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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Monolithic ballasted penetrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

Hickerson, Jr., James P. (Cedar Crest, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Baldwin, Michael D. (Albuquerque, NM); Maguire, Michael C. (Worcester, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Oregon Ballast Water Task Force Report on Ballast Water Management in Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon Ballast Water Task Force Report on Ballast Water Management in Oregon #12;Oregon Ballast Water Task Force Report on Ballast Water Management in Oregon Prepared for the Oregon State Legislature October 2006 #12;Report on Ballast Water Management in Oregon-2006 Acknowledgements We would like to thank

3

Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent ballasts, which are a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

4

Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

5

EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Triaxial TestsTests Direct Shear TestsDirect Shear Tests Clean and Coal Dust Fouled Ballast BehaviorClean1 EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH for Laboratory StudyFouling Mechanism / Need for Laboratory Study Mechanical Properties of Coal Dust

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

6

Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004 #12;Acknowledgements We would like Ballast Water Management Program in 2004 Produced for the Oregon State Legislature By The Oregon Ballast State University September 2004 #12;Report on Oregon Ballast Water Management Program 2004 Executive

7

HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change in the output power for the solid state ballast asof the solid state ballast's constant output power withswitching power supplies such as the solid state ballast.

Ailing, W.R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Permeability, Resistivity and Strength of Fouled Railroad Ballast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particles between the ballast particles; therefore, permeability and resistivity were also correlated. The strength properties of clean and fouled ballast were also evaluated using large direct shear box and modified direct shear box (extension in height...

Rahman, A. J.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

IBECS network/ballast interface: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed to design, develop, and demonstrate an IBECS network/ballast interface that is useful for economically dimming controllable ballasts in commercial buildings. The first section of the report provides the general background of the IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) research and development work as well as the context for the development of the network/ballast interface. The research and development effort that went into producing the first proof-of-concept circuit and the physical prototype of that concept is detailed in the second section. In the third section of the report, we describe the lessons learned from the first demonstration of the network/ballast interface at an office at LBNL. The fourth section describes how electrical noise interference encountered with the first generation of interface led to design changes for a refined prototype that hardened the interface from electrical noise generated by the ballast. The final section of the report discusses the performance of refined prototype after we replaced the proof-of-concept prototype with the refined prototypes in the demonstration office at LBNL.

Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Pete

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2002 #12;Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2002 Produced for the Oregon State Legislature by Jordan Vinograd and Mark Water Task Force December 2002 #12;Report on Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2002 i Executive

11

ON-SITE DEMONSTRATION PROCEDURE FOR SOLID-STATE FLUORESCENT BALLAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solid-state ballast supplies electrical power to theof switching power transistors that are essential for solid-solid-state ballast can transform the input electrical power

Verderber, Rudy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness of Management Practices and Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness tanks exchange coastal ballast water with mid-ocean seawater (referred to as "ballast water exchange of high-resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model ballast tank water flow and to predict EE

13

Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast.

Schultz, William Newell (Niskayuna, NY); Thomas, Robert James (Rexford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Study of high frequency & low frequency electronic ballasts for HID lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamp electronic ballasting is receiving increasing attention in the recent years as low wattage HID lighting systems are finding indoor applications. Advantages of high frequency electronic ballast for HID lamps...

Peng, Hua

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, T.L.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

Performance of "Ultra-High" Efficient Electronic Ballast for HID Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms--Electronic ballast, HID lamps, resonant inverter, power loss modeling, Silicon Carbide (Si of >95% for the ballast. Diode bridge rectifier EMI filter Resonant Inverter Power Factor Correction 75423, USA Abstract--A new electronic ballast circuit for High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps

Tolbert, Leon M.

19

Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an indirectly heated gasification system that converts switchgrass into hydrogen-rich gas suitable for powering fuel cells. The project includes investigations of the indirectly-heated gasifier, development of particulate removal equipment, evaluation of catalytic methods for upgrading producer gas, development of contaminant measurement and control techniques, modeling of the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier, and estimation of the cost of hydrogen from the proposed gasification system. Specific technologies investigated include a thermally ballasted gasifier, a moving bed granular filter, and catalytic reactors for steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction. The approach to this project was to employ a pilot-scale (5 ton per day) gasifier to evaluate the thermally ballasted gasifier as a means for producing hydrogen from switchgrass. A slipstream from the gasifier was used to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. Other tests were conducted with laboratory-scale equipment using simulated producer gas. The ballasted gasifier operated in conjunction with a steam reformer and two-stage water-gas shift reactor produced gas streams containing 54.5 vol-% H2. If purge gas to the feeder system could be substantially eliminated, hydrogen concentration would reach 61 vol-%, which closely approaches the theoretical maximum of 66 vol-%. Tests with a combined catalyst/sorbent system demonstrated that steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction could be substantially performed in a single reactor and achieve hydrogen concentrations exceeding 90 vol-%. Cold flow trials with a laboratory-scale moving bed granular filter achieved particle removal efficiencies exceeding 99%. Two metal-based sorbents were tested for their ability to remove H2S from biomass-derived producer gas. The ZnO sorbent, tested at 450? C, was effective in reducing H2S from 200 ppm to less than 2 ppm (>99% reduction) while tests with the MnO sorbent were inconclusive. A computer model was developed that successfully predicted the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier. An economic comparison of an air-blown gasification plant and a ballasted gasifier plant found that operating costs for ballasted gasification plant are about 31% higher than for the air blown gasifier plant. Hydrogen from the ballasted gasification plant and air blown gasification plant are projected to be $2.43/kg and $1.85/kg, respectively. This is lower than U.S. DOE’s 2010 target price of $2.90/kg and comparable to U.S. DOE’s 2015 target price of $2.00/kg.

Robert C. Brown

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier DOE Hydrogen Program Contractors biomass #12;Approach Outline Gasifier Pilot Plant· Develop subsystems for the hydrogen production system and pyrolysis occur simultaneously in a single reactor · Exothermic combustion provides heat · Endothermic

22

Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other integral CFL and future dimmable integral and plug-in versions of the EFL products.

Rebecca Voelker

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The provenance of the stone ballast from the Molasses Reef Wreck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would limit the sources for ballast to the Old World and the Caribbean Basin of the New World. 5econd, the bailast was sampled systematically in the field which decreased the level of bias in the data collection. Third, the overall diversity... ballast Iithologfes with source locations, particularly when metamorphic and igneous rocks are under study. Paleontology is instrumental for provenance correlations of sedimentary lithologies. Fossils found in ballast stones can give geological dates...

Lamb, William Reginald

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Analysis and design of an electronic ballast for fluorescent tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with conventional ballasts. The proposed strategy is experimentally implemented in the power electronics laboratory. Further, a front end passive power factor correction and harmonic reduction approach is suggested and fully analyzed. Power factor correction... and harmonic reduction is necessary to further improve the overall efficiency and also to comply with the new harmonic standards IEC-555, which limits the harmonics generated on a single phase ac source. To my parents ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my...

Kuchimanchi, Krishna V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts.

27

HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A trapazoid for each type and lamp wattage is published bylamp wattage for the core-coil ballast was measured with a dynamometer type

Ailing, W.R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 23, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 11 Electronic Ballast Control IC With Digital Phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 23, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 11 Electronic Ballast Control ballast controller fabricated in a 0.8 CMOS process used in a 400 W, 150 kHz HID electronic ballast. Index Terms--Current regulation, digital control, electronic bal- last, integrated circuit, over voltage

29

On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ballasts: Handling, Storage and Procedure: 8.40 Created: 07/01/2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of industrial compounds produced by chlorination of biphenyl, noted primarily as an environmental pollutant applies to all Contractors, Project Managers, Facilities Operations and Environmental Health & Safety (EH-lamping activities and construction/renovation activities at Columbia University. Ballasts manufactured before 1978

Jia, Songtao

31

Ecosystem under Pressure: Examining the Phytoplankton Community in the High Ballast Water Discharge Environment of Galveston Bay, Texas (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water from port to port (Anderson, 2009). The combination of larger ballast tanks, ever increasing international commerce and shorter transit times, has synergistically contributed to the increasing rate of successful invasions in coastal bays... and Gymnodinium catenatum (found in POH June 2007), native to Japan, was introduced to Australia (Hallegraeff and Bolch, 1991). Viable cysts of the toxic species of Alexandrium were identified and cultured from multiple ballast tanks of vessels traveling from...

Steichen, Jamie L

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

33

IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC-97, 39-45, St. Louis, 1997. A MHz Electronic Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps Michael Gulko and Sam Ben-Yaakov* Power Electronics Laboratory-Resonance Inverter (CS-PPRI) topology [2] as a ballast for low wattage HID lamps designated as automotive headlights lamp option to replace the conventional 'halogen' type headlights. Unfortunately, application of HID

34

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier Robert C. Brown, Glenn Norton, Andy Suby, Jerod Smeenk, Keith Cummer, and Josh Nunez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier Robert C. Brown, Glenn Norton, Andy fuel cells. We have developed a thermally ballasted gasifier that uses a single reactor for both compared to conventional gasifiers. The carbon monoxide, along with steam used to fluidize the reactor, can

35

Evaluation of Ships' Ballast Water as a Vector for Transfer of Pathogenic Bacteria to Marine Protected Areas in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and unloading cargo as well as during transit. As a ship unloads it’s cargo at a port, it takes on ballast water and then when it loads cargo at the next port, it discharges the ballast water, thus transferring water from port to port. Aquatic organisms...

Morris, Theresa L

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

Efficacy of open-ocean ballast water exchange as a means of preventing invertebrate invasions between freshwater ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between freshwater ports Derek K. Gray Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University Lakes to European ports. Each vessel had paired ballast tanks, one of which was designated as a control ports. BWE was verified by ship records and, in two cases, by in situ water quality sensors. BWE

37

2004 35thAnnual IEEE Power Electronics SpecialistsConference Aachen, Germany. 2004 Digital Controller Design for Electronic Ballasts with Phase Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 35thAnnual IEEE Power Electronics SpecialistsConference Aachen, Germany. 2004 Digital Controller Design for Electronic Ballasts with Phase Control Yan Yin and Regan Zane Colorado Power Electronics Center University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, CO 80309-0425 yiny@colorado.edu, zane

38

Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fully Integrated Ballast Controller with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for This work is co-sponsored by the National Science Foundation (under Grant No. 0348772), General Electric Colorado Power Electronics Center University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, CO 80309-0425 regan Global Research (through CoPEC) and the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory

40

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal7.pdfFlash_2010_-24.pdfOverview Flow Cells forFluorescent Lamp

42

Feature scaling of large, ballasted, field emission arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emitters are an exciting technology for high-frequency, high-power applications because of their excellent free space electron transport, and their potential for high current density and high current, especially when ...

Guerrera, Stephen A. (Stephen Angelo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Project Profile: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

alone cost about 0.95 per watt for rooftop installations. Cascade is developing a plastic-based photovoltaic (PV) racking system that reduces mechanical and electrical labor,...

44

Performance of Geogrid Reinforced Ballast under Dynamic Loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

string pot versus dynamic loading at 1100 psi (9 psi tie bearing pressure) 37 4.1.3 East string pot versus dynamic loading at 2500 psi (21 psi tie bearing pressure) 38 4.1.4 East string pot versus dynamic loading at 3500 psi (31 psi tie bearing pressure...) 39 4.1.5 East string pot versus dynamic loading at 4500 psi (38 psi tie bearing pressure) 41 4.1.6 East string pot versus dynamic loading at 4500 psi (soaked) (40 psi tie bearing pressure) 43 4.2 Unreinforced test 45 4.2.1 West string pot 45 4...

Jowkar, Milad

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclear waste,

46

Metal Halide Lamp Ballast and Fixture | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM ProjectMemoDepartment ofEMMesh GenerationMetal

47

Project Profile: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309DepartmentDepartment ofCycles |PerovskitesSystem |

48

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5Post-Holiday HolidayProcessRateofofRenewable EnergyRenewable

49

Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartmentfor EngineeringDepartment ofBoilersData CenterDepartment

50

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that ballast wattage would track ballast/lamp type accordingaverage wattage for each ballast type and number of lamps

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Francesco Bedini Jacobini, Erol Tutumluer, Mohd Rapik Saat Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (Rail

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

52

PHASE I FINAL REPORT SUBCONTRACT NO. 2019702 "ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT BALLASTS"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

b. Task lighting power input comparison vrs lighting levelsSystem power comparison with Stevens set a minimum lightinglighting levels Stevens VRS ? a. System power comparison,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - asphalt ballast Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field tested open-graded ... Source: Texas at Austin, University of - Center for Transportation Research Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 5 Safe Operating...

54

Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a typical increase in an HID lamp equivalent resistance RI,, ovet its lifetime of more than 100 controlled resonant inverters to drive HID lamps. Considering the variation of the lamp resistance over its the lamp resistance during its Iifetime and system frequency range limitations. Design constraints have

55

TESTING OF ENERGY CONSERVATION OF ELECTRONIC BALLASTS FOR FLUORESCENT LIGHTING REVIEW OF RECENT RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DESIGN GOALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ur:.V(. ,(lh. Fluorescent Lighting Review of Recent Resultsfrom 30 0 C to 50°C. The lighting system.with core ballastswas conducted to measure the lighting system performance for

Verderber, R.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, amplified ribosomal rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and phylogenetic analysis. Bacterial communities in Texas ports and bays were also examined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), looking at both temporal and spatial variations...

Neyland, Elizabeth B.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

57

Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

Matthews, Adrian

58

STATE OF UTAH CONTRACT NUMBER: MA049 January 24, 2014 Page 1 of 3 Includes Codale Lamp and Ballast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39% Off Air Filters 23% Off 40% Off 12% Off Paint & Accessories 23% Off 12% Off 25% Off Batteries and Storage 56078 Metal Working /Welding & Lubrication 54545 Motor and Power Transmission 28502 Outdoor

Capecchi, Mario R.

59

Status of China's Energy Efficiency Standards and Labels for Appliances and International Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irons Automatic rice cookers Televisions Radio receivers andlamp ballasts Automatic rice cookers Hot water bottle Small

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Control of low-frequency square-wave electronic ballast with resonant ignition using a dsPIC30F2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, theoretically, is a solution to prevent the acoustic resonance provided that the lamp power has no ac component igniter is an external circuit that is coupled to the main power stage by a transformer. In [5 for two-stage HID lamps. The first stage is the power factor correction (PFC) stage, and the second

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial and Industrial End Uses Incandescent Lamps Refrigerators Residential AC (Including Heat Pumps) Washing Machines Fluorescent Ballasts Electric Water Heaters

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave Electronic Ballast With Resonant Ignition F. Javier Díaz, Francisco J) electronic ballast with digital control. The first stage of the ballast is a power factor correction (PFC

64

The Aesthetics of Remembering 9/11: Towards a Transnational Typology of Memorials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a memorial of bronze or granite at first sight representsfixed on a block of local granite with a 6.8-foot glassUpper Palatinate region (granite and glass). 61 The memorial

Gessner, Ingrid

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dimming every light cheaply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the successful development and testing of the first ballast/IBECS network interface that will allow commercially-available controllable ballasts to be operated from the Internet via IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System). The interface, which is expected to cost original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) only about $1-2/unit, has been hardened so that it is impervious to electronic noise generated by most 0-10 VDC controllable ballasts.

Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Peter; Jennings, Judith

2002-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

New approaches to interfacing thermoelectric generators to the load bus in a nuclear space vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reactor and the thermoelectrics. This type oi' system wastes the excess power generated as heat. Heat dissipation in space is very difficult. In the reference design TCAs (thermoelectric converter assembly) and shunt regulators connect directly... ballast load. The variable ballast compensa, tes 1' or the variation of the load. This type of control philosophy is very inefficient. Of the power generated, some is wasted in the variable ballast by heat dissipation. New architectures of controlling...

Brohlin, Paul LeRoy

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

DOE/LX/07-0092&D1 Secondary Document  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formerly stored included capacitors, light ballasts, and liquid-filled potential transformers, brake shoes, speed increaser, recorders, portable handrails, carts, a metal...

68

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ballasts can reduce lighting energy by 20 to 30 percent. * ENERGY STAR light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs can last 25 years without lamp replacement. Compact...

69

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

fixtures. Dimming of the fixtures in the dayrooms and inmate cells in response to daylight or space usage would release energy savings. Dimming ballasts will need to be...

70

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

150 million compact fluorescent light bulbs in 2010. (ChinaCleaners Incandescent Bulbs Fluorescent Lamps Ballasts forincandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps. Consumers

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

CX-001990: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

University will replace windows in three buildings, lamps and ballasts in the library, light fixtures in the athletic complex, and initiate a recycling program....

72

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorescent Ballasts Electric Water Heaters Standby PowerRanges Gas Ranges Gas Water Heaters Gas Boilers CommercialHeating) Commercial Gas Water Heaters Industrial Motors

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capture targeted commercial lighting opportunities through use of fluorescent, light emitting diode (LED), electronically ballasted metal halide and other efficient fixtures. BPA...

74

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Microsoft Word - SWMU 542  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrical wire, metal light fixtures & ballasts, mercury vapor lights and incandescent lights. WASTE QUANTITY: 542a - Approximately 35 ft 3 . 542b - Approximately 75 ft 3...

76

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps MediumBallasts and Fixtures General Service Incandescent Lamps,Intermediate Base Incandescent Lamps and Candelabra Base

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Making the Market Right for Environmentally Sound Energy-Efficient Technologies: U.S. Buildings Sector Successes that Might Work in Developing Countries and Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than their 100-year old incandescent ancestors. However,Hz core-coil ballasts. Incandescent lighting consumes aboutthe developing world, incandescent lamps drive peak demand,

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ballasts Electric Water Heaters Standby Power InductionRanges Gas Ranges Gas Water Heaters Gas Boilers CommercialHeating) Commercial Gas Water Heaters Industrial Motors

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lighting fixtures and lighting upgrades; conversion of exit signs to light- emitting diode; replacement of T-12 lamps and ballasts; heating, ventilating, and air...

80

CX-002214: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

efficient lighting fixtures and lighting upgrades; conversion of exit signs to light-emitting diode; replacement of T-12 lamps and ballasts; heating, ventilating, and air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CX-004779: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(i.e., install compact and linear fluorescent light bulbs and ballasts, light emitting diode emergency and exit signs lighting, occupancy sensors, andor appliances) and...

82

Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help to Meet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stan- dards, for rice cookers for example, and develop- ingirons Automatic rice cookers Televisions Radio receivers andlamp ballasts Automatic rice cookers Hot water bottle Small

Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju, Jeff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irons Automatic rice cookers Microwave Radio receivers andFluorescent Lamp Ballast Rice cooker Microwave ovens OfficeOthers include: rice cookers, microwaves, laser printers,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Impacts of China's Current Appliance Standards and Labeling Program to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irons; electric rice cookers; televisions; radios; andirons Automatic rice cookers Televisions Radio receivers andlamp ballasts Automatic rice cookers Hot water bottle Small

Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive thermal compensation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

schemes like the band-gap reference c. Limitation of thermal runaway... . Resistor ballast 2. Mitigation of thermal runaway by temperature matching and compensation....

86

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Freezers Room air conditioners Televisions Clothes washers Dishwashers Battery chargers Water heaters Fluorescent lamp ballasts Incandescent reflector lamps If your appliance has...

87

U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

building retrofits to include lighting (i.e., install compact and linear fluorescent light bulbs and ballasts, LED emergency and exit signs lighting, occupancy sensors, andor...

88

Scour around an offshore wind turbine W.F. Louwersheimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scour around an offshore wind turbine MSc Thesis W.F. Louwersheimer January, 2007 Delft University of Technology Ballast Nedam Faculty of Civil Engineering Egmond Offshore Energy Section of Hydraulic Engineering #12;Scour around an offshore wind turbine Delft University of Technology Ballast Nedam - Egmond

Langendoen, Koen

89

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rail ClipsRail Clips Track Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rail ClipsRail Clips and Track Renewal ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J 2009 7 #12;Track Renewal ­ Tie replacement ballast packingTie replacement, ballast packing ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 8 #12;Track Renewal ME 6222: Manufacturing

Colton, Jonathan S.

91

THE AMERICAN BIOLOGY TEACHER SLIME MOLD 537 Few laboratory exercises are designed to teach biology students about barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water into the Great Lakes in the 1980s have caused extensive ecological and eco- nomic damage (Miller through ballast water, ships are advised to take measures to avoid transporting exotic species in ballast to the movement of aquatic organisms, but only if every ship always follows these vol- untary compliances

Ross, Shane

92

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), nitrogen dioxide (which may cause throat and lung irritation), and sulfur dioxide (which can impair, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfer dioxide -- in a 10xl2x8-foot room with normal ventilation. The levels of each calculated the concentration of four gases produced by these heaters -- carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide

93

Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building WATER STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from an 8-foot-high CMU wall and concrete slab passively cool the structure ADAPTIVE TO NEW TECHNOLOGY and confirmed during commissioning). Daylighting helps keep the lighting loads reduced to a lighting power with a 150° azimuth. These panels are coupled with a SMA America Sunny Boy 5000-US inverter located

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

94

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The social implications of ritual behavior in the Maya Lowlands : a perspective from Minanha, Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plaza floor (AP-1 st ). The plaster cap was completelybuilding. The poorly preserved plaster cap was approximatelyThe level consisted of a plaster cap and ballast layer for

Schwake, Sonja Andrea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Analysis and design of closed-loop control of power electronic converter systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

filter system to cancel neutral current harmonic (IOOA) in a threephase four-wire electric distribution system. (b)Input power factor correction and harmonic reduction stage of a commercially available electronic ballast (12OV, 64W) for fluorescent...

Huang, Yenchin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of a Method for Predictively Simulating Penetration of a Low Speed Impactor into a Weak Cohesionless Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geotextile barrier system that utilizes soil as ballast to prevent ballistic or vehicular impacts LSTC Livermore Software Technology Corporation LS-DYNA A complex non-linear explicit FEA software package developed by LSTC to simulate complex high rate non...

Arrington, Dusty Ray

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, LBNL-4998E. General Electric Lamp and BallastEuropean Union General Electric High Intensity DischargeEnergy Saver”; and General Electric has a 26 watt T5 lamp (

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Kathleen H. Hartman, D.V.M., Ph.D. USDA APHIS VS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Domestic ­ International · Water transfer ­ Ballast water ­ Recreational activities Support Branch Staging Area Supply Unit Facilities Unit Ground Support Unit. heavy equipment operator ­ Type · Pond vs. open waterway · Small dozer or big

Kane, Andrew S.

100

A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . 63 4. Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass, Gas Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 B. Biomass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 3. Biomass-Derived H2 from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier, Iowa State University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Keystone: Order (2013-CE-2601)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Keystone Technologies, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Keystone had failed to certify that certain models of fluorescent lamp ballasts comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

102

Keystone: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-2601)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Keystone Technologies, LLC failed to certify a variety of fluorescent lamp ballasts as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

103

The readers point vessel: hull analysis of an eighteenth century merchant sloop excavated in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Bay, Jamaica in 1994. Excavators removed overburden and the ballast pile, recovering over 600 artifacts associated with the vessel-After exposing well-preserved hull remains, divers recorded the ship's structure. The vessel is preserved from the base...

Cook, Gregory D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Efficient Light Sources Today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high...

Hart, A. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Pre-Retrofit Lighting Study at the University of Texas at Arlington, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audit Report for the site, completed in 1991, recommended a lighting retrofit that included delamping, relamping with high efficiency lamps, the installation of high efficiency electronic ballasts, and the installation of specular reflectors. However...

Houcek, J. K.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Power Conditioning and Control Applications for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical power conditioning and control (PCC) systems are finding cost effective applications in AC motor drives, lamp ballasts and power supplies. Substantial system efficiency improvements are being realized when the appropriate PCC system...

Brushwood, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-2605)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. finding that basic model VEL-I S40-SC, a fluorescent lamp ballast, does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

108

4 Scienco Sorvlco Feature Weascd on receipt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not dcvoldying such strong centrifugal force, do effect approciable reductions in :- Possum by this action hurricane blast and ita ballast of exceodingly fine rain nom snothers everything. Then a wall of spray high

109

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents U.S. Rulemaking Documents TSL 4 PHP IncandescentLamps Incandescent Lamps Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts kWh/yrand T5 fluorescent tubes, incandescent lamps, CFLs, Halogen

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimized Magnetic Components Improve Efficiency of Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xtures (designed for incandescent bulbs) has allowed residential and small commercial electric customers of incandescent lamps and last 10 times longer [1]. High-frequency electronic ballasts are used to power CFLs

111

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE AND FIELD INSPECTION CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watts: 1. Type of luminaire (i.e.: post top, wall pack, surface, shoe box); for non-incandescent luminaires, indicate nominal lamp wattage and lamp type ( i.e.: fluorescent, incandescent, HID); ballast type. For incandescent luminaires, the lum

112

Electrical Equipment Replacement: Energy Efficiency versus System Compatibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end users to select the most energy efficient equipment when replacing motors, motor drives, transformers, lamps, ballasts, etc., given costs associated with energy consumption when compared with installation. The selection of replacement parts...

Massey, G. W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

Richard Zhang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coexistence of congeneric native and invasive species: The case of the green algae Codium spp. in northwestern Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological invasions have increased in number in coastal eco- systems in recent decades, although until are carried with the sand and rock ballast of ships, such as seaweeds, molluscs and arthro- pods (Carlton

Provan, Jim

115

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The IGBT Compendium: Applications and Social Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................15 4.3 Electronic Ballasts for Compact Fluorescent Lamps...............................................................................................40 4.5.9 Drive Circuits for Plasma TVs..................................................................................46 4.7.2 Arc and Tube Welding

117

8680 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 30 / Thursday, February 13, 2014 / Notices sleeves; anchors; steel wire; copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; turbine jets; fuel/cooling/ballast/ macerator/hydraulic/bilge/sump/ hydraulic/jet pumps and related parts; steam and gas turbines and related parts; marine/diesel engines and related parts; hydrojet engines

118

Characterization of argon arc source in the infrared J. M. Bridges and A. L. Migdall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metrologia Characterization of argon arc source in the infrared J. M. Bridges and A. L. Migdall path. Although a resistor of 0,25 is used for ignition, the arc requires no ballast during Metrologia

Migdall, Alan

119

CALIFORNIA Jackalyne Pfannenstiel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Regulations, appliance standards, refrigerators, air conditioners, space heaters, water heaters, pool heaters, plumbing fittings, plumbing fixtures, showerheads, spray valves, faucets, tub spout diverters, water closets, urinals, fluorescent lamp ballasts, lamps, emergency lighting, exit signs, traffic

120

EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER N1!PA DEl'l!R1.llNAl'ION R[CIPIENT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

their proposed actions. The plan will describe the plan 10 dispose of any sanitary or hazardous waste, e.g. construction and demolition debris. old light bulbs. lead ballasts,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U.S. DEPARTl\\IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

their proposed actions. The plan will describe the plan to dispose of any sanitary or hazardous waste, e.g. construction and demolition debris, old light bulbs, lead ballasts,...

122

Graduate Student Lounge Andleeb Mazhar and Dr. Kristi Gaines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 38 ballast types , Full Spectrum and Fluorescent lighting can bring the desired affect in our-candles are recommended. Based on the cost-effective Retrofitting Analysis lighting system from 17 distinct bulb types

Rock, Chris

123

A spreadsheet for analyzing the in situ performance of fluorescent luminaires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spreadsheet program for determining system efficacy, power input and light output of common 4 ft fluorescent lighting systems under realistic operating conditions is described. The program uses accepted IES engineering principles to precisely account for ballast factor, existing thermal conditions and maintenance practices. The spreadsheet, which includes a data base of lamp and ballast performance data, can be used to calculate the cost-effectiveness of many common lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, F.; Zhang, Chin.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Universal Waste Management Procedure: 8.42 Created: 7/30/2014 Version: 1.2 Revised: 7/30/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fluorescent lamps are classified as Universal Wastes due to their mercury content. Other examples of lamps pressure sodium, and metal halide lamps. It can be expected that fluorescent and HID lamps, including green batteries are managed as universal waste. 2. Lamps are defined by the above regulations as "the bulb or tube

Jia, Songtao

125

Dawn at Vesta Press Kit/JULY 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.c.brown@nasa.gov Washington, DC Jia-Rui Cook/Priscilla Vega Dawn Mission 818-354-0850/4-1357 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, jccook-gain antenna is 5 feet (1.52 meters) in diameter. When the solar arrays are deployed, Dawn's wingspan is 64.6 kilograms) hydrazine propellant Power: Two 27-foot-by-8-foot (8.3-meter-by- 2.3-meter) solar panels

Waliser, Duane E.

126

Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Facing the Energy Dilemma - One Company's Approach: Energy Management at 3M at the Plant Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pass at cooling water - heating water. Reduced some lighting. Change thermostat settings. Installed low wattage fluorescents. Turn out unnecessary lights at night. Reduced boiler excess air. Convert to more efficient lighting types. The list... 2400 2-lamp fluores to have this condition in your plant. BUILDING SPECIFIC ENERGY STANDARDS (BSES) Steam generation facilities produce regular fuel consumption and steam output reports. At 3M Center, a Monthly Power and Refrigera tion Report...

Marson, T. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Rotary Table Model: Oilwell A-49 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 133/8, 11¾, 10¾ in.) Power Engines/Generators: 7 EMD 16 cylinder diesel 5 @ 2,100 kW (3,000 hp) 2 @ 1,000 shp Liquid Capacities Diesel fuel (MGO): 997,152 gal (3,217 mt) Drill water: 343,959 gal Ballast: 182

129

Environment and Coastal Management Marine Invasive Species in North America: Impacts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of world shipping and the number of species that can be and are being transported via ballast water, tank aquaculture, canals, aquarium trade, recreational boating, hydrocarbon exploration and trans- portation. Beach, Coastal Sprawl: The Effects of Urban Design on Aquatic Ecosystems in the United States (Arlington

Taggart, Christopher

130

SCE Classroom Lighting Guidelines 38 September 2004 Design Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCE Classroom Lighting Guidelines 38 September 2004 EXAMPLE 1 Design Description In this design, the ambient lighting system uses two, twenty foot of semi-indirect luminaires that are suspended in 2 rows electronic ballasts. The whiteboard task light is a linear wallwasher about 12 feet long that uses (3) Super

131

PWM Regenerative Rectifiers: State of the Art J. Rodriguez, Senior Member, IEEE, J. Dixon, J. Espinoza, Member, IEEE, and P. Lezana.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for microelectron- ics, household-electric appliances , electronic ballast, battery charging, DC-motor drives, power frequency. The simplest line-commutated converters use diodes to trans- form the electrical energy from AC a negative effect in the operation of the electrical system and therefore, an increasing attention is paid

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

132

Engineered Products: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5401)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Engineered Products Company manufactured/privately-labeled and distributed a number of units of noncompliant basic model 15701, a metal halide lamp fixture with a magnetic probe-start ballast in the U.S.

133

Instrumentation for Far-infrared Spectroscopy Peter R. Griffiths1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at one end with an infrared transparent window (A) through which radiation reaches a thin absorbing film- and Far-Infrared Spectroscopy Window Incident radiation A B Absorbing film Pneumatic chamber Ballasting passes through the window onto a blackened film, causing the pressure of the gas in the pneumatic chamber

Homes, Christopher C.

134

The Integrated Classroom Lighting System (ICLS) is designed for use in general-purpose classrooms at the K-12 through university level. Further, ICLS has applications in a wide range of conference rooms and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cartons improves installation times and reduces jobsite waste. Use and Care Manual Every classroom warranty, we will provide a single source warranty on all ICLS electronic and interconnection components energy usage and light output · ICLS is available with 0.77, 0.88, and 1.18 ballast factor electronic

135

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ballast rock island in Santa Rosa Sound, 8 k iles south of Pensacola, Fla. The Gulf of Mexico is visible are designed to determine existing pollution levels, concen- trations causing acute and chronic effects to devote addi- tional time to developing the national program to monitor organochlorine pesticide pollution

136

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Page 1 DePaul Cinespace Studios Equipment Reservation Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mount Charger w/ power cord 1,156.00$ FLUORESCENT FIXTURES KINO FLO 6 4x4 head w/ select ballast, 1 head Kit) 605.00$ 2 2' Fixture Travel Case (Interview Kit) 550.00$ 2 4' Bulb Ship Case 220.00$ 2 2' Bulb

Schaefer, Marcus

138

Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

TU Delft knowledge valorisation Innovation with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patient monitoring. Research consortia Wind energy far offshore RWE Offshore Wind, Eneco, TenneT, Ballast plan for large-scale wind energy innovation, known as Far and Large Offshore Wind, or FLOW. The FLOW products and services. TU Delft has a long history of socially and commercially relevant research. Two

Langendoen, Koen

140

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 20, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2005 1499 Custom Spectral Shaping for EMI Reduction in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by General Electric Global Research through the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41252 compliance with FCC regulations. Noise modulation is also used for electronic ballasts in [11] to avoid is with Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation, Broomfield, CO 80021 USA. R. Zane is with the Electrical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A SPICE Compatible Model of High Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the arc's * Corresponding author behavior of HID lamps. This model are derived from the arc-linear resistance of the lamp, is the global specific conductance of the plasma, V is the volume of the plasma, L is the length of plasma and S is the cross section. ~ Vin G1 Lamp Model Ballast v(lamp) i(lamp) Analytical

142

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 3, MAY 2007 815 Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 3, MAY 2007 815 Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency Over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast With Phase Control Francisco J. Azcondo, Senior was presented in part at The 20th Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC'05

143

Presented at the 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for economically dimming controllable ballasts in commercial buildings. The first section provides the generalLBNL-49975 LG-228 Presented at the 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Office of Building Technology, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under

144

Underwater Unmanned Vehicle Boeing gave us the opportunity to compete against the Electrical Engineering Dept. The competition was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underwater Unmanned Vehicle Overview Boeing gave us the opportunity to compete against Underwater Unmanned Vehicles. Basically we had to build remote controlled submarines from the ground up. Objectives To design a Underwater Unmanned Vehicle that meets the following Specs: Has an internal Ballast

Demirel, Melik C.

145

Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Joint Rail Conference April 17-19, 2012, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Joint Rail Conference JRC2012 April 17-19, 2012, Philadelphia, and Debakanta Mishra3 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana characteristics, foundation type, ballast settlement from fouling and/or degradation, as well as fill and subgrade

146

MINI-MUSEUM Schedule 2014 DATE TOPIC SPEAKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINI-MUSEUM Schedule 2014 DATE TOPIC SPEAKER Oct 15 Dinosaurs and the origin of birds Prof. Hans amphibians Prof. David M. Green (Director, Redpath Museum) Oct. 29 Nov.5 Nov. 12 Pandora's Ballast Tank) Barbara Lawson (Curator of World Cultures, Redpath Museum) Nov. 19 Humans, evolution, and the future

Shoubridge, Eric

147

Climate ActionPlan2010 nau.edu/green  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Research · Section 2 Energy and Climate Change · Section 3 Operations · Section 4 Procurement · Section 5 Recycling and Waste Minimization · Section 6 Transportation · Section 7 Water · Appendix 1 Table of Contents. All light fixtures have been converted to electronic ballasts and T-8 lamps. The university has made

148

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

savings come primarily from commercial and industrial equipment and residential water heaters. · Savings Ballasts Water Heaters Small Electric Motors Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Clothes Dryers Clothes Incandescent Reflector Lamps Direct Heating Equipment Pool Heaters Clothes Washers, Commercial Dishwashers

149

APPLIANCE EFFICIENCY REGULATIONS FOR REFRIGERATORS AND FREEZERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS GAS SPACE HEATERS WATER HEATERS PLUMBING FITTINGS FLUORESCENT LAMP BALLASTS LUMINAIRES GAS COOKING APPLIANCES AND GAS POOL HEATERS SEPTEMBER 1992 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS APPLIANCE) Gas space heaters, excluding the following types: (1) gravity type central furnaces; (2) heaters

150

Leaf water potential in Pinus taeda L. as related to fluctuating soil water and atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growing on Bienville loamy fine sand near Rusk, Texas. The average available water storage capacity was 9. 50 inches in the 8-foot profile. Siruiltaneous measurements of leaf water potential and environmental variables were made weekly at two hour... pressure 2 deficit, temperature, and wind (R 0. 78). A regression equation relating total daily water stress to only vapor pressure deficit and soil water content in the 0- to 4-foot soil layer was also signifi- 2= cant (R = 0. 76). The total daily...

Ellison, Stanley Lee

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Alderaan Issue 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also announced its intentions to participate in more con venti ons and has encouraged conventi on coordi nators to contact them. PUOLlSH!:R 'S ,&,UIA.NCE ALDERAAN 4--FEBRUARY 1) 1979 Alderaan is edited and publi s hed irregularly by Kzinti Press... on are vi sib 1 e. 4) There is a black and yellow design painted on the ceiling of the dining room of the Lars' farm. 5) There is a 7-8 foot tall hitching post outside the cantina in Mos Eisley. 6) After R2D2's chess piece takes Chewie's, it takes a small...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy and lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in research for new types of lighting with increased efficacies (lumens/watt) are discussed in the following areas: (1) high-frequency, solid-state ballasts, (2) isotopic enhancement of mercury isotopes, (3) magnetic augmentation, (4) electrodeless, ultra-high frequency, (5) tuned phosphors, (6) two-photon phosphors, (7) heat mirrors, and (3) advanced control circuits to take advantage of daylight and occupancy. As of 1985, improvements in efficacy have been accomplished on an economic basis to save energy for (1) high-frequency ballasts (25%), (2) isotopic enhancement (5%), and (8) advanced control circuits (up to 50%). Most of these advances depend on a deeper understanding of the weakly ionized plasma as a radiating and diffusing medium. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Berman, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy-efficient compact screw-in fluorescent lamp. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact fluorescent lamp has been designed and constructed which can replace an incandescent lamp. The lamp is slightly larger than a standard lamp (8 3/4 in. x 3 1/4 in.), but is designed to fit a majority of portable lamp applications. This version, with a core-coil ballast, results in a system efficacy of 54 lumens per watt, with a light output of more than 1800 lumens. This compares favorably with a 100-watt incandescent (17.5 lumens per watt and 1750 lumens light output). The color temperature of 3000/sup 0/K is compatible with an incandescent lamp (2800/sup 0/K). The color rendition index (CRI) is 84. With a solid-state ballast, the efficacy and light output could be increased by 20% (65 l/w, 2200 lumens) and could provide a direct replacement for a three-way, 150-watt incandescent lamp (15 l/w, 2200 lumens).

Morton, E.W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Analysis and corrective measures for forced commutated cycloconverters(FCC'S) under unbalance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for motion control, robotics; Variable v'oltage, fixed frequency uninterruptable power for critical loads; High frequency applications include induction heating, electronic ballasts for fluorescent lamps, battery chargers; Controllable Var generators... intervals between the input and output terminals. The control determines the durations of the conduction int, ervals Three phase Input of Fixed voltage Fixed frequency Fo ce commut. ated Cycloconverr. er)FCC) 51 Three phase output of Variable...

Wang, Xucheng

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

3-50 A classroom is to be air-conditioned using window air-conditioning units. The cooling load is due to people, lights, and heat transfer through the walls and the windows. The number of 5-kW window air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a total of 9u365 = 3285 off hours per year. Disregarding the ballast factor, the annual energy and cost) = (4730 kWh/year)($0.08/kWh) = $378/year The implementation cost of this measure is the sum lamps)(60 W/lamp )(3285 hours/year) = 4730 kWh/year Cost Savings = (Energy Savings)(Unit cost of energy

Bahrami, Majid

156

At skrive speciale eller ph.d.-afhandling p Ris er en mulighed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forskningsmiljø- et. Det er en god ballast at have med i det senere karriereforløb". Når seniorforsker Jimmy Bak for Optik og Fluid Dynamik udbyder Jimmy Bak et forskningsprojekt som del af et ph.d.-studie. Projektet, der ugen. Side 11 >> E-mail: jimmy.bak@risoe.dk "Som vejleder vil jeg påstå, at udfor- dringen ikke kun er

157

Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessment Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as an insect stowed away in a cargo box or a lar- val fish brought on board a ship in the bal- last water. When is not just an eco- nomic issue--the health of our unique coastal and marine ecosystems is a source of pride into new areas--such as the unintentional transport of species in the ballast water of freight ships

Zavaleta, Erika

158

2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 HouseCoveredAir Conditioners andBallasts; Notice

159

2014-10-27 Issuance: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fan Light Kits; Notice of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 HouseCoveredAir Conditioners andBallasts;

160

2014-10-29 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 HouseCoveredAir Conditioners andBallasts;External

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Finite Element Modeling of the Fastening Systems and the Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sleeper and Ballast 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 0.0000 0.0002 0.0004 0.0006 0.0008 0 of strands Rail seat area is between 0.39 m to 0.67 m Rail Seat Area Component Modeling: Concrete Sleeper Seat Area Position of concrete surface strain lt = 0.48 m Component Modeling: Concrete Sleeper

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

162

Systems Modeling, Simulation and Material Operating Requirements for Chemical Hydride Based Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydride based hydrogen storage. AB was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A new systems concept based on augers, ballast tank, hydrogen heat exchanger and H2 burner was designed and implemented in simulation. In this design, the chemical hydride material was assumed to produce H2 on the augers itself, thus minimizing the size of ballast tank and reactor. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure, in various components of the storage system. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. The control variable AB (or alane) flow rate was determined through a simple expression based on the ballast tank pressure, H2 demand from the fuel cell and hydrogen production from AB (or alane) in the reactor. System simulation results for solid AB, liquid AB and alane for both steady state and transient drive cycle cases indicate the usefulness of the model for further analysis and prototype development.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Summary of UTMB O&M Project: Energy Conservation Potential in Five Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by 88 Watts per fixture if two lamps and a ballast are disconnected. In addition, a formal program of turning-off lights in corridors and elevator lobbies after hours would contribute to less energy consumption. Texas State Energy Conservation Office...ESL-TR-93/10-03 LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Summary of UTMB O&M Project: ENERGY CONSERVATION POTENTIAL IN FIVE BUILDINGS Submitted to the Texas State Energy Conservation Office By the Monitoring and Analysis Task E (O&M) Dr. Mingsheng...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Peak Power Reduction Strategies for the Lighting Systems in Government Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEAK POWER REDUCTION STRATEGIES FOT THE LIGHTING SYSTEMS IN GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS Dina AlNakib CLEP, Dr. Ahmad Al-Mulla CEM, Gopal Maheshwari Department of Building and Energy Technologies Environment and Urban Development Division Kuwait... begins at 7:30 h and ends between 14:00 and 15:30 h. Lighting systems in MC building comprise mostly of T12 fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and incandescent lamps with a total connected load of 2,900 k...

Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advances in Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

colour rendition. The quartz-halogen incandescent lam s operate at higher temperatures, and have a somewhat higher efficacy, but they are rarely used except for special applicati ns. 3-2 High Intensity Discharge Lamps. Mercury is the grandfather... of the H.I.D. lamps. Its blue-green light, has been used almost exclusively for streetlighti and, often with colour-improving phospho it is still being used in industrial and commercial applications. Reactor-type ballasted mercury lamps can now...

Tumber, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Memorandum of Decision: Withdrawal of Waiver for Fluorescent Electronic  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM ProjectMemo DistributingOn March 31,Ballasts

170

A laboratory study of the effect of oil-soluble inhibitors on tanker corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, watex was present under the Cargo in '-. - ? Che form of residual fi~ on the metal. The thick rust eo~leq as present in . most tanks, tended to xstain moisture And aot as a shield (1$), ' Thus, corxosicn occurred during both ballait and I , 'cargo...'pxesencc of an; electrolyte solution, '. Xn tanker compart I ments the solient is water, It is supplied by condensation in all tarks&. and by sec water ballast in, a number of compartments; l. l . gone vessels still'employ &ttsXworthing~ or tank' washing...

Schneider, Frederick Haden

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response:Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of today's advanced building control systems are designed to improve granularity of control for energy efficiency. Examples include direct digital controls for building heating, ventilation, and cooling systems (HVAC), and dimmable ballasts for continuous dimming for daylighting applications. This paper discusses recent research on the use of new and existing controls in commercial buildings for integrated energy efficiency and demand response (DR). The paper discusses the use of DR controls strategies in commercial buildings and provides specific details on DR control strategy design concepts for a new building in New York. We present preliminary results from EnergyPlus simulations of the DR strategies at the New York Times Headquarters building currently under construction. The DR strategies at the Times building involve unique state of the art systems with dimmable ballasts, movable shades on the glass facade, and underfloor air HVAC. The simulation efforts at this building are novel, with an innovative building owner considering DR and future DR program participation strategies during the design phase. This paper also discusses commissioning plans for the DR strategies. The trends in integration of various systems through the EMCS, master versus supervisory controls and dynamic operational modes concepts are presented and future research directions are outlined.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

The New York Times headquarters daylighting mockup: Monitoredperformance of the daylighting control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nine-month monitored field study of the performance of automated roller shades and daylighting controls was conducted in a 401 m{sup 2} unoccupied, furnished daylighting mockup. The mockup mimicked the southwest corner of a new 110 km{sub 2} commercial building in New York, New York, where The New York Times will be the major tenant. This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of two daylighting control systems installed in separate areas of an open plan office with 1.2-m high workstation partitions: (1) Area A had 0-10 V dimmable ballasts with an open-loop proportional control system and an automated shade controlled to reduce window glare and increase daylight, and (2) Area B had digital addressable lighting interface (DALI) ballasts with a closed-loop integral reset control system and an automated shade controlled to block direct sun. Daylighting control system performance and lighting energy use were monitored. The daylighting control systems demonstrated very reliable performance after they were commissioned properly. Work plane illuminance levels were maintained above 90% of the maximum fluorescent illuminance level for 99.9{+-}0.5% and 97.9{+-}6.1% of the day on average over the monitored period, respectively, in Areas A and B. Daily lighting energy use savings were significant in both Areas over the equinox-to-equinox period compared to a non-daylit reference case. At 3.35 m from the window, 30% average savings were achieved with a sidelit west-facing condition in Area A while 50-60% were achieved with a bilateral daylit south-facing condition in Area B. At 4.57-9.14 m from the window, 5-10% and 25-40% savings were achieved in Areas A and B, respectively. Average savings for the 7-m deep dimming zone were 20-23% and 52-59% for Areas A and B, respectively, depending on the lighting schedule. The large savings and good reliability can be attributed to the automatic management of the interior shades. The DALI-based system exhibited faulty behavior that remains unexplained, but operational errors are expected to be resolved as DALI products reach full maturity. The building owner received very competitive bids ($30-75 US/DALI ballast) and was able to justify use of the daylighting control system based on operational cost savings and increased amenity. Additional energy savings due to reduced solar and lighting heat gains were not quantified but will add to the total operational cost savings.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Study of the Filling of Wall Cavities With Retrofit Wall Insulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Power Marketing Agency, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), conducted a retrofit wall insulation study to determine the effects of various obstructions within a wall cavity, where voids are likely to occur, and preferred filling methods and material types. The insulation test structure was composed of four 8-foot /times/ 12-foot walls, and was built using standard construction practices. The inside walls were clear plastic glazing, instead of gypsum board, to enable viewing of the filling process. A total of eight tests were performed: four cellulose, two rockwool, and two fiberglass. One- and two-hole filling methods were observed. All insulations were found to perform in the same basic manner with all experiencing the same problem areas. Common installer problems were empty spaces at the tops of cavities and missed cavities, especially above headers. Wiring and lath and plaster consistently caused reduced insulation densities in cavities. The problems with wiring, lath and plaster, and other features in the wall cavities were avoided with the use of a filler tube. The filler tube also provided a more consistent fill along the length of the entire cavity. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Flores, Joseph A.; Grill, Alan R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction rate of methane decomposition using a tubular reactor having a 1 inch inside diameter with an 8 foot long heated zone was investigated in the temperature range of 700 to 900 C with pressures ranging from 28.2 to 56.1 atm. Representing the rate by a conventional model, {minus}dC{sub CH4}/dt= k1 C{sub CH4} {minus}k2 C{sub H2}{sup 2}, the rate constant k1 for methane decomposition was determined. The activation energy, 31.3 kcal/mol, calculated by an Arrhenius Plot was lower than for previously published results for methane decomposition. This result indicates that submicron particles found in the reactor adhere to the inside of the reactor and these submicron high surface area carbon particles tend to catalyze the methane decomposition. The rate constant has been found to be approximately constant at 900 C with pressure range cited above. The rate of methane decomposition increases with methane partial pressure in first-order. The rate of the methane decomposition is favored by higher temperatures and pressures while the thermochemical equilibrium of methane decomposition is favored by lower pressures. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of discrete processes that erase their own histories: application to Turing machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work done before on the construction of quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of Turing machines and general descrete processes is extended here to include processes which erase their own histories. The models consist of three phases, the forward process phase in which a map T is iterated and a history of iterations is generated, a copy phase which is activated if and only if T reaches a fix point, and an erase phase which erases the iteration history, undoes the iterations of T and recovers the initial state except for the copy system. A ballast system is used to stop the evolution at the desired state. The general model so constructed is applied to Turing machines. The main changes are that the system undergoing the evolution corresponding to T iterations becomes three systems corresponding to the internal machine, the computation tape, and computation head. Also the copy phase becomes more complex since it is desired that this correspond also to a copying Turing machine.

Benioff, P.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Massachusetts Military Reservation. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying photovoltaics (PV) systems on a superfund site located within the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.17/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Massachusetts, such as the solar renewable energy credits. According to calculations, MMR can place 8 MW of ballast-weighted, ground-mounted PV systems on the crowns of the three landfill caps and the borrow pit with the PV modules tilted at 30 degrees.

Stafford, B.; Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Designing criteria for building power systems supplying distributed non-linear loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In commercial and institutional buildings, the wider use of power electronics equipment, such as computer switch-mode power supplies and compact fluorescent lights with electronic ballasts, can create many problems. These loads are generally single-phase with a 3rd harmonic current that can be equal or more than 60%. The aim of this paper is that of analyzing several specific aspects of power system design, such as: sizing of circuits; and the selection of circuits, by correlating them with this specific problem of distributed nonlinear load supply. The proposed criteria can be utilized both in a short-term action for resolution of specific problems, and in medium-term action for development of new optimization procedures of power system design.

Grasselli, U.; Parise, G. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Italy). Electrical Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Lighting energy management in industrial plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides some guidance to assist plant managers and engineers in managing their light energy problems. Incandescent, flourescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps are compared. Flourescent is still predominant, incandescent is not recommended-and HID is rapidly gaining favor. Lamp life and lumen depreciation must be determined. Light loss factors which are not recoverable are: luminaire ambient temperature, voltage to the luminaire, ballast factor, and luminaire surface dirt depreciation. Light loss factors which can be recovered by plant maintainence are: room surface dirt depreciation, lamp failures, lamp lumen depreciation, and luminaire dirt depreciation. A method to determine the savings that may result from group relamping versus spot replacement is given. Finally, energy management steps, to maximize performance, are listed.

Bachler, J.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2006 period, and of energy efficiency standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts and distribution transformers. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products in order to estimate realized impacts and to update projected impacts. It also performed new analysis for the first (1990) fluorescent ballast standards, which had been introduced in the NAECA legislation without a rulemaking. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential/ commercial primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in 2030 by 4percent compared to the levels expected without any standards. The reduction for the residential sector is larger, at 8percent. The estimated cumulative energy savings from the standards amount to 39 quads by 2020, and 63 quads by 2030. The standards will also reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by considerable amounts.The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to $241 billion by 2030, and grows to $269 billion by 2045. The overall ratio of consumer benefits to costs (in present value terms) in the 1987-2050 period is 2.7 to 1. Although the estimates made in this study are subject to a fair degree of uncertainty, we believe they provide a reasonable approximation of the national benefits resulting from Federal appliance efficiency standards.

Meyers, Stephen P.; McMahon, James; Atkinson, Barbara

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Systems Modeling of Chemical Hydride Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fixed bed reactor was designed, modeled and simulated for hydrogen storage on-board the vehicle for PEM fuel cell applications. Ammonia Borane (AB) was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to {approx}16% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. The design evaluated consisted of a tank with 8 thermally isolated sections in which H2 flows freely between sections to provide ballast. Heating elements are used to initiate reactions in each section when pressure drops below a specified level in the tank. Reactor models in Excel and COMSOL were developed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept, which was then used to develop systems models in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments and drive cycle simulations showed that the storage system meets thirteen 2010 DOE targets in entirety and the remaining four at greater than 60% of the target.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

SYSTEMS MODELING OF AMMONIA BORANE BEAD REACTOR FOR OFF-BOARD REGENERABLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN PEM FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Out of the materials available for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has a high hydrogen storage capacity (upto 19.6% by weight for the release of three hydrogen molecules). Therefore, AB was chosen in our chemical hydride simulation studies. A model for the AB bead reactor system was developed to study the system performance and determine the energy, mass and volume requirements for off-board regenerable hydrogen storage. The system includes hot and cold augers, ballast tank and reactor, product tank, H2 burner and a radiator. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure in the reactor system. Control signals to various components are governed by a control system which is modeled as an independent subsystem. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. Preliminary system simulation results for a start-up case and for a transient drive cycle indicate accurate trends in the reactor system dynamics.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; King, Dale A.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC; ,

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

W.E. Lowry

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

D. Tang

2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andr& #233

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

193

Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labeling Programs in China: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer's production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andre

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Recessed Lighting in the Limelight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recessed downlights are among the most popular installed lighting fixtures for new and remodeled homes. DOE estimates there are at least 350 million currently installed in US homes, and around 20 million are sold each year. A recent California study showed only 0.4 percent of recessed cans used compact fluorescent lamps. Annual reported sales of fluorescent residential recessed downlights nationwide make up no more than three percent of total residential recessed downlight sales. Standard recessed downlights waste energy by leaking conditioned air to unconditioned attic space, and using less efficient, high-heat incandescent bulbs. 33 states have adopted building codes that require recessed cans installed in the building shell to be airtight. To encourage lighting fixture manufacturers to bring to market high-efficiency air-tight recessed cans, DOE is sponsoring the recessed downlights project. PNNL solicited bids for energy efficient recessed downlights meeting the following specifications: They must use pin-based CFLs, have an airtight housing, be IC-rated, use electronic ballasts, and have a light output minimum of 900 initial lumens. PNNL did short- and long-term testing of the submitted lamps and negotiated lower prices for consumer purchase of qualifying models.

Gordon, Kelly L.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-performance CFL downlights: The best and the brightest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Downlight fixtures -- often referred to as ``recessed cans`` -- are among the most common lighting fixtures in commercial and residential settings. As such, they represent one of the most promising targets for improving lighting energy efficiency. The authors estimate that downlight fixtures account for more than one-fifth of the 2.8 billion incandescent lighting sockets in the US, and represent about 8 percent of total direct lighting energy use. Over 30 million new fixtures of this type are sold each year in the US. With existing and foreseeable technology, nearly two-thirds of the incandescent downlights in the US are candidates for retrofit or replacement with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or fixtures. The remaining one-third, however, are unlikely to ever be replaceable with CFL technology because of constraints on light output, lighting quality, size, and cost-effectiveness of CFL alternatives. High performance downlight systems using compact fluorescent lamps and incorporating advanced optical, thermal, and ballast designs use up to 75 percent less energy than conventional incandescent downlight fixtures. Many CFL downlight fixtures, however, perform poorly. In this report, the authors explore ways in which various elements of fixture design influence performance. They also describe exemplary elements of high-performance designs, and evaluate several emerging or experimental technologies that promise to further improve efficiency.

Sardinsky, R.; Hawthorne, S.; Newcomb, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Current Work in Energy Analysis (Energy Analysis Program -1996 Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work that Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been doing most recently. One of our proudest accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. This analysis played a key role in shaping the U.S. position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. Our participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. We are also especially proud of our study of ''leaking electricity,'' which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of U.S. residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the following pages summarize results of research. activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China. These are the intellectual endeavors of a talented team of researchers dedicated to public service.

Energy Analysis Program

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

The United Stirling 4-95 and 4-275 Engines I underwater use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United Stirling 4-95 and 4-275 well-known engines have been adapted to underwater operation. The 4-95 power module has an output of 20 kW /SUB e/ and 40 kW as heat. The standard 4-95 engine has been modified for a pressurized combustion. The combustion pressure mates with the surrounding water depth at current limits for operational offshore diving. Hence no energy consuming compression or any complex dissolving system for the exhaust gas is required. Increased diving depth can be reached through already established technology. Combustion gas recirculation is used as thermic ballast and for flame temperature control, when using pure oxygen. The 4-275 engine is currently subject to underwater modification utilizing the same technology. This energy module will have an output of 100 kW /SUB e/ and 200 kW as heat. The system will comprise a LOX-storage, thus providing extensive underwater air-independent endurance. Based upon extensive laboratory testing and demonstrations under submerged conditions, the system is now scheduled for field testing and commercial introduction.

Nilsson, H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

Qin, Y.; He, F., E-mail: hefeng@bit.edu.cn; Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T., E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Xie, K. [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Current work in energy analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial and residential buildings would have a major positive impact on energy use and environmental quality in California.

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which rubulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) was determined. It appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were a chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO{sub 2}-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea, Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1, and Olisthodiscus luteus. Although many more samplings at diverse sites must be accomplished, the discovery of distinctly different sequences of rbcL mRNA at different water depths suggests that there is a stratification of active CO{sub 2}-fixing organisms in western Lake Erie. 54 refs., 7 figs.

Xu, H.H.; Tabita, F.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Engineering study of the potential uses of salts from selective crystallization of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is the fractional crystallization of nitrate salts from tank waste stored on the Hanford Site. This study reviews disposition options for a CSP product made from Hanford Site tank waste. These options range from public release to onsite low-level waste disposal to no action. Process, production, safety, environment, cost, schedule, and the amount of CSP material which may be used are factors considered in each option. The preferred alternative is offsite release of clean salt. Savings all be generated by excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization. Income would be received from sales of salt products. Savings and income from this alternative amount to $1,027 million, excluding the cost of CSP operations. Unless public sale of CSP products is approved, the material should be calcined. The carbonate form of the CSP could then be used as ballast in tank closure and stabilization efforts. Not including the cost of CSP operations, savings of $632 million would be realized. These savings would result from excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization and reducing purchases of chemicals for caustic recycle and stabilization and closure. Dose considerations for either alternative are favorable. No other cost-effective alternatives that were considered had the capacity to handle significant quantities of the CSP products. If CSP occurs, full-scale tank-waste stabilization could be done without building additional treatment facilities after Phase 1 (DOE 1996). Savings in capital and operating cost from this reduction in waste stabilization would be in addition to the other gains described.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Commercializing government-sponsored innovations: Twelve successful buildings case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies. 27 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Goel, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Status of the Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Program in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its commitment to promoting and improving the local enforcement of appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling, the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) launched the National and Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling project on August 14, 2009. The project’s short-term goal is to expand the effort to improve enforcement of standards and labeling requirements to the entire country within three years, with a long-term goal of perfecting overall enforcement. For this project, Jiangsu, Shandong, Sichuan and Shanghai were selected as pilot locations. This report provides information on the local enforcement project’s recent background, activities and results as well as comparison to previous rounds of check-testing in 2006 and 2007. In addition, the report also offers evaluation on the achievement and weaknesses in the local enforcement scheme and recommendations. The results demonstrate both improvement and some backsliding. Enforcement schemes are in place in all target cities and applicable national standards and regulations were followed as the basis for local check testing. Check testing results show in general high labeling compliance across regions with 100% compliance for five products, including full compliance for all three products tested in Jiangsu province and two out of three products tested in Shandong province. Program results also identified key weaknesses in labeling compliance in Sichuan as well as in the efficiency standards compliance levels for small and medium three-phase asynchronous motors and self-ballasted fluorescent lamps. For example, compliance for the same product ranged from as low as 40% to 100% with mixed results for products that had been tested in previous rounds. For refrigerators, in particular, the efficiency standards compliance rate exhibited a wider range of 50% to 100%, and the average rate across all tested models also dropped from 96% in 2007 to 63%, possibly due to the implementation of newly strengthened efficiency standards in 2009. Areas for improvement include: Greater awareness at the local level to ensure that all manufacturers register their products with the label certification project and to minimize their resistance to inspections; improvement of the product sampling methodology to include representative testing of both large and small manufacturers and greater standardization of testing tools and procedures; and continued improvement in local enforcement efforts.

Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fino-Chen, Cecilia; Fridley, David; Ning, Cao

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

All auto shredding: evaluation of automotive shredder residue generated by shredding only vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A well developed infrastructure exists for the reuse and recycling of automotive parts and materials. At the end of a vehicle's useful life many parts are removed and sold for reuse and fluids are recovered for recycling or proper disposal. What remains is shredded, along with other metal bearing scrap such as home appliances, demolition debris and process equipment, and the metals are separated out and recycled. The remainder of the vehicle materials is call shredder residue which ends up in the landfill. As energy and natural resources becomes more treasured, increased effort has been afforded to find ways to reduce energy consumption and minimize the use of our limited resources. Many of the materials found in shredder residue could be recovered and help offset the use of energy and material consumption. For example, the energy content of the plastics and rubbers currently landfilled with the shredder residue is equivalent to 16 million barrels of oil per year. However, in the United States, the recovered materials, primarily polymers, cannot be recycled due to current regulatory barriers which preclude the re-introduction into commerce of certain materials because of residual contamination with substances of concern (SOCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The source of the PCBs is not well understood. Old transformers, capacitors, white goods and ballasts from lighting fixtures are likely contributing factors. The project was designed to evaluate whether vehicles of varying age and manufacturing origin contribute to the PCB content in shredder residue. Additionally, the project was designed to determine if there are any trends in material composition of the shredder residue from varied age and manufacturing groups. This information would aid in future material recovery facility strategy and design. The test utilized a newly installed shredder plant to shred four categories of automobiles. The categories were defined by vehicle age and the manufacturing company and location. Each category of vehicles was processed individually through the shredder plant and the resulting shredder residue was analyzed for its materials composition and presence of PCBs and leachable metals. The results show that shredder residue from all vehicle categories tested are not significant contributors of PCBs and leachable metals. It was evident that leachable cadmium levels have decreased in newer vehicles. The composition of the shredder residue from each of the four categories is similar to the others. In addition, these compositions are approximately equal to the composition of typical shredder residues, not limited to automotive materials.

Duranceau, C. M.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems); (Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC); (American Chemistry Counsel, Plastics Division)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Closure Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site - Antelope Lake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for investigation and closure of CAU 496, Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-008-TAAL (Buried Rocket), at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), was approved by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on July 21,2004. Approval to transfer CAS TA-55-008-TAAL from CAU 496 to CAU 4000 (No Further Action Sites) was approved by NDEP on December 21, 2005, based on the assumption that the rocket did not present any environmental concern. The approval letter included the following condition: ''NDEP understands, from the NNSA/NSO letter dated November 30,2005, that a search will be conducted for the rocket during the planned characterization of other sites at the Tonopah Test Range and, if found, the rocket will be removed as a housekeeping measure''. NDEP and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office personnel located the rocket on Mid Lake during a site visit to TTR, and a request to transfer CAS TA-55-008-TAAL from CAU 4000 back to CAU 496 was approved by NDEP on September 11,2006. CAS TA-55-008-TAAL was added to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' of 1996, based on an interview with a retired TTR worker in 1993. The original interview documented that a rocket was launched from Area 9 to Antelope Lake and was never recovered due to the high frequency of rocket tests being conducted during this timeframe. The interviewee recalled the rocket being an M-55 or N-55 (the M-50 ''Honest John'' rocket was used extensively at TTR from the 1960s to early 1980s). A review of previously conducted interviews with former TTR personnel indicated that the interviewees confused information from several sites. The location of the CAU 496 rocket on Mid Lake is directly south of the TTR rocket launch facility in Area 9 and is consistent with information gathered on the lost rocket during recent interviews. Most pertinently, an interview in 2005 with a former TTR range manager recalled a lost rocket that possibly contained a depleted uranium ballast in an inert warhead. The interviewee confirmed that the last tracking coordinate for the rocket indicated it was lost in an area south of Area 9 near the l T R range coordinates X = 6,614.57 feet (ft) and Y = -20,508.79 ft. These coordinates correspond to a location approximately 2,295 ft northeast of the Mid Target, on Mid Lake. CAS TA-55-008-TAAL was removed from CAU 496 before the SAFER investigation could be completed, and before the new information could be evaluated and the conceptual site model assumptions confirmed.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

Mark Kauss

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-foot 2-lamp ballasts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with lead shot • PCB-contaminated soil • Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment • Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils • Lead debris • Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. • Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. • A use restriction is required at CAU 566. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. • Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Mark Krauss

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and radium-226. A corrective action was implemented to remove approximately 50 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil, approximately 1 cubic foot of radium-226 contaminated soil (and scabbled asphalt), and a high-efficiency particulate air filter that was determined to meet the criteria of a potential source material (PSM). Electrical and lighting components (i.e., PCB-containing ballasts and capacitors) and other materials (e.g., mercury-containing thermostats and switches, lead plugs and bricks) assumed to be PSM were also removed from Building 2201, as practical, without the need for sampling. Because the COC contamination and PSMs have been removed, clean closure of CAS 26-41-01 is recommended, and no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU. No further action is necessary because no other contaminants of potential concern were found above preliminary action levels. The physical end state for Building 2201 is expected to be eventual demolition to slab. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Clean closure is the recommended corrective action for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 117. • Corrective Action Unit 117 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Mark Burmeister

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

Peter Morante

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z