha; NG Colton; EA Daymo; TD Hylton; CK Bayne; TH May

    2000-01-28

    The Lasentec M600 in-line particle size analyzer was installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 1998 to support retrieval of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT). Before installation at ORNL, the sensor underwent validation testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Instrument Validation facility. Mechanically, the instrument worked well during validation testing and met all expectations. Operationally, much was learned about optimum ways to display and interpret the data. Slurry samples taken during the in-line tests at PNNL were shipped to the vendor for analysis with a benchtop Lasentec sensor. These experiments were performed to determine if off-line analyses yield particle size distributions similar to those generated by the in-line sensor. It was determined that the Lasentec sensor measures repeatable chord lengths as long as particles are ''presenter'' to the sensor window the same way. After the initial non-radioactive simulant testing at PNNL, the instrument was shipped for radioactive validation and acceptance testing in the Slurry Monitoring Test System (SMTS) connected to the Tank W-9 of the GAATs at ORNL. For all acceptance tests conducted at ORNL, the variation in the chord length distribution and the total particle count corresponded very well with the slurry density data as determined using an in-line Promass 63M Coriolis meter. Based on the performance results obtained, the Lasentec M600P FBRM is expected to meet the requirements for measuring the particle size distribution during the slurry transfer operations at Hanford and the Oak Ridge GAAT remediation project. The Red Valve pressure sensor was endorsed at the Hanford Site following instrument validation tests at PNNL and is currently in operation in the Tank 241-C-106 pump pit. While this instrument measures pressure within a transfer line, this type of pressure sensor could be configured to measure pressure drop over time. In turn, the status of a slurry transfer could be inferred from the pressure-drop measurement. In 1998, four Red Valve pressure sensors (with Sensotech Model AE-213 pressure transducers) were installed before and after the booster pumps of the 4-in. slurry (SL-200) and supernatant (SN-200) transfer lines between Tank 241-C-106 and Tank 241-AY-1 02. These pressure sensors have been in operation for over 1 year, and to date, the sensors have been trouble-flee according to the operators involved with slurry and supernatant transfer operations. Based on these observations, it is apparent that the Red Valve pressure sensors could be installed at the end of the slurry transfer lines and used to measure the pressure drop in the system.

  15. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  16. Electrochemical and metallurgical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Alloy 600 in simulated primary water containing sulfur contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Kelly, K.

    1985-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Alloy 600 was investigated in aerated solutions of sodium thiosulfate containing 1.3% boric acid. Results indicate that in the borated thiosulfate solution containing 7 ppM sulfur, 5 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide is sufficient to inhibit SCC in U-bends. The occurrence of inhibition seems to correlate to the rapid increase of pH and conductivity of the solution as a result of the lithium hydroxide addition. In the slow strain rate tests in the borated solution containing 0.7 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide, significant SCC is observed at a sulfur level of 30 ppB, i.e., a lithium to sulfur ratio of 23. In a parallel test in 30 ppB sulfur level but without any lithium hydroxide, the SCC is more severe than that in the lithiated environment. In the constant load test on a specimen held initially at a nominal stress near the yield strength of the material, cracks continue to grow until fracture during controlled, progressive dilution of the bulk solution, leading to final lithium concentration of 1.5 ppM and sulfur concentration (as thiosulfate) of 9.6 ppB i.e., a lithium to sulfur ratio of about 156, although lithium hydroxide retards the rate of crack propagation to some extent. The crack growth rate is strongly influenced by the electrochemical potential which is primarily governed by the local crack tip chemistry.

  17. Analysis of the cracking behavior of Alloy 600 RVH penetrations. Part 1: Stress analysis and K computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandari, S.; Vagner, J.; Garriga-Majo, D.; Amzallag, C.; Faidy, C.

    1996-12-01

    The study presented here concerns the analysis of crack propagation behavior in the Alloy 600 RVH penetrations used in the French 900 and 1300 MWe PWR series. The damage mechanism identified is clearly the SCC in primary water environment. Consequently the analysis presented here is based on: (1) the stress analysis carried out on the RVH penetrations, (2) the SCC model developed in primary water environment and at the operating temperatures, and (3) the fracture mechanics concepts. The different steps involved in the study are: (1) Evaluation of the stress state for the case of the peripheral configuration of RVH penetrations; the case retained here is that of a conic tube with stress analysis conducted using multi-pass welding. (2) Computation of the influence functions (IF) for a polynomial stress distribution in case of a tube of Ri/t ratio (internal diameter/thickness) corresponding to that of an RVH penetration. (3) Establishment of a propagation law based on study and review of data available in the literature. (4) Conduction of a parametric study of crack propagation using several initial defects. (5) Analysis of crack propagation of defects observed in various reactors and comparison with measured propagation rates. This paper (Part 1) deals with the first two steps namely Stress Analysis and K Computation.

  18. Intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking propagation behavior of alloy 600 in high-temperature caustic solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H. . Komae Research Lab.)

    1999-06-01

    The effect of stress intensity factors (K) at the intergranular attack and stress corrosion crack (IGA/SCC) tips on the IGA/SCC propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Values of K at the IGA/SCC crack tips were calculated using the statically indeterminate model. Based upon analysis of those factors, the double-cantilever beam (DCB) and SG model boiler tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity on IGA/SCC crack propagation. K at the crack tips increased with increasing crack length. For a long crack, K decreased with an increasing number of cracks. However, for a short crack, K decreased slightly with an increasing number of cracks. DCB test results showed the IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) increased gradually with increasing K in the range from 15 MPa[radical]m to [approximately]60 MPa[radical]m. This is the range relevant to IGA/SCC crack tips of typical SG tubes under operating conditions of Pressurized-water reactors. Metallographic examination of tubes removed from the SG model boiler, fouled with 10 ppm sodium hydroxide (NaOH), showed IGA/SCC propagation rates were almost constant in the tested range of K.

  19. Residual stress analysis of alloy 600 U-bends, reverse U-bends, and C-rings: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    Over the last several years, one of the leading causes of alloy 600 steam generator tubing leaks has been the primary-side-initiated, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in heavily cold-worked regions of the U-bends or tubesheet expansion transitions. Field and laboratory experiences have demonstrated that high residual stresses contribute significantly to the initiation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). EPRI initiated this project to measure and quantify the magnitude of these residual stresses in steam generator tubes as well as in various laboratory tests specimens. the objectives were: To measure the residual stresses in steam generator tube U-bends; To measure residual stresses in reverse U-bend (RUB) specimens as well as residual stresses and X-ray diffraction peak broadening in C-ring specimens used in laboratory tests; and To determine whether residual stress occurs as a result of exposure to steam generator operating temperature. Using an advanced X-ray instrument, investigators measured residual stresses on both the outside diameter (OD) and inside diameter (ID) surfaces and subsurfaces of steam generator U-bends and on the test surfaces of laboratory RUB and C-ring specimens. They measured these residual stresses in the hoop and axial directions and also calculated equivalent stresses. Results are discussed. 25 refs., 92 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-eliminationmore » yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low-temperature reactivity of these species as fuels in internal combustion engines.« less

  1. Spectra of atomic sulfur {sup 1}D in transitions to autoionizing Rydberg states in the region of 75 800-89 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.-C.; Chen, I-C.; Huang, T.-P.; Yuh, J.-Y.; Lee, Y.-Y.

    2008-10-07

    We recorded photoionization spectra of sulfur atoms in transitions from state {sup 1}D in the range of 75 800-89 500 cm{sup -1}. Dissociation of CS{sub 2} after photolysis at 193 nm produced these sulfur atoms in a singlet excited state; they were then ionized with synchrotron radiation (NSRRC, beamline U9CGM) at resolution of up to 3 cm{sup -1} and detected with a quadruple mass filter. Rydberg series 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[3/2] and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup 0})ns[5/2] with n extending to 16 and 32, respectively, to limit {sup 2}D{sup 0} are assigned. New Rydberg series 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[1/2]{sub 1}, ({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup 0})nd[5/2], and ({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[5/2] with n from 5-9 for the former two series and 7-13 for the latter are assigned. A new Rydberg line at 85 335 cm{sup -1} is assigned to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})6d {sup 1}P.

  2. Fracture toughness, tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1996-10-01

    The fracture toughness and tensile properties of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, were characterized in 54 and 338 C water with an elevated hydrogen content. Results were compared with air data to evaluate the effect of low and high temperature water on mechanical properties. In addition, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of EN82H and EN52 welds was evaluated in 360 C water with high hydrogen. Elastic-plastic J{sub c} fracture toughness testing revealed that the fracture resistance of all test materials was exceptionally high in 54 and 338 C air and 338 C water, demonstrating that fracture properties were essentially unaffected by the high temperature water environment. In 54 C water, however, J{sub c} values for EN82H and EN52 welds were reduced by an order of magnitude, and Alloy 690 showed a five-fold decrease in J{sub c}. Tensile properties for all test materials were essentially unaffected by the water environment, except for the total elongation for EN82H welds which was significantly reduced in 54 C water. At a strain rate of 5 x 10{sup 6} sec{sup {minus}1} in low temperature water, there appears to be sufficient time for environmental interactions to restrict ductility in EN82H welds. Constant-load testing of precracked weld specimens in 360 C water resulted in extensive intergranular SCC in EN82H welds loaded to K{sub I} levels between 35 and 55 MPa {radical}m, whereas no SCC occurred in EN52 welds under comparable test conditions.

  3. Inhibitory effect of boric acid on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H.; Koike, M.; Suda, M.

    1995-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of boric acid on the Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGA/SCC) propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Based on the analysis results of stress intensity factors at IGA/SCC crack tips, the notched C-ring tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity and boric acid on the IGA/SCC crack propagation. The A.C. impedance measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were also conducted to clarify the inhibitory effect of boric acid. Notched C-ring test results indicated that IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 increased gradually with increasing stress intensity factor in the range 4 to about 26 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, which might be loaded on the IGA/SCC crack tips of actual SG tubes under PWR secondary conditions. Adding boric acid slightly retarded the crack velocity in both all volatile treatment (AVT) water and caustic solutions. IGA/SCC crack velocities were lower in nearly neutral solutions than in alkali or acidic solutions. Furthermore, A.C. impedance studies showed that the polarization resistances of oxide films formed in boric acid solutions were higher than those of films formed in acidic and alkali solutions. AES analysis revealed that boron content in the oxide films formed in acidic solution containing boric acid was lowest. Good agreement was obtained between the IGA/SCC inhibitory effect of boric acid and the formation of the stable oxide films containing boron.

  4. High-Resolution Characterization of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 in High-Temperature Primary Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2000-06-01

    Intergranular (IG) attack regions and stress-corrosion cracks in alloy 600 U-bend samples tested in 330C, pressurized-water-reactor water have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Observations of cross-sectional samples revealed short oxidized zones preceding crack tips and narrow (10-nm wide), deeply penetrated, oxidized zones along grain boundaries exposed along open cracks. High-resolution TEM imaging and fine-probe analysis were used to determine the local chemistries and structures in these corrosion-affected zones. Matrix areas surrounding the crack tips appeared highly strained, whereas the IG penetrations generally did not. The predominant oxide structure found along crack walls and just ahead of crack tips was NiO with metal-atom ratios similar to the alloy. The attacked grain boundaries off open cracks contained similar fine-grained NiO-structure oxide together with local areas of Cr-rich oxide and Ni-rich metal. In contrast, Cr-rich oxide identified as Cr2O3 predominated at the leading edges of the IG attack. Stereoscopic imaging of these tip structures revealed nm-scale porosity and tunnels within the oxide and pores along the grain-boundary plane ahead of the oxide. The general interpretation of these results is that IG attack and cracking follows local dissolution or oxidation and the formation of pores at grain boundaries. This degradation occurs at the nanometer scale and therefore requires high-resolution ATEM methods to reveal detailed characteristics. Experimental support for several possible IG degradation mechanisms is considered.

  5. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-elimination yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low-temperature reactivity of these species as fuels in internal combustion engines.

  6. Stress-corrosion cracking of Alloys 600 and 690 and weld metals No. 82 and No. 182 in high-temperature water. Interim report. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The relative susceptibilities of Alloys 600 and 690 base metals and I-82 and 182 weld metals to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in pure water at 288/sup 0/C were evaluated. A combination of creviced and non-creviced slow-strain-rate, smooth sustained-load, and precracked fracture mechanics tests were employed in the evaluation. Susceptibility was determined as a function of dissolved oxygen content, degree of sensitization, and crevice condition. The results indicated that Alloy 600, and I-182 and I-82 weld metals were susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all conditions examined. No correlation was found between the location of IGSCC and the location of maximum grain boundary corrosion in a boiling 25% nitric acid test.

  7. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: solar kinetics T-600 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics T-600 solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector are presented for three output temperatures at five cities in the US. (WHK)

  8. Influence of stress intensity and loading mode on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary waters of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1994-05-01

    The steam generator in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of a nuclear power plant consists mainly of a shell made of carbon (C) steel and tubes made of alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, alloy 600 suffers environmentally induced cracking with exposure to high-temperature primary water. The susceptibility of alloy 600 to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was investigated as a function of the level of applied stresses and mode of loading. Constant load tests were conducted with specimens prepared from thin wall tubes, and constant deformation tests were conducted using specimens prepared from plates. With tubes exposed to primary water at 330 C, the crack propagation rate (CPR) was found to increase from 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]11] m/s at a stress intensity (K[sub i]) of 10 MPa[radical]m to 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] at K[sub i] = 60 MPa[radical]m. CPR obtained using compact specimens prepared from plates were 1 order of magnitude lower than values measured in tubes at the same temperature and in the same solution at each stress intensity. The corollary was that values of crack propagation and threshold stress intensities obtained using compact specimens could not be extrapolated to the behavior of thin wall tubes.

  9. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  10. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for AZNM subregion (lbs CO 2 MWh load) 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 January 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 February 800 1,100 1,400 1,700...

  11. Role of carbides in stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 600 and controlled-purity Ni-16% Cr-9% Fe in primary water at 360 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G.S.; Lian, K.

    1998-09-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of two commercial alloy 600 (UNS N06600) conditions (heat-treated at low temperature [600LT] and at high temperature [600HT]) and two controlled-purity Ni-16% Cr-9% Fe alloys (carbon-doped mill-annealed [CDMA] and carbon-doped thermally treated [CTRR]) were investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests in primary water (0.001 M lithium hydroxide [LiOH] + 0.01 M boric acid [H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}]) with 1 bar (100 kPa) hydrogen overpressure at 360 C and 320 C. Heat treatments produced two types of microstructures in the commercial and controlled-purity alloys: one dominated by grain-boundary carbides (600HT and CDTT) and one dominated by intragranular carbides (600LT and CDMA). CERT tests were conducted over a range of strain rates and at two temperatures with interruptions at specific strains to determine the crack depth distributions. Results showed IGSCC was the dominant failure mode in all samples. For the commercial alloy and controlled-purity alloys, the microstructure with grain-boundary carbides showed delayed crack initiation and shallower crack depths than did the intragranular carbide microstructure under all experimental conditions. Data indicated a grain-boundary carbide microstructure is more resistant to IGSCC than an intragranular carbide microstructure. Observations supported the film rupture/slip dissolution mechanism and enhanced localized plasticity. The advantage of these results over previous studies was that the different carbide distributions were obtained in the same commercial alloy using different heat treatments and, in the other case, in nearly identical controlled-purity alloys. Observations of the effects of carbide distribution on IGSCC could be attributed more confidently to the carbide distribution alone rather than other potentially significant differences in microstructure or composition. Crack growth rates (CGR) increased with increasing strain rate according to a power law relation with a strain rate exponent between 0.4 and 0.64. However, CGR measured in m/unit strain decreased with increasing strain rate, indicating an effect of environment or creep. Temperature dependence of CGR was consistent with the literature.

  12. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-243 Petroleum-Contaminated Soil Bioremediation Pad, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-11-07

    The 600-243 waste site consisted of a bioremediation pad for petroleum-contaminated soils resulting from the 1100 Area Underground Storage Tank (UST) upgrades in 1994. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) pole positions from a dispersive {pi}{pi} scattering data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz e Elvira, J.; Martin, R. Garcia; Pelaez, J. R.; Kaminski, R.

    2011-05-23

    We show how the new precise data on kaon decays together with forward dispersion relations, sum rules and once- and twice-subtracted Roy equations allow for a precise analysis of {pi}{pi} scattering. The once subtracted Roy equations provide a more stringent consistency check for the parametrizations of the S0-wave data in the region from 450 to 1100 MeV that allows us to present a preliminary determination of the f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) poles from the constrained dispersive data analysis.

  15. Analytical TEM Comparisons of Stress-Corrosion-Crack Microstructure in Alloy 600 under Steam-Generator Service and Laboratory Test Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Scott, Peter M.

    2002-05-31

    High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) been used to characterize stress-corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing from tests with caustic and acid-sulfate solutions. The aim of this work was to identify the microstructural and microchemical signatures of intergranular attack and cracking produced under well-controlled test conditions in order to determine the local environments promoting degradation in service. The examinations are part of an experimental program devoted to a study of IGA/IGSCC in steam generator tube alloys supported by the Framatome Owners Group via its Steam Generator Technical Committee.

  16. Field Testing of LIDAR-Assisted Feedforward Control Algorithms for Improved Speed Control and Fatigue Load Reduction on a 600-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Avishek A.; Bossanyi, Ervin A.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul; Boquet, Mathieu; Krishnamurthy, Raghu

    2015-12-14

    A severe challenge in controlling wind turbines is ensuring controller performance in the presence of a stochastic and unknown wind field, relying on the response of the turbine to generate control actions. Recent technologies such as LIDAR, allow sensing of the wind field before it reaches the rotor. In this work a field-testing campaign to test LIDAR Assisted Control (LAC) has been undertaken on a 600-kW turbine using a fixed, five-beam LIDAR system. The campaign compared the performance of a baseline controller to four LACs with progressively lower levels of feedback using 35 hours of collected data.

  17. Comparison of the National Green Building Standard (ICC 700-2008) and LEED for Homes to the Residential Provisions of the 2009 IECC for the Delaware Green for Green Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Makela, Eric J.

    2011-01-30

    Adhering to Delaware’s Green for Green program specifications results in homes being built to more energy-efficient levels than the 2009 IECC levels. Specifically: • Certifying at the Silver Performance Level for the ICC 700 standard using either the Prescriptive or Performance Paths will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC. • Certifying at the Silver level under LEED for Homes standard, including mandatory compliance with ENERGY STAR 2006 and earning two additional energy points will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC.

  18. {ital p}{sub {ital t}} and {ital x}{sub {ital F}} dependence of the polarization of {Sigma}{sup +} hyperons produced by 800 GeV/{ital c} protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelos, A.; Albuquerque, I.F.; Bondar, N.F.; Carrigan, R. Jr.; Chen, D.; Cooper, P.S.; Lisheng, D.; Denisov, A.S.; Dobrovolsky, A.V.; Dubbs, T.; Endler, A.M.F.; Escobar, C.O.; Foucher, M.; Golovtsov, V.L.; Gottschalk, H.; Gouffon, P.; Grachev, V.T.; Khanzadeev, A.V.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lach, J.; Lang Pengfei; Lebedenko, V.N.; Li Chengze; Li Yunshan; Luksys, M.; Mahon, J.R.P.; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Pommot Maia, M.C.; Samsonov, V.M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Shi Huanzhang; Smith, V.J.; Fukun, T.; Terentyev, N.K.; Timm, S.; Tkatch, I.I.; Uvarov, L.N.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Yan Jie; Wenheng, Z.; Zheng Shuchen; Zhong Yuanyuan

    1995-10-01

    We utilize the angle and momentum resolution of our apparatus to study the polarization of 375 GeV/{ital c} {Sigma}{sup +} hyperons produced by 800 GeV/{ital c} protons incident on a Cu target. By examining in detail two of our high statistics data samples, we find evidence for structure in the {ital p}{sub {ital t}} dependence of {Sigma}{sup +} polarization and are able to extract the {ital x}{sub {ital F}} dependence of the {Sigma}{sup +} polarization and compare it with {ital x}{sub {ital F}} behavior in the {Lambda}{sup 0} and {Xi}{sup {minus}} systems.

  19. Evidence of incomplete annealing at 800 °C and the effects of 120 °C baking on the crystal orientation and the surface superconducting properties of cold-worked and chemically polished Nb

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sung, Z. -H.; Dzyuba, A.; Lee, P. J.; Larbalestier, D C; Cooley, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    High-purity niobium rods were cold-worked by wire-drawing, followed by various combinations of chemical polishing and high-vacuum baking at 120 °C or annealing at 800 °C in order to better understand changes to the surface superconducting properties resulting from typical superconducting radio-frequency cavity processing. AC susceptibility measurements revealed an enhanced upper transition Tc at ~ 9.3–9.4 K in all samples that was stable through all annealing steps, a value significantly above the accepted Tc of 9.23 K for pure annealed niobium. Corresponding elevations were seen in the critical fields, the ratio of the surface critical field Hc3 to the bulk uppermore » critical field Hc2 rising to 2.3, well above the Ginzburg–Landau value of 1.695. Orientation imaging revealed an extensive dislocation rich sub-grain structure in the as-drawn rods, a small reduction of the surface strain after baking at 120 °C, and a substantial but incomplete recrystallization near the surface after annealing at 800 °C. We interpret these changes in surface superconducting and structural properties to extensive changes in the near-surface interstitial contamination produced by baking and annealing and to synergistic interactions between H and surface O introduced during electropolishing and buffered chemical polishing.« less

  20. Evidence of incomplete annealing at 800 °C and the effects of 120 °C baking on the crystal orientation and the surface superconducting properties of cold-worked and chemically polished Nb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, Z. -H.; Dzyuba, A.; Lee, P. J.; Larbalestier, D C; Cooley, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    High-purity niobium rods were cold-worked by wire-drawing, followed by various combinations of chemical polishing and high-vacuum baking at 120 °C or annealing at 800 °C in order to better understand changes to the surface superconducting properties resulting from typical superconducting radio-frequency cavity processing. AC susceptibility measurements revealed an enhanced upper transition Tc at ~ 9.3–9.4 K in all samples that was stable through all annealing steps, a value significantly above the accepted Tc of 9.23 K for pure annealed niobium. Corresponding elevations were seen in the critical fields, the ratio of the surface critical field Hc3 to the bulk upper critical field Hc2 rising to 2.3, well above the Ginzburg–Landau value of 1.695. Orientation imaging revealed an extensive dislocation rich sub-grain structure in the as-drawn rods, a small reduction of the surface strain after baking at 120 °C, and a substantial but incomplete recrystallization near the surface after annealing at 800 °C. We interpret these changes in surface superconducting and structural properties to extensive changes in the near-surface interstitial contamination produced by baking and annealing and to synergistic interactions between H and surface O introduced during electropolishing and buffered chemical polishing.

  1. Effects of pH and stress intensity on crack growth rate in Alloy 600 in lithiated + borated water at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; McIlree, A.R.

    1992-12-31

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on Alloy 600. Constant load tests were conducted at 330 and 350{degrees}C in solutions containing dissolved hydrogen, boric acid (0 < B < 1200 ppm) and lithium hydroxide (0 < Li < 10 ppm). In the PWR working conditions range, that is, 6.9 < pH < 7.4 (or 0.5 ppm < Li < 3.5), there is little effect of the solution pH on the intergranular crack growth rate (IGSCC). However, there is a strong influence of the stress intensity on the IGSCC. K{sub ISCC} {approx} 5-10 MPa{radical}m. Dissolution plays an important role in the IGSCC process.

  2. Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 tubes in PWR primary water - review and assessment for model development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garud, Y.S.; Gerber, T.L.

    1983-05-01

    The service performance of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 tubes with respect to primary-side intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and related experimental observations are reviewed, assessed, and summarized. The qualitative trends suggested by these observations and the role of primary variables of IGSCC are discussed from the point of view of mechanistic considerations. The need for a quantitative model to predict the IGSCC is established. The review and assessment indicate that, in addition to the water chemistry and metallurgical variables, explicit consideration of stress (and attendant deformation, i.e., strain-rate) is essential for any evaluation of the IGSCC to be complete. A promising approach of quantitative model development is presented with the above background. The analytical-experimental work needed for the model development is suggested, and implementation of the model and potential benefits to utilities is briefly discussed.

  3. Strain rate and temperature effects on the stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing in the primary water conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, U.C.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-01-01

    A single heat of Inconel Alloy 600 was examined in this work, using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated primary water at temperatures of 325/sup 0/-345/sup 0/-365/sup 0/C. The best measure of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was percent SCC present on the fracture surface. Strain rate did not seem to affect crack growth rate significantly, but there is some question about the accuracy of calculating these values in the absence of a direct indication of when a crack initiates. Demarcation was determined between domains of temperature/strain rate where SCC either did, or did not, occur. Slower extension rates were needed to produce SCC as the temperature was lowered. 10 figs.

  4. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-09-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking.

  5. Role of residual stresses in stress corrosion cracking in alloy 600 tubes. Part 1. Determination of throughwall residual stresses and their modification by transient heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Zemanian, T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of transient heat treatment on throughwall residual stress distribution of cold worked Alloy 600 tubes has been investigated, using electrochemical machining coupled with Sachs analyses for residual stress calculations. Heating for 60 to 150 seconds at 775 to 850 C is used. Specimens are made from one highly cold worked and one lightly cold worked tube. In both cases significant reduction of the magnitude of the stress, and modification of the stress distribution are achieved as a result of the heat treatment. The percentage reduction of the magnitude of the stress caused by the same heat treatment is generally greater in the lightly cold worked tube than in the highly cold worked one. The implications of the stress relieving heat treatments to mitigating stress corrosion cracking in a specific case are discussed. 14 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  6. The study of stress application and corrosion cracking on Ni-16 Cr-9 Fe (Alloy 600) C-ring samples by polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Jing; Fuller, Marina L Suominen; McIntyre, N Stewart; Carcea, Anatolie G; Newman, Roger C; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2012-03-27

    Microscopic strains associated with stress corrosion cracks have been investigated in stressed C-rings of Ni-16 Cr-9 Fe (Alloy 600) boiler tubing. Polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction was used to measure deviatoric strain tensors and the distribution of dislocations near cracks that had been propagated in electrochemically accelerated corrosion tests. An associated investigation of the C-ring-induced strains prior to corrosion showed significant tensile strain in the stress axis direction by the torsional closure of the alloy tube section in the C-ring test. Significant grain lattice rotation and pronounced plastic strain at some grain boundaries were noted. Stress-corrosion-cracking-generated intergranular cracks were produced in two Alloy 600 specimens after 6 h and 18 h tests. The diffraction patterns and resultant strain tensors were mapped around the cracked area to a 1 μm spatial resolution. The strain tensor transverse to the crack growth direction showed tensile strain at the intergranular region just ahead of the crack tip for both specimens. Both cracks were found to follow grain boundary pathways that had the lowest angle of misorientation. Dislocation distributions within each grain were qualitatively obtained from the shapes of the diffraction spots and the effect of 'hard' and 'soft' grains on the crack pathway was explored for both 6 h and 18 h specimens. The Schmid factor of one of the grains adjacent to the crack at the 6 h and 18 h initiation sites was found to be the lowest, compared to Schmid factors calculated for surface grains away from the initiation site, and also along the crack path into the bulk.

  7. Effect of water on mechanical properties and stress corrosion behavior of alloy 600, alloy 690, EN82H welds, and EN52 welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-02-01

    The fracture toughness and tensile properties of alloy 600 (UNS N06600), alloy 690 (UNS N06690), and their welds (EN82H [UNS N06082] and EN52 [UNS N06052]) were characterized in 54 C and 338 C water with an elevated hydrogen content. Results were compared with air data to evaluate the effect of low- and high-temperature water on the mechanical properties. In addition, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of EN82H and EN52 welds was evaluated in 360 C water. Elastic-plastic (J{sub IC}) fracture toughness testing revealed that the fracture resistance of all test materials was exceptionally high in 54 C and 338 C air and 338 C water, demonstrating that fracture properties essentially were unaffected by the high-temperature water environment. In 54 C water, however, J{sub IC} values for EN82H and EN52 welds were reduced by an order of magnitude, and alloy 690 showed a fivefold decrease in J{sub IC}. Scanning electron fractography revealed that the degraded fracture properties were associated with a fracture mechanism transition from ductile dimple rupture to intergranular cracking. The latter was associated with hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism. The fracture toughness for alloy 600 remained high in 54 C water, and microvoid coalescence was the operative mechanism in low-temperature air and water. Tensile properties for all test materials essentially were unaffected by the water environment, except for the total elongation for EN82H welds, which was reduced significantly in 54 C water. Constant-load testing of precracked weld specimens in 360 C water resulted in extensive intergranular SCC in EN82H welds, whereas no SCC occurred in EN52 welds under comparable test conditions.

  8. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  9. DNP 2015: APS Division of Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Registration and Accommodation request The companion fee covers the reception and companions program that is held in parallel with the plenary session. Non-member registration is for non APS members who wish to attend the sessions or be a vendor at the meeting. DNP 2015 Registration fee schedule Date Members Non-Members Students/Unemployed Companion Before Sept. 2 $275 $600 $100 $50 After Sept. 2 $350 $700 $175 $60 On-Site $400 $800 $200 $75 Registration and hotel accommodations will be handled

  10. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for School Buses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42 39 45 20 Deployment ID 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 857 Number of days Breakdown of Total Operational Days Collected by Deployment for School Buses 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% # of Vehicles Reporting: 204 # of Days Included: 857 Generated: Thu Aug 07, 2014 42 39 45 20 Deployment ID 0 50 100 150 200 204 Number of Vehicles Breakdown of Total Vehicles by Deployment for School Buses 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% # of Vehicles Reporting: 204 # of Days Included: 857 Generated: Thu Aug 07, 2014 39 42 45

  11. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate Testing and Analytical Electron Microscopy of Alloy 600 as a Function of Pourbaix Space and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lewis; S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; G.A. Young

    2000-10-04

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rate tests and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) studies were performed over a broad range of environments and heat treatments of Alloy 600. This effort was conducted to correlate bulk environmental conditions such as pH and electrochemical potential (EcP) with the morphology of the SCC crack. Development of a library of AEM morphologies formed by SCC in different environments is an important step in identifying the conditions that lead to SCC in components. Additionally, AEM examination of stress corrosion cracks formed in different environments and microstructures lends insight into the mechanism(s) of stress corrosion cracking. Testing was conducted on compact tension specimens in three environments: a mildly acidic oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions, a caustic environment containing 10% NaOH, and hydrogenated near-neutral buffered water. Additionally, stress corrosion cracking testing of a smooth specimen was conducted in hydrogenated steam. The following heat treatments of Alloy 600 were examined: mill annealed at 980 C (near-neutral water), mill annealed at 1010 C (steam), sensitized (acid and caustic), and mill annealed + healed to homogenize the grain boundary Cr concentration (caustic). Crack growth rate (CGR) testing showed that sensitized Alloy 600 tested in the mildly acidic, oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions produced the fastest cracking ({approx} 8.8 {micro}m/hr at 260 C), and AEM examination revealed evidence of sulfur segregation to the crack tip. The caustic environment produced slower cracking ({approx} 0.4 {micro}m/hr at 307 C) in the mill annealed + healed heat treatment but no observed cracking in the sensitized condition. In the caustic environment, fully oxidized carbides were present in the crack wake but not ahead of the crack tip. In near-neutral buffered water at 338 C, the CGR was a function of dissolved hydrogen in the water and exhibited a maximum (0.17 {micro}m/hr) near the transition between Ni and NiO stability. The cracks in near-neutral hydrogenated water exhibited Cr-rich spinels and NiO-type oxides but no significant oxidation of grain boundary carbides. No clear effect of dissolved hydrogen on the crack wake morphology was apparent. In hydrogenated steam testing of a smooth specimen (CGR estimated as {approx} 0.7 {micro}m/hr at 399 C), metallic nickel nodules were evident in both the crack wake and on the specimen surface. Oxide particles having a similar size and shape to the microstructural carbides were found in the crack wake, suggesting that these particles are carbides that were oxidized by contact with the steam. The present results show that different environments often produce unique crack tip morphologies that can be identified via AEM.

  12. Interaction of thermo-mechanical processing parameters and stress corrosion cracking for two heats of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, J.P.; Webb, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    The relationship between hot rolling parameters, annealing parameters, microstructures and stress corrosion cracking behavior of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 in deaerated primary plant grade water at 680{degrees}F was investigated. A high carbon (0.07%) and a medium carbon (0.04%) heat were hot rolled 20% or 80% starting at 3 different temperatures: below, near, and above the carbide solvus followed by annealing for 1 or 4 hours at a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}F or 1900{degrees}F. Materials that are resistant to stress corrosion cracking were produced by hot rolling above the carbide solvus temperature followed by annealing at high temperatures (>1900{degrees}F). A combination of hot rolling below carbide solvus, large rolling reduction and a short annealing at a low temperature produced materials susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, especially for the high carbon heat. The resistant materials have by optical metallography as having carbide decorated grain boundaries, little intragranular carbide precipitation and good grainboundary correlation between a nital and a phosphoric acid etch. The susceptible materials as lack grain boundary carbide precipitation, have heavy intragranular carbide precipitation and lack grain boundary correlation between a nital and a phosphoric acid etch.

  13. Investigation of the sulfur and lithium to sulfur ratio threshold in stress corrosion cracking of sensitized alloy 600 in borated thiosulfate solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Kelly, K.

    1984-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Alloy 600 was investigated in aerated solutions of sodium thiosulfate generally containing 1.3% boric acid. The aim of the investigation, among others, was to determine the existence, if any, of a threshold level of sulfur, and lithium to sulfur ratio governing the SCC. Specimens were first solution annealed at 1135/sup 0/C for 45 minutes, water quenched, and then sensitized at 621/sup 0/C for 18 hours. Reverse U-bends were tested at room temperature, whereas slow strain rate and constant load tests were performed at 80/sup 0/C. All tests were performed in solutions open to the atmosphere. The results indicate that in the borated thiosulfate solution containing 7 ppM sulfur, 5 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide is sufficient to inhibit SCC in U-bends. The occurrence of inhibition seems to correlate to the rapid increase of pH and conductivity of the solution as a result of the lithium hydroxide addition. In the slow strain rate tests in the borated solution containing 0.7 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide, significant stress corrosion cracking is observed at a sulfur level of 30 ppb, i.e., a lithium to sulfur ratio of 23. In a parallel test in 30 ppb sulfur level but without any lithium hydroxide, the stress corrosion cracking is more severe than that in the lithiated environment, thus implying that lithium hydroxide plays some role in the stress corrosion cracking inhibition.

  14. Interaction of thermo-mechanical processing parameters and stress corrosion cracking for two heats of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, J.P.; Webb, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    The relationship between hot rolling parameters, annealing parameters, microstructures and stress corrosion cracking behavior of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 in deaerated primary plant grade water at 680[degrees]F was investigated. A high carbon (0.07%) and a medium carbon (0.04%) heat were hot rolled 20% or 80% starting at 3 different temperatures: below, near, and above the carbide solvus followed by annealing for 1 or 4 hours at a nominal temperature of 1600[degrees]F or 1900[degrees]F. Materials that are resistant to stress corrosion cracking were produced by hot rolling above the carbide solvus temperature followed by annealing at high temperatures (>1900[degrees]F). A combination of hot rolling below carbide solvus, large rolling reduction and a short annealing at a low temperature produced materials susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, especially for the high carbon heat. The resistant materials have by optical metallography as having carbide decorated grain boundaries, little intragranular carbide precipitation and good grainboundary correlation between a nital and a phosphoric acid etch. The susceptible materials as lack grain boundary carbide precipitation, have heavy intragranular carbide precipitation and lack grain boundary correlation between a nital and a phosphoric acid etch.

  15. Effects of zinc additions on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of sensitized stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 182 weld metal in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    ZnO additions to boiling water reactor (BWR) water have been the focus of recent interest, primarily because of their beneficial influence in reducing buildup of radioactive species such as Co{sup 60} in the oxide film of structural components, e.g., stainless steel piping. The effect of ZnO additions on stress corrosion crack growth rates were studied using 1T CT fracture mechanics specimens of sensitized type 304 stainless steel, sensitized Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exposed to {approx}288 C water containing various levels of dissolved oxygen and impurities. Zn levels of 5 to 100 ppb Zn{sup 2+} were evaluated and found to reduce crack growth rates for all materials and in all water chemistries. Many Zn tests involved long term exposure and were performed at somewhat reduced corrosion potential (e.g., from {approx}+200 to 0 {minus}+50 mV{sub she}); variations in corrosion potential from +200, to +50, to {minus}50 mV{sub she} clearly had an important effect. The benefit of Zn appeared to be most pronounced when the growth rate was decreased (e.g., by corrosion potential). This was consistent with the findings of mechanistic studies, which showed that Zn decreased the repassivation response at times >10{sup 4} s, which is associated with low crack tip strain rates, i.e., low growth rates. Reduced corrosion potentials are also expected to directly effect Zn, since high (crack mouth) corrosion potentials inhibit the transport of Zn{sup 2+} into the crack. Zn also increased the fracture strain of the oxide on stainless steel, and may also reduce crack growth rates by increasing the pH in the crack. Similar benefits are expected for other structural materials, such as nonsensitized or irradiated stainless steel, carbon steel, low alloy steel, and other nickel alloys.

  16. Results of U-xMo (x=7, 10, 12 wt.%) Alloy versus Al-6061 Cladding Diffusion Couple Experiments Performed at 500, 550 and 600 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Yongho Sohn

    2013-04-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al 6061 for use in research and test reactors. U–Mo alloys in contact with Al and Al alloys can undergo diffusional interactions that can result in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex fine-grained microstructures composed of multiple phases. A monolithic fuel currently being developed by the RERTR program has local regions where the U–Mo fuel plate is in contact with the Al 6061 cladding and, as a result, the program finds information about interdiffusion zone development at high temperatures of interest. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo, and U-12wt.%Mo vs. Al 6061 (or 6061 aluminum) cladding, annealed at 500, 550, 600 degrees C for 1, 5, 20, 24, or 132 hours, was analyzed by backscatter electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy on a scanning electron microscope. Concentration profiles were determined by standardized wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and standardless x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results of this work shows that the presence of surface layers at the U–Mo/Al 6061 interface can dramatically impact the overall interdiffusion behavior in terms of rate of interaction and uniformity of the developed interdiffusion zones. It further reveals that relatively uniform interaction layers with higher Si concentrations can develop in U–Mo/Al 6061 couples annealed at shorter times and that longer times at temperature result in the development of more non-uniform interaction layers with more areas that are enriched in Al. At longer annealing times and relatively high temperatures, U–Mo/Al 6061 couples can exhibit more interaction compared to U–Mo/pure Al couples. The minor alloying constituents in Al 6061 cladding can result in the development of many complex phases in the interaction layer of U–Mo/Al–6061 cladding couples, and some phases in the interdiffusion zones of U–Mo/Al–6061 cladding couples are likely similar to those observed for U–Mo/pure Al couples.

  17. Executive Committee meeting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6, 2016 6:00PM to 7:00PM EST The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board's Executive Committee meeting is open to the public...

  18. Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Source Heat Pumps Nashville, TN 1,800,000 1,800,000 3,600,000 New School & Performing Arts Theater Pennsylvania 1001 South 15th Street Associates, LLC Recovery Act - Geothermal...

  19. Search for Scalar Diphoton Resonances in the Mass Range 65–600 GeV with the ATLAS Detector in pp Collision Data at s=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-20

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range 65–600 GeV is performed using 20.3 fb₋1 of √s=8 TeV pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No significant evidence for an additional signal is observed. The results are presented as limits at the 95% confidence level on the production cross section of a scalar boson times branching ratio into two photons, in a fiducial volume where the reconstruction efficiency is approximately independent of the event topology. Lastly,more » the upper limits set extend over a considerably wider mass range than previous searches.« less

  20. Tubular solid oxide fuel cells with porous metal supports and ceramic interconnections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Kevin; Ruka, Roswell J.

    2012-05-08

    An intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell structure capable of operating at from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. having a very thin porous hollow elongated metallic support tube having a thickness from 0.10 mm to 1.0 mm, preferably 0.10 mm to 0.35 mm, a porosity of from 25 vol. % to 50 vol. % and a tensile strength from 700 GPa to 900 GPa, which metallic tube supports a reduced thickness air electrode having a thickness from 0.010 mm to 0.2 mm, a solid oxide electrolyte, a cermet fuel electrode, a ceramic interconnection and an electrically conductive cell to cell contact layer.

  1. Obama Administration Announces Additional $208,759,900 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... TX DeSoto City 187,700 TX Duncanville City 148,600 TX Edinburg City 683,100 TX El Paso City 5,802,700 TX Euless City 454,200 TX Flower Mound City 607,700 TX Fort Worth ...

  2. Diffusion Barrier Selection from Refractory Metals (Zr, Mo and Nb) via Interdiffusion Investigation for U-Mo RERTR Fuel Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Huang; C. Kammerer; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01

    U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment monolithic fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Diffusional interactions between the U-Mo fuel alloy and Al-alloy cladding within the monolithic fuel plate construct necessitate incorporation of a barrier layer. Fundamentally, a diffusion barrier candidate must have good thermal conductivity, high melting point, minimal metallurgical interaction, and good irradiation performance. Refractory metals, Zr, Mo, and Nb are considered based on their physical properties, and the diffusion behavior must be carefully examined first with U-Mo fuel alloy. Solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Mo, Zr, or Nb diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C for various times. The interdiffusion microstructures and chemical composition were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. For all three systems, the growth rate of interdiffusion zone were calculated at 1000, 900 and 800 degrees C under the assumption of parabolic growth, and calculated for lower temperature of 700, 600 and 500 degrees C according to Arrhenius relationship. The growth rate was determined to be about 10 3 times slower for Zr, 10 5 times slower for Mo and 10 6 times slower for Nb, than the growth rates reported for the interaction between the U-Mo fuel alloy and pure Al or Al-Si cladding alloys. Zr, however was selected as the barrier metal due to a concern for thermo- mechanical behavior of UMo/Nb interface observed from diffusion couples, and for ductile-to-brittle transition of Mo near room temperature.

  3. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 2,200 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Oil production thousand barrelsday Permian Region -25 0 25 50 75 100 ...

  4. PPPO Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SSAB Board Meeting - January 6:00PM to 8:00PM EST 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Paducah Citizens Advisory Board Meeting - January 6:00PM to 8:00PM CST 24 25 26 27...

  5. FAQs for Survey Forms 800, 810, and 820

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG) are products of refinery processing (distillation, cracking, etc.) of crude oil and unfinished oils and include the following product Codes: - 641 ...

  6. Well cored to 9,800 ft in Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, K.B. )

    1991-05-13

    The mining industry's slim hole drilling rigs have proven applicable to primary oil exploration. These machines are smaller than conventional drilling rigs and can be transported with relative ease to remote locations. A typical rig drills an entire well by coring, with the cores retrieved by wire line without tripping the pipe. The core drilling system is specially suited to drilling hard rock formations. This paper reports on the project which evaluated the geological aspects of the Parana basin and determined the applicability of slim hole, core drilling techniques as an exploration tool. The Parana basin is found in the eastern third of Paraguay, part of northeastern Argentina, and part of southern Brazil. Much of the basin is overlaid by basalt flows up to 5,000-ft thick, and there are numerous igneous intrusions and dikes within the sedimentary section. This combination makes seismic quality poor and interpretation extremely difficult. The formations are relatively old, with Triassic red beds occurring only a few feet below the surface or immediately below the basalt. Beneath the Triassic are Permian marine deposits, Permo-Carboniferous tillites, and then Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician deposits to the basement. The section outcrops 100 miles west of the Mallorquin Well No. 1 site. The Parana basin has been only randomly explored. To date, success has been limited to a minor gas find near Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  7. Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $800 Million from Recovery Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    be outsourced," Secretary Chu said. "With American investment and ingenuity -- and resources grown right here at home -- we can lead the way toward a new green energy economy." ...

  8. Dismantling of Building 409. IR-800-803-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-700-703-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND95-2049 UC-700 Unlimited Release

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Problems Micheal W. Glass Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 for the United S t a t e s Department of Energy...

  11. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 84.700 Geothermal Leasing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Implementing regulations in Alaska governing geothermal leasing procedures including competitive and non-competitive leasing. Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  12. Florida Power & Light Company, 700 Universe Blvd. Juno Beach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In the latter case, technological advances in the world of digital "bits" have enabled not ... of specific pricing programs and marketing tactics; (iv) the impact of social norms ...

  13. Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on government buildings, energy efficient traffic signals and street lights, deployment of Combined Heat and Power and district heating and cooling systems, and others. ...

  14. Obama Administration Announces Additional $16,956,700 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on government buildings, energy efficient traffic signals and street lights, deployment of Combined Heat and Power and district heating and cooling systems, and others. ...

  15. 14,700 tons of silver at Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calutron magnets was because of a shortage of copper during the war. As you will recall, Gen. Groves sent Col. Nichols to arrange for the purchase of as much uranium ore as could...

  16. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline...

  17. An experimental study of the solubility of molybdenum in H2O and KCl-H2O solutions from 500 ºC to 800 ºC, and 150 to 300 MPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Thomas; Mavrogenes, John

    2008-04-22

    The solubility of molybdenum (Mo) was determined at temperatures from 500 °C to 800 °C and 150 to 300 MPa in KCl-H2O and pure H2O solutions in cold-seal experiments. The solutions were trapped as synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz at experimental conditions, and analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICPMS). Mo solubilities of 1.6 wt% in the case of KCl-bearing aqueous solutions and up to 0.8 wt% in pure H2O were found. Mo solubility is temperature dependent, but not pressure dependent over the investigated range, and correlates positively with salinity (KCl concentration). Molar ratios of ~1 for Mo/Cl and Mo/K are derived based on our data. In combination with results of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy of individual fluid inclusions, it is suggested that Mo-oxo-chloride complexes are present at high salinity (>20 wt% KCl) and ion pairs at moderate to low salinity (<11 wt% KCl) in KCl-H2O aqueous solutions. Similarly, in the pure H2O experiments molybdic acid is the dominant species in aqueous solution. The results of these hydrothermal Mo experiments fit with earlier studies conducted at lower temperatures and indicate that high Mo concentrations can be transported in aqueous solutions. Therefore, the Mo concentration in aqueous fluids seems not to be the limiting factor for ore formation, whereas precipitation processes and the availability of sulfur appear to be the main controlling factors in the formation of molybdenite (MoS2).

  18. Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    14,700 staff, about 11,200 of whom are national personnel. 1,800 people are employed at Head Office in Eschborn near Frankfurt am Main and at various locations within Germany....

  19. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pm Executive SessionDiscussions with C-Mod team as desired * Priorities Marmar * 8 Tesla Wolfe 7:00 pm PAC Dinner (if desired) Wednesday, February 25, 2004 8:00 am Executive...

  20. K C Electric Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    K C Electric Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: K C Electric Association Place: Colorado Website: www.kcelectric.coop Outage Hotline: 1-800-700-3123 Outage Map:...

  1. Rate of reaction of hydrogen sulfide-carbonyl sulfide mixtures with fully calcined dolomite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.S.; Petrie, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic data are obtained by a gravimetric technique for rates of reaction of calcium oxide in fully calcined dolomite with hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen sulfide-carbonyl sulfide mixtures. The data are presented as values for a factor k defined by d(CAO) = -k (CAO) dt. At 600, 700, and 800 degrees C with (H/sub 2/S) from 0.5% to 5.0% by volume and (H/sub 2/S)/(COS) = 20 for mixtures, expressions for k show apparent rate constants and the dependence on sulfurous gas concentration. For example, at 700 degrees C, k = 1.43 x 10/sup -4/ (h2s) 1.06/S and k = 1.70 x 10/sup -4/ (H/sub 2/S + COS) 1.00/s. Since the date show first-order dependence on calcium oxide, k's for H/sub 2/S alone as the sulfurous gas and h2s-cos mixtures can be obtained for the same sample, free from scatter due to variations from sample to sample. Addition of values for k from runs with H/sub 2/S as the only sulfurous gas and runs with COS as the only sulfurous gas are compared to measurements with actual mixtures. K's for the mixtures are approximately 30% higher than the sum of the appropriate separate values.

  2. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you need care. A daily tuition rate would apply. Hours of operation 7:00 am - 6:00 pm Snacks and meal provided For more detailed information click here, or feel free to visit our...

  3. EM/Stewardship Committee meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM/Stewardship Committee meeting EM/Stewardship Committee meeting June 22, 2016 6:00PM to 7:00PM EDT The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board's EM/Stewardship Committee meeting is open

  4. Executive Committee meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Committee meeting Executive Committee meeting July 6, 2016 6:00PM to 7:00PM EDT The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board's Executive Committee meeting is open

  5. Executive Committee meeting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Executive Committee meeting Executive Committee meeting February 3, 2016 6:00PM to 7:00PM EST The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board's Executive Committee meeting is open...

  6. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in the United States, 1930-2000 Figure 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic...

  7. Microsoft Word - LMI_Kickoff_Agenda_2014-09-23_forweb5.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6:00 Dinner Jorgensen Lobby 7:00 Climate Change and the Future of Photovoltaics Nate Lewis (Caltech) 8:15pm Shuttle from Caltech to Hilton Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Winnett...

  8. (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co,Zn)4O7 cathodes with superior high-temperature phase stability for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young Nam, Kim; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manthiram, Arumugam; Huq, Ashfia

    2012-01-01

    (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo4-xZnxO7 (1.0 x 2.0) oxides crystallizing in a trigonal P31c structure have been synthesized and explored as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). At a given Zn content, the (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo4-xZnxO7 sample with 50 % Y and 50 % In exhibits much improved phase stability at intermediate temperatures (600 - 800 oC) compared to the samples with 100 % Y or In. However, the substitution of Zn for Co in (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co4-xZnx)O7 (1.0 x 2.0) decreases the amount of oxygen loss on heating, total electrical conductivity, and cathode performance in SOFC while providing good long-term phase stability at high temperatures. Among the various chemical compositions investigated in the (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co4-xZnx)O7 system, the (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo3ZnO7 sample offers a combination of good electrochemical performance and low thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) while maintaining superior phase stability at 600 800 oC for 100 h. Fuel cell performances of the (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co3Zn)O7 + Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) (50 : 50 wt. %) composite cathodes collected with anode-supported single cell reveal a maximum power density value of 521 mW cm-2 at 700 oC.

  9. Obama Administration Announces Additional $42,380,100 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 438,900 IN Elkhart County 629,800 IN Hamilton County 362,400 IN Hendricks County 546,900 IN Lake County 2,979,700 IN LaPorte County 462,900 IN Porter County 511,800 IN St. ...

  10. 2011 Workshop Agenda_Ver_21.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7:00 AM 8:00 AM 60 Workshop Registration 8:00 AM 8:05 AM 5 Welcome and Workshop Logistics John Makepeace, Office of Engineering and Construction Management 8:05 AM 8:20 AM 15...

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... PAD District V 6 6 0 389,980 295,034 94,946 419,700 323,700 96,000 ......605,600 2,510,400 96,000 PAD District V 31,500 0 0 0 12,500 14,200 24,500 0 ...

  12. Comparative study of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube materials in water at 315 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, P.K.; Ghosal, S.K.

    1981-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Type 304 and 304L stainless steels, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, and Monel 400 has been studied in water at 315 C, with or without 0.6 ppm Pb and 0.05 or 8 ppm O/sub 2/. Under mill annealed, cold worked (25%) and stress relieved (675 C, 1 hour) conditions, Type 304L, Incoloy 800, and Monel 400 were resistant to cracking, whereas highly stressed Inconel 600 cracked intergranularly. Inconel 600, heat treated at 600 C for 24 hours or more following annealing, was resistant to SCC. The effects of microstructural changes on SCC behavior are discussed. 20 refs.

  13. Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - March | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - March March 3, 2016 6:00PM to 8:00PM EST Portsmouth SSAB Office, 1862 Shyville Road, Piketon, Ohio 45661 Contact: Greg Simonton, DOE Site Office: ...

  14. DUNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    600 m downstream of the Fermilab beamline, and a 40,000 metric ton cryogenic liquid argon detector deployed deep underground at Sanford Lab, located 800 miles (1,300 km)...

  15. Paducah CAB Board meeting - May | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah CAB Board meeting - May May 19, 2016 6:00PM to 8:00PM CDT Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office 270-441-6821 ...

  16. File:(131112) Presentacion LAC LEDs.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (131112) Presentacion LAC LEDs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:(131112) Presentacion LAC LEDs.pdf Size of this preview: 800 600 pixels. Go to...

  17. Microsoft Word - Y12GammaAppendicesAand B.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    %) Max Dose 2174 Dose(mrem) Frequency 0 200 400 600 800 0 20 40 60 80 Quarterly Y-12 Film Badge Gamma Dose for 1952 Note change in vertical scale, frequency or number of workers...

  18. File:UtahEnergyForumSiting.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UtahEnergyForumSiting.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:UtahEnergyForumSiting.pdf Size of this preview: 800 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  19. Paducah CAB Board meeting - March | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah CAB Board meeting - March March 17, 2016 6:00PM to 8:00PM CDT Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office 270-441-6821 ...

  20. Paducah CAB Board meeting - August | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    27, 2015 6:00PM to 8:00PM CDT Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office 270-441-6821 www.pgdpcab.energy.gov...

  1. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas production million cubic feetday 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica June-2015 June-2016 New-well oil production ...

  2. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Haynesville Region +86 -150 -64 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 new-well oil production per rig rig count ...

  3. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Eagle Ford Region +127 -322 -195 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0 200 400 600 800 1000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 new-well oil production per rig rig count ...

  4. Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - May | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Board Meeting - May Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - May May 5, 2016 6:00PM to 8:00PM EDT Portsmouth SSAB Office, 1862 Shyville Road, Piketon, Ohio 45661 Contact: Greg Simonton, DOE Site Office: 740-897-3737

  5. Paducah CAB Board and Subcommittees - November | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - November November 19, 2015 6:00PM to 8:00PM CST Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office 270-441-6821 www.pgdpcab...

  6. File:DIA Visual Development.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DIA Visual Development.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:DIA Visual Development.pdf Size of this preview: 800 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6...

  7. Paducah Citizens Advisory Board Meeting - January | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah Citizens Advisory Board Meeting - January January 21, 2016 6:00PM to 8:00PM CST Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office ...

  8. Word Pro - S12

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas 2014 2015 2016 531 505 484 2014 2015 2016 0 200 400 600 800 a Excludes emissions from biomass energy consumption. b Includes coal coke net imports. Web Page: http:...

  9. Paducah CAB Board Meeting - November | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 6:00PM to 8:00PM CST Paducah CAB Office, 111 Memorial Drive, Paducah, KY 42001 Contact Buz Smith, DOE Site Office 270-441-6821 www.pgdpcab.energy.gov...

  10. File:DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf Size of this preview: 800 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  11. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments will be posted in their entirety on BPA's website. At a public scoping meeting: December 9, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; Hal Holmes Community Center, 209 N. Ruby Street, Ellensburg, ...

  12. Genepool Quarterly Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genepool Quarterly Maintenance Genepool Quarterly Maintenance November 7, 2012 by Kirsten Fagnan The Genepool cluster will be offline for maintenance next Tuesday, November 13th from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm (PST). During this time staff will upgrade the Genepool compute nodes to Debian 6. Also, the firmware for /projectb and /house will be updated. /projectb will be unavailable from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm (PST) and /house will be unavailable from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm (PST). Any webservices or workflows

  13. RUS Bulletin 1794-A-600: Preparing an Environmental Report for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    construed as imposing new requirements on RUS applicants. Where words of a "mandatory" nature are used, they are meant to reflect environmental requirements created by existing...

  14. SEPA United States Environmental Monitoring EPA/600/4-861022

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In addition, physical examinations of the off-site residents revealed a normally healthy population consonant with the age and sex distribution of .that population. Community ...

  15. Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of 73,259,203 in Utah weatherization and energy funding announced by the Administration on March 12th and detailed at energy.govrecovery. "These investments will save...

  16. Contractors Donate Nearly $600,000 to Charity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s prime contractor for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Bechtel National Inc., and its employees donated more than $590,000 to community organizations in 2015.

  17. GE CRD SERVICE ORDER TERMS AND CONDITIONS (6/00)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GE GLOBAL RESEARCH SERVICE ORDER TERMS AND CONDITIONS (May 2013) FORM A INTEGRITY STATEMENT: If you as a supplier become aware of any situation that appears to be inconsistent with GE's Policy to maintain lawful and fair practices in its supplier relationships, you may write to our Ombudsman at: GE Global Research, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309. 1. ACCEPTANCE AND TERMS AND CONDITIONS: (a) Seller accepts this Order and any changes by signing the acceptance copy and returning it to GE.

  18. Secretaries Chu and Vilsack Announce More Than $600 Million Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oil, spur the creation of the domestic bio-industry and provide new jobs in many rural ... Guarantee for First-of-its-Kind Cellulosic Bio-Refinery in Iowa Department of Energy ...

  19. Public Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 24, 2005 Visitors are welcome to view Fermilab's herd of about sixty buffalo seven days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. mid-October to mid-April and from 8:00 a.m....

  20. Portsmouth Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - September 6:00PM to 8:00PM EDT Portsmouth Site Public Tour 8:30AM to 12:00PM EDT 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Portsmouth SSAB Subcommittees - September 4:00PM to 6:00PM EDT 27 28 29 30...

  1. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Mizushima, Yoriko; Kim, Youngsuk; Nakamura, Tomoji; Ohba, Takayuki; Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500C. After 600700C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  2. Effect of carbonization temperature on the physical and electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrode from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishak, M. M.; Deraman, M. Talib, I. A.; Basri, N. H.; Omar, R.; Nor, N. S. M.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R.; Taer, E.

    2015-04-16

    Self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) was prepared from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches. The SACG green monoliths were carbonized in N{sub 2} environment at 400, 500, 600 and 700C to produce carbon monoliths labeled as CM1, CM2, CM3 and CM4 respectively. The CMs were activated in CO{sub 2} surrounding at 800C for 1 hour to produce activated carbon monolith electrodes (ACM1, ACM2, ACM3 and ACM4). The physical properties of the CMs and ACMs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm techniques. ACMs were used as electrode to fabricate symmetry supercapacitor cells and the cells performances were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) standard techniques. In this paper we report the physical and electrochemical properties of the ACM electrodes by analyzing the influence of the carbonization temperature on these properties.

  3. Indiana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,009 1,490 772 1,087 753 1,818 2,926 4,027 1,339 600 1,088 869 2002 1,860 2,683 2,173 3,043 1,326 3,544 6,744 4,557 3,299 1,903 2,010 1,962 2003 1,395 1,700 1,800 603 2,583 2,402 2,865 4,399 2,334 1,387 2,628 2,576 2004 3,287 4,188 1,799 1,693 3,079 1,320 2,176 2,179 1,520 393 332 980 2005 1,534 844 2,175 3,653 2,422 5,416 6,420 6,106 2,540 1,339 862 2,064 2006 1,376 779 1,617 1,685 1,740 2,619 6,100 4,873 1,454 1,584 1,831

  4. Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

  5. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,009 1,490 772 1,087 753 1,818 2,926 4,027 1,339 600 1,088 869 2002 1,860 2,683 2,173 3,043 1,326 3,544 6,744 4,557 3,299 1,903 2,010 1,962 2003 1,395 1,700 1,800 603 2,583 2,402 2,865 4,399 2,334 1,387 2,628 2,576 2004 3,287 4,188 1,799 1,693 3,079 1,320 2,176 2,179 1,520 393 332 980 2005 1,534 844 2,175 3,653 2,422 5,416 6,420 6,106 2,540 1,339 862 2,064 2006 1,376 779 1,617 1,685 1,740 2,619 6,100 4,873 1,454 1,584 1,831

  6. Effect of calcination temperature on electrical properties of Nd{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, K. P.; Halim, S. A.; Chen, S. K.; Ng, S. W.; Chew, Z. Y.

    2015-04-24

    In this work, Nd{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} was synthesized via cryo-milling method to investigate the effect of calcination temperature on the structure, microstructure, magnetic and electrical properties. XRD analysis revealed all samples can be indexed to orthorhombic structure systems with Imma space group accompany with some minor phases of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and BaMnO{sub 3}. FESEM analysis confirmed that a slight increase in the grain size from 117.4 nm (600C), 119.5 nm (700C), 121.0 nm (800C), 123.1 nm (900C) to 138.4 nm (1000C) was observed when different calcination temperature was applied. Four Point Probe measurements showed that all samples are in paramagnetic insulating region and T{sub MIT} is lower than 20K. Resistivity increase when grain size reduces due to increase of effective grain boundary that weakens the electron hopping process via double exchange mechanism. Beside, a drastic increase of resistivity also observed due to present of minor secondary phase (BaMnO{sub 3}) in sample C9.

  7. Sulfide stress cracking resistance of low-alloy nickel steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshino, Y.; Minozaki, Y.

    1986-04-01

    The sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of Ni-containing low-alloy steels was studied using laboratory and commercial heats over the range of 600 to 800 MPa yield strength (700 to 900 MPa tensile strength). The results were interpreted with regard to observations by metallurgical and electrochemical analyses. In steel containing 1% Cr and 0.5% Mo, the SSC resistance is not affected by up to 2% Ni. A commercial steel with 3.7% Ni-1.8% Cr-0.4% Mo exhibits the same K/sub ISSC/ and Ni-free steels. The cracking resistance begins to deteriorate when fresh martensite exceeds 5 vol%. The lattice diffusion of hydrogen is decreased by the additional Ni, whereas the subsurface hydrogen concentration remains constant in 5% NaCl solution and decreases in NACE TM-01-77 solution up to 5% Ni. Thus, nickel has no harmful effect in terms of hydrogen absorption and diffusion. However, nickel enhances the formation of surface trenches in acidified solutions. This is intensified in the anodically polarized slow extension rate test, which results in loss in elongation. Consequently, nickel per se has no effect on the propagation of SSC unless its addition results in the formation of fresh martensite. However, it may or may not enhance crack initiation, depending on a specific combination of solution and steel, by forming surface trenches that subsequently trigger hydrogen cracking from their bottom.

  8. Isolated polypeptide having arabinofuranosidase activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Pamela; Van Solingen, Pieter; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael

    2010-02-23

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry. TABLE-US-00001 cip1 cDNA sequence (SEQ ID NO: 1) GACTAGTTCA TAATACAGTA GTTGAGTTCA TAGCAACTTC 50 ACTCTCTAGC TGAACAAATT ATCTGCGCAA ACATGGTTCG CCGGACTGCT 100 CTGCTGGCCC TTGGGGCTCT CTCAACGCTC TCTATGGCCC AAATCTCAGA 150 CGACTTCGAG TCGGGCTGGG ATCAGACTAA ATGGCCCATT TCGGCACCAG 200 ACTGTAACCA GGGCGGCACC GTCAGCCTCG ACACCACAGT AGCCCACAGC 250 GGCAGCAACT CCATGAAGGT CGTTGGTGGC CCCAATGGCT ACTGTGGACA 300 CATCTTCTTC GGCACTACCC AGGTGCCAAC TGGGGATGTA TATGTCAGAG 350 CTTGGATTCG GCTTCAGACT GCTCTCGGCA GCAACCACGT CACATTCATC 400 ATCATGCCAG ACACCGCTCA GGGAGGGAAG CACCTCCGAA TTGGTGGCCA 450 AAGCCAAGTT CTCGACTACA ACCGCGAGTC CGACGATGCC ACTCTTCCGG 500 ACCTGTCTCC CAACGGCATT GCCTCCACCG TCACTCTGCC TACCGGCGCG 550 TTCCAGTGCT TCGAGTACCA CCTGGGCACT GACGGAACCA TCGAGACGTG 600 GCTCAACGGC AGCCTCATCC CGGGCATGAC CGTGGGCCCT GGCGTCGACA 650 ATCCAAACGA CGCTGGCTGG ACGAGGGCCA GCTATATTCC GGAGATCACC 700 GGTGTCAACT TTGGCTGGGA GGCCTACAGC GGAGACGTCA ACACCGTCTG 750 GTTCGACGAC ATCTCGATTG CGTCGACCCG CGTGGGATGC GGCCCCGGCA 800 GCCCCGGCGG TCCTGGAAGC TCGACGACTG GGCGTAGCAG CACCTCGGGC 850 CCGACGAGCA CTTCGAGGCC AAGCACCACC ATTCCGCCAC CGACTTCCAG 900 GACAACGACC GCCACGGGTC CGACTCAGAC ACACTATGGC CAGTGCGGAG 1000 GGATTGGTTA CAGCGGGCCT ACGGTCTGCG CGAGCGGCAC GACCTGCCAG 1050 GTCCTGAACC CATACTACTC CCAGTGCTTA TAAGGGGATG AGCATGGAGT 1100 GAAGTGAAGT GAAGTGGAGA GAGTTGAAGT GGCATTGCGC TCGGCTGGGT 1150 AGATAAAAGT CAGCAGCTAT GAATACTCTA TGTGATGCTC ATTGGCGTGT 1200 ACGTTTTAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA 1250 AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAG GGGGCGGCCG C 1271

  9. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  10. Sigma meson in pole-dominated QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojo, Toru; Jido, Daisuke

    2008-12-01

    The properties of the {sigma} meson are studied using the QCD sum rules for tetraquark operators. In the SU(3) chiral limit, we separately investigate SU(3) singlet and octet tetraquark states as constituents of the {sigma} meson and discuss their roles for the classification of the light scalar nonets {sigma}, f{sub 0}, a{sub 0}, and {kappa} as candidates of tetraquark states. All of our analyses are performed in the suitable Borel window which is indispensable to avoid the pseudopeak artifacts outside of the Borel window. We can set up acceptably wide Borel windows after preparing favorable linear combinations of operators and including the dimension 12 terms in the operator-product expansion. Taking into account the possible large widths, we evaluate masses for singlet and octet states as 700-850 and 600-750 MeV, respectively, although the octet operators have a smaller overlap with the tetraquark states than the singlet case, which requires careful interpretations. The splitting of the singlet and octet states emerges from the number of the qq annihilation diagrams, which include the color singlet annihilation processes qqqq{yields}(qq){sub 1} and the color octet annihilation processes qqqq{yields}G(qq){sub 8}. The mass of the {sigma} meson is evaluated as 600-800 MeV, which is much closer to the experimental value {approx}500 MeV than the mass evaluated by 2-quark correlator analyses, {approx}1.0 GeV. This indicates that the tetraquark state shares a larger fraction in the {sigma} meson than ordinary two quark meson states.

  11. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  12. Preparation and lithium intercalation behavior of TiO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yunjiao, E-mail: yunjiaoli6601@hotmail.com; Li, Lin; Chen, Lingpeng; Wang, Xuanyu; Xu, Cang

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: The poor crystalline anatase phase or amorphous TiO{sub 2} was prepared by TiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis under different pH conditions. Phase transition behavior and lithium intercalation ability of the obtained TiO{sub 2} were found to be related to TiO{sub 2} property. The results indicate that TiO{sub 2} products obtained from TiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis at lower pH are favorable for lithium intercalation. - Abstract: The low crystalline or amorphous TiO{sub 2} was prepared by TiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis in aqueous solutions under different pH conditions at 45 C. The products obtained at lower pH (1.233.10) appear to be nano-sized particles with poor crystalline anatase structure and an uniform particle size distribution, while the product prepared at pH 4.10 presents in a poor crystalline anatase structure and the regular morphology starts to disappear, and the products obtained at higher pH (>6.00) are amorphous and irregular morphology. The hydrolysis products obtained at pH 2.60 and 8.80 were heat-treated at 300, 400, 600, 700 and 800 C for 3 h, respectively, to figure out the phase transition. The differences in phase transition process were observed, which verified the properties difference. The lithium intercalation abilities of the obtained TiO{sub 2} were studied. The results indicated that the TiO{sub 2} obtained at lower pH are more favorable for lithium intercalation and are better precursors.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slide 060112_Cogdell.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heterogeneous case where variation comes from different apoproteins * Rings contain multiple types of alpha and beta apoproteins Rings contain multiple types of alpha and beta apoproteins - - seen as different sight energies in the 'B850' manifold - - site energies vary within an alpha/beta dimer Variability in B800 LH2 complexes from C. vinosum 0 8 1.0 CV_LH2 800/820 CV_LH2 800/840 CV_LH2 800/850 CV_LH2 LL800/850 0.4 0.6 0.8 absorbance 650 700 750 800 850 900 950 0.0 0.2 wavelength (nm)

  14. Fact #800: October 21, 2013 Characteristics of New Light Vehicles over Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From model years 1980 to 2012, there have been significant gains in automotive technology. For new light vehicles, horsepower has more than doubled and "0-to-60" acceleration times have dropped...

  15. Production of J/{Psi} in 800 GeV/c p-Si interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fermilab E771 Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    The authors report on the analysis of high mass opposite sign dimuon states produced in pSi interactions at {radical}s = 38.7 GeV. These data have been collected with an open geometry fixed target spectrometer in the Fermilab Experiment E771. J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) total cross section sand J/{psi} x{sub f} and p{sub t} differential cross sections have been measured and compared with extrapolations from data at lower energies. Evidence for {Upsilon} meson production is also presented.

  16. Hugoniot Measurements at Low Pressures in Tin Using 800 MeV proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Cynthia; Hogan, Gary E; King, Nicholas S. P.; Kwiathowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; McNeil, Wendy Vogan; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher; Rightley, Paul; Saunders, Alexander

    2009-08-05

    A 2cm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure in the region of the {beta} {yields} {gamma} phase change using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically as the shock wave moved through the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record of the equations of state along the Hugoniot for the P1 wave from a shock velocity of 3.25 km/sec down to near the sound speed. Edge release effects were removed from the data using tomographic techniques. The data show evidence for a phase transition that extends over a broad pressure range. The data and analysis will be presented.

  17. HUGONIOT MEASUREMENTS AT LOW PRESSURES IN TIN USING 800 MeV PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G. E.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; McNeil, W. V.

    2009-12-28

    A 20 mm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure just below the beta->gamma phase change, using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a thin stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically at multiple points as the shock wave moved though the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record along the principal Hugoniot from a peak shock velocity of 3.27 km/sec to a minimum of 3.09 km/sec. Edge release effects were removed from the data using simple tomographic reconstruction techniques. The data and analysis are presented.

  18. MO-G-BRE-02: A Survey of IMRT QA Practices for More Than 800 Institutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulliam, K; Kerns, J; Howell, R; Followill, D; Kry, S; O'Daniel, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A wide range of techniques and measurement devices are employed for IMRT QA, causing a large variation of accepted action limits and potential follow up for failing plans. Such procedures are not well established or accepted in the medical physics community. To achieve the goal of proving insight into current IMRT QA practices, we created an electronic IMRT QA survey. The survey was open to a variety of the most common QA devices and assessed the type of comparison to measurement, action limits, delivery methods, and clinical action for failing QA plans. Methods: We conducted an online survey through the Radiological Physics Center's (RPC) annual survey with the goal of ascertaining elements of routine patient-specific IMRT QA. A total of 874 institutions responded to the survey. The questions ranged from asking for action limits, dosimeter type(s) used, delivery techniques, and actions taken when a plan fails IMRT QA. Results: The most common (52%) planar gamma criteria was 3%/3 mm with a 95% of pixels passing criteria. The most common QA device were diode arrays (48%). The most common first response to a plan failing QA was to re-measure at the same point the point dose (89%), second was to re-measure at a new point (13%), and third was to analyze the plan in relative instead of absolute mode (10%) (Does not add to 100% as not all institutions placed a response for each QA follow-up option). Some institutions, however, claimed that they had never observed a plan failure. Conclusion: The survey provided insights into the way the community currently performs IMRT QA. This information will help in the push to standardize action limits among dosimeters.

  19. Modifications to Building 409 Dismantling. IR-800-805-1.01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. EIA-800, Weekly Refinery and Fractionator Report Page 1 U. S...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noticeoog.jsp. * Electronic Filing Option: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is a Windows-based application that will enable you to enter data interactively,...

  1. EPA Approval for Dismantling of Building 409. IR-800-804-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  2. Secretary Chu Highlights More Than 1,800 Electric Vehicle Chargers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Drawing on Google Maps, this new collaboration will coordinate an online network of all U.S. charging stations and will serve as the primary data source for GPS and mapping ...

  3. EIA-800, Weekly Refinery and Fractionator Report Page 1 U. S...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    You can also send your Excel files to EIA using a secure method of transmission: HTTPS. This is an industry standard method to send information over the web using secure, encrypted ...

  4. 800 to 1000 New Jobs Coming to Piketon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and accelerate cleanup efforts of cold-war era contamination at the Portsmouth site in ... will be using another remnant of that era - excess uranium stockpiles - to fund the ...

  5. Fact #700: November 7, 2011 Biodiesel Consumption is on the Rise for 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration began tracking biodiesel consumption in 2001. For the first few years biodiesel consumption remained relatively low – well under one thousand barrels per...

  6. Letter: EPA Comments on Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-700-704-1.02.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. Responsiveness Summary to EPA Comments on Debris Consolidation. IR-700-704-1.01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Vaisala WINDCAP Ultrasonic Wind Sensor WMT700...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  9. Florida Power & Light Company, 700 Universe Blvd. Juno Beach 33408

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive energy option for many industrial and commercial facilities. This is particularly the case in areas of the country with high electricity rates. However, regions with air quality concerns often have strict limits on criteria pollutants, such as nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and

  10. MHK ISDB/Instruments/MTi-G-700 GPS/INS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    updates occur. Search Related Instruments Related Measurement 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS AIRMAR 150WX...

  11. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #6, August 28, 2005 (7:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-28

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  12. Attendees - December 15-16, 2015 P&RA Technical Exchange Meeting |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Attendee Resources Attendee Resources Venue Information The Technology Forum (exhibits and poster displays) will be open during hours listed below. May 19 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. May 20 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. May 21 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. Students at the Summit The SunShot Grand Challenge Summit will bring together more than 800 members of the solar community to review the progress made toward the SunShot goal and discuss the challenges ahead to make solar energy more affordable and widespread across America.

  13. Attendee Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attendee Resources Attendee Resources Venue Information The Technology Forum (exhibits and poster displays) will be open during hours listed below. May 19 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. May 20 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. May 21 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. Students at the Summit The SunShot Grand Challenge Summit will bring together more than 800 members of the solar community to review the progress made toward the SunShot goal and discuss the challenges ahead to make solar energy more affordable and widespread across America.

  14. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  15. New York Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,303,342 4,308,592 4,335,006 4,353,668 4,364,169 4,387,456 1987-2013 Sales 3,603,700 3,552,891 3,478,107 3,465,943 1997-2013 Transported 731,306 800,777 886,062 921,513 1997-2013...

  16. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  17. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  18. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - EIA PG V3a.pptx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    World Hydrocarbon Resources Sarah O. Ladislaw, Center for Strategic and International Studies John Staub, U.S. Energy Information Administration Donald L. Gautier, U.S. Geological Survey Phani Gadde, Wood Mackenzie Vello Kuuskraa, Advanced Resources International The world will consume 1,100 billion barrels of oil between 2010 and 2040 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Cummulative consumption 2010- 2040 Proved reserves Unproved shale Reserve growth & undiscovered Rest of world

  20. Widget:Google Gadget | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    borders1&upsphereearth&syndopen&w700&h600&title2013+Geothermal+Plant+Flyby+Tour&border%23ffffff%7C0px%2C1px+solid+%23004488%7C0px%2C1px+solid+%23005599%7C0px%2C1px+solid+%2...

  1. Performance of Blackglas{trademark} composites in 4000-hour oxidation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.; Gonczy, S.; McNallan, M.; Cox, A.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of long term (4000 hour) oxidation on the mechanical properties of Blackglas{trademark}-Nitrided Nextel{trademark}312 Ceramic Matrix Composites in the temperature range of 500{degrees} - 700{degrees}C was investigated. Flexure specimens of the title composites prepared using three different pyrolysis processes were subjected to oxidation in flowing dry air at 500{degrees}, 600{degrees}C, and 700{degrees}C. Samples were removed at several different time intervals for 3-point flexure analysis. Results indicate that processing conditions had very little effect on the oxidation resistance of this system. At 600{degrees} and 700{degrees}C the mechanical properties degrade continuously to a steady value about half the original flexure strength. At 500{degrees}C, material properties initially improve then begin to slowly degrade. Optical microscopy indicates that oxidation of the matrix begins at the matrix/fiber interface and microcracks and proceeds into the bulk of the matrix.

  2. Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-06-25

    Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

  3. BWXTymes, October 2004: Y-12 newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loudon $31,600 Blount $15,600 Knox $260,300 Anderson $208,600 Roane $67,800 OCTOBER 2004 Out with the old and in with the new A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12's 2004 United Way campaign was a resounding success, raising more than $650,000 for local charitable organiza- tions. Included in this amount was a corpo- rate contribution of $40,000. Special events dur- ing the drive included a book fair, a silent online auction, a bake sale, a

  4. Effect of calcination temperature on structural and photocatalyst properties of nanofibers prepared from low-cost natural ilmenite mineral by simple hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpraditpan, Athapon; Wirunmongkol, Thanakorn; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Nanofibers were prepared from low-cost ilmenite mineral via simple hydrothermal. High photocatalyst nanofibers were prepared via post heat treatment method. The nanofibers calcined at 100700 C for 2 h maintained nanofiber structure. The calcined nanofibers at 400 C showed the highest photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanate nanofibers were synthesized via the hydrothermal method (120 C for 72 h) using natural ilmenite mineral (FeTiO{sub 3}) as the starting material. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) for specific surface area. The nanofibers were 2090 nm in diameter and 27 ?m in length. The as-synthesized nanofibers calcined at 300400 C showed TiO{sub 2} (B) whereas the nanofibers calcined at 500 C revealed a mixture of two phases of TiO{sub 2} (B) and anatase. The nanofibers calcined at high temperature of 6001000 C showed a mixture of tri-crystalline of anatase, rutile, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The rutile phase increased with increasing calcination temperature. The nanofibers calcined at 300700 C maintained their structure while the morphology of the nanofibers calcined at 8001000 C transformed into submicron rod-like structure. This increase of calcination temperature led to the phase transformation from thermodynamically metastable anatase to the most stable form of rutile phase. The crystallite size of prepared samples increased with increasing calcination temperature. Interestingly, with increasing calcination temperature, the absorption edge of the prepared samples shows an obvious shift to visible light region due to the change of crystallite phase and increased crystallite size. Therefore, the band gap energy of the prepared samples became narrower with increasing calcination temperature. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the nanofibers calcined at 400 C for 2 h was found to be not merely higher than those of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles powders (P-25, JRC-01, and JRC-03) but also the highest of all the samples in this study.

  5. Auditing Focus Matthew Chambers (Michigan Technological University...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Syscalls) 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00 10.00 12.00 14.00 wall chmod chown mkdir rmdir Time (Miliseconds) Command Syscalls Aduitd Off Auditd On Hybrid Benchmark Init Calculate...

  6. RangeTables.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vcmmg) LET vs. Range in Si for 15 MeV SEE Beams (low LET) 4 He 14 N 0 0.5 1 1.5 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Range in Silicon (m) 4 He 14 N 20 Ne 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 50 100 150...

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600 800 Million Barrels 8 59 24 16 93 60 85 72 43 18 27 19 20 10 0 4 5 4 0 1 0 8 7 5 9 41 23 34 19 3 3 7 20 0 0 1980 1985 1990 ...

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Source: Table 3.5. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 ... 800 Billion Dollars Fuel 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 ...

  9. Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Events Events Bay Area Maker Faire 2016 May 20, 2016 12:00PM PDT to May 22, 2016 6:00PM PDT National Innovation Summit May 22, 2016 2:00PM EDT to May 25, 2016 4:00PM EDT Clean Energy Ministerial June 1, 2016 8:00AM EDT to June 2, 2016 4:00PM EDT

  10. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... To date in Fiscal Year 2013, the MSA has had 25 First Aid cases. 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00 10.00 Feb-12 Mar-12 Apr-12 May-12 ... 15,273 18,295 0 (3,022) 48,385 51,228 (2,842) ...

  11. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For Fiscal Year 2013, the MSA has had 20 First Aid cases. 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00 10.00 Jan-12 Feb-12 Mar-12 Apr-12 May-12 ... (11) 453 453 372 (0) 82 22,267 22,267 27,015 0 ...

  12. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3He(pol. p, +): differential 200, 300, 400 X4 10302014 1985EP01 3He(p, 2p), (p, pd): 300, 450 X4 10302014 1977FR05 3He(p, p): differential 415, 600, 800 cm ...

  13. CrayQuatlerly_20120725_Cray_Compiler_ZhengjiZhao.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    y ( %) Intel ---6% Cray, G NU 0% PGI default VASP w ith C ray c ompiler r uns a t t he s ame s peed a s P GI c ompiler for t he h ybrid j obs 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 48 72 96...

  14. File:Energy Data Jam.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    800 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Go next page next page Full resolution (1,500 1,125...

  15. Paducah Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Paducah CAB Board and Subcommittees - November 6:00PM to 8:00PM CST 22...

  16. Portsmouth Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2016 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - March 6:00PM to 8:00PM EST 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 South Central Ohio Regional High...

  17. PPPO Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2016 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - March 6:00PM to 8:00PM EST 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 South Central Ohio Regional High...

  18. GEOTHERMAL Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 2016 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Stanford Geothermal Workshop 8:00AM to 6:00PM EST...

  19. GEOTHERMAL Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting 8:00AM to 6:00PM EST 20...

  20. PPPO Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Portsmouth SSAB Board Meeting - November 6:00PM to 8:00PM EST 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Portsmouth SSAB Subcommittees...

  1. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office Events ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Program Evaluation Conference 8:30AM to 12:30PM PDT 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Paducah CAB Board meeting - August 6:00PM to 8:00PM CDT 30 31 1 2 3 4 5...

  2. Dismantling of Building 409. Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) on Interim Response Actions. IR-800-804-1.03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  3. Dissolution of surface oxide layers on titanium and titanium subhydride between 25/sup 0/ and 700/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittberg, T.N.; Wang, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    The surface-sensitive, spectroscopic techniques of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been applied to the study of oxide dissolution on titanium and titanium subhydride. In an earlier study it was shown, using AES, that the rate of oxygen dissolution into titanium increased sharply at about 350/sup 0/C. These data correlated well with physical property measurements that indicated that at these temperatures an exothermic reaction, corresponding to the reaction of free titanium with atmospheric oxygen, was occurring. In the present study the work has been expanded to include studies of TiH/sub x/ (x = 1.15, 1.62). It has been found that dissolution of the native oxide on titanium subhydride occurs at a substantially higher temperature (about 500/sup 0/C) than for titanium. It appears that the outward diffusion of hydrogen is inhibiting the inward diffusion of oxygen on the subhydride samples at temperatures below 500/sup 0/C. Further studies of the dissolution of oxides on titanium at fixed temperatures in the range of 300 to 350/sup 0/C have shown that there is a semi-logarithmic relationship between the surface oxygen level and the time at temperature. This is in agreement with earlier gravimetric studies on titanium oxidation in this temperature range.

  4. Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Comments on Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-700-704-1.03.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  5. Secretaries Chu and Vilsack Announce More Than $600 Million Investment in Advanced Biorefinery Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Private company investment brings total to nearly $1.3 billion for 19 biorefinery projects to create jobs and new markets for rural America

  6. Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1980, the U.S. produced 56 times more vehicles than China. China's vehicle production has been growing since then, while U.S. vehicle production was hit hard in the recent economic downturn. In...

  7. Proposals For Four Interim Response Actions. IR-600-604-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. Sampling Report: Engineering Soil Sampling for the Quarry Northeast Slope. DOE/OR/21548-600.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. PonemanUtilization GSA Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (6)_0_0.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  10. Measurement of the e+e-??+?- cross section between 600 and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Volume: 753; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands Language: English Word...

  11. Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency Improvements in Arkansas | Department of Energy This includes $20,117,400 for state, county and city efforts in Arkansas. A detailed breakdown is below. Today's announcement builds on an investment of $87,530,415 in Arkansas weatherization and energy funding announced by the Administration on March 12th and detailed at energy.gov/recovery. "These investments will save taxpayer dollars and create jobs in communities around the country," said Vice President Biden.

  12. T-600: Security Advisory for Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Reader and Acrobat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This vulnerability (CVE-2011-0611) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. There are reports that this vulnerability is being exploited in the wild in targeted attacks via a Flash (.swf) file embedded in a Microsoft Word (.doc) file delivered as an email attachment, targeting the Windows platform. At this time, Adobe is not aware of any attacks via PDF targeting Adobe Reader and Acrobat. Adobe Reader X Protected Mode mitigations would prevent an exploit of this kind from executing.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulischeck, T.S.; Van Rooyen, D.; Bulischeck, T.S.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear grade tubing was evaluated in high purity water at 365, 345, 325, and 290 C. Initial results indicate that a linear extrapolation of data from high temperature tests can be used to predict the service life of steam generator tubing that has been plastically deformed or is continually deforming by denting. 8 refs.

  14. Un~ted States Environmental Monltorlng EPA/600/4-86/022 Env~ronmental...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    comp i 1 ed by R. F. Grossman, S. C. Black, R. E. Dye, D. D. Smith, D. 3 . Thom6, A. A . ... CONF-730915. B184 Black, S. C. and D. D. Smith, 1984, "Nevada Test S i t e Experimental ...

  15. United States Environmental Monitoring EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    e s t areas, calendar y e a r 1980 D. D. Smith, R. F. Grossman, W. D. Corkern, D. J. ... i z e a b l e mule deer herd described by Smith e t a1 . (1978) r e s i d e s i n t h e ...

  16. I United States Env~ronmental Monitoring EPA-600.4-83-032 Env...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A. A. Mullen, G. D. P o t t e r and D. D. Smith, and Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment ... Smith, D. D. and V. E. Andrews, 1981. S e l e c t e d Radioisotopes i n Animal Tissues: ...

  17. SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The S-R Project is an upgrade of an existing segment of the transmission grid that long pre-dates the establishment of the relevant federal lands crossed by the line (the "NPS ...

  18. EPA Comments on Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-600-604-1.02.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  19. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #24, September 6, 2005 (6:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-06

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  20. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  1. Evgeny Ostroumov | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Events Upcoming events in Indian Country. USET Semi-Annual Conference May 15, 2016 8:00AM CDT to May 18, 2016 5:00PM CDT 2016 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality May 17, 2016 8:00AM EDT to May 19, 2016 5:00PM EDT 2016 Indian Business Alliance Conference May 17, 2016 7:00AM MDT to May 19, 2016 4:00PM MDT Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop May 17, 2016 8:30AM MST to May 18, 2016 12:00PM MST USDA Community Connect Grant Program

  2. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  3. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration 8:00 a.m.-8:20 a.m. Welcome and Introduction Jonathan Male, Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy 8:20 a.m.-9:00 a.m. Morning Keynotes David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Byron Paez, Deputy Director for Deputy Assistant

  4. 2012 Workshop Agenda_Ver_25.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    START STOP DUR. (min.) TOPIC SPEAKER Tuesday, April 3 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 60 Workshop Registration 8:00 AM 8:05 AM 5 Welcome and Workshop Logistics John Makepeace, Office of Engineering and Construction Management 8:05 AM 8:20 AM 15 Opening Remarks Ingrid Kolb, Director, Office of Management 8:20 AM 8:40 AM 20 Achieving Management and Operational Excellence Melvin G. Williams, Associate Deputy Secretary 8:40 AM 8:55 AM 15 Break 8:55 AM 9:45 AM 50 Project Management Success: Are We There Yet? Paul

  5. Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Events Events Upcoming events in Indian Country. USET Semi-Annual Conference May 15, 2016 8:00AM CDT to May 18, 2016 5:00PM CDT 2016 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality May 17, 2016 8:00AM EDT to May 19, 2016 5:00PM EDT 2016 Indian Business Alliance Conference May 17, 2016 7:00AM MDT to May 19, 2016 4:00PM MDT Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop May 17, 2016 8:30AM MST to May 18, 2016 12:00PM MST USDA Community Connect Grant Program

  6. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,078,178 5,180,875 5,231,028 1990's 5,509,312 5,308,457 5,324,039 5,373,300 5,700,666 5,431,665 5,843,661 5,906,329 5,800,561 5,689,438 2000's 5,699,377 5,815,542 5,312,348...

  8. Message from the Secretary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians Tribal Energy Project Feasibility Study The Land The Land The Land Reservation consists of 1820 acres Historically as low as 120 acres Acquisition of 800+ acres in 1988 Purchase of 900 acres in 1998 The People 700 members today 130 living on Reservation 90% people on Reservation below poverty line Long waiting list of people wanting to live on Reservation Challenges Facing the Tribe Quality, Affordable Housing Decent, Living Wage Jobs Sustainable Growth Upper

  9. Argonne Distinguished Fellows | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Distinguished Fellows Argonne's world-class scientists have achieved national and international recognition, including: Three Nobel Prizes, 119 R&D 100 Awards, More than 700 national and international awards and honors, and More than 800 patents. The Argonne Distinguished Fellow is the highest scientific/engineering rank at the laboratory, and this distinction is held by only a small fraction (approximately 3 percent) of the research staff. Staff members who achieve this rank have a

  10. Fractional distillation of C/sub 2//C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons at optimum pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tedder, D.W.

    1984-08-07

    A method of recovering by distillation the separate components of a hydrocarbon gas mixture comprising ethylene, ethane, propylene and propane which comprises separating the ethylene and ethane as an overhead from a propylene and propane bottom in a first distillation tower at from about 400 to about 600 psia, separating ethylene and ethane as an ethylene overhead and an ethane bottom in a second distillation tower at from about 600 to about 700 psia, and separating propylene as an overhead from a propane bottom in a third distillation tower at from about 280 to about 300 psia is disclosed.

  11. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  12. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 C followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 C) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 C as compared to 500 C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  13. NA_-_Letter_%5B1211140672%5D_-_1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM RESULTS & FORECAST CATEGORY Total Procurement Total SB Small Disad. Bus Woman-Owned SB Hub-Zone SB Veteran-Owned SB Service Disabled Vet. SB FY 2009 Dollars Goal (projected) $210,000,000 $139,860,000 $12,600,000 $14,700,000 $6,300,000 $42,000,000 $4,200,000 FY 2009 Dollars Accomplished $222,209,712 $142,098,377 $7,570,924 $11,761,989 $3,243,572 $79,415,951 $2,797,603 FY 2009 % Goal 66.60% 6.00% 7.00% 3.00%

  14. NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES - NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM RESULTS & FORECAST CATEGORY Total Procurement Total SB Small Disad. Bus Woman-Owned SB Hub-Zone SB Veteran-Owned SB Service Disabled Vet. SB FY 2009 Dollars Goal (projected) $210,000,000 $139,860,000 $12,600,000 $14,700,000 $6,300,000 $42,000,000 $4,200,000 FY 2009 Dollars Accomplished $222,209,712 $142,098,377 $7,570,924 $11,761,989 $3,243,572 $79,415,951 $2,797,603 FY 2009 % Goal 66.60% 6.00% 7.00% 3.00%

  15. DepoNet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2010 6:00 p.m. Columbia Gorge Hotel 4000 Westcliff Drive Hood River, Oregon Mr. James Parham, Facilitator PANEL MEMBERS: Ms. Mary Beth Burandt, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Mr. Jeff Lyon, Washington State Department of Ecology, Hanford Project Office Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Public Hearing February 9, 2010 2 1 U.S.

  16. Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1985-04-01

    A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Best Practices Case Study: New Tradition Homes - Landover Commons, Vancouver, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    Case study of New Tradition Homes who saved 26% over Washington states energy code by moving ducts inside conditioned space, upgrading the furnace, increasing attic insulation to R-49, and improving air sealing. This added $3,600 to the initial cost or $290 in increased annual mortgage costs but saved $991 per year for an annual net cash back to the homeowner of $700.

  18. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 10, 2015, 6:00 p.m. DOE Information Center 1 Science.gov Way, Oak Ridge, Tenn. AGENDA I. Welcome and Announcements (D. Hemelright) .................................................................. 6:006:05 A. Next Meeting: Annual Planning Meeting, Sat., Aug. 22, 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Tremont Lodge, Townsend, Tenn. B. Presentation of Service Awards to Outgoing Members (S. Cange) C. Introduction of New Student Representatives (S. Cange) II. Comments from the Deputy Designated Federal

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - EM SSAB Chairs Webinar - (3) Tyborowski Presentation.042213 [Read-Only]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Budget Overview for the EM SSAB Chairs www.energy.gov/EM 1 Terry Tyborowski Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning & Budget Office of Environmental Management April 25, 2013 FY 2014 Budget Overview for the EM SSAB Chairs 235 237 213 472 475 448 555 5,000 5,200 5,400 5,600 5,800 6,000 (dollars in millions) EM Funding Levels: FY 2012 - FY 2014 ($M) 5,710 5,745 5,290 5,622 www.energy.gov/EM 2 5,003 5,033 4,618 4,854 224 213 4,200 4,400 4,600 4,800 FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Annualized CR

  20. Effect of postdeposition annealing on the electrical properties of ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films grown on p-Si by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altuntas, Halit; Donmez, Inci; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi

    2014-07-01

    Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric thin films were deposited on (111)-oriented p-type silicon wafers by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium and oxygen plasma. Structural analysis of the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films was carried out using grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. As-deposited films were amorphous. Upon postdeposition annealing at 700, 800, and 900?C for 30?min under N{sub 2} ambient, films crystallized into ?-form monoclinic structure. Electrical properties of the ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were then investigated by fabricating and characterizing Al/?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Si metaloxide-semiconductor capacitors. The effect of postdeposition annealing on the leakage current densities, leakage current conduction mechanisms, dielectric constants, flat-band voltages, reverse breakdown voltages, threshold voltages, and effective oxide charges of the capacitors were presented. The effective oxide charges (Q{sub eff}) were calculated from the capacitancevoltage (C-V) curves using the flat-band voltage shift and were found as 2.6??10{sup 12}, 1.9??10{sup 12}, and 2.5??10{sup 12} cm{sup ?2} for samples annealed at 700, 800, and 900?C, respectively. Effective dielectric constants of the films decreased with increasing annealing temperature. This situation was attributed to the formation of an interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer during annealing process. Leakage mechanisms in the regions where current increases gradually with voltage were well fitted by the Schottky emission model for films annealed at 700 and 900?C, and by the FrenkelPoole emission model for film annealed at 800?C. Leakage current density was found to improve with annealing temperature. ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film annealed at 800?C exhibited the highest reverse breakdown field value.

  1. The oxidation of a gasoline surrogate in the negative temperature coefficient region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhert, David B.; Miller, David L.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Owens, Kevin G.

    2009-03-15

    This experimental study investigated the preignition reactivity behavior of a gasoline surrogate in a pressurized flow reactor over the low and intermediate temperature regime (600-800 K) at elevated pressure (8 atm). The surrogate mixture, a volumetric blend of 4.6% 1-pentene, 31.8% toluene, 14.0% n-heptane, and 49.6% 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), was shown to reproduce the low and intermediate temperature reactivity of full boiling range fuels in a previous study. Each of the surrogate components were examined individually to identify the major intermediate species in order to improve existing kinetic models, where appropriate, and to provide a basis for examining constituent interactions in the surrogate mixture. n-Heptane and 1-pentene started reacting at 630 K and 640 K, respectively, and both fuels exhibited a strong negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior starting at 700 and 710 K, respectively. Iso-octane showed a small level of reactivity at 630 K and a weak NTC behavior starting at 665 K. Neat toluene was unreactive at these temperatures. The surrogate started reacting at 630 K and exhibited a strong NTC behavior starting at 693 K. The extent of fuel consumption varied for each of the surrogate constituents and was related to their general autoignition behavior. Most of the intermediates identified during the surrogate oxidation were species observed during the oxidation of the neat constituents; however, the surrogate mixture did exhibit a significant increase in intermediates associated with iso-octane oxidation, but not from n-heptane. While neat toluene was unreactive at these temperatures, in the mixture it reacted with the radical pool generated by the other surrogate components, forming benzaldehyde, benzene, phenol, and ethyl-benzene. The observed n-heptane, iso-octane, and surrogate oxidation behavior was compared to predictions using existing kinetic models. The n-heptane model reasonably predicted the disappearance of the fuel, but overpredicted the formation of several of the smaller intermediates. The iso-octane model significantly overpredicted the reaction of the fuel and formation of the intermediates. The 1-pentene model reasonably predicted the fuel consumption, but underestimated the importance of radical addition to the double bond. The results of this study provide a critical experimental foundation for the investigation of surrogate mixtures and for validation of kinetic models. (author)

  2. Can industry`s `fourth` fossil fuel establish presence in US?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armor, A.F.; Dene, C.E.

    1996-09-01

    After five years of commercial experience burning Orimulsion overseas, US utilities are now evaluating the new fuel as a serious alternative to oil. In their relentless drive to remain competitive, electric utilities with oil-fired generating units are searching for lower cost fuel alternatives. Because of high fuel prices, oil-fired units have low capacity factors. Only 23 out of 142 oil-capable units in the US had capacity factors greater than 50% in 1993; the average was a mere 24%. Utility consumption of fuel oil slid from over 600,000 barrels (bbl)/day in 1989 to less than 200,000 bbl/day last year. Orimulsion now fuels nearly 3,000 MW/yr worldwide. The UK`s PowerGen Ltd, currently the world`s largest consumer of Orimulsion, fires some 10-million bbl/yr at two 500-MW units at its Ince plant and three 120-MW units at its Richborough plant. Both plants formerly burned fuel oil, and have been using Orimulsion since 1991. Canada`s New Brunswick Power Corp has fired Orimulsion in two units at its Dalhousie plant since 1994 (Power, April 1995, p 27); one 105-MW unit was originally designed for fuel oil, the other 212-MW unit was designed for coal. Last year, Denmark`s SK Power converted its coal-fired, 700-MW Asnaes Unit 5 to Orimulsion firing. And in the US, Florida Power and Light Co. (FP and L) has signed a 20-yr fuel supply contract with Bitor America Corp (Boca Raton, Fla.), for two 800-MW units at the oil-fired Manatee plant, contingent on securing necessary permits. The Manatee installation (Power, September 1994, p 57) would be the first in the US to burn the fuel. Today, five years after Orimulsion begun to be used commercially, many of the lingering questions involving the new fuel`s handling, transportation, combustion, emissions control, spill control, and waste utilization have been settled. Several US utilities have expressed serious interest in the fuel as an alternative to oil.

  3. Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February » Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response WHEN: Feb 26, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Courtyard Marriott, Santa Fe CONTACT: Evelyn Mullen (505) 665-7576 CATEGORY: Community TYPE: Meeting INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description A number of novel isotopes and associated drug compounds are being developed, both in the US and elsewhere, for diagnosis and therapy in the field of nuclear medicine. The accelerator at Los Alamos is

  4. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520...

  5. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 0.39 0.40 0.19 0.21 0.22 0.44 0.44 0.89 12-Month ... 2013, there have been 41 First Aid cases. 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00 10.00 Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 Jan-13 Feb-...

  6. Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 million gallons of groundwater at the site. PDF icon Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater

  7. Mechanistic Insight into the Formation of Cationic Naked Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generated Under Equilibrium Control - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research October 24, 2014, Research Highlights Mechanistic Insight into the Formation of Cationic Naked Nanocrystals Generated Under Equilibrium Control Pre-JCESR stripping chemistries (for cationic NC): NOBF4 (strong oxidant, not suitable for many compositions, ~$600/mol) Et3OBF4 (mild, but still causes adatom desorption for some sensitive compositions, ~$800/mol) New ligand-stripping chemistry developed within JCESR:

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  9. DepoNet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DRAFT TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIORNMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT PUBLIC HEARING March 8, 2010 6:00 p.m. Seattle Center 305 Harrison Street Seattle, Washington 98109 Mr. James Parham, Facilitator PANEL MEMBERS: Ms. Mary Beth Burandt, U.S. Department of Energy. Office of River Protection Mr. Jeff Lyon, Washington State Departement of Ecology, Hanford Project Office Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free:

  10. Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpelt, Michael; Bloom, Ira D.; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. is provided. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

  11. Solid-oxide fuel cell electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Ira D.; Hash, Mark C.; Krumpelt, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A solid-oxide electrolyte operable at between 600.degree. C. and 800.degree. C. and a method of producing the solid-oxide electrolyte are provided. The solid-oxide electrolyte comprises a combination of a compound having weak metal-oxygen interactions with a compound having stronger metal-oxygen interactions whereby the resulting combination has both strong and weak metal-oxygen interaction properties.

  12. Missouri Department of Natural Resourses (DNR) Comments on Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-600-604-1.03.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  13. Removal of Abandoned Power Lines and Poles From Weldon Spring Site. IR-600-603-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  14. Thermodynamic properties of isobutane-isopentane mixtures from -40 to +600/sup 0/F and up to 1000 psia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, J.S.; Levelt Sengers, J.M.H.; Morrison, G.; Sengers, J.V.

    1984-07-01

    The Helmholtz function for pure isobutane from a recent correlation has been converted to a dimensionless form and a pressure-enthalpy chart based on this function has been generated by computer. A Helmholtz function for mixtures of isobutane and isopentane has been formed based upon the dimensionless isobutane Helmholtz function as the reference fluid by means of an extended corresponding-states principle. Scarce literature data for saturation properties of isopentane, and new data for its vapor pressure and for the critical line of the mixture were used. The accuracy of the surface was checked by comparing with literature enthalpy data and with new VLE data for the mixture. Tables of thermodynamic properties have been generated from this Helmholtz function for the 0.1 mole fraction isopentane-in-isobutane mixture in the single-phase region and on the dew- and bubble-point curves, together with properties of the coexisting phase. A pressure-enthalpy chart for this mixture has also been generated.

  15. Development of a model for predicting intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes in PWR primary water. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garud, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary mathematical model developed in this study may make it possible to predict stress corrosion cracking on the primary side of PWR steam generator tubing. The study outlines a comprehensive testing program that will provide the operational and experimental data to further develop and verify the model.

  16. Un~ted States Env~ronmental Monltor~ng EPA.600 '4-88, 021 Envtronmenta...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sunderland S. C. Black, B. B. Dicey, A. N. J a r v i s D. D . Smith, D. J. Thorn6 A . A . ... CONF-730915. 8184 Black, S. C. and D. D. Smith, 1984, "Nevada Test S i t e Experimental ...

  17. Electrochemical oxygen pumps. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J. D. Noble, J.

    2009-10-01

    All tasks of the Work Plan of ISTC Project 2277p have been completed, thus: (1) techniques of chemical synthesis were developed for more than ten recipes of electrolyte based on cerium oxide doped with 20 mole% of gadolinium (CeGd)O{sub 2}, doped by more than 10 oxide systems including 6 recipes in addition to the Work Plan; (2) electric conductivity and mechanical strength of CeGd specimens with additions of oxide systems were performed, two candidate materials for the electrolyte of electrochemical oxygen pump (pure CeGd and CeGd doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal) were chosen; (3) extended studies of mechanical strength of candidate material specimens were performed at room temperature and at 400, 600, 800 C; (4) fixtures for determination of mechanical strength of tubes by external pressure above 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C were developed and fabricated; and (5) technology of slip casting of tubes from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} and of (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal, withstanding external pressure of minimum 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C was developed, a batch of tubes was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (6) technology of making nanopowder from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} was developed based on chemical synthesis and laser ablation techniques, a batch of nanopowder with the weight 1 kg was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (7) a business plan for establishing a company for making powders of materials for electrochemical oxygen pump was developed; and (8) major results obtained within the Project were reported at international conferences and published in the Russian journal Electrochemistry. In accordance with the Work Plan a business trip of the following project participants was scheduled for April 22-29, 2006, to Tonawanda, NY, USA: Manager Victor Borisov; Leader of technology development Gennady Studenikin; Leader of business planning Elena Zadorozhnaya; Leader of production Vasily Lepalovsky; and Translator Vladimir Litvinov. During this trip project participants were to discuss with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and representative of Praxair Inc. J. Chen the results of project activities (prospects of transition metal-doped material application in oxygen pumps), as well as the prospects of cooperation with Praxair at the meeting with the company management in the following fields: (1) Deposition of thin films of oxide materials of complex composition on support by magnetron and ion sputtering, research of coatings properties; (2) Development of block-type structure technology (made of porous and dense ceramics) for oxygen pump. The block-type structure is promising because when the size of electrolyte block is 2 x 2 inches and assembly height is 10 inches (5 blocks connected together) the area of active surface is ca. 290 square inches (in case of 8 slots), that roughly corresponds to one tube with diameter 1 inch and height 100 inches. So performance of the system made of such blocks may be by a factor of two or three higher than that of tube-based system. However one month before the visit, J. Chen notified us of internal changes at Praxair and the cancellation of the visit to Tonawanda, NY. During consultations with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and Senior Project Manager A. Taylor a decision was made to extend the project term by 2 quarters to prepare proposals for follow-on activities during this extension (development of block-type structures made of dense and porous oxide ceramics for electrochemical oxygen pumps) using the funds that were not used for the trip to the US.

  18. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm³

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findingsmore » advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and “hot Neptune” exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.« less

  19. Engineering Evaluation Costs Analysis (EE/CA) for the Proposed Management of Contaminated Structures at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant. IR-700-703-1.02.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  1. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and hot Neptune exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.

  2. A 700 year sediment record of black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near the EMEP air monitoring station in Aspvreten, Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marie Elmquist; Zdenek Zencak; Oerjan Gustafsson

    2007-10-15

    In view of poor constraints on historical combustion emissions, past environmental loadings of black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were reconstructed from dated lake sediment cores collected 70 km south of Stockholm, Sweden. Compared to several dramatic variations over the recent 150 years, the preindustrial loadings were steady within {+-}50% through the entire medieval with BC fluxes of 0.071 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} and PAH fluxes of 6 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. In the wood-burning dominated century leading up to the industrial revolution around 1850, increasing BC fluxes were leading PAH fluxes. BC fluxes reached their millennial-scale maximum around 1920, whereas PAH fluxes increased exponentially to its record maximum around 1960, 50-fold above preindustrial values. For 1920-1950, BC fluxes consistently decreased as PAH fluxes kept increasing. Coal and coke represented >50% of the Swedish energy market in the 1930s. Combined with sharply decreasing (1,7-)/(1,7{+-}2,6-dimethylphenanthrene), indicative of diminishing wood combustion, and decreasing methylphenanthrenes/phenanthrene, indicative of higher-temperature combustion (coal instead of wood), the sediment archive suggests that the relative BC/PAH emission factors thus are lower for coal than for wood combustion. For the first time, both BC and PAH fluxes decreased after 1960. This trend break is a testament to the positive effects of decreasing reliance on petroleum fuels and a number of legislative actions aimed at curbing emissions and by 1990, the loading of BC was back at preindustrial levels, whereas that of PAH were the lowest since the 1910s. However, for the most recent period (1990-2004) the BC and PAH fluxes are no longer decreasing. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 94,600 94,600 1990's 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 94,600 96,600 96,600 96,600 96,600...

  4. Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01

    This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

  5. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  6. Vacancy defects in as-grown and neutron irradiated GaP studied by positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dlubek, G.; Bruemmer, O.; Polity, A.

    1986-08-18

    Positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements have been used to study vacancy defects in n-italic-type GaP. Vacancies in the P sublattice with a concentration of some 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ were observed in as-grwon GaP. The vacancies disappear during annealing at 500--800 /sup 0/C. In neutron-irradiated GaP positrons are trapped by Ga vacancies which anneal out in two stages situated at 300--550 /sup 0/C and 550--700 /sup 0/C.

  7. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  8. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia National Laboratories Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Documents SNL NOI Federal Register Notice 2011-15951 SNL Facility Poster 1 SNL Facility Poster 2 SNL Facility Poster 3 SNL Fact Sheet SNL SWEIS Fact Sheet

    nd PV Performance Modeling Workshop Photo courtesy of Sempra Energy Dates: 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 with special evening session 7:00 to 9:00 pm 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on Thursday, May 1, 2013 Location: The

  10. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  11. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  12. STEAB Meeting Agenda August 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arrive at Laboratory Welcome and Introductions / Continental Breakfast Meeting Agenda State Energy Advisory Board Meeting ♦ August 14-16, 2007 Hotel Durant ♦ 2600 Durant Ave. ♦ Berkeley, CA 94704 Phone (510) 845-8981 Time Proceeding Venue/Presenter Monday, August 13 7:00 p.m. Kick-Off Dinner / Adagia Restaurant Meet in Hotel Lobby at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, August 14 LBNL 8:00 a.m. Depart Hotel for LBNL LBNL shuttle bus to be provided 8:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m. STEAB Overview and Reason for Lab Visit

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE Tank Removal Study Vinces presentation Final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T k R l S d DOE Tank Removal Study Hanford Advisory Board Tank Waste Committee Vince Panesko November 3, 2011 Concept Sketch for Tank Removal Concept Sketch for Tank Removal Page 3-3 of RPP-RPT-47167 Concept Sketch - Deep Soil Excavation Concept Sketch Deep Soil Excavation Page 3-3 of RPP-RPT-47167 Soil removal to 5 feet below tanks Soil removal to 5 feet below tanks 5 5 19,700 Ci Cs 137 5 feet below tank 25,100 Ci Cs 137 59,000 Ci Cs 137 CONCERNS CONCERNS 1. Does it make sense to spend $800

  14. Fuel Injection Strategy for Soot-Filter Regeneration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel injection is optimized to allow both fast soot removal and temperatures below 700-800oC in case of drop-to-idle event. A 1-D mathematical model was used to simulate soot loading and temperature variations as a function of time and axial position in the filter during active regenerations and drop-to-idle events. The fact that the maximum temperature reached in a soot filter is a function of the soot loading when the drop-to-idle event occurs has been taken into account for developing this

  15. Bioenergy 2015 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda Bioenergy 2015 Agenda Below is an agenda overview of the Bioenergy 2015 schedule of events. A more detailed agenda with session descriptions and speakers (as they become available) is also available. Tuesday, June 23, 2015 7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration 8:00 a.m.-8:15 a.m. Welcome Keynote 8:15 a.m.-8:30 a.m. Congressional Keynote(s) 8:30 a.m.-8:40 a.m. Introductory Keynote 8:40 a.m.-9:00 a.m. BETO Keynote 9:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Plenary I: Policy and Market Overview 10:30

  16. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  17. Assessment of Recuperator Materials for Microturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omatete, O.O.

    2001-01-30

    Microturbines in production (or nearly in production) use metal recuperators with gas inlet temperatures of less than 700 C to raise their efficiency to about 30%. To increase their efficiencies to greater than 40% (which is the DOE Advanced Microturbine Program goal) will require operating at higher gas inlet temperatures, if the compression ratio remains less than 6. Even at higher compression ratios, the inlet temperature will increase as the efficiency increases, necessitating the use of new materials of construction. The materials requirement for recuperators used in microturbines may be categorized by their maximum operating temperatures: 700, 800, and {approximately}900 C. These limits are based on the materials properties that determine recuperator failure, such as corrosion, oxidation, creep, and strength. Metallic alloys are applicable in the 700 and 800 C limits; ceramics are applicable in the 900 C range. Most of the heat exchangers in the current microturbines are primary surface recuperators (PSR), compact recuperators fabricated in 347 stainless steel by rolling foil that is a few (>5) mil thick into air cells; the metal recuperators are operated at temperatures below 650 C. Preliminary research indicates that the use of 347 stainless steel can be extended to 700 C. However, additional directed research is required to improve the current properties of 347 stainless steel and to evaluate extended demonstrations on recuperators fabricated from it. Beyond 700 C and up to about 800 C, advanced austenitic stainless steels or other alloys or superalloys become applicable. Their properties must be measured in the expected operational environment, and recuperators fabricated from them must be evaluated for an extended period. Temperatures beyond 900 C exceed the limits of metals, and ceramic materials will be needed. The relevant properties of Si{sub 3} N{sub 4} and SiC, (creep, corrosion, and oxidation) have been studied extensively. Prototype ceramic recuperators have been fabricated from both cordierite and RBSN; consequently, their properties and those of other low-cost applicable ceramic materials need to be investigated further. Because no ceramic microturbine recuperators are in production, it will be necessary to fabricate prototype units and evaluate their properties over an extended demonstration period. A comprehensive workshop for those involved in recuperators for microturbines is recommended to determine how the technology can be accelerated to support the development of ultra-efficient microturbines. The immediate emphasis should be on the cost-effective manufacture of higher-temperature metallic recuperators; the development of ceramic recuperators should be considered a long-term objective.

  18. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 700 1990's 690 650 600 505 460 420 2000's 380 350 400 430 280 400 330 305 285 310 2010's 230 210 212 1,089 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  19. Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Happening Now If it's spring, it's NanoDays. If it's fall, it's High-Tech Halloween. Throughout the year, we're opening exhibits and hosting lectures. There is always something exciting happening at the museum. Full Events Calendar » May 19 Thu Climate change and the Arctic @ UnQuarked Wine Room 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Join us for convivial discussion on May 19 at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked May 25 Wed New climate change exhibit opens May 25 @ Bradbury Science Museum 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM The May 25

  20. Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 280 1980's 294 363 381 483 577 681 700 701 932 704 1990's 641 580 497 458 440 503 639 680 600 531 2000's 858 782 806 756 765 710 686 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  1. Flow Batteries Enabled by Nanoscale Percolating Conductor Networks - Joint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 562 543 606 668 655 669 1992 657 597 565 552 587 658 624 638 623 727 658 698 1993 700 633 663 660 685 634 713 694 644 688 640 657 1994 654 616 768 683 725 684 825 699 656 785 703 671 1995 614 632 664 637 666 590 593 554 559 522 547 554 1996 569 542 505 501 531 552 581 605 605 532 583 600 1997 596 578 689 626 611 508 581

  2. Spring MRS 2016 - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spring MRS 2016 Spring MRS 2016 Mon, Mar 28, 2016 6:00pm 18:00 Fri, Apr 1, 2016 7:00pm 19:00 Phoenix Convention Center 100 North 3rd Street Phoenix, Arizona 85004 United States Joel Ager, "Experimental Demonstrations of Solar-Driven Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting and Carbon Dioxide Reduction" John Gregoire, "High Throughput Materials Integration: Identifying Optimal Interfaces for Solar Fuels Applications" John Gregoire, "Accelerated Photoanode Discovery: A High

  3. Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Barrels) and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 280 1980's 294 363 381 483 577 681 700 701 932 704 1990's 641 580 497 458 440 503 639 680 600 531 2000's 858 782 806 756 765 710 686 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. China has 6,000-mile pipeline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming, S.

    1983-08-01

    A dramatic change has taken place in China's oil transport system, with pipelines replacing tank-cars as the most important means of transport for crude oil and petroleum products. According to Petroleum Ministry officials, the volume of crude oil carried by China's pipeline system increased from 23.2 percent in 1971 to 65.6 percent in 1981, while the volume delivered by tank-cars declined from 61.11 percent to 8.4 percent. The remainder was transported by tankers. China's 9,700 km (6,000-mile) pipeline network includes 5,600 km (3,500 miles) designed to carry crude oil and more than 600 km (375 miles) for petroleum products, plus 3,400 km (2,100 miles), mostly in Sichuan province, for natural gas.

  5. Annealing to Mitigate Pitting in Electropolished Niobium Coupons and SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, L.D.; Hahn, E.; Hicks, D.; Romanenko, A.; Schuessler, R.; Thompson, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-08

    Ongoing studies at Fermilab investigate whether dislocations and other factors instigate pitting during cavity electropolishing (EP), despite careful processing controls and the inherent leveling mechanism of EP itself. Here, cold-worked niobium coupons, which exhibited increased tendencies for pitting in our past study, were annealed in a high vacuum furnace and subsequently processed by EP. Laser confocal scanning microscopy and special defect counting algorithms were used to assess the population of pits formed. Hardness measurements indicated that annealing for 2 hours at 800 C produced recovery, whereas annealing for 12 hours at 600 C did not, as is consistent with known changes for cavities annealed in a similar way. The 800 C anneal was effective in some cases but not others, and we discuss reasons why tendencies for pitting remain. We discuss implications for cavities and continued work to understand pitting.

  6. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy in the Americas May 17, 2013 Neelesh Nerurkar Bureau of Energy Resources U.S. Department of State The Americas in a Changing World Data Source: BP Energy Outlook Regional Shares of Global Oil And Gas Market Growth Americas Asia Middle East 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2010-2030 1990-2010 Americas Asia Middle East Other 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2010-2030 1990-2010 Supply growth Demand growth Americas Asia Middle East Other 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2010-2030 1990-2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200

  7. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33%

  8. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per

  9. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520 1,743 1,382 1,263 1,555 2000's 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  11. Oregon Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 3,221 1,923 1,439 1,173 1,067 1,291 2000's 1,214 1,110 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  12. Effect of martensite to austenite reversion on the formation of nano/submicron grained AISI 301 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimi, M.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Eskandari, M.

    2009-11-15

    The martensite to austenite reversion behavior of 90% cold rolled AISI 301 stainless steel was investigated in order to refine the grain size. Cold rolled specimens were annealed at 600-900 deg. C, and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Feritscope, and hardness measurements. The effects of annealing parameters on the formation of fully-austenitic nano/submicron grained structure and the mechanisms involved were studied. It was found that annealing at 800 deg. C for 10 s exhibited the smallest average austenite grain size of 240 {+-} 60 nm with an almost fully-austenitic structure.

  13. Matching Controls to Declining Risks at the Hanford Site's Plutonium

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee Date: Monday, March 5, 2012 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. EDT / Dutch Treat Dinner 6:00 p.m. - 8 p.m. Date: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: Ronald Reagan Building, Horizon Room, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC Overview The Department of

  14. March 17 & 18, 2016 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy March 17 & 18, 2016 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 17 & 18, 2016 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 17 & 18, 2016 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee Date: Thursday, Mach 17 12:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. EDT Date: Friday, March 18, 2015 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. EDT Location: National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), 4301 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22203 Overview The Department of Energy's Electricity

  15. March 26 & 27, 2015 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Services » Electricity Advisory Committee » Archived Meetings 2008-2015 » 2015 EAC Meetings » March 26 & 27, 2015 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 26 & 27, 2015 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 26 & 27, 2015 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee Date: Thursday, March 26, 2015 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. EDT Date: Friday, March 27, 2015 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: National Rural Electric Cooperative

  16. March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee March 5 & 6, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee Date: Monday, March 5, 2012 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. EDT / Dutch Treat Dinner 6:00 p.m. - 8 p.m. Date: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: Ronald Reagan Building, Horizon Room, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC Overview The Department of

  17. October 15 & 16, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy October 15 & 16, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee October 15 & 16, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee October 15 & 16, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee Date: Monday, October 15, 2012 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. EDT / Dutch Treat Dinner 6:00 p.m. - 8 p.m. Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: Capital Hilton, 1001 16th St. NW, Washington, DC Overview The Department of Energy's

  18. Oregon Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 3,221 1,923 1,439 1,173 1,067 1,291 2000's 1,214 1,110 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520 1,743 1,382 1,263 1,555 2000's 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  20. STEAB Meeting Agenda August 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheraton Denver West Hotel 360 Union Blvd. Denver, CO August 12 - 14, 2008 Monday - August 11 6:00 - 6:15 Members Meet in Hotel Lobby 6:15 Members Walk to Jose O'Shea's 6:30 Dutch Treat Group Dinner and Socializing Tuesday - August 12 8:00 Breakfast Buffet (in meeting room) 8:30 Welcome: Rita Wells, Manager, DOE Golden Field Office 8:45 NREL Exec Mgmt Overview with Q&A: Bobi Garrett Current NREL political environment, climate directions, fossil fuel depletion, the challenge facing us in the

  1. 2013 Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design Oct. 21-23, 2013 Louisiana State University, Lod Cook Alumni Center, Baton Rouge, LA Contact: Ellen Stevens; 1-225-578-0058; esteve2@lsu.edu Mon Oct. 21: arrive 6:00 pm: Dinner (provided in Abell room), set up posters Tues Oct 22: 8:00 am: (a) Breakfast (provided in hotel for those staying at the Lod Cook hotel; continental breakfast provided in Abell Room) (b) set up posters (c) speakers load presentations 8:45 am: Jerry Spivey

  2. 2014 PDSF User Meeting Minutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Minutes 2014 PDSF User Meeting Minutes December 2 Attending Jeff Outages / Downtimes 11/11 NERSC / PDSF maintenance 11/18 project hours Upcoming Downtime None Other Issues New Mendel nodes are online. Slides The slides from the meeting can be found here. November 4 Attending Jeff, Mike Outages / Downtime 10/20 NERSC CA and NEWT outage Upcoming Downtime 11/11 8:00 am to 6:00 pm maintenance Other Issues PDSF old home hardware is being retired. Please check your scripts for "/home" or

  3. DepoNet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2010 6:00 p.m. Doubletree Hotel 1000 N.E. Multnomah Street Portland, Oregon Mr. James Parham, Facilitator PANEL MEMBERS: Ms. Mary Beth Burandt, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Mr. Jeff Lyon, Washington State Department of Ecology, Hanford Project Office Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Public Hearing February 10, 2010 2 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 DRAFT TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT 3 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  4. DepoNet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DRAFT TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT PUBLIC HEARING DATE: FEBRUARY 23, 2010 6:00 p.m. RED LION INN AT THE PARK 303 WEST NORTH RIVER DRIVE SPOKANE, WA 99206 James Parham, Facilitator PANEL MEMBERS: Ms. Mary Beth Burandt, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Jeff Lyon, Washington State Department of Ecology, Hanford Project Office Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Public Hearing February 23,

  5. DRAFT/PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT AGENDA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA JANUARY 29-30, 2002 Judith Holm, TEC Co-Chair, DOE-NTP Monday, January 28, 2002 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. Consolidated Grant Topic Group Meeting Judith Holm, DOE-National Transportation Program Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:00 - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast and General Registration Sue Martindale, Mary McConnell, SAIC 8:30 -12:00 p.m. Topic Group Meetings - Training and Medical Issues - Ella

  6. Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River,"

  7. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2012 Meetings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2012 Meetings MARCH 5 & 6, 2012 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Date: Monday, March 5, 2012 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. EDT / Dutch Treat Dinner 6:00 p.m. - 8 p.m. Date: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: Ronald Reagan Building, Horizon Room, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC A Federal Register Notice of the open meeting is available. JUNE 11 & 12, 2012 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  8. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 2. Volume 1. Executive summary. Report for November 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Brown, B.; Wade, M.

    1987-03-30

    A total of 16 stations were sampled during a 2-year field program designed to characterize the biological, chemical, and sedimentary processes on the slope and rise off North and South Carolina. Box cores were taken along 4 transects at depths of 600-3500 m. The infauna yielded a total of 1202 species, 520 of which were new to science. Annelids were the dominant taxa in terms of density and numbers of species. Species diversity was highest at an 800 m site off Charleston. Higher than normal lead and hydrocarbon inventories suggest enhanced scavenging processes in the area.

  9. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Class 8 Tractors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    26 2 58 8 12 10 11 59 24 13 9 44 0 Deployment ID 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1150 Number of days Breakdown of Total Operational Days Collected by Deployment for Class 8 Tractors 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% # of Vehicles Reporting: 70 # of Days Included: 1150 Generated: Thu Aug 07, 2014 2 8 58 10 12 0 24 11 26 13 44 59 9 Deployment ID 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 70 Number of Vehicles Breakdown of Total Vehicles by Deployment for Class 8 Tractors 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% # of Vehicles Reporting: 70 # of Days

  10. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Delivery Vans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Number of days 974 800 600 400 200 0 37 3 5 54 52 36 7 6 50 51 1 22 23 4 53 55 57 48 49 60 Deployment ID Breakdown of Total Operational Days Collected by Deployment for Delivery Vans 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% # of Vehicles Reporting: 94 Generated: Thu Aug 07, 2014 # of Days Included: 974 37 1 3 36 22 5 23 6 7 52 54 4 50 51 48 49 53 55 57 60 Deployment ID 0 20 40 60 80 94 Number of Vehicles Breakdown of Total Vehicles by Deployment for Delivery Vans 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% # of Vehicles Reporting:

  11. Word Pro - S6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Coal Figure 6.1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2015 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2015 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 96 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review May 2016 2014 20 15 2016 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 a Includes

  12. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  13. Argonne_map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ROADS & PARKING BUILDINGS 603 1 2 3 4 5 A B C D E F G 360 - E4 361 - E4 362 - E3 363 - E4 366 - E4 369 - E4 370 - E4 371 - E4 376 - E4 399 - E4 600 Area 600 - E3 617 - E3 800 Area 891 - B2 900 Area 950 - G3 951 - G2 952 - G2 953 - G2 East Area 046 - F2 091 - G3 100 Area 108 - E2 145 - F2 146 - F2 200 Area 200 - C2 201 - D2 202 - D2 203 - D2 204 - E2 205 - D2, D3 300 Area 302 - D3 306 - D4 308 - D3 309 - D3 206 - C2 208 - C2 211 - C2 212 - D2 213 - D2 214 - D3 216 - D2 314 - D4 315 - D4 316 -

  14. Corrosion and degradation of materials in the Synthane coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurkewycz, R.; Firestone, R.F.

    1981-09-01

    Corrosion monitoring of materials was conducted in the operating environments of the Synthane coal gasification pilot plant between 1976 and 1978. Metal and refractory specimens were exposed in the gasifier vessel in two test locations (fluidized bed, freeboard). Metal coupons only were exposed in the gasifier char cooler (freeboard) and four test locations in the quench system (vapor and liquid phases). Exposure times under operating conditions were 181 to 782 h. In two gasifier test locations (600 psig, 1284/sup 0/F and 1434/sup 0/F), the performance of nickel-base alloys with >20 wt % Cr, 40 to 46 wt % Ni, and 3 to 9.1 wt % Mo was consistently better than for other test alloys. Equivalent linear corrosion rates for these better alloys were < 20 mpy (782 h) with Montana Rosebud coal as feedstock; however, with Illinois No. 6 coal the linear rates were >20 mpy but <75 mpy (181 h). IN-600 (76.5 wt % Ni, 15.8 wt % Cr) was found unsuitable for gasifier internal application. All refractories tested in the two gasifier test locations (600 psig, 1284/sup 0/F and 1434/sup 0/F), with the exception of silicon nitride, were not greatly affected during either exposure period. The better materials were monolithic refractories with 5 to 30% porosity and 50 to 60% alumina content. Corrosion monitoring of metals in the gasifier char cooler freeboard (600 psig, 800/sup 0/F) showed that Type 304 was more resistant to corrosion attack than Type 410 and carbon steel (A-515).During exposure in the product gas quench system (5 to 600 psig, 200/sup 0/ to 445/sup 0/F), austenitic stainless steels, IN-600, and Type 430 experienced only limited corrosion loss and slight to moderate pitting attack (maximum pit depth <7 mils). Monel 400 and carbon steel specimens incurred unacceptable levels of degradation.

  15. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis productsmore » increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.« less

  16. Structural characteristics and gasification reactivity of chars prepared from K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixed HyperCoals and coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Hiroyuki Kawashima; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2009-04-15

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with mineral matter content <0.05 wt %. Oaky Creek (C = 82%), and Pasir (C = 68%) coals were subjected to solvent extraction method to prepare Oaky Creek HyperCoal, and Pasir HyperCoal. Experiments were carried out to compare the gasification reactivity of HyperCoals and parent raw coals with 20, 40, 50 and 60% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as a catalyst at 600, 650, 700, and 775{sup o}C with steam. Gasification rates of coals and HyperCoals were strongly influenced by the temperature and catalyst loading. Catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal chars was found to be chemical reaction controlled in the 600-700{sup o}C temperature range for all catalyst loadings. Gasification rates of HyperCoal chars were found to be always higher than parent coals at any given temperature for all catalyst loadings. However, X-ray diffraction results showed that the microstructures of chars prepared from coals and HyperCoals were similar. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show no significant difference between the chemical compositions of the chars. Significant differences were observed from scanning electron microscopy images, which showed that the chars from HyperCoals had coral-reef like structures whereas dense chars were observed for coals. 26 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Performance of Anode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell with Thin Bi-Layer Electrolyte by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zigui; Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Fisher, Daniel; Wu, Naijuan; Ignatiev, Alex

    2012-07-15

    Anode-supported yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/samaria doped ceria (SDC) bi-layer electrolytes with uniform thickness and high density were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition at 1000 degrees C. Fuel cells with such bi-layer electrolytes were fabricated and tested, yielding open circuit voltages from 0.94 to 1.0 V at 600-700 degrees C. Power densities from 0.4 to 1.0 W cm{sup -2} at 0.7 V were achieved in air at temperatures of 600-700 degrees C. Cell performance was improved in flowing oxygen, with an estimated peak power density of over 2 W cm{sup -2} at 650 degrees C, assuming the same overall resistance over the entire range of current density. The high cell performance was attributed to the very low ohmic resistance of the fuel cell, owing to the small thickness of the electrolyte. Stable performance was also demonstrated in that the voltage of the fuel cell showed very little change at a constant current density of 1 A cm{sup -2} during more than 400 hours of operation at 650 degrees C in flowing oxygen. SEM analysis of the fuel cell after testing showed that the bi-layer electrolyte had retained its chemical and mechanical integrity.

  18. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  19. The design, fabrication, operation and maintenance of (41) 400 H. P. -600 SCFM helium screw compressor systems (Five-year operation report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallaver, C.

    1988-12-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) uses thirty-four (34) identical compressor systems connected to a common header to supply clean high pressure helium gas feeding 26 refrigerators supplying liquid helium to 777 super conducting magnets. There are seven (7) similar compressor packages in other locations. The purpose of this paper is (after five years of operation) to present all the problems, modifications and experiences associated with the design and operation of these compressor systems.

  20. 100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragland, K.W.; Aerts, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    In this project a downdraft, packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system using woodchips is being developed. The combustor is designed to promote intense combustion in a thin reaction zone and to control particulate growth by using high excess air. The combustor contains a magnesia and alumina gravel bed on top of which woodchips are fed. The following test objectives were established for the 100 hr test: (a) demonstrate preliminary durability of the combustor; (b) demonstrate steady operation of the system; (c) investigate combustor pressure drop; (d) investigate bed ash cake buildup; (e) expose metal alloy coupons for corrosion examination; (f) obtain closure within 10% on mass and energy balances; and (g) obtain emissions data. The plan for the 100 hr test was to operate the combustor at the following conditions: day 1, 4 atm (absolute) pressure and 700--800 C outlet temperature; day 2, 4 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; day 3, 5 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; days 4 and 5, repeat day 3. The inlet air was not preheated. The paper gives test results and discusses fuel characterization, combustor performance, mass and energy balance, emissions, composition of ash and deposits, and metal coupons representing turbine blade material.

  1. Exploring Alternative Non-contact temperature measurements for 99Mo production facility NorthStar FY14 Activity 5, Deliverable 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew; Dalmas, Dale

    2015-03-04

    We have conducted an experiment to explore an alternative non-contact method of measuring the Inconel target window temperature. This experiment involves using a standard color camera to observe the visible light emitted from the Inconel target window at high heat in order to estimate the window temperature. The safety limit to prevent target window failure is 700 °C and therefore we need a reliable and accurate method of measuring temperature especially in the range of 600 °C to 700 °C if it is to replace the IR camera. In this temperature range the window will emit a significant amount of black body radiation within the visible range and hence the idea of using a color camera. The goal is to see if the shift in window color (determined by the RBG pixel values of the camera) as the target window is heated to 700 °C can be calibrated to the temperature.The reasons for exploring this as an alternative to an IR are camera are: significant cost reduction and potentially less complicated to calibrate.

  2. Partially-reflected water-moderated square-piteched U(6.90)O2 fuel rod lattices with 0.67 fuel to water volume ratio (0.800 CM Pitch)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative funded the design and construction of the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at Sandia National Laboratories. The start-up of the experiment facility and the execution of the experiments described here were funded by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. The 7uPCX is designed to investigate critical systems with fuel for light water reactors in the enrichment range above 5% 235U. The 7uPCX assembly is a water-moderated and -reflected array of aluminum-clad square-pitched U(6.90%)O2 fuel rods.

  3. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kevin

    2014-08-31

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100oC have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800oC. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest operation temperature up to 750oC, first distributed chemical measurements at the record high temperature up to 700oC, first distributed pressure measurement at the record high temperature up to 800oC, and the fiber laser sensors with the record high operation temperature up to 700oC. The research performed by this program dramatically expand the functionality, adaptability, and applicability of distributed fiber optical sensors with potential applications in a number of high-temperature energy systems such as fossil-fuel power generation, high-temperature fuel cell applications, and potential for nuclear energy systems.

  4. Product Supplied for Propane/Propylene

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    838 700 942 850 1,100 918

  5. O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS database\DOE\2012\Document List 03-02-2012 10-10-11-600\Document List 03-02-2012 10-10-11-600_docs\DOE-HQ-2012-0004-DRAFT-0005.html

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5.html[2/3/2012 12:41:43 PM] PUBLIC SUBMISSION As of: February 03, 2012 Received: January 17, 2012 Status: Pending_Post Tracking No. 80f99189 Comments Due: January 20, 2012 Submission Type: Web Docket: DOE-HQ-2012-0004 U.S. Department of Energy Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Comment On: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-0001 Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Document: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-DRAFT-0005 Comment on FR Doc # 2011-32622 Submitter Information Name: Carol Hellmann Address: US Dept of Energy 1617

  6. O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS database\DOE\2012\Document List 03-02-2012 10-10-11-600\Document List 03-02-2012 10-10-11-600_docs\Robin Hindel_ Comment -DRAFT-0003.html

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Robin%20Hindel_%20Comment%20-DRAFT-0003.html[2/3/2012 12:39:35 PM] PUBLIC SUBMISSION As of: February 03, 2012 Received: January 11, 2012 Status: Pending_Post Tracking No. 80f93029 Comments Due: January 20, 2012 Submission Type: Web Docket: DOE-HQ-2012-0004 U.S. Department of Energy Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Comment On: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-0001 Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Document: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-DRAFT-0003 Comment on FR Doc # 2011-32622 Submitter Information Name: Robin

  7. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  8. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 36,240 1990's 37,500 37,800 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 31,000 39,072 36,575 2000's 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 49,335 53,003 48,215 49,364 50,602 2010's 52,498 56,813 50,700 54,920 60,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  9. Next Update: October 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a . Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 (Megawatts and 2007 Base Year) 2007 782,227 46,676 41,684 58,314 181,700 209,109 43,167 62,188 139,389 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC (U.S.) 789,915 47,364 41,222 61,779 184,000 204,791 43,800 64,927 142,032 806,672 48,181 43,208 62,647 187,100 209,288 44,784 66,247 145,217 822,889 49,093 44,737 63,399

  10. Next Update: October 2009 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and Projected 2008 through 2012 2007 4,012,728 232,405 217,602 301,766 954,700 1,049,298 210,875 307,064 739,018 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC (U.S.) 4,085,683 242,923 225,058 301,767 973,800 1,073,081 208,532 313,946 746,575 4,149,201 248,996 230,745 305,223 984,000 1,086,304 212,884 319,355 761,694 4,226,516 255,216 239,483 308,534 999,200

  11. Effects of aluminum on epitaxial graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Chao Johansson, Leif I.; Hultman, Lars; Virojanadara, Chariya; Niu, Yuran

    2015-05-21

    The effects of Al layers deposited on graphene grown on C-face SiC substrates are investigated before and after subsequent annealing using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), photoelectron spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission. As-deposited layers appear inert. Annealing at a temperature of about 400?C initiates migration of Al through the graphene into the graphene/SiC interface. Further annealing at temperatures from 500?C to 700?C induces formation of an ordered compound, producing a two domain ?7??7R19 LEED pattern and significant changes in the core level spectra that suggest formation of an Al-Si-C compound. Decomposition of this compound starts after annealing at 800?C, and at 1000?C, Al is no longer possible to detect at the surface. On Si-face graphene, deposited Al layers did not form such an Al-Si-C compound, and Al was still detectable after annealing above 1000?C.

  12. Austin's Home Performance with Energy Star Program: Making a Compelling Offer to a Financial Institution Partner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark

    2011-03-18

    Launched in 2006, over 8,700 residential energy upgrades have been completed through Austin Energy's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program. The program's lending partner, Velocity Credit Union (VCU) has originated almost 1,800 loans, totaling approximately $12.5 million. Residential energy efficiency loans are typically small, and expensive to originate and service relative to larger financing products. National lenders have been hesitant to deliver attractive loan products to this small, but growing, residential market. In response, energy efficiency programs have found ways to partner with local and regional banks, credit unions, community development finance institutions (CDFIs) and co-ops to deliver energy efficiency financing to homeowners. VCU's experience with the Austin Energy HPwES program highlights the potential benefits of energy efficiency programs to a lending partner.

  13. Dynacracking process first commerical application for upgrading heavy oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, F.N. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynacracking process developed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., is a non-catalytic process capable of upgrading heavy oil whose sulfur, metal, and carbon contents may be high. It converts residual stocks to distillates with high naphtha yields, and to synthetic fuel gas of high quality (700-800 Btu/ft/sup 3/). It has esentially no air polution emissions and requires a relatively small amount of water and utilities. The process generates sufficient heat internally such that, except for start-up, no boilers, furnaces, or external heaters are required to operate the plant. Several aspects of the process are discussed: chemistry, hardware, feedstock, flexibility in the product mix, product quality, and economics.

  14. Fabrication of carbon nanotube films from alkyne-transition metal complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iyer, Vivekanantan S. (Delft, NL); Vollhardt, K. Peter C. (Oakland, CA)

    2007-08-28

    A simple method for the production or synthesis of carbon nanotubes as free-standing films or nanotube mats by the thermal decomposition of transition metal complexed alkynes with aryl, alkyl, alkenyl, or alkynyl substituents. In particular, transition metal (e.g. Co, Ni, Fe, Mo) complexes of diarylacetylenes, e.g. diphenylacetylene, and solid mixtures of these complexes with suitable, additional carbon sources are heated in a vessel. More specifically, the heating of the transition metal complex is completed at a temperature between 400-800.degree. C. and more particularly 550-700.degree. C. for between 0.1 to 24 hours and more particularly 0.5-3 hours in a sealed vessel under a partial pressure of argon or helium.

  15. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  16. Study of the thermal transformations of Co- and Fe-exchanged zeolites A and X by 'in situ' XRD under reducing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronchetti, Silvia; Turcato, Elisa Aurelia; Delmastro, Alessandro; Esposito, Serena; Ferone, Claudio; Pansini, Michele; Onida, Barbara; Mazza, Daniele

    2010-06-15

    'In situ' high temperature X-ray diffraction under reducing atmosphere is used for the first time to study the thermal stability and transformations of Co- and Fe-exchanged A and X zeolites. TG-DTA and 'ex situ' XRD characterization were also carried out. The temperature of incipient crystallization of metallic phase was found to be 700 {sup o}C in Fe-zeolites and 800 {sup o}C in Co-zeolites. Moreover, ex situ X-ray experiments, after thermal treatment both under inert and reducing atmosphere, revealed the formation of ceramic phases upon the thermal collapse of the zeolitic framework. Metal nanoparticles were obtained by reduction and the size of metal clusters was found to range between 24 and 40 nm.

  17. On the State of the Art of Metal Interconnects for SOFC Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski@netl.doe.gov

    2011-02-27

    One of the recent developments for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) is oxide component materials capable of operating at lower temperatures such as 700-800C. This lower temperature range has provided for the consideration of metallic interconnects which have several advantages over ceramic interconnects: low cost, ease in manufacturing, and high conductivity. Most metals and alloys will oxidize under both the anode and cathode conditions within an SOFC, thus a chief requirement is that the base metal oxide scale must be electrically conductive since this constitutes the majority of the electrical resistance in a metallic interconnect. Common high temperature alloys form scales that contain chrome, silicon and aluminum oxides among others. Under SOFC operating conditions chrome oxide is a semi-conductor while silicon and aluminum oxides are insulators. In this talk we will review the evolution in candidate alloys and surface modifications which constitute an engineered solution for SOFC interconnect applications.

  18. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1991-01-01

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  19. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at the Wilmington, Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. This active solar system is composed of 2,700 square feet of Revere liquid flat plate collectors piped to a 2,800 gallon concrete storage tank located below ground near the building. A micro-computer based control system selects the optimal applications of the stored energy among space, domestic water and pool alternatives. The controlled logic is planned for serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat-new addition, domestic water-entire facility, and pool heating-entire facility. A modified trombe wall passive operation the active system will bypass the areas being served passively. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution.

  20. Sintered Cr/Pt and Ni/Au ohmic contacts to B12P2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frye, Clint D.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Edgar, James H.; Voss, Lars F.; Conway, Adam M.; Shao, Qinghui; Nikolic, Rebecca J.

    2015-04-09

    With this study, icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor possessing interesting properties such as high hardness, chemical inertness, and the reported ability to self-heal from irradiation by high energy electrons. Here, the authors developed Cr/Pt and Ni/Au ohmic contacts to epitaxially grown B12P2 for materials characterization and electronic device development. Cr/Pt contacts became ohmic after annealing at 700 °C for 30 s with a specific contact resistance of 2×10–4 Ω cm2, as measured by the linear transfer length method. Ni/Au contacts were ohmic prior to any annealing, and their minimum specific contact resistance was ~l–4 × 10–4 Ωmore » cm2 after annealing over the temperature range of 500–800 °C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry revealed a strong reaction and intermixing between Cr/Pt and B12P2 at 700 °C and a reaction layer between Ni and B12P2 thinner than ~25 nm at 500 °C.« less