National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 8-foot 2-lamp ballasts

  1. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Replace...

  2. Fully Integrated Ballast Controller with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    frequency electronic ballasts are used to provide stable ac drive to a variety of discharge lamps. In many digital phase controller that provides near cycle-by-cycle phase regulation. Benefits and approaches

  3. Ballast Water Exchange in the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2004-01-01

    This white paper focuses on the regional component of ballast water management and specifically addresses concerns in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Gulf of Maine. It summarizes vessel traffic and ballast water exchange in ...

  4. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent ballasts, which is a FEMP designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  5. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  6. Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (R)or parabolic reflector (PAR) CFLs for flood and spotlighting. Some CFL fixtures have built-in electronic ballasts and polished metal reflectors. When used in recessed...

  7. Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballast Water Management Program in 2004 Produced for the Oregon State Legislature By The Oregon Ballast regulations; shipping industry's compliance with Oregon law; and ballast water treatment technology as inefficient and having some safety constraints, ballast water exchange is still the primary treatment method

  8. Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp Ballasts Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts The

  9. EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH for Laboratory StudyFouling Mechanism / Need for Laboratory Study Mechanical Properties of Coal DustMechanical Properties of Coal Dust Grain Size AnalysisGrain Size Analysis AtterbergAtterberg LimitsLimits Specific

  10. PERSPECTIVE Modeling ships' ballast water as invasion threats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Mark

    of individual ships that enter the Great Lakes loaded with cargo and that declare "no ballast on board" (NOBOB) is typically one to two orders of magnitude higher than that of vessels that exchange ballast. Because NOBOB dans les Grands-Lacs chargés de cargo et qui déclarent ne pas avoir de ballast (NOBOB) est généralement

  11. Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and market impact (1992 - 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Figure 1. Ballast Shipment and DSM Rebate Data . . . . .Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent2 Electronic Ballast DSM Rebate Estimates Derived from Core

  12. SURFACE WAVE TESTING FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF BALLAST AND FOUNDATION LAYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ballast and subgrade) condition assessment system based on the seismic surface wave method soil in a track system are essential to schedule and predict maintenance costs and to improve safety structure. Concerns for seismic testing of track substructure include coupling between receiver and ballast

  13. Optimizing Ballast Design of Wave Energy Converters Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    Optimizing Ballast Design of Wave Energy Converters Using Evolutionary Algorithms Mitch Colby, 97331 kagan.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT Wave energy converters promise to be a viable alternative% improvement in power output over a ballast-free wave energy converter. General Terms Algorithms; Applications

  14. Electronic screw-in ballast and improved circline lamp phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, T.P.

    1980-09-01

    A solid state ballast has been designed for the efficient operation of a 10 in circline fluorescent lamp. The circuit can be manufactured using power hybrid technology. Eight discrete component versions of the ballasts have been delivered to LBL for testing. The results show the solid state fluorescent ballast system is more efficient than the core-coil ballasted systems on the market.

  15. Analysis and design of an electronic ballast for fluorescent tube 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchimanchi, Krishna V.

    1992-01-01

    Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Enjeti Prasad In this thesis, the analysis, design and implementation of an electronic ballast circuit with power factor correction to replace the conventional ballast for fluorescent lighting systems is presented... layout for the PCB Voltage across the tube Current through the tube 44 45 25 Gate voltages across the mosfets 27 Conventional diode rectifier Rectifier with inductor 47 48 28 Series resonant filter 49 29 Parallel resonant power factor...

  16. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  17. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  18. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  19. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

    1999-08-31

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

  20. Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Brown

    2007-04-06

    The goal of this project is to develop an indirectly heated gasification system that converts switchgrass into hydrogen-rich gas suitable for powering fuel cells. The project includes investigations of the indirectly-heated gasifier, development of particulate removal equipment, evaluation of catalytic methods for upgrading producer gas, development of contaminant measurement and control techniques, modeling of the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier, and estimation of the cost of hydrogen from the proposed gasification system. Specific technologies investigated include a thermally ballasted gasifier, a moving bed granular filter, and catalytic reactors for steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction. The approach to this project was to employ a pilot-scale (5 ton per day) gasifier to evaluate the thermally ballasted gasifier as a means for producing hydrogen from switchgrass. A slipstream from the gasifier was used to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. Other tests were conducted with laboratory-scale equipment using simulated producer gas. The ballasted gasifier operated in conjunction with a steam reformer and two-stage water-gas shift reactor produced gas streams containing 54.5 vol-% H2. If purge gas to the feeder system could be substantially eliminated, hydrogen concentration would reach 61 vol-%, which closely approaches the theoretical maximum of 66 vol-%. Tests with a combined catalyst/sorbent system demonstrated that steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction could be substantially performed in a single reactor and achieve hydrogen concentrations exceeding 90 vol-%. Cold flow trials with a laboratory-scale moving bed granular filter achieved particle removal efficiencies exceeding 99%. Two metal-based sorbents were tested for their ability to remove H2S from biomass-derived producer gas. The ZnO sorbent, tested at 450? C, was effective in reducing H2S from 200 ppm to less than 2 ppm (>99% reduction) while tests with the MnO sorbent were inconclusive. A computer model was developed that successfully predicted the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier. An economic comparison of an air-blown gasification plant and a ballasted gasifier plant found that operating costs for ballasted gasification plant are about 31% higher than for the air blown gasifier plant. Hydrogen from the ballasted gasification plant and air blown gasification plant are projected to be $2.43/kg and $1.85/kg, respectively. This is lower than U.S. DOE’s 2010 target price of $2.90/kg and comparable to U.S. DOE’s 2015 target price of $2.00/kg.

  1. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  2. Custom Spectral Shaping for EMI Reduction in Electronic Ballasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waveforms, resulting in the elimination of power spectral density (PSD) distortion and reduced peak currents power and light color, increase lifetime and realize smaller and lighter ballasts. With such a source used extensively to reduce EMI in power supplies [1-10]. The power spectral density (PSD) is spread

  3. Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Voelker

    2001-12-21

    The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other integral CFL and future dimmable integral and plug-in versions of the EFL products.

  4. Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and assessment of market impact (1992 - 1997)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

    2000-06-30

    In this report we present national estimates of utility Demand-Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts during the period of 1992 - 1997. We then compare these trends with developments in the fluorescent ballast market from 1993 - 1998. The analysis indicates that DSM rebates for electronic ballasts peaked in the mid-1990s and declined sharply in 1996 and 1997. In a parallel trend, electronic ballast sales and market share both increased significantly during 1993 - 1994 and increased more slowly in 1996 -1997.

  5. EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts.

  6. Magnetic fluorescent ballasts: Market data, market imperfections, and policy success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Sanstad, A.H.; Shown, L.J.

    1995-12-01

    Many economists have strongly questioned engineering-economic studies aimed at demonstrating anomalously slow diffusion of energy-efficient technology and the benefits of regulations to promote such technology. One argument against such studies is that standard techniques of engineering-economics are either inappropriate for or are routinely misapplied in assessing the performance of the market for energy efficiency. This paper presents engineering-economic evidence on the diffusion of energy efficiency improvements that takes account of such critiques. The authors examine the engineering and economic characteristics of standard and energy-efficient magnetic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Efficient magnetic ballasts represented an excellent investment for 99% of the commercial building floor stock, and a moderately good investment for 0.7% of the commercial floor stock. Still, these ballasts were only being adopted in the 1980s at a rate commensurate with the enactment of appliance efficiency standards in various states. In this case, there is solid empirical evidence for skepticism about the effectiveness of the market mechanism in promoting cost-effective energy efficiency improvements as well as evidence of the benefits of regulation to counteract this shortcoming.

  7. Ecosystem under Pressure: Examining the Phytoplankton Community in the High Ballast Water Discharge Environment of Galveston Bay, Texas (USA) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steichen, Jamie L

    2013-01-15

    . Dinoflagellates, capable of forming harmful algal blooms leading to fish and shellfish kills, are being transported to Galveston Bay via ballast water. Our results suggest that Galveston Bay is at risk for invasive species introductions via ballast water...

  8. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  9. Evaluation of Ships' Ballast Water as a Vector for Transfer of Pathogenic Bacteria to Marine Protected Areas in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa L

    2013-05-10

    . These organisms have moved to the forefront of ballast water management (BWM) trepidations because they compose serious threats to human health as well as Marine Protected Area (MPA) ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ballasting activities of ships calling...

  10. ISSUANCE 2015-06-17: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

  11. ISSUANCE 2015-08-14: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Reopening of the Comment Period

  12. Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies speed line, true high speed rail has seen an increasing success in those countries where such lines were speed rail (HSR) systems around the world during the past 50 years, one of the observed phenomena

  13. Low-frequency square-wave electronic ballast with resonant ignition using digital mode and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-frequency square-wave electronic ballast with resonant ignition using digital mode and power both the functions of a resonant circuit for lamp ignition and a current controlled low frequency of the FB converter according to the lamp requirements. I. INTRODUCTION The primary motivation for using low

  14. HF Multiresonant Electronic Ballast for Fluorescent Lamps with Constant Filament Preheat Voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HF Multiresonant Electronic Ballast for Fluorescent Lamps with Constant Filament Preheat Voltage resonance arrangement that acts as a current source. During warm up the filaments are driven by a secondary the filament and shorts out the voltage across the lamp. Simulation and experimental results suggest

  15. Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for zero voltage switching (ZVS) with fixed frequency and power control [8,9]. II. STEADYSTATE ANALYSISDesign of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast with Phase, Spain azcondof@unican.es,branasc@unican.es Absrracr - The paper presents the design guidelinesof phase

  16. Evaluation of approaches to quantify total residual oxidants in ballast water management systems employing chlorine for disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer-Faust, AG; Ambrose, RF; Ambrose, RF; Tamburri, MN

    2014-01-01

    by-products in ballast water treatment: An evaluation ofregulatory data. Water Research 46, 4884-4901. White, G.C.Guidelines for Safe Recreation Water Environments Volume 2.

  17. Enhanced silica ballasting from iron stress sustains carbon export in a frontal zone within the California Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    2000), Resolving the ‘‘opal paradox’’ in the Southern Ocean,Boyd et al. , 2007]. Because opal is denser than seawater,to the ballasting effect of diatom opal on particle export,

  18. The provenance of the stone ballast from the Molasses Reef Wreck 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, William Reginald

    1988-01-01

    with the actual (optically observed) mi nera I composition, the mode. The samples that were sent for chemical analysis were only from those basalt ballast stones which had been petrographically examined. Chemical analysis was used to decrease the potential...). The proportion of groundmass in the individual rocks is variable. Some of the rocks are nearly andesitic in composition as judged by the high amount of p lagioclase feldspars. They are grouped with basalts because of their similarity in overall appearance...

  19. 2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  20. IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC-97, 39-45, St. Louis, 1997. A MHz Electronic Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps Michael Gulko and Sam Ben-Yaakov* Power Electronics Laboratory lamps designated for automotive headlight applications was investigated theoretically, by simulation and experimentally. The study reveals that a based ballast (CS-PPRI) complies with the automotive requirement of very

  1. 2004 35thAnnual IEEE Power Electronics SpecialistsConference Aachen, Germany. 2004 Digital Controller Design for Electronic Ballasts with Phase Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Controller Design for Electronic Ballasts with Phase Control Yan Yin and Regan Zane Colorado Power switching frequency range. In this paper, the design of a digital controller for an LCC resonant inverter2004 35thAnnual IEEE Power Electronics SpecialistsConference Aachen, Germany. 2004 Digital

  2. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buy new fixtures made for new lightbulbs for the greatest energy savings, reliability, and longevity.

  3. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  4. Strength and Resistivity Properties of Fouled Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neupane, Madan

    2015-05-31

    . Resistivity tests using a Wenner 4 probe array in horizontal alignment and fall of potential method with a vertical probe and vertical alignment were carried out. Also, the light weight deflectometer (LWD) test for the measurement of dynamic modulus, static...

  5. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    construction guide specifications and project specifications; renovation, repair, maintenance, and energy service contracts; lease agreements; acquisitions made using...

  6. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedoxRelated

  7. Performance of Geogrid Reinforced Ballast under Dynamic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jowkar, Milad

    2011-12-31

    .9.1 Light weight deflectometer test (LWD) 31 3.9.2 Density testing by drive tube 32 3.9.3 DCP (Dynamic Cone Penetrometer) 33 Chapter Four Test Results 34 4.1 Loading sequence for the unreinforced test 36 vii 4.1.1 East string pot 37 4.1.2 East... settlement (West string pot) 101 4.9.3 Number of cycles versus settlement (East string pot) 102 4.9.4 Actual pressure vs. settlement 102 4.10 Additional testing such as LWD, CBR, Sieve Analysis and Tell-Tale readings 106 4.10.1 LWD 106 viii 4.10.2 CBR...

  8. Digitally controlled low frequency square wave electronic ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the Boost converter is commonly used. However the boost output DC voltage has to be set to be greater tha and the second is a full-bridge converter (FB) used for both ignition and square wave drive. Ignition is achieved as a resonant inverter. After ignition the converter operates as a LFSW inverter by controlling the FB to act

  9. Project Profile: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A 2010 Rocky Mountain Institute report estimated that structural systems alone cost about $0.95 per watt for rooftop installations. Cascade is developing a plastic-based photovoltaic (PV) racking...

  10. Feature scaling of large, ballasted, field emission arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrera, Stephen A. (Stephen Angelo)

    2011-01-01

    Field emitters are an exciting technology for high-frequency, high-power applications because of their excellent free space electron transport, and their potential for high current density and high current, especially when ...

  11. Permeability, Resistivity and Strength of Fouled Railroad Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A. J.

    2013-08-31

    stream_size 103650 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Rahman_ku_0099M_12866_DATA_1.pdf.txt stream_source_info Rahman_ku_0099M_12866_DATA_1.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...

  12. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7, 2011 |1 DOE Hydrogen and FuelAwardee: City of

  13. Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof EnergyPresentation:DaisStatesEMCHIEF HUMANAtMetal

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-142 Current State of Understanding about the Effectiveness of Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and subsequently discharged. Although NOBOB ships are, as of summer 2006, being required to flush their tanks

  15. HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailing, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Support ---Gasketing Alzak Reflector Installation %" pipe thread in top insert for conduit mounting or for mounting with eye bolt (

  16. Study of high frequency & low frequency electronic ballasts for HID lamps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hua

    1997-01-01

    known to avoid acoustic resonances. This thesis focuses on real-time detection of acoustic resonance occurrence by measuring lamp electrical parameters. Theoretical analysis and experiment results pronounce that the variation of the lamp impedance ([]R...

  17. TESTING OF ENERGY CONSERVATION OF ELECTRONIC BALLASTS FOR FLUORESCENT LIGHTING REVIEW OF RECENT RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DESIGN GOALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Ur:.V(. ,(lh. Fluorescent Lighting Review of Recent Resultsfrom 30 0 C to 50°C. The lighting system.with core ballastswas conducted to measure the lighting system performance for

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 23, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 11 Electronic Ballast Control IC With Digital Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Global Research (through CoPEC) and in part by the Department of Energy's National Energy current positive zero crossing. Phase control provides reliable drive of the resonant converter cost CMOS processes and few external components. Experimental results are presented for an integrated

  19. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

  20. JET-SUSPENDED, CALCITE-BALLASTED CYANOBACTERIAL.WATERWARTS IN A tment of Arizona State ,Tempe, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    of innumerable springs, surface and underwater streams, and sinkholes ("pozas"), which are famous (Konopka 1989) and small karstic sinkholes et al. the nature of the spring itself made the presence

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Network Equipment) · Lighting (Docket #12-AAER-2B) (Fluorescent Dimming Ballasts, Light-emitting Diodes

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballasts, Light-emitting Diodes, and Multifaceted Reflector Lamps · Water Appliances (Docket #12-AAER-2C

  3. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

  4. Advances in Environmental Vibration Fifth International Symposium on Environmental Vibration, Chengdu, China, October 20-22, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Advances in Environmental Vibration Fifth International Symposium on Environmental Vibration, Chengdu, China, October 20-22, 2011 Ballast Vibrations and Deformations due to Different Train Loading patterns on the vibration and permanent deformation accumulation trends of railroad ballast. As opposed

  5. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ballast: See High-Efficiency Ballast. Btu: British thermal unit. A unit quantity of energy consumed by or delivered to a building. A Btu is defined as the amount of energy...

  6. ISSUANCE 2015-05-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts. flbclarificationfinalrule.pdf More...

  7. 3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave Electronic Ballast With Resonant Ignition F. Javier Díaz, Francisco J) electronic ballast with digital control. The first stage of the ballast is a power factor correction (PFC

  8. Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01

    ballast fluorescent and LED lighting, which are DC- internalmotors [7]. Fluorescent and LED lighting uses one-quarter ofbest technology Lighting Incandescent, fluorescent, LED

  9. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts 2014-06-18 Issuance: Test Procedure for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy...

  10. Sample Contract Language for Construction Using Energy-Efficient...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Management Program: Air conditioners Ballasts Boilers Chillers Doors Electric motors Furnaces Heat pumps Lamps Lighting controls Luminaries Plumbing (faucets, showerheads)...

  11. Department Sets Aggressive Schedule for New Appliance Standards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    service lamps; fluorescent lamp ballasts; residential dishwashers; ranges and ovens; microwave ovens; residential clothes dryers; room air conditioners; packaged terminal air...

  12. Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    2002. Chinese Household Electric Washing Machine Efficiencymachines, copiers, monitors, high intensity discharge lamps and ballasts, electricElectric storage water heaters Household induction cooktop Computer monitors Copy machines

  13. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Washing Machines Fluorescent Ballasts Electric Water HeatersRoom AC Washing Machines $/kWh Electric Water HeatersWashing Machine) Cooking Products (Electric Induction

  14. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ballasts, advanced lighting controls, and connection to the building management system to control heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) demand. The roofing was replaced...

  15. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, which causes the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. High-Efficiency Ballast (HEB): A lighting conservation feature...

  16. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 20, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2005 1499 Custom Spectral Shaping for EMI Reduction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 20, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2005 1499 Custom Spectral Shaping), electronic ballast, frequency modulation (FM), resonant inverter, spread spectrum. I. INTRODUCTION HIGH-FREQUENCY (HF) ac sources are used in a va- riety of applications, including electronic ballasts where HF

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: FUNDAMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, VOL. 50, NO. 8, AUGUST 2003 1103 Small-Signal Analysis of Frequency-Controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: FUNDAMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, VOL. 50, NO. 8, AUGUST 2003 1103 Small-Signal Analysis of Frequency-Controlled Electronic Ballasts Yan Yin, Student of frequency-controlled dimming electronic ballasts. A modified phasor transformation is proposed that converts

  19. Verh. Internat. Verein. Limnol. 2009, vol. 30, Part 7, p. 10351038, Stuttgart, July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1993 are loaded with cargo and are declared as `no ballast water on board' (NOBOB) ships. These NOBOB ships carry residual water and sediments in their ballast tanks. Once in the Great Lakes these NOBOB of inbound cargo and the loading of outbound cargo. These NOBOB ships represent a greater risk for introduc

  20. Rail ClipsRail Clips Track Renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Rail ClipsRail Clips and Track Renewal ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J 2009 7 #12;Track Renewal ­ Tie replacement ballast packingTie replacement, ballast packing ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 8 #12;Track Renewal ME 6222: Manufacturing

  1. October 3, 2005 Lt. Governor Cruz Bustamante

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that they recommend alignment with State and federal standards so the shipping industry does not have to deal regarding ballast water treatment standards for California. The standards were approved by twelve of sixteen STANDARDS REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION OF THE CALIFORNIA ADVISORY PANEL ON BALLAST WATER PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

  2. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

  3. The Technical and Economic Potential for Electricity Energy Efficiency in a Semiconductor Manufacturing Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, A. H. W.; Golden, J. W.; Zarnikau, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    systems can replace mercury vapor systems and conventional fluorescent systems, respectively. A fluorescent lighting retrofit includes T- 8 lamps, electronic ballasts, and reflectors which use silver-film laminates and polished aluminium to create a...

  4. The readers point vessel: hull analysis of an eighteenth century merchant sloop excavated in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Gregory D.

    1997-01-01

    's Bay, Jamaica in 1994. Excavators removed overburden and the ballast pile, recovering over 600 artifacts associated with the vessel-After exposing well-preserved hull remains, divers recorded the ship's structure. The vessel is preserved from the base...

  5. A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . 63 4. Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass, Gas Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 B. Biomass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 3. Biomass-Derived H2 from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier, Iowa State University

  6. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  7. Keystone: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-2601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Keystone Technologies, LLC failed to certify a variety of fluorescent lamp ballasts as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Keystone: Order (2013-CE-2601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Keystone Technologies, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Keystone had failed to certify that certain models of fluorescent lamp ballasts comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Hydrobiologia 499: 191210, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    % of transoceanic vessels entered the Great Lakes with cargo and thus had "no ballast on board" (NOBOB) status tanks of NO- BOB ships. During 1981­2000, 70% of NOBOB vessels made their final stop at Lake Superior

  10. Analysis and design of closed-loop control of power electronic converter systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yenchin

    1997-01-01

    filter system to cancel neutral current harmonic (IOOA) in a threephase four-wire electric distribution system. (b)Input power factor correction and harmonic reduction stage of a commercially available electronic ballast (12OV, 64W) for fluorescent...

  11. Power Conditioning and Control Applications for Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brushwood, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical power conditioning and control (PCC) systems are finding cost effective applications in AC motor drives, lamp ballasts and power supplies. Substantial system efficiency improvements are being realized when the appropriate PCC system...

  12. Petropolises: A Quest for Soft Infrastructure as Water-Based Urbanisms of the Floating Frontier City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Thomas; Bhatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Oil Boat takes on oil, water, and drilling fluid to ballastSoft Infrastructure as Water-Based Urbanisms of the Floatingfor oil operations in waters with depths greater than 2,000

  13. Walk-In Panels | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    v1.0 More Documents & Publications Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May 2, 2011) Automatic Commercial Ice Makers...

  14. Philips: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-2605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. manufactured and distributed noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballast basic model VEL-1S40-SC in the U.S.

  15. Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-2605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. finding that basic model VEL-I S40-SC, a fluorescent lamp ballast, does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  16. Environment We have an excellent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    projects include: I The multi-million pounds Flood Risk ManagementResearch Consortium and radical engineering whichhas developed XiTRACK, a polymer ballast stabilisation technique for track

  17. Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp Ballasts Fluorescent Lamp BallastsFlywheel

  18. Focus Group Meeting (Activities Status) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp Ballasts Fluorescent Lamp BallastsFlywheelMay

  19. Universal Waste Management Procedure: 8.42 Created: 7/30/2014 Version: 1.2 Revised: 7/30/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Universal Waste Management Procedure: 8.42 Created: 7/30/2014 Version: 1.2 Revised: 7 by these regulations. At Columbia, the following wastes are managed as universal wastes: 1. Batteries are defined batteries are managed as universal waste. 2. Lamps are defined by the above regulations as "the bulb or tube

  20. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  1. Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

    2000-04-01

    A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

  2. Proceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , USA JRC2013-2489 SEISMIC TESTING FOR TRACK SUBSTRUCTURE (BALLAST AND SUBGRADE) ASSESSMENT of the track system due to future train traffic. This information can used to assess track safety of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign on developing and using seismic wave propagation principles to develop

  3. Best Practices: Energy Savings Efficient energy use reduces Colorado State's total energy demand, decreases harmful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the first universities in the nation to offer on- campus residents the option to purchase green power. More lamps and ballasts. The project was partially funded by the Platte River Power Authority and the City. The Platte River Power Authority and the City of Fort Collins helped to fund this project by providing

  4. Reverendi patris fratris Bartholomaei à Ledesma ordinis praedicatorum et sacrae theologiae professoris De septem novae legis sacramentis summarium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledesma, Bartolomé de, ca. 1515-1604

    2011-03-22

    face cell. 2. Enlarge diffuser opening to 16 by 46 inches. 3. Replace 1/2-inch hardware cloth by #3 stainless cane weave with 2-inch mesh, painted white. 4. Replace ballasts with Advance R-2S40-TP Mark III or equivalent. 5. Replace blankets with light...

  5. On hot summer days, businesses and consumers may worry about whether

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Develop electric rates to promote the use of load shedding ballasts. · Consider code changes to require electricity to go around. These periods of peak electric load can pose a real threat if the demand for electricity exceeds the supply; resulting blackouts can cripple regions within a city or state. Building new

  6. TU Delft knowledge valorisation Innovation with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    patient monitoring. Research consortia Wind energy far offshore RWE Offshore Wind, Eneco, TenneT, Ballast plan for large-scale wind energy innovation, known as Far and Large Offshore Wind, or FLOW. The FLOW an active marketing policy. TU Delft has licensing agreements with Delftship, BAM and Mampaey Offshore

  7. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  8. Experiment study on FLOATING JACKET: a new concept for deep water platform design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yufeng

    1996-01-01

    in this thesis. The most unique feature of the new FJ concept is to place much of the needed buoyancy/ballast deep in the ocean water. The deck and production equipment are supported by a jacket structure which is in turn mounted on top of the large buoyancy...

  9. A SPICE Compatible Model of High Intensity Discharge Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the arc's * Corresponding author behavior of HID lamps. This model are derived from the arc-linear resistance of the lamp, is the global specific conductance of the plasma, V is the volume of the plasma, L is the length of plasma and S is the cross section. ~ Vin G1 Lamp Model Ballast v(lamp) i(lamp) Analytical

  10. Photovoltaic olar nergy Development on Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a selfballasting photovoltaic solar racking system will affect a closed landfills dirt cap. The effects areas of remote and Photovoltaic solar panels with a self-ballasting system. Source: www to generate up to 7,000 megawatts of solar energy while avoiding sensitive biological resources. The data

  11. IEEE POWER ELECTRONICS LETTERS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, JUNE 2004 51 Digital Phase Control for Resonant Inverters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE POWER ELECTRONICS LETTERS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, JUNE 2004 51 Digital Phase Control for Resonant of applications requiring high quality ac output, including electronic ballasts for lighting and induction Editor J. Sun. The authors are with the Colorado Power Electronics Center, University of Colorado

  12. Engineered Products: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5401)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Engineered Products Company manufactured/privately-labeled and distributed a number of units of noncompliant basic model 15701, a metal halide lamp fixture with a magnetic probe-start ballast in the U.S.

  13. J. Great Lakes Res. 29(4):545557 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the Laurentian Great Lakes from NOBOB (no ballast on board) vessels. To evaluate biocide effectiveness present in NOBOB vessels may have a significant impact on biocide efficacy. Exper- iments using material from actual NOBOB vessels generally corroborated data from the water-sediment experiments and suggest

  14. News on Aquatic Invasions Great Lakes Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to as "NOBOBs" (no- ballast-on-board). Research on NOBOB ships as vectors for ANS introductions to the Great), and Philip T. Jenkins and Associates Ltd. Results of the Great Lakes NOBOB Research Program ("NOBOB Assessment") were sum- marized in a 2005 Final Report showing that NOBOB vessels carry live invertebrates

  15. BIODIVERSITY Transoceanic ships as vectors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    On Board' or NOBOB tanks) were not subject to the same regulation until 2006 in Canada and 2008 in the USA of invertebrate resting stages in the residual waters and sediments within emptied ballast tanks, i.e. NOBOB (`No and diversity of bryozoans (as statoblasts) in residual sediment samples taken from 51 NOBOB tanks of 33

  16. U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Preventing Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    all water from the boat hull. · Drain live-wells, bilge, ballast tanks, and transom wells. · Empty weather. Calculate local dry time at: http://www.100thmeridian.org/Emersion.asp · If sufficient drying of last use. If this is not possible, arrange for cleaning at a facility that is specially designed

  17. Scour around an offshore wind turbine W.F. Louwersheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Scour around an offshore wind turbine MSc Thesis W.F. Louwersheimer January, 2007 Delft University #12;Scour around an offshore wind turbine Delft University of Technology Ballast Nedam - Egmond iii Scour around an offshore wind turbine W.F. Louwersheimer Student number 1067419 January, 2007

  18. BYPASS SYSTEM FOR SHUNTING OF ELECTROMAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    power source of the electromagnet and energy dump to a ballast load. The bypass module is remotely monitored and controlled through a CAN-bus. The SHUNT-20 modules are made by the Switch Mode Technology with application of the up-to-date components in the "Euromechanics" standard. INTRODUCTION Designing of compact

  19. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluations (SemEval-2007), pages 366369, Prague, June 2007. c 2007 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), with 140 training and about 70 testing sentences per relation. Sentence classes are ap- proximately 50: "Among the contents of the vessel1> were a set of carpenters tools, several large storage jars, ceramic utensils, ropes and remnants of food, as well as a heavy load of ballast stones." Word

  20. Lading of the Late Bronze Age ship at Uluburun 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Shih-Han Samuel

    2012-08-29

    ), 10 large storage jars (pithoi) (approximately 3.5 tons if filled with water), approximately 51 Canaanite pilgrim flasks, 24 stone anchors (3.3 tons), nearly 1 ton of ballast stones, and the hull remains itself. Two computer programs, Rhinoceros...

  1. Philips: Order (2012-SE-2605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. to pay a $82,478 civil penalty after finding Philips had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 7,498 units of basic model VEL-1S40-SC, noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballasts.

  2. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Safety Management Manual Safety Management Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Engineer Standing Orders 7.9 Responsibilities of Engineers 7.10 Waste Oil, Sewage and Trash 7.11 Bilge and Ballast Handling Operations 7.12 Fuel Oil Systems 7.13 Pre-Cruise Planning 7.14 Shipboard Science Watches 8.3 Shipboard Piracy Planning 8.4 Medical Evacuations 8.5 Loss of Steering 2 Feb 2015 2 Feb 2015 2

  4. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

    2005-10-01

    The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

  5. Effect of naphthalene and phenanthrene on the grass shrimp palaemonetes pugio (Holthuis) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Gene Paul

    1977-01-01

    in the Environment Contamination of coastal zones with oil remains one of the most serious consequences of the increased demand for petroleum products. Among the most common causes of this type of pollution are the discharge of ballast waters by tankers and other... OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES. . . INiTRODUCTION vii Osmoregulation in Palaemonetes ~u io. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sources of Petroleum in the Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . Char. cteristics and Toxicity of Oil to Marine...

  6. Focus Group Meeting (Activities Status) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  7. Focus Group Meeting (Activities Status) | Department of Energy

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  8. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Meeting) | Department of Energy

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  9. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Meeting) | Department of Energy

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  10. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Meeting) | Department of Energy

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  11. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Meeting) | Department of Energy

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  12. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Wrap-Up) | Department of Energy

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  13. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

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  14. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

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  15. Focus Series - Chicago-Energy Impact Illinois (EI2)

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  16. Focus Series … Maine Residential Direct Install Program

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  17. Focus Series: Denver Energy Advisor Program Helps Homeowners Go the Extra Mile in Mile-High City

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  18. Focus Series: OREGON„On Bill Financing Program: On-Bill Financing Brings Lenders and Homeowners On Board

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  19. Focus Series: Philadelphia Energyworks: In the City of Brotherly Love, Sharing Know-How Leads to Sustainability

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  20. Focus Series: Program Finds Community "Readiness" Is the Key to More

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  1. Focus Series: Program Finds Community ReadinessŽ Is the Key to More Retrofits

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  2. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors

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  3. Focus on Energy Program | Department of Energy

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  4. Follow-Up on the Management of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Project

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  5. Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of

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  6. Follow-up Inspection on Characterization Wells at Los Alamos National Laboratory, INS-L-13-05

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  7. Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory, INS-O-13-04

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  8. Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment, INS-L-12-01

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  9. Follow-up Review of Property Control and Accountability at the Idaho National Laboratory, INS-L-11-03

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  10. Follow-up Review of Security at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

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  11. Follow-up Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - December 2001 |

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  12. Follow-up on The Department of Energys Acquisition and Management of Software Licenses

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  13. Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, OAS-RA-L-12-05

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  14. Follow-up on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrodynamic Test Program

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  15. Form Approv

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  16. Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic

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  17. Formalizing our Commitment to Environmental Justice | Department of Energy

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  18. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure

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  19. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility |

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  20. Formatting PDFs for the Web | Department of Energy

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  1. Former Chrysler Plant Changes Gears to Solar | Department of Energy

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  2. Former Oak Ridge Bechtel Jacobs Employee Charged with Violating Atomic

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  3. Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2014 Annual Report, March 2015

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  4. Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers, February 1, 2013

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  5. Former Worker Program Brochure | Department of Energy

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  6. Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone | Department of

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  7. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Fact Sheet

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  8. Forming the Future

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  9. Forms | Department of Energy

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  10. Forrestal Garage Parking Guidelines, Revised August 12, 2010

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  11. Forsyth County Slashes Energy Bills with Upgrades | Department of Energy

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  12. Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate

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  13. Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Loan Program | Department of

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  14. Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John Martin

    1968-01-01

    . At this point, the bellows valve, E, was closed and the thermocouple pressure elements monitored for an increase in pressure; and if after several hours no increase in pressure was registered, the system was considered thoroughly out-gassed and free of leaks... PPM 0. 5 PPM Figure 3 is a block diagram of the system into which methane was admitted. From the storage cylinder the methane passed through a Hoke-Phoenix gas-ballast high purity regulator. From needle valve, A, the integrity of the methane...

  15. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, S. S.; Maxwell, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    to various stages of lighting reduction. This paper examines these lighting control strategies for a 90,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Iowa. Using the EnergyPlus building energy simulation code, annual lighting energy savings associated...) Energy Cost Savings ($/yr) Six-Lamp Fixture With 32 Watt 4 Foot Super T8 Lamps 222 43.512 191,191 46.6 204,971 2,295 9,757 * Per fixture including ballast power ESL-IE-09-05-29 Proceedings of the Thirty-First Industrial Energy Technology...

  17. Breakdown voltage improvement of standard MOS technologies targeted at smart power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, P.M.; Simas, M.I.C.; Lanca, M.; Finco, S.; Behrens, F.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents and discusses trade-offs of three different design techniques intended to improve the breakdown voltage of n-type lateral medium power transistors to be fabricated in a conventional low cost CMOS technology. A thorough analysis of the static and dynamic characteristics of the modified structures was carried out with the support of a two-dimensional device simulator. The motivation behind this work was the construction of a low cost smart power microsystem, including control, sensing and protection circuitries, targeted at an electronic ballast for efficient control of the power delivered to fluorescent lamps.

  18. Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

    1994-03-01

    This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

  19. Above Code: What does that mean? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muns, S.

    2007-01-01

    with electronic ballast ?? “Super-T8” systems L.E.D. - Light Emitting Diode ?? Pros: • Energy Efficient • Super-Long Life - 100,000 hrs ?? Cons: Expensive• • Difficult to Produce “White” Light • Icing in outdoor applicationsgpp ??Consume as much as 75% less energy... construction ?? The average home emits twice as many greenhouse SourceSource:: 2002 US Census gases (GHG) as the average car National Perspective ?? Energy savings potential in the 15 states with least efficient codes (or no code) • 18.5 trillion Btu...

  20. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    and lighting systems. Table 2 shows the development of four-foot energy-saving retrofit lamps. By utilizing new cathode designed and different gas fills, 34-watt energy-saving lamps were developed that operate on existing rapid start ballasts and afford... of fluorescent lamps, two watts of system power are consumed in heating the lamp cath odes. The shedding of cathode heating wattage was the next lamp efficiency improvement to be introduced. One available sy tern dis connects the lamp cathodes from...

  1. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

    2006-04-30

    Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 20% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years. At 30% market penetration saturation, a cumulative 695 Billion kWh of energy could be saved through 2025, a cost savings of $52 Billion.

  2. Memorandum of Decision: Withdrawal of Waiver for Fluorescent Electronic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof EnergyPresentation:Dais Analytic Leo08Ballasts Capable

  3. Focus Group Meeting (Topical Meeting) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  5. Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  6. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  7. Food and Beverage Sector (NAICS 311 and 312) Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. Food and Drug Administration White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardship and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  9. For Immediate Release

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. For Service Providers and Software Developers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  11. For Utilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  12. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  13. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  14. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp BallastsActivities, OAS-M-06-09 |Superior2

  15. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  16. Forecourt Storage and Compression Options | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  17. Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  18. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. Forest Genetics Ontario

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321 and 322) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp BallastsActivities, OAS-M-06-09andSault U.S.

  1. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp BallastsActivities, OAS-M-06-09andSault

  2. Forklift Storage Tank R&D: Timely, Critical, Exemplary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance Case Definitions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. The New York Times headquarters daylighting mockup: Monitoredperformance of the daylighting control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2006-02-24

    A nine-month monitored field study of the performance of automated roller shades and daylighting controls was conducted in a 401 m{sup 2} unoccupied, furnished daylighting mockup. The mockup mimicked the southwest corner of a new 110 km{sub 2} commercial building in New York, New York, where The New York Times will be the major tenant. This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of two daylighting control systems installed in separate areas of an open plan office with 1.2-m high workstation partitions: (1) Area A had 0-10 V dimmable ballasts with an open-loop proportional control system and an automated shade controlled to reduce window glare and increase daylight, and (2) Area B had digital addressable lighting interface (DALI) ballasts with a closed-loop integral reset control system and an automated shade controlled to block direct sun. Daylighting control system performance and lighting energy use were monitored. The daylighting control systems demonstrated very reliable performance after they were commissioned properly. Work plane illuminance levels were maintained above 90% of the maximum fluorescent illuminance level for 99.9{+-}0.5% and 97.9{+-}6.1% of the day on average over the monitored period, respectively, in Areas A and B. Daily lighting energy use savings were significant in both Areas over the equinox-to-equinox period compared to a non-daylit reference case. At 3.35 m from the window, 30% average savings were achieved with a sidelit west-facing condition in Area A while 50-60% were achieved with a bilateral daylit south-facing condition in Area B. At 4.57-9.14 m from the window, 5-10% and 25-40% savings were achieved in Areas A and B, respectively. Average savings for the 7-m deep dimming zone were 20-23% and 52-59% for Areas A and B, respectively, depending on the lighting schedule. The large savings and good reliability can be attributed to the automatic management of the interior shades. The DALI-based system exhibited faulty behavior that remains unexplained, but operational errors are expected to be resolved as DALI products reach full maturity. The building owner received very competitive bids ($30-75 US/DALI ballast) and was able to justify use of the daylighting control system based on operational cost savings and increased amenity. Additional energy savings due to reduced solar and lighting heat gains were not quantified but will add to the total operational cost savings.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Massachusetts Military Reservation. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, B.; Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.

    2011-07-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying photovoltaics (PV) systems on a superfund site located within the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.17/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Massachusetts, such as the solar renewable energy credits. According to calculations, MMR can place 8 MW of ballast-weighted, ground-mounted PV systems on the crowns of the three landfill caps and the borrow pit with the PV modules tilted at 30 degrees.

  6. Considerations of the effects of high winds on a low-level radioactive interim storage pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    On Wednesday, March 27, 1991, the St. Louis area experienced high winds that damaged a synthetic cover of a low-level radioactive waste storage pile at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) in Hazelwood, Missouri. Winds in the St. Louis area at the time of the incident were reported to be 35 mi/h with gusts up to 50 mi/h. Tornado warnings were in effect at the time. The purpose of this summary is to analyze the effects of uplift forces on a synthetic pile cover because of high winds. Consideration is given to anchoring the synthetic cover, type and placement of ballast on the pile, and the type of synthetic membranes best suited to this application. Discussion also includes the emergency procedures used in responding to the incident.

  7. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  8. Supported PV module assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  9. Characterization of a 12-pdr wrought-iron cannonball from the Akko 1 shipwreck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvikel, D. [Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel); Ashkenazi, D., E-mail: dana@eng.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Stern, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kahanov, Y. [Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel)

    2013-09-15

    The Akko 1 shipwreck, discovered in Akko harbor, Israel, is the remains of an eastern Mediterranean brig built at the beginning of the 19th century. Among other finds, eleven cannonballs were found in the shipwreck and three of them were retrieved. Two of the cannonballs, the 9- and 24-pdrs, have been studied previously. The present study of the 12-pdr cannonball included ?-rays radiographic testing, XRF analysis, density measurements, optical microscopy and SEM-EDS observation, OES analysis and microhardness tests. The investigation included characterization of the composition, microstructure and slag analysis. The results revealed a quite homogenous microstructure of ?-ferrite phase, with glassy, wüstite and fayalite slags, as typical for a wrought-iron—annealed product, a more complicated and an earlier technology, compared to the 9- and 24-pdr that were made of cast-iron. Ferritic cannonballs are extremely rare, especially in the 19th century, when cannonballs were manufactured of cast iron by the sand casting process. The different manufacturing methods may indicate a different place of fabrication, and an apparently earlier production date for the 12-pdr, which might have even been used as ballast. - Highlights: • Three cannonballs were retrieved from the 19th century Akko 1 shipwreck. • The 12-pdr differs from the 9- and 24-pdr cannonballs previously studied. • The 12-pdr was made of high quality annealed wrought-iron, not of cast-iron. • The technology used indicates a date earlier than the middle of the 19th century. • Perhaps the 12-pdr belonged to another navy than the other two or used as ballast.

  10. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.; Kline, S.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA)); Duthie, R.G. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, Inc., and Bechtel National, Inc., is developing a mild gasification process that uses a fluidized/entrained-bed reactor. This reactor is designed to process caking bituminous coals over a wide range of particle sizes without oxidative pretreatment, and also without the use of oxygen or air as reactants. The co-product streams, consisting of char, fuel gas, water, and condensables, would be separated by conventional means such as cyclone, staged condensers, and recycle-oil scrubbers. An isothermal process research unit (PRU) has been built at IGT, consisting of an 8-inch-I.D., 8-foot-long fluidized-bed section and a 4-inch-I.D., 13-foot-long entrained flow section, externally heated by electrical heaters. This quarter, eleven mild gasification tests were conducted in the PRU. Illinois No. 6 coal was used in nine of the tests and a West Virginia metallurgical grade of coal was used in the last two tests. The tests conducted in the PRU this quarter were operated with feed rates about three times higher than those used in the last quarter. Results show the effect of process temperature on the shields of char, oils/tars, and gases. Various compositional effects on the oils/tars were also discovered. Char upgrading studies were completed for the char co-product options of smokeless fuel and adsorbent char. A total condensate collection system was designed for the PRU system. 18 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-27

    This paper investigates ballasting and remineralization controls of carbon sedimentation in the twilight zone (100-1000 m) of the Southern Ocean. Size-fractionated (<1 {micro}m, 1-51 {micro}m, >51 {micro}m) suspended particulate matter was collected by large volume in-situ filtration from the upper 1000 m in the Subantarctic (55 S, 172 W) and Antarctic (66 S, 172 W) zones of the Southern Ocean during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) in January-February 2002. Particles were analyzed for major chemical constituents (POC, P, biogenic Si, CaCO3), and digital and SEM image analyses of particles were used to aid in the interpretation of the chemical profiles. Twilight zone waters at 66 S in the Antarctic had a steeper decrease in POC with depth than at 55 S in the Subantarctic, with lower POC concentrations in all size fractions at 66 S than at 55 S, despite up to an order of magnitude higher POC in surface waters at 66 S. The decay length scale of >51 {micro}m POC was significantly shorter in the upper twilight zone at 66 S ({delta}{sub e}=26 m) compared to 55 S ({delta}{sub e}=81 m). Particles in the carbonate-producing 55 S did not have higher excess densities than particles from the diatom-dominated 66 S, indicating that there was no direct ballast effect that accounted for deeper POC penetration at 55 S. An indirect ballast effect due to differences in particle packaging and porosities cannot be ruled out, however, as aggregate porosities were high ({approx}97%) and variable. Image analyses point to the importance of particle loss rates from zooplankton grazing and remineralization as determining factors for the difference in twilight zone POC concentrations at 55 S and 66 S, with stronger and more focused shallow remineralization at 66 S. At 66 S, an abundance of large (several mm long) fecal pellets from the surface to 150 m, and almost total removal of large aggregates by 200 m, reflected the actions of a single or few zooplankton species capable of grazing diatoms in the euphotic zone, coupled with a more diverse particle feeding zooplankton community immediately below. Surface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion of biomass in the large size fraction were associated with low particle loading at depth, with all indications implying conditions of low export. The 66 S region exhibits this 'High Biomass, Low Export' (HBLE) condition, with very high >51 {micro}m POC concentrations at the surface ({approx}2.1 {micro}M POC), but low concentrations below 200 m (<0.07 {micro}M POC). The 66 S region remained HBLE after iron fertilization. Iron addition at 55 S caused a ten fold increase in >51 {micro}m biomass concentrations in the euphotic zone, bringing surface POC concentrations to levels found at 66 S ({approx}3.8 {micro}M), and a concurrent decrease in POC concentrations below 200 m. The 55 S region, which began with moderate levels of biomass and stronger particle export, transitioned to being HBLE after iron fertilization. We propose that iron addition to already HBLE waters will not cause mass sedimentation events. The stability of an iron-induced HBLE condition is unknown. Better understanding of biological pump processes in non-HBLE Subantarctic waters is needed.

  12. Current Work in Energy Analysis (Energy Analysis Program -1996 Annual Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy Analysis Program

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work that Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been doing most recently. One of our proudest accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. This analysis played a key role in shaping the U.S. position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. Our participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. We are also especially proud of our study of ''leaking electricity,'' which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of U.S. residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the following pages summarize results of research. activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China. These are the intellectual endeavors of a talented team of researchers dedicated to public service.

  13. Current work in energy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

  14. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  15. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  16. Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

    1997-07-01

    Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

  17. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; ,

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  18. Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-12-01

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

  19. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  20. Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

    2010-12-03

    The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

  1. Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-10-18

    An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

  2. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American Energy Technologies, Ltd., and an 80-gallon (302-liter) Rheem tank containing an electric backup element.

  3. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

  4. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  5. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-06-22

    This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

  6. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the occupant to leave lights on]. The PWC will be an entirely open networking system in which all manufacturers of task lights, furniture-mounted lighting and ballast manufacturers can participate and have a business position.

  7. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  8. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  9. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  11. Status of the Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Program in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fino-Chen, Cecilia; Fridley, David; Ning, Cao

    2011-09-26

    As part of its commitment to promoting and improving the local enforcement of appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling, the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) launched the National and Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling project on August 14, 2009. The project’s short-term goal is to expand the effort to improve enforcement of standards and labeling requirements to the entire country within three years, with a long-term goal of perfecting overall enforcement. For this project, Jiangsu, Shandong, Sichuan and Shanghai were selected as pilot locations. This report provides information on the local enforcement project’s recent background, activities and results as well as comparison to previous rounds of check-testing in 2006 and 2007. In addition, the report also offers evaluation on the achievement and weaknesses in the local enforcement scheme and recommendations. The results demonstrate both improvement and some backsliding. Enforcement schemes are in place in all target cities and applicable national standards and regulations were followed as the basis for local check testing. Check testing results show in general high labeling compliance across regions with 100% compliance for five products, including full compliance for all three products tested in Jiangsu province and two out of three products tested in Shandong province. Program results also identified key weaknesses in labeling compliance in Sichuan as well as in the efficiency standards compliance levels for small and medium three-phase asynchronous motors and self-ballasted fluorescent lamps. For example, compliance for the same product ranged from as low as 40% to 100% with mixed results for products that had been tested in previous rounds. For refrigerators, in particular, the efficiency standards compliance rate exhibited a wider range of 50% to 100%, and the average rate across all tested models also dropped from 96% in 2007 to 63%, possibly due to the implementation of newly strengthened efficiency standards in 2009. Areas for improvement include: Greater awareness at the local level to ensure that all manufacturers register their products with the label certification project and to minimize their resistance to inspections; improvement of the product sampling methodology to include representative testing of both large and small manufacturers and greater standardization of testing tools and procedures; and continued improvement in local enforcement efforts.

  12. All auto shredding: evaluation of automotive shredder residue generated by shredding only vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duranceau, C. M.; Spangenberger, J. S.

    2011-09-26

    A well developed infrastructure exists for the reuse and recycling of automotive parts and materials. At the end of a vehicle's useful life many parts are removed and sold for reuse and fluids are recovered for recycling or proper disposal. What remains is shredded, along with other metal bearing scrap such as home appliances, demolition debris and process equipment, and the metals are separated out and recycled. The remainder of the vehicle materials is call shredder residue which ends up in the landfill. As energy and natural resources becomes more treasured, increased effort has been afforded to find ways to reduce energy consumption and minimize the use of our limited resources. Many of the materials found in shredder residue could be recovered and help offset the use of energy and material consumption. For example, the energy content of the plastics and rubbers currently landfilled with the shredder residue is equivalent to 16 million barrels of oil per year. However, in the United States, the recovered materials, primarily polymers, cannot be recycled due to current regulatory barriers which preclude the re-introduction into commerce of certain materials because of residual contamination with substances of concern (SOCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The source of the PCBs is not well understood. Old transformers, capacitors, white goods and ballasts from lighting fixtures are likely contributing factors. The project was designed to evaluate whether vehicles of varying age and manufacturing origin contribute to the PCB content in shredder residue. Additionally, the project was designed to determine if there are any trends in material composition of the shredder residue from varied age and manufacturing groups. This information would aid in future material recovery facility strategy and design. The test utilized a newly installed shredder plant to shred four categories of automobiles. The categories were defined by vehicle age and the manufacturing company and location. Each category of vehicles was processed individually through the shredder plant and the resulting shredder residue was analyzed for its materials composition and presence of PCBs and leachable metals. The results show that shredder residue from all vehicle categories tested are not significant contributors of PCBs and leachable metals. It was evident that leachable cadmium levels have decreased in newer vehicles. The composition of the shredder residue from each of the four categories is similar to the others. In addition, these compositions are approximately equal to the composition of typical shredder residues, not limited to automotive materials.

  13. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  14. Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

    2010-01-11

    The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

  15. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and radium-226. A corrective action was implemented to remove approximately 50 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil, approximately 1 cubic foot of radium-226 contaminated soil (and scabbled asphalt), and a high-efficiency particulate air filter that was determined to meet the criteria of a potential source material (PSM). Electrical and lighting components (i.e., PCB-containing ballasts and capacitors) and other materials (e.g., mercury-containing thermostats and switches, lead plugs and bricks) assumed to be PSM were also removed from Building 2201, as practical, without the need for sampling. Because the COC contamination and PSMs have been removed, clean closure of CAS 26-41-01 is recommended, and no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU. No further action is necessary because no other contaminants of potential concern were found above preliminary action levels. The physical end state for Building 2201 is expected to be eventual demolition to slab. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Clean closure is the recommended corrective action for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 117. • Corrective Action Unit 117 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  16. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

  17. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

  18. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with lead shot • PCB-contaminated soil • Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment • Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils • Lead debris • Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. • Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. • A use restriction is required at CAU 566. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. • Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  19. Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Morante

    2005-12-31

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

  20. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-11

    This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.