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Sample records for 8-89 efg 07-90

  1. 2012 National Electricity Forum: February 8-9, 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 National Electricity Forum: February 8-9, 2012 2012 National Electricity Forum: February 8-9, 2012 January 4, 2012 - 11:28am Addthis The 2012 National Electricity Forum will...

  2. EM-1 Related Memorandum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy DATE: February 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-6 (D. Pepson, 301-903-7432) SUBJECT: Environmental Management-Project...

  3. April 8/9, 2003 Green Bank GBT PTCS Conceptual Design Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    April 8/9, 2003 Green Bank GBT PTCS Conceptual Design Review Current GBT Performance #12;GBT PTCS Conceptual Design Review ­ April 8/9, 2003 Focus Tracking Empirical Model (gravity only): A + B cos(E) + C (which primarily affect pointing) #12;GBT PTCS Conceptual Design Review ­ April 8/9, 2003 Blind Pointing

  4. The Weatherization Assistant User's Manual (Version 8.9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettings, Michael B.; Malhotra, Mini; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The Weatherization Assistant is a Windows-based energy audit software tool that was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to help states and their local weatherization agencies implement the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program. The Weatherization Assistant is an umbrella program for two individual energy audits or measure selection programs: the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) for site-built single-family homes and the Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) for mobile homes. The Weatherization Assistant User's Manual documents the operation of the user interface for Version 8.9 of the software. This includes how to install and setup the software, navigate through the program, and initiate an energy audit. All of the user interface forms associated with the software and the data fields on these forms are described in detail. The manual is intended to be a training manual for new users of the Weatherization Assistant and as a reference manual for experienced users.

  5. Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    ). · The initial configuration was rotated 90° for the blanket analysis as this seems to favor the maintenance droplets falling in chamber Pb flow Porous mesh Pb film Pump Liquid recycling #12;Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL

  6. Efg Crystal Growth Apparatus And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackintosh, Brian H. (Concord, MA); Ouellette, Marc (Nashua, NH)

    2003-05-13

    An improved mechanical arrangement controls the introduction of silicon particles into an EFG (Edge-defined Film-fed Growth) crucible/die unit for melt replenishment during a crystal growth run. A feeder unit injects silicon particles upwardly through a center hub of the crucible/die unit and the mechanical arrangement intercepts the injected particles and directs them so that they drop into the melt in a selected region of the crucible and at velocity which reduces splashing, whereby to reduce the likelihood of interruption of the growth process due to formation of a solid mass of silicon on the center hub and adjoining components. The invention also comprises use of a Faraday ring to alter the ratio of the electrical currents flowing through primary and secondary induction heating coils that heat the crucible die unit and the mechanical arrangement.

  7. March 8-9, 2004/ARR Some of the Major Considerations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    of power cycle: Rankine vs. Brayton · Need for HX and separate power cycle working fluid · Optimizing TBR report, June 2000 #12;March 8-9, 2004/ARR 8 Power Cycle Configuration · Rankine cycle (steam) vs. Brayton Pressure (from EU Study) · He-cooled ceramic breeder blanket in conjunction with a Rankine steam power

  8. Indo-Australian Geothermal Energy Capacity Building Workshop February 8-9 2010, NGRI, Hyderabad.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    Indo-Australian Geothermal Energy Capacity Building Workshop February 8-9 2010, NGRI, Hyderabad. Geothermal energy is known to be one of the clean energy without smoke and also without environmental hazards in identifying these resources in different parts of our country for possible exploitation of the energy source

  9. International Logistics and Supply Chain Congress' 2007 November 8-9, 2007, Istanbul, TURKIYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ©International Logistics and Supply Chain Congress' 2007 November 8-9, 2007, Istanbul, TURKIYE 1 THE THIRD PARTY LOGISTICS SELECTION: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE Aicha Aguezzoul1 1 Aicha Aguezzoul, Centre, France, aicha.aguezzoul@univ-metz.fr Abstract The outsourcing of logistics activities to third

  10. Optimization of the Ballistic Guide Design for the SNS FNPB 8.9 A Neutron Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeyasu M. Ito; Christopher B. Crawford; Geoffrey L. Greene

    2006-04-28

    The optimization of the ballistic guide design for the SNS Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline 8.9 A line is described. With a careful tuning of the shape of the curve for the tapered section and the width of the straight section, this optimization resulted in more than 75% increase in the neutron flux exiting the 33 m long guide over a straight m=3.5 guide with the same length.

  11. 2nd PhD Workshop on System Integration of Renewable Energy October 8-9, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    2nd PhD Workshop on System Integration of Renewable Energy WSIRE 2014 October 8-9, 2014 Hanse climate change, and rising energy costs are important reasons for the extension of renewa- ble energy://www.see.uni-oldenburg.de) and the PhD program ,,Renewable Energy" (University of Oldenburg, http://www.phd-renewable-energy.de). Hanse

  12. Measurement of the production cross-section of positive pions in the collision of 8.9 GeV/c protons on beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARP Collaboration

    2007-10-30

    The double-differential production cross-section of positive pions, $d^2\\sigma^{\\pi^{+}}/dpd\\Omega$, measured in the HARP experiment is presented. The incident particles are 8.9 GeV/c protons directed onto a beryllium target with a nominal thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The measured cross-section has a direct impact on the prediction of neutrino fluxes for the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments at Fermilab. After cuts, 13 million protons on target produced about 96,000 reconstructed secondary tracks which were used in this analysis. Cross-section results are presented in the kinematic range 0.75 GeV/c < $p_{\\pi}$ < 6.5 GeV/c and 30 mrad < $\\theta_{\\pi}$ < 210 mrad in the laboratory frame.

  13. Cross-Sections of Large-Angle Hadron Production in Proton- and Pion-Nucleus Interactions I: Beryllium Nuclei and Beam Momenta of +8.9 Gev/c and -8.0 Gev/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HARP-CDP group; :; A. Bolshakova; I. Boyko; G. Chelkov; D. Dedovitch; A. Elagin; M. Gostkin; S. Grishin; A. Guskov; Z. Kroumchtein; Yu. Nefedov; K. Nikolaev; A. Zhemchugov; F. Dydak; J. Wotschack A. De Min; V. Ammosov; V. Gapienko; V. Koreshev; A. Semak; Yu. Sviridov; E. Usenko; V. Zaets

    2009-06-23

    We report on double-differential inclusive cross-sections of the production of secondary protons, deuterons, and charged pions and kaons, in the interactions with a 5% nuclear interaction length thick stationary beryllium target, of a +8.9 GeV/c proton and pion beam, and a -8.0 GeV/c pion beam. Results are given for secondary particles with production angles between 20 and 125 degrees.

  14. Comparison of Geant4 hadron generation with data from the interactions with beryllium nuclei of +8.9 GeV/c protons and pions, and of -8 GeV/c pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bolshakova

    2008-04-18

    Hadron generation in the Geant4 simulation tool kit is compared with inclusive spectra of secondary protons and pions from the interactions with beryllium nuclei of +8.9 GeV/c protons and pions, and of -8.0 GeV/c pions. The data were taken in 2002 at the CERN Proton Synchrotron with the HARP spectrometer. We report on significant disagreements between data and simulated data especially in the polar-angle distributions of secondary protons and pions.

  15. EFG IO?-90)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEPE. 1.

  16. 4/18/11 10:39 AMB.C. aspires to lead the country in research and development Page 1 of 6http://www.canada.com/story_print.html?id=713de69a-38b7-48a8-9d50-d96d0aa1142b&sponsor=

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4/18/11 10:39 AMB.C. aspires to lead the country in research and development Page 1 of 6http://www.canada.com/story_print.html?id=713de69a-38b7-48a8-9d50-d96d0aa1142b&sponsor= B.C. aspires to lead the country in research for economy, innovation and education" by 2010. #12;4/18/11 10:39 AMB.C. aspires to lead the country

  17. October 8-9, 2014, Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    : Generating Reliable Wind Power Forecasts from Ensemble Weather Forecasts 11:00-11:30 Coffee Break 11 Regression Ensembles for Wind Power Prediction Daniel Lückehe: An Evolutionary Approach to Geo: Dynamic Design of Balancing Power with k-Nearest Neighbors Cornelius Steinbrink: Uncertainty

  18. NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generated from scientific and engineering applications. It contains a very developed matrix-vector multiplication routine for general sparse matrices. It is suitable to solve...

  19. NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shmem and Synchronization Primitives on the Cray T3E April 8, 1998 | Author(s): Adrian Wong | The task asynchronous programming model and one-sided communication protocols will be...

  20. ERSUG Meeting: January 8-9, 1996 (Berkeley, CA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDieselAbsorptionPowering6106 TotalMinutes ERSUG Meeting July

  1. Echo 8-9 Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDoubleEERESoda LakeEcho 1-7 Wind Farm

  2. I EFG Kww United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina: l ._._,I:'A

  3. High power spatial single-mode quantum cascade lasers at 8.9 $\\mu$m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, S; Bengloan, J Y; Calligaro, M; Parillaud, O; Giovannini, Massimo; Faist, J; Sirtori, C; Forget, Sebastien; Faugeras, Clement; Bengloan, Jean Yves; Calligaro, Michel; Parillaud, Olivier; Giovannini, Marcella; Faist, Jerome; Sirtori, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    High performance of InP-based quantum cascade lasers emitting at $\\lambda$ ~ 9$\\mu$m are reported. Thick electroplated gold layer was deposited on top of the laser to improve heat dissipation. With one facet high reflection coated, the devices produce a maximum output power of 175mW at 40% duty cycle at room temperature and continuous-wave operation up to 278K.

  4. Clim. Past, 8, 89115, 2012 www.clim-past.net/8/89/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindau, Ralf

    Geodynamik, Wien, Austria 5Agencia Estatal de Meteorologia, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 6Slovenian Environment

  5. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    of Ore Deposits Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistryof Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry,

  6. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    From consideration of uranium deposits which have much inFrom consideration of uranium deposits which have much in

  7. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office ofand the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office ofRegulatory Res. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Mail Stop

  8. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    o f fractures amount and hidraulic conductivity w i t ho f fractures amount and hidraulic conductivity with depth (

  9. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    of the stability of nuclides retention by rocks is aprimary task, as well as nuclides forms and compoundsto ground waters. nuclides. During about 3.5 million m of

  10. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    drainage wells has already been constructed and it will start operating soon. (ii) discharge of sanitary

  11. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    last thirty years, many hydraulic well tests were performedD model. The hydraulic head measured in monitoring wells wasdistribution, as well as to define hydraulic conductivity

  12. Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    for isolation of waste Well construction/loss of cement Wellthe waste non-hazardous or immobile. W E L L CONSTRUCTION

  13. Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment ofEnergyJoe Olencz About Us JoeFuel Cell

  14. HEPAP December 8-9, 2014 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel086-7, 2013

  15. OpenEI maintenance March 8-9, 2013 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE EnergyOklahoma:VisualizingOpenEI Town HallOpenEI

  16. Hanford Site Small Businesses Secure $8.9 Billion in Subcontracts |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs

  17. 2012 National Electricity Forum: February 8-9, 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOE Sustainability Awards2 National Electricity

  18. EfG KMOJ- United States Government I@,&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation$;/:4,4 (;

  19. Differences in physical activity and sedentary time in relation to weight in 8-9 year old children.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purslow, Lisa R.; Hill, Claire; Saxton, Jenny; Corder, Kirsten; Wardle, Jane

    2008-12-12

    on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health. Lon- don 2004. 2. Strong WB, Malina RM, Blimkie CJR, Daniels SR, Dishman RK, Gutin B, Hergenroeder AC, Must A, Nixon PA, Pivarnik JM, et al.: Evidence Based Physical Activity for School... , Sjostrom M, Yngve A, Poortvliet E, Nilsson A, Froberg K, Wedderkopp N, Westerterp K: Physical activity assessed by activity monitor and doubly labeled water in children. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2001, 33:275-281. 31. Trost SG, Ward DS, Moorhead SM, Watson PD...

  20. Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007, Discussion Session Highlights, Comments, and Action Items

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJean Seibert StuckySolarList | Department

  1. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning: Shared Task, pages 6267, Sofia, Bulgaria, August 8-9 2013. c 2013 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iran and North Ko- rea, the development of nuclear power is mainly determined by the political forces are implemented to meet the safety expectation of the op- eration of nuclear power plant. All these measures. For nations like Iran and North Korea, the development of nu- clear power is mainly determined by po- litical

  2. Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on Statistical Machine Translation, pages 200205, Sofia, Bulgaria, August 8-9, 2013 c 2013 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and minimum Bayes-risk objective. 1 Introduction This paper describes the University of Cam- bridge system errors in decoding. It also allows better integration with other steps in our translation pipeline such as 5-gram lan- guage model (LM) rescoring and lattice minimum Bayes-risk (LMBR) decoding (Blackwood

  3. Data:225b952f-75c8-44c8-9e4b-2e63f6a9a928 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  4. Coupling Antibody to CNBr Sepharose 1. Dialyze purified antibody against 0.2 M NaHCO3, pH 8.9. Use SpectraPor 2 (12-14 kDal cut off)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    minutes at 2000 rpm. Save supernatant on ice. Determine the efficiency of coupling by comparing amount antibody solution in 15 ml red cap tube on ice. Save a small amount (~10 µl) of antibody. 3. Wash 10 mls with antibody. Measure amount added based on increase in volume. Aim for 10 mg antibody per ml Sepharose

  5. $ %& ' ( ) 0 1 2 ) 34 5 6 78 9 @A B A CD EFG H I P Q RS T U VW5 6 7X Y ` B @ a CD EFG H I b c de fG P g hi EfphIq U r Efpe g g EF ps t t e fIEG 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvester, David J.

    T @ a x e g ID p hg ID E b c de fG P g hi EfphIq e x t s Ihg X H e fH Ie fq U u H i hG ps pE s Eg IFq @9 9 9 u f S EH g e f s fg H p H r D up Is G Eg I Cw B x e g ID pU hg ID E Q H ID Ex H Ihp u Et H fIx Eg I P Q RS T S EH g ps pE s Eg IFq e hg EG ID E r fe Epp Q e G EFFhg 5 fe s t 6 e FFp 6 eq E u

  6. !#"$"&%('*),+.- /1 0(+2 '43 56/4%(7&3$ 8:9; 9='?%@0(A&8C BED4 FHG IKJL/49;8 M NPORQTS$U: VX W; Y OZW\\[ZQ]W;U 1,# N(U ^#_`NPORWba@ c N(OZd eHU Q a:e 2,##

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckmiller, Rolf

    to be either one or two---note that such a distance function always satisfies the triangle inequality---within

  7. An adaptive grid refinement strategy for the simulation of negative streamers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    ,7], polluted water [8,9] or biogas [10]. More recently, efforts have been undertaken to improve the flow around

  8. The formulation and computer implementation of element-free Galerkin method for Euler-Bernoulli beam theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikh, Nauman Mansoor

    2001-01-01

    Element-free Galerkin (EFG) method is used to solve second and fourth-order one-dimesional problems. Moving least square (MLS) approximation is used to generate shape functions for the EFG model. MLS method is discussed in detail along with its key...

  9. LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERISTY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center School of Allied Health Professions Department of Physical Therapy 1900 Gravier Street New Orleans Professions Mission______________________________________8-9 Department of Physical Therapy Mission, Purpose

  10. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willner, I.

    2010-01-01

    produced by hypochlorite oxidation of Mn(III)-porphyrins, oxidize water to H 02 or O in 8,9 However, we find that treatment

  11. Developing Spin Devices for Logic and Memory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    to  lack  promise.    Spintronics  research  has  so  far  goal  is  to  use   spintronics,  which  leverages  the  spin   devices[8,9]  (spintronics).    Such  devices  take  

  12. Combined Heat and Power: A Vision for the Future of CHP in the United States in 2020, June 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is a summary document based on discussions at the CHP Vision Workshop held in Washington, DC, June 8-9, 1999

  13. arXiv:1006.0120v1[astro-ph.CO]1Jun2010 Cold dust and young starbursts 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael

    .D. Dowell8,9 , E. Dwek15 , S. Dye6 , S. Eales6 , D. Elbaz7 , D. Farrah2 , M. Fox1 , A. Franceschini3 , W

  14. Readiness Review Training- Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides used for November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  15. Fabrication of engineered M13 bacteriophages into liquid crystalline films and fibers for directional growth and encapsulation of fibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    network scaffolds have been prepared using electro-spinning,8,9 peptide self-assembly15­17 and polymer

  16. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.T.

    2011-01-01

    of steam coal and coking coal to be $15/t (IEA, 1995). Thisaround 8-9% for good coking coal (IISI, 1982). Drying

  17. Extreme-ultraviolet spectral purity and magnetic ion debris mitigation by use of low-density tin targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S S; Tillack, Mark S; O'Shay, Beau; Tao, Y; Paguio, R; Nikroo, A

    2006-01-01

    by the magnetic field due to confinement of the plumeconfinement 3 , application of electrostatic repeller fields 8,9 , and magnetic

  18. Increasing use of non-traditional vehicles for psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Karen E; Davis, Scott A; Cantrell, Jacob; Feldman, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Patient preferences for facial sunscreens: a split- face,for other products such as sunscreens [8,9]. Over the study

  19. The Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO? Slurry (PHICCOS) feeding system : design, coupled multiscale analysis, and technoeconomic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botero, Cristina, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The continuous conveying of a solid feedstock like pulverized coal into a pressurized environment is a challenging task required in multiple industrial processes. Plants based on pressurized, entrained-flow gasifiers (EFG) ...

  20. Heritage Drive EastCampusDrive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .c/14 axmb Auxiliary Maintenance Building . . . . i/5,6 b-34, b-38, b-41, b-51 (Service Halls and Cannon Center (canc) . . . . . . . . . .d­f/8,9 hlra Helaman Recreation Area Intramural Recreation Area . . . . .a,b/4­6 itb Information Technology Building . . .c/8,9 swkt

  1. Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus: Effect of Strain A On Corn Inbreds, Single- and Double-Cross Hybrids. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toler, R.W.; Bockholt, A.J.; Alston, F.G.

    1982-01-01

    \\l ated ,: K 55 77.3 g 74.1** K 64 78.8 efg 75.7 h** Tx 61M 79.8 def 79.2 def Tx 585 78.3 efg 78.4 efg Tx 127C 74.8 h 74.5 h Tx 441 83.2 bc 77 .9 de** Tx 173D 79.3 def 78.2 efg Tx 203 78.8 efg 78.0 fg Tx 303 84.1 bc 79.3 def** Tx 325 85.0 b 80....71 kl 57.48 gh 62.59 de 51.08 i j 60.50 fgh 60.73 fgf 56.39 ghi 57.56 gh 42.32 kl 56.95 gh 81.03 b 95.89 a Uni{IOCU 1 ated 42.95 k** 48.54 j** 65.74 ef** 65.61 ef 48.54 j 72 .64 cd** 61.98 fg 59.11 gh 74.40 c** 57.51 gh** 55.70 hi...

  2. The problem of a metal impurity in an oxide: ab-initio study of electronic and structural properties of Cd in Rutile TiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Errico; G. Fabricius; M. Renteria

    2007-04-18

    In this work we undertake the problem of a transition metal impurity in an oxide. We present an ab-initio study of the relaxations introduced in TiO2 when a Cd impurity replaces substitutionally a Ti atom. Using the Full-Potential Linearized-Augmented-Plane-Wave method we obtain relaxed structures for different charge states of the impurity and computed the electric-field gradients (EFGs) at the Cd site. We find that EFGs, and also relaxations, are dependent on the charge state of the impurity. This dependence is very remarkable in the case of the EFG and is explained analyzing the electronic structure of the studied system. We predict fairly anisotropic relaxations for the nearest oxygen neighbors of the Cd impurity. The experimental confirmation of this prediction and a brief report of these calculations have recently been presented [P.R.L. 89, 55503 (2002)]. Our results for relaxations and EFGs are in clear contradiction with previous studies of this system that assumed isotropic relaxations and point out that no simple model is viable to describe relaxations and the EFG at Cd in TiO2 even approximately.

  3. Low Temperature Deposition of Metal Oxide Thin Films in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide using Metal-organic Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gougousi, Theodosia

    Semiconductor (CMOS) devices, [1,2] magnetic tunnel junctions, [3] and optical coatings.[4] Conventional such as electroplating, [6,7] electroless deposition, [8,9] and in supercritical carbon dioxide for the deposition

  4. Characterization of Self-Assembly and Charge Transport in Model Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beers, Keith Morgan

    2012-01-01

    3 actuators, 4 and solar energy conversion devices. 5,6 Of6 actuators, 7 and solar energy conversion devices. 8,9 Thisas fuel cells, 10 solar energy conversion devices, 1,11 and

  5. Biotemplated Hierarchical Nanostructure of Layered Double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    such as bubbles, colloids,4 polymers,5,6 surfactant,7 and porous anodic alumina8,9 have been widely used. However demonstrated as an effective and recyclable photocatalyst for the decomposition of dyes in water, owing to its

  6. The soft impact of composite sandwich beams with a square-honeycomb core B.P. Russell, T. Liu, N.A. Fleck, V.S. Deshpande*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    with finite element simulations based upon a damage mechanics approach. A range of failure modes were observed al. [7] and the detailed delamination studies of Xu and Rosakis [8,9]. Likewise, in the automotive failure mechanism and the fo

  7. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 195412 (2012) Bias-dependent D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    with an Elliot- Yafet-type mechanism was identified.6 Subsequent experi- ments appear to have confirmed to a few nanoseconds at 4 K were found in bilayer graphene.8,9 Following these experiments both the Elliot

  8. CELLULAR STRUCTURES IN INSTABILITIES : AN INTRODUCTION J.E. Wesfreid + and S. Zaleski ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    -7], continental drift motion [8-9], geothermal reservoirs [i0] are related to convection phenomena experiment, for instance, when the aspect ratio (i.e. ratio of horizontal dimensions to the vertical one

  9. Design and Synthesis of Plasmonic Core/Shell Nanorods for Light Trapping in Organic Photo-Voltaics, Non-Linear Optics and Photo-Thermal Tumor Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankovic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Biomedical Optics 15(1): 016010-016010. Chen,semiconductor films." Opt. Lett. Optics Letters 8(9): 491-H. “Plasmonic, Thermo-Optic and Electro-Optic Modulator

  10. 512 NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | JULY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the frequency or the phase of high-finesse superconducting microwave resonators8,9 . The hybridization of quantum dots with superconducting microwave elements leads to new methods for interferometry

  11. DEC SW 40th Street

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project outcomes: Construction of GSHP District Energy Plant. Energy/Cost Savings of HW, CHW, and DHW service (~8-9%). Data Collection to Establish Model for Geothermal District System.

  12. Autonomously-triggered microfluidic cooling using thermo-responsive Abhishek K. Agarwal,{a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hongrui

    water. Temperature-responsive hydrogels, which exhibit volumetric expansion and contraction, cooling, which can be facilitated by technologies such as air-cycling8,9 and pumps,10 generally requires

  13. The usefulness of the generalised computational model of Term Graph Rewriting Systems (TGRS) for designing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banach, Richard

    of programs written in UFO ([8,9]), a state-of-the-art object- oriented functional language, onto equivalent as follows: the next two sections introduce MONSTR and UFO and provide Term Graph Rewriting

  14. Engineering Competition 2012 BEST Engineering Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, Vassilis

    Engineering Competition 2012 8-9 2012 ATHENS #12;BEST Engineering Competition O : Engineering Competition 2012, , 8 9 2012, . , , BEST - Board of European Students. , 2 , " " . projects, , mail- . #12;BEST Engineering Competition

  15. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2011-01-01

    the separation of cathodic arc plasma and macroparticles infor filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition [8-9]; and theoptics [10]. An image of arc plasma transport in a curved

  16. Precision requirements for space-based X CO 2 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    5,6 A. Alkhaled, 5 P. Rayner, 7 D. J. Jacob, 8,9 P.Law, R. M. , D. J. Rayner, L. P. Steele, and I. G. Enting (Brien, D. M. , and P. J. Rayner (2002), Global observations

  17. Investigation of shear banding in three-dimensional foams G. Ovarlez1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stress, this leads to the viscosity bifurcation phenomenon [8,9]. This implies that, in addition) and shear-induced resuspension [11]. Some yield stress fluids seem not to exhibit shear banding, although

  18. DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 8-9, 2005, the Department of Energy held the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of...

  19. Supplement 15, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Nematoda And Acanthocephala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.; Beard, Mary I.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Mary I.

    1966-01-01

    Lake Balaton Camelostrongylus mentulatus Buchwalder, R., I962 a, 415, 416, 424-426, figs. 1, 8-9 Camelus dromedarius (feces) Tierpark Berlin-Friedrichs- felde Camelostrongylus mentula- tus Vicugna vicugna Guerrero Diaz, C. ?., [l962 a] 105 Peru...

  20. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

  1. Bioenergy Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol - A Joint Research Agenda, Jun 2006 (8.9 MB) Roadmap for Agricultural Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States, Nov 2003 (3.5 MB)...

  2. Removal of Engineered Nanomaterials Through Conventional Water Treatment Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Silver Released into Water from Commercially Available SockStability of commercial metal oxide nanoparticles in water.Water Res. 2008, 42 (8-9), 2204-12. Crittenden, J. C. ;

  3. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Kansas City, MO, March 8–9, 2011.

  4. The Industry/Utility Interface - An Overview 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    monopoly. An annual growth rate of electrical energy consumption of 8-9% per year, the continuing availability of increasingly larger and larger, more efficient generating units, coupled with fuel prices of less than 25c per million BTU'S, perpetuated...

  5. Electric-field gradients at the Zr sites in Zr3Fe: Measured using perturbed-angular-correlation spectroscopy and calculated using band theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Electric-field gradients at the Zr sites in Zr3Fe: Measured using perturbed-angular-correlation spectroscopy and calculated using band theory Arthur T. Motta, Stephen E. Cumblidge, and Gary L. Catchen; published 13 December 2001 We have measured the electric-field-gradient EFG parameters VZZ

  6. Slides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel J. Kelleher

    2014-08-31

    where E1(f,g) = E(f,g) + ?f,g?L2 ... Say G = (V,E) is a graph, and we say that x ? y if x is connected ... Michael J. Ignatowich, Catherine E. Maloney, David J. Miller,.

  7. Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

  8. ASSESSMENT OF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PM 1-2 PM 1-2 PM 2-3 PM 2-3 PM 3-4 PM 3-4 PM 4-5 PM 4-5 PM 5-6 PM 5-6 PM 6-7 PM 6-7 PM 7-8 PM 7-8 PM 8-9 PM 8-9 PM 9-10 PM 9-10 PM 10-11 PM 10-11 PM 11 PM- Midnight 11 PM-...

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  10. Contoured inner after-heater shield for reducing stress in growing crystalline bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalejs, Juris P. (Wellesley, MA)

    1996-09-24

    An apparatus for growing hollow crystalline bodies by the EFG process, comprising an EFG die having a top surface shaped for growing a hollow crystalline body having a cross-sectional configuration in the shape of a polygon having n faces, and a radiation shield adjacent to and surrounded by the top end surface of the die, characterized in that the shield has an inner edge defining a similar polygon with n sides, and the inner edge of the shield is notched so that the spacing between the n faces and the n sides is greatest between the central portions of the n faces and the n sides, whereby the greater spacing at the central portions helps to reduce lateral temperature gradients in the crystalline body that is grown by use of the die.

  11. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on the agronomic characteristics of corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, Freddy Gene

    1969-01-01

    weights v!ere not ef Fected by MDMV. Al 1 the i n- bred lines shcwed symptoms oF the virus but there were different degrees of tolerance. in the hybrid test NiDNiV delayed maturity, ; educed plant and ear heigh'ts, reduc d yi lds and also ear widths... and the uninoculated plots . For the inb& ed test. Inbred Lines FD~aays to 5i]k+ Inoculated Uninoculated K64 Tx61M I x585 ; x12/C Tx441 Tx173D Tx203 i'x 303 Tx325 Tx508 Tx601 Tx602 77. 3 g 78. 8 efg 79. 8 def 78. 3 efg 74. 8 h 83. 2 bc 79. 3 def...

  12. Nitrogen utilization efficiency in sorghum cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Stewart Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Blb 72nd 68ef 64e 70 68bcd 65cdef 65cde 61efg 61efg 56g 56g 87ab Blab 78cd 71d 76cd 63f 74d 65ef Bob 75bc 72de 68d 69def 62ef 65fg 61ef 71bc 61defg 83bc 75c Average 66 63 79 71 73 67 Means within a year and N rate followed by the same.... 5bcd 22. 5bc 13. 2cd 12. 8cd 16. 8bcd 17. 0bcd 11. 5cd 6 ld 115. 7a 97. 7b 36. 0cd 39. 6c 36. 0cd 27. 1cdef 26. 9cdef 29. Bede 23. 5cdef 19. 4def 21. 3cdef 19. 6def 12. 7ef 9. 0f 46. 9b 64. 3a 32. 7c 30. 0c 96. 4a 88. 5a...

  13. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gunwoo; Griffin, John M.; Blanc, Frédéric; Haile, Sossina M.; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-03-03

    in the superprotonic phase, proton conductivity arising from structural and dynamic disorder of hydrogen bonds and phosphate anions.6 Understanding this is key to engineering novel, improved electrolytic materials for these applications. In this context, mixed... Hz. Powder averaging was achieved using the ZCW6765 scheme. For all oxygen sites, ?iso, CQ, ?Q, and the Euler angles describing the relative orientations of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors for the oxygen sites were used as input parameters, the data...

  14. Porous Solids DOI: 10.1002/anie.200503950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    solids have found technological applications as [*] N. N. Akl, X. Qi, J. Y. Kim, Prof. F. E. Osterloh in electrically conducting compo- sites,[14­17] as electrode materials for Li-battery applications,[18 mobile ions into porous structures.[8,9] We describe herein a novel approach to metallic porous solids

  15. A model of ideal elastomeric gels for polyelectrolyte gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    as smart materials in sensors and actuators.8,9 These applications have motivated the development of theo effect well and that it provides a good description of the free energy associated with the stretching that the presence of cross-links does not affect the mixing energy of the polymer chains and the solvent measurably

  16. Chemical Sensor Based on Microfabricated Wristwatch Tuning Forks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    made of different conducting polymers or composites in combination with multivariate statistical tech-7 single-walled carbon nanotubes,8,9 polyaniline micro/ nanostructures, 10-12 and carbon-polymer composites the mechanical response of a thin (10-µm) polymer wire stretched across the two prongs of a wristwatch quartz

  17. Influence of Chemisorption on the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    composites. However, direct ex- perimental measurements of the thermal properties of CNT- polymer composites to a polymer matrix greatly improves the system's thermal conductivity,8,9 while others report that the effect transfer in CNT-polymer composites without significantly sacrificing the high axial Young's modulus of CNTs

  18. Ecological correlates of sociality in Pemphigus aphids, with a partial phylogeny of the genus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Nathan; Whitfield, John A; Foster, William A

    2007-10-03

    when a species has acquired soldiers, morphs that actively defend against predators. It is undoubtedly rele- vant that these soldiers are often the agents of socially advanced behaviours other than defence, such as nest cleaning [8,9], nest repair [10...

  19. Library Guide Access ... 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    ____________________________ Library Guide 2012-2013 #12;Contents Access ... 3 Finding things ... 4-6 Layout and classification... 7 Floor plans ... 8-9 Borrowing things ... 10 Renewing and returning things;Sidney Sussex Library Guide 2012-2013 Welcome to the Richard Powell Library Tel: (01223) 338852 e

  20. Library Guide Access ... 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    ____________________________ Library Guide 2014-2015 #12;Contents Access ... 3 Finding things ... 4-6 Layout and classification... 7 Floor plans ... 8-9 Borrowing things ... 10 Renewing and returning things;Sidney Sussex Library Guide 2014-2015 Welcome to the Richard Powell Library Tel: (01223) 338852 e

  1. Birth and growth of a granular jet John R. Royer,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    through a granular pack 8,9 and the functional form of the drag force on an object moving through a granu. This is demon- strated by the granular jet formed by the impact of a solid sphere into a bed of loose, fine sand is the result of an interplay between ambient gas, bed particles, and impacting sphere. Here we present

  2. Comparison of simulations and data from a seismo-acoustic tank Jon M. Collisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the slab requires accounting for shear waves in this environment. Acoustic measurements were obtained along for solving such range-dependent seismo-acoustics problems,8,9 including anisotropic10 and interface wave prior to the experiment. We were unable to obtain acoustic/fluid para- bolic equation solutions

  3. Large and ultrafast third-order optical nonlinearity of heteroleptic triple-decker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Large and ultrafast third-order optical nonlinearity of heteroleptic triple-decker Abstract The third-order optical nonlinearity of two triple-decker mixed phthalocyaninato and porphyrinato investigated for several homoleptic double- decked diphthalocyanines [8,9]. One interesting property

  4. Flame Dynamics and Structure Within Sub-Millimeter Combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of micro-and mesoscale portable heat and power sources, and systems for a myriad of applications,1 of micro- and mesoscale heat sources through development of micro- combustors, engines, heaters) in confined spaces with a large surface-area-to-volume ratio.8,9 Relatively lower temperature devices

  5. Genizah MS T-S AS 70.261

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2010-12-07

    *k T-S AS 70.261 *t Bible translation (?) *s 5 x 8.9; 4 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Text too damaged to identify, appears to be a Bible translation with Hebrew incipits *e...

  6. JOURNAL OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY J. Raman Spectrosc. 2003; 34: 769775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    . An additional change in the spectrum is observed between 7.7 and 8.9 GPa, possibly due to the formation for these changes have been the subject of much study.2 A recently discovered phase transition in pyroxenes display C1 site symmetry. According to factor group analysis, there are 14 Ag and 16 Bg Raman-active modes

  7. This journal is c the Owner Societies 2012 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Cite this: DOI: 10.1039/c2cp42121f

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    , and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents of living, together with increased agricultural and industrial activities further limit the availability of oil and natural gas byproduct waters.8,9 Desa- lination of sea water via ion exchange has been

  8. Terahertz multistatic reflection imaging Timothy D. Dorney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    and is made possible by the availability of fiber-coupled THz receiver antennas. We use a migration procedure techniques for improved spatial resolution,8,9 interferometric imaging for improved depth resolution,10 formation procedure, also using fiber- coupled THz antennas.17 This approach, known as Kirchhoff migration

  9. Molecular Orientation and Relaxation of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) by Polarization Modulation Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezolet, Michel

    (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is induced during its processing via fiber spinning or blow molding. This polymer can crystals. Finally, shrinkage experiments on oriented PET have demonstrated that, beyond a certain degree of orientation, shrinkage is hindered due to the development of crystallinity.8,9 To investigate the orientation

  10. Design Challenges and Activation Concerns for ARIES Vacuum Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    composition specifically tailored for LLW) ­ 3Cr-3WV bainitic steels ­ 8-9%Cr reduced activation ferritic-martensitic is unacceptable for VV due to complex heat treatment requirement · Selection of austenitic stainless steel (such-based steel). #12;7 Seven Steels Selected for Further Analysis The seven steels: ­ F82H ferritic steel (having

  11. Power-Law Fading of the Frustration Effect in a Periodic Rectangular Superconducting Network with Increasing Aspect Ratio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Ren; CHEN, RL.

    1988-01-01

    ). 26. A. Samara and H. Tpraechi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 347 (1987). 3J. H. Davies, P. A. Lee, and T. M. Rice, Phys. Rev. 8?9, 4260 (1984). 4T. C. Halsey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1018 (1985); D. Deutscher and K. A. Muller, ibEd 59, 1745 (1.987); see also...

  12. A7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated Haiti in January 2010. On March

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    A7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated Haiti in January 2010. On March 11, an 8.9 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Japan -- the most powerful in the nation's recorded history -- generated earthquake with an epicenter in northern Virginia rattled houses and nerves from Florida to Maine, damaging

  13. GIS IN LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Distance Education Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 GIS IN LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SWS 5721C Distance Education Section [GIS: Geographic Information, reading material, library of GIS video clips, and GIS resources) Email and discussion board are used communication): Chat sessions: Thursday 8-9 p.m. US Eastern Time. A virtual computer lab is used for GIS

  14. On the Role of External Constraints in a Spatially Extended Evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antal, Tibor

    (viruses that infect bacteria) [8,9]. In these systems the players wish to maximize their individual income-player matrix games where the players' income depend on their simulta- neous choice between two options is symmetric in the sense that player's income is independent of the player itself, it depends only

  15. World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) WTEC Workshop Report on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkle, Ralph C.

    of low cost is set by the cost of the raw materials and energy involved in manufacture, the limit in Nanoparticles, Nanostructured Materials, and Nanodevices in the United States Proceedings of the May 8-9, 1997 A new manufacturing technology looms on the horizon: molecular nanotechnology (http

  16. March 2014 Visual Sample Plan Version 7.08.1 8.0 References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Term Monitoring Networks." Bioremediation Journal 8:89-107. Cameron, K, and P Hunter. 2002, "Using Spatial Models and Kriging Techniques to Optimize Long-Term Ground-Water Monitoring Networks: A Case Study." Environmetrics of trends with emphasis on water quality applications , Hydrological Processes 10:127-149. Fisher, R. A

  17. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 232 (2009) 5460 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    configurations for cars [8,9]. Unfortunately, the introduction of new parameters in hybrid methods reduces.elsevier.com/locate/cam A fully adaptive hybrid optimization of aircraft engine blades L. Dumasa, , B. Druezb , N. Lecerfb 2007 Received in revised form 26 June 2008 Keywords: Optimization Genetic algorithms Hybrid methods

  18. The energy sector in Sri Lanka is currently a hotbed of activity and change. A reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the electricity sector in this small island country in South Asia. The country's current installed power capacity at an annual rate of 8-9%. 60% of the power comes from large-hydro facilities, however, almost all large hydro that intends to provide for off-grid power needs with renewable energy technologies like solar PV, micro-hydro

  19. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 241 0.400 0.430 0.024 42 8.9 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  20. Characterization of CdS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition using four different cadmium sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Lee

    , such as cadmium sulfate [8,9], cadmium acetate [10­14], cadmium iodide/nitrate [15­18], and cadmium chloride [11Characterization of CdS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition using four different cadmium January 2008 Abstract A comprehensive study of the effect of cadmium sources on chemical bath deposited

  1. Ris Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3 1. European Commission. (2007). Communication from the Commis- sion to the European Council and the European Parliament ­ An energy policy of the Brussels European Council 8/9 March 2007. Brussels. (7224/1/07 Rev. 1). 3. Danish Energy authority. (2007

  2. EE 2CJ4: Circuits and Systems file:///home/jeremic/outline.html 1 of 3 01/07/2008 08:37 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremic, Aleksandar

    of linear second-order circuits (Dorf: Chs 8,9; Irwin: Ch 7; Rizzoni: Ch 5) Advanced steady-state analysis Transform analysis of linear circuits (Dorf: Ch 14; Irwin: Chs 13,14) Two-port networks (Dorf: Ch 17; Irwin for voltages at nodes, and branch or loop currents. They will be able to solve linear transient circuit

  3. 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim (1 of 8) 1501152wileyonlinelibrary.com A Hybridized Power Panel to Simultaneously Generate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    energy harvesting with a lower produc- tion cost per watt. With the solar panels quickly spreading across at a speed of 2.7 m s-1, which is an innovative energy compensa- tion to the common solar cells, especially devoted to developing the renewable and green energy technologies.[8,9] Among them, solar energy

  4. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 January ... 99.4 100.8 105.4 102.1 102.9 91.6 96.2 107.0 110.1 101.8 89.2 February ... 94.2 96.5 101.2 101.4 98.8 86.9 91.9...

  5. Realization and Modeling of Metamaterials Made of rf Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ,5], cloaking [6,7], transformation optics [8,9], and perfect absorption [10]. Most of the applications invoking in space (e.g., for cloaking or transformation optics) or that can be tuned and reconfigured after for digital rf receivers [25,26]. Superconducting metamaterials have been proposed to address all three

  6. mess:Read[ans] nxt] state] => *QMyCounter[self qhd curr state],

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banach, Richard

    as such a framework. Although we have concentrated on a specific language model (UFO), we can show MONSTR by examining the different MONSTR code needed to describe different versions of UFO (e.g. [8,9], and as shown in our fleeting discussion of UFO ), especially wrt the interaction between concurrency, state and method

  7. Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gpm) per pump - 1 pump can move 1.3-1.4 m 3 minute (8-9 bpm) of stimulation fluid * Fuel consumption per job is assumed to be 118.5 m 3 (31,300 gal) Scenarios Water for...

  8. A multithreaded modular software toolkit for control of complex experiments N. Sinenian,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for real-time applications.10,11 These options each have strengths and weaknesses. DDKs ease driver options are available to the experimenter. One such option is to create a control scheme from scratch control.8,9 Several options exist for the experimenter both for con- trol and data acquisition; here we

  9. Quantum Accelerator Modes from the Farey Tree A. Buchleitner,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summy, Gil

    driven quantum systems [5], quantum reso- nances [6,7], and stochastic web states [8,9]. These ``strong. Eigenmodes of a periodically driven dissipative system are locked in their time evolution onto the phaseQuantum Accelerator Modes from the Farey Tree A. Buchleitner,1 M. B. d'Arcy,2,* S. Fishman,3 S. A

  10. Samira Fazlollahi1,2, Gwenaelle Becker 2, Michel Guichard 2, Francois Marechal 1 1 Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    [103 kg/MJ] GPC [103 /MJth] B -39 32.2 8.9 J -6 65 7.5 B: gas boilers, steam turbines, gasifier and biogas engines J: gas boilers, steam turbines and gas engines economical targets environmental impacts

  11. Problems associated with the establishment of a whole body counter at a university reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Gregory R

    1999-01-01

    the information collected in the counts, all three of the detectors were calibrated according to the guidelines established in ANSI N 13.30 and NCRP Report 57, using guidance from NUREG 8.9. The primary results of this project were: 1) a knowledge of how...

  12. Acta Materialia 51 (2003) 24572475 www.actamat-journals.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    for an effective ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) are recog- nized to be: (i) low thermal conductivity; (ii-up of these "splats" results in a lay- ered arrangement in the coating, analogous to a brick-wall-like structure where the splats are entwined in complex arrays [8,9]. This splat-based layered microstructure leads

  13. Effects of shock waves on Rayleigh-Taylor instability Yong-Tao Zhanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yong-Tao

    in an astrophysical setting8,9 and in an inertial confinement fusion.10 Progress in an understanding of RTI be identified as a mixing layer forma- tion. Pacitto et al.15 reported an RTI experiment using a magnetic fluid and applying a magnetic field. These authors measured different values of the magnetic field, the wave- length

  14. ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng Chu, Winnie V. Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zheng

    ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng substrates using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mesa geometry light emitting diodes (LEDs) were demonstrated in recent years, such as photodetectors,8,9) light-emitting diodes (LEDs),10­13) and random lasing

  15. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE March 8-9, 2001 #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber on analysis ­ Remaining issues #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry

  16. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 January ... 2.8 2.9 2.8 5.8 - 8.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 1.0 - 1.3 February ... 3.0 3.0 3.1 5.8 - 8.9 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.9 - 1.3 March...

  17. Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Yun Jung as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study

  18. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G. Chemical Compatibility p.9 Radioactive Waste Disposal p.10 Bio Hazard Waste chemical and radioactive waste, and Biohazardous waste. This document contains university procedures

  19. Structural Requirements and Reaction Pathways in Dimethyl Ether Combustion Catalyzed by Supported Pt Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    of the elementary steps required for catalytic combustion of dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt clusters were determined in developing economies. Recent studies have addressed steam reforming of DME on supported metal catalysts4-7 and its homogeneous combustion pathways via radical intermedi- ates.8,9 Here, we explore the catalytic

  20. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 January ... 2.8 2.8 3.3 5.3 - 8.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.8 - 1.4 February ... 2.9 2.9 3.7 5.2 - 8.9 0.6 0.6 W 0.8 - 1.4 March...

  1. 364 wileyonlinelibrary.com www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    to tailor BHJ morphology.[8,9] Despite these improvements, most optimized D-A polymer BHJ solar cells in the Mixed Regions of Polymer­Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells J. A. Bartelt, Z. M. Beiley, W. R-based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells[1] consisting of electron-donating polymers and electron

  2. Electronic Structure and Spectra of Catechol and Alizarin in the Gas Phase and Attached to Titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , photoelectrolysis, waste processing, quantum confine- ment devices, and solar cells.1-5 Solar cells of the Gra of the dye-excited state influence the efficiency of the solar cell.8,9 The competition of charge¨tzel type are based on transition metal or organic dye molecules that are adsorbed to a highly porous

  3. EWONAP Procurement Fundamentals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HUD's Eastern Woodlands Office of Native American Programs in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center invites you to attend the Procurement Fundamentals training instructed by Vince Franco, Compliance & Resource Development Director of the Native Learning Center in Atlanta, Georgia on September 8-9, 2014.

  4. 1 | P a g e Intensive Freshman Seminars Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    learning community and our lives, are: Integrity: ascribing to the same set of personal principles in all Information and Personal Survey on our website by July 6, 2015. We hope that as you look back on this program to Academic Integrity 6 IFS Begins 8-9 Preparing for IFS 10-11 Settling in at IFS 12-15 IU Dictionary 16

  5. A Metal-Organic Bilayer Open Framework with a Dynamic Component: Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    ,5 catalysis,6,7 and sensor technology.8,9 Compared with the formation of inorganic porous materials devices. Here we report the synthesis of a bilayer open framework, which retains its framework are useful in design and synthesis of multidimensional networks since they have two fixed vacant coordination

  6. Observation of Terahertz Emission from a Laser-Plasma Accelerated Electron Bunch Crossing a Plasma-Vacuum Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    resolution. T rays have applications [1,2] in biological imaging, material screening, semiconductor imaging, which can be used to noninvasively measure optical prop- erties of materials with hundred micron in dielectric properties (transition radiation) [8,9]. The radiation is coherent when electrons in a bunch emit

  7. Vector Map Compression: A Clustering Approach Shashi Shekhar, Yan Huang, Judy Djugash, Changqing Zhou y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shekhar, Shashi

    ­192 Minneapolis, MN 55414 [shekhar; huangyan; djugash; czhou]@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT Vector maps (e.g. road maps and/or a fee. GIS'02, November 8--9, 2002, McLean, Virginia, USA. Copyright 2002 ACM 1­58113­XXX­X/02

  8. American Journal of Primatology 74:11061127 (2012) RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    , SUZANNE PALMINTERI6, RICARDO R. SANTOS7, LIZA M. VEIGA8,9, THIAGO H.G. ALVIM10, MARK BOWLER11, JANICE CHISM12, ANTHONY DI FIORE13, EDUARDO FERNANDEZ-DUQUE14, ANA C. P. GUIMAR ~AES8, AMY HARRISON-LEVINE15

  9. Management & Officers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    the information collected in the counts, all three of the detectors were calibrated according to the guidelines established in ANSI N 13.30 and NCRP Report 57, using guidance from NUREG 8.9. The primary results of this project were: 1) a knowledge of how...

  10. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    8-9 Volume XXIV, No. 4 July/August/September 2012 Operations, Maintenance and Engineering 3 Operations, Maintenance, Engineering Successes 12 Planning and Construction Successes 28 Technical Support 36 Professional Development 42 This Issue: Operations, Maintenance and Engineering #12;D I G E S T Public Works

  11. Physica D 238 (2009) 11681179 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacson, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    boundary method Finite volume method a b s t r a c t A mechanism is presented which drives a fluid flow.J. Atzberger). generate deformations in vessels containing a drug for delivery. In [8,9] propulsion mechanisms: www.elsevier.com/locate/physd A microfluidic pumping mechanism driven by non-equilibrium osmotic

  12. Nanolithography probes Novel Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Probes for High-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    excep- tionally well in DPN molecular writing/imaging mode. Furthermore, the integration of UNCD films tasks such as drilling, cutting, or milling.[9,10] The cost of these specialized probes-69451 Weinheim DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500028 small 2005, 1, No. 8-9, 866 ­874 full papers H. D. Espinosa

  13. Department of Energy Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buses used in revenue service since 2000 No engine issues, fuel consumption equivalent to CNG Improved cost represents a 20% premium over CNG (CNG at $1.50 per gge and hydrogen at $3 per gge) #12;10 Ballard consumption of 8.9 miles per gge is 2.5 times better than conventional CNG bus Lessons learned applied to P-5

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C9, supplCment au Journal de Physique 111, Volume 3, dCcembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the internal attack occurs by selective chlorination of chromium carbides which precipitate along the grain quality chlorine "contaminated" fuels [8,9]. High temperature corrosion by chlorine differs from corrosion;144 JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV with chromium to form chromium carbides preventing formation of a protective

  15. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    28.8 0.71 8.9 2.82 26.4 Colorado... 2.48 27.6 2.28 42.0 2.35 35.6 Connecticut ... 5.85 74.2 3.67 70.7 4.77 72.4 Delaware ... 3.70...

  16. A Study in Causal Discovery from Population-Based Infant Birth and Death Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valtorta, Marco

    causally to infant mortality in the United States. We used the U.S. Linked Birth Infant Death dataset rates than the United States. Japan had the lowest rate of 4.4, while the US rate was 8.9 3 . This paper contribute causally to infant mortality in the United States. Infant mortality is one of the most important

  17. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature12930 Alveolar progenitorand stem cells in lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature12930 Alveolar progenitorand stem cells in lung development, renewal or maintain AT1 and AT2 cells, and alveoli are a major site of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death2cellsisobservedfollowingbulklabellingofAT2cellpopulations8,9 . To circumvent slow turnover, lung injury models have been used and provide

  18. Biomaterials 27 (2006) 176184 Functional compressive mechanics of a PVA/PVP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karduna, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterials 27 (2006) 176­184 Functional compressive mechanics of a PVA/PVP nucleus pulposus­7] and nucleus replacement [8,9] are two non-fusion techniques emerging as potential ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials

  19. ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF CO EMISSIONS IN THE LOS ANGELES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    #12;ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF CO EMISSIONS IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN Donald H. Stedman, Gary A. Comparison of tailpipe %CO measured by an on-board analyzer and by remote sensing. Data collected 12/8/89, 12

  20. Killing in Okaraygua: An Inspector Irronogaray Mystery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Stuart

    2012-09-05

    /dp/B0096TUC9K/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1347294990&sr=8-9&keywords=Stuart+Levine Description: Killing in Okaraygua is an historical novel as well as a murder mystery that takes place in an imaginary Latin American nation in the 1980s. The characters found...

  1. Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for zero voltage switching (ZVS) with fixed frequency and power control [8,9]. II. STEADYSTATE ANALYSISDesign of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast with Phase, Spain azcondof@unican.es,branasc@unican.es Absrracr - The paper presents the design guidelinesof phase

  2. Enhanced Biosensing Resolution with Foundry Fabricated Individually Addressable Dual-Gated ISFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    small signals and increase the sensor accuracy when monitoring small pH dynamics in biological reactions reactions into electrical signals.1,2 In an ISFET, the gate region is exposed to an electrolyte, making,8,9 and ISFETs made with metal oxides and polymers are used to monitor biological activity.10

  3. Grain boundary energies in body-centered cubic metals Sutatch Ratanaphan,a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    . In annealed polycrystals, the grain boundary energy distribu- tion (GBED) is known to be inversely correlatedO [8,9], Y2O3 [10], Ni [11], a Ni-based alloy [12], a ferritic steel [13], and an austenitic steel [14

  4. Rainfall limit of the N cycle on Earth Stephanie A. Ewing,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    Richard C. Quinn,5 Jennifer L. Macalady,6 Steven Kohl,7 Scott D. Wankel,8,9 Carol Kendall,8 Christopher P. Citation: Ewing, S. A., G. Michalski, M. Thiemens, R. C. Quinn, J. L. Macalady, S. Kohl, S. D. Wankel, C

  5. LAW VII & ID 7th Linguistic Annotation Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Workshop August 8-9, 2013 Sofia, Bulgaria #12;Production and Manufacturing by Omnipress, Inc. 2600 Anderson Interest Group for Annotation (ACL SIGANN). It provides a forum to facilitate the exchange and propagation a two-day event which would reach out to both communities. Traditionally, the LAW features a theme

  6. SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

  7. Seismic Response of the SchoolSeismic Response of the School Buildings in Van to the EarthquakeBuildings in Van to the Earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Response of the SchoolSeismic Response of the School Buildings in Van to the Earthquake, Yavuz Durgun, Istanbul Technical University, 8-9 February, 2012-Istanbul 2/40 SEISMIC RESPONSE.11.201109.11.2011 2. School buildings in the Turkish Seismic Code 3. Typical school buildings in Turkey 4. Seismic

  8. Chebyshev expansion methods for electronic structure calculations on large molecular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    of con- structing new semiempirical tight binding models,2 where there too the groundstate energy are the plane- wave total energy and Car­Parrinello approaches.8,9 These methods are capable of dealing of an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, of the form1 H 2 2me 2 r , 1.1 for determining the ground state energy

  9. Author's personal copy Geometric control of capillary architecture via cell-matrix mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Systems and Intelligence Science, The Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China tissue function [1,2]. A critical challenge in building any tissue, however, is the requirement for integrating with the host vasculature [8,9]. In these situati

  10. Local heat transfer measurement and thermo-fluid characterization of a pulsating heat pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandekar, Sameer

    and possibly future specific requirements from electronics cooling [6,7], heat recovery [8,9] and passiveLocal heat transfer measurement and thermo-fluid characterization of a pulsating heat pipe Mauro 2013 Accepted 29 July 2013 Available online Keywords: Pulsating Heat Pipes Local heat transfer Pressure

  11. Efficient organic light-emitting diodes using polycrystalline silicon thin films as semitransparent anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.2032604 Organic light-emitting diodes OLED have attracted much interest due to their potential application in flat with silicon microdisplay OLED.8,9 However, silicon has high absorption in the visible light which greatlyEfficient organic light-emitting diodes using polycrystalline silicon thin films as semitransparent

  12. Second Harmonic Generation in Neurons: Electro-Optic Mechanism of Membrane Potential Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuste, Rafael

    of Biological Sciences, and y Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York ABSTRACT Second harmonic an excellent SHG chromophore (8,9). We observed a linear dependency between SHG signals and membrane potential angle, the tilt angle of the dye molecule with respect to the plasma membrane can be analytically

  13. NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} and steric effect of Nd on valence mixing and ordering of Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, J.; Karen, P.

    2010-11-15

    NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} above and below Verwey transition is studied by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy and compared with GdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} that adopts a higher-symmetry charge-ordered structure typical of the Sm-Ho variants of the title phase. Differences are investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy accounting for iron valence states at their local magnetic and ionic environments. In the charge-ordered state, the orientation of the electric-field gradient (EFG) versus the internal magnetic field (B) agrees with experiment only when contribution from charges of the ordered d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup 2+} is included, proving thus the orbital ordering. The EFG magnitude indicates that only some 60% of the orbital order occurring in the Sm-Ho variants is achieved in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The consequent diminishing of the orbit contribution (of opposite sign) to the field B at the Fe{sup 2+} nucleus explains why B is larger than for the Sm-Ho variants. The decreased orbital ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} causes a corresponding decrease in charge ordering, which is achieved by decreasing both the amount of the charge-ordered iron states in the sample and their fractional valence separation as seen by the Moessbauer isomer shift. The charge ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} is more easily suppressed by the oxygen nonstoichiometry (w) than in the Sm-Ho variants. Also the valence mixing into Fe{sup 2.5+} is destabilized by the large size of Nd. The orientation of the EFG around this valence-mixed iron can only be accounted for when the valence-mixing electron is included in the electrostatic ligand field. This proves that the valence mixing occurs between the two iron atoms facing each other across the structural plane of the rare-earth atoms. -- Graphical Abstract: Moessbauer spectrum detects ordering of d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup II}O{sub 5} via the electric-field gradient (EFG) of the orbital, which makes the main component of the total EFG parallel with the magnetic moment B. Display Omitted

  14. . United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG pw,

  15. . UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG

  16. Change Notice for DOE-STD-3013-2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to aMeetingNational891 EFG 107-9OJ

  17. Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to aMeetingNational891 EFG

  18. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabama Alabama ProfileDistrictD (2001) --EFG

  19. Bandgap measurements of low-k porous organosilicate dielectrics using vacuum ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, H.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Ryan, V. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoemission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of VUV radiation on porous organosilicate (SiCOH) dielectrics during plasma processing. By comparing photoemission spectroscopic results before and after VUV exposure, VUV irradiation with photon energies less than 9.0?eV was found to be beneficial in depleting accumulated charge in SiCOH films while VUV photons with higher energies did not have this effect. Moreover, VUV irradiation with 8.9?eV photons depletes the most charge. From this result, it can be concluded that 8.9?eV is the bandgap plus the electron affinity energy of SiCOH dielectrics.

  20. Models for Self-Gravitating Photon Shells and Geons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andréasson, Håkan; Thaller, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    We prove existence of spherically symmetric, static, self-gravitating photon shells as solutions to the massless Einstein-Vlasov system. The solutions are highly relativistic in the sense that the ratio $2m(r)/r$ is close to $8/9$, where $m(r)$ is the Hawking mass and $r$ is the area radius. In 1955 Wheeler constructed, by numerical means, so called idealized spherically symmetric geons, i.e. solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations for which the energy momentum tensor is spherically symmetric on a time average. The structure of these solutions is such that the electromagnetic field is confined to a thin shell for which the ratio $2m/r$ is close to $8/9$, i.e., the solutions are highly relativistic photon shells. The solutions presented in this work provide an alternative model for photon shells or idealized spherically symmetric geons.

  1. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000 January ... 37.6 38.7 41.2 134.9 28.8 204.9 8.5 8.6 8.8 13.4 - 22.2 February ... 41.4 42.8 45.6 152.4 25.9 223.9 8.9 9.1 9.6 15.2 - 24.7...

  2. Spinodally synthesized magnetoelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shenqiang; Wuttig, Manfred

    2007-08-20

    . Examples are bulk composites of Terfenol-D/PVDF #1;Polyvinylidene Difluoride,8,9 Fe–Ga/PMN-PT #1;Lead magnesium niobate- Lead titanate#2;,10 CoFe2O4/BaTiO3,11 Terfenol-D/PMN-PT12 LSMO/PZT,13,14 and Metglas/PVDF laminates.15,16 Pulsed laser films from...

  3. Effects of quenching and tempering on the microstructure and bake hardening behavior of ferrite and dual phase steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    ]. The quenching of the DP steel results not only in the formation of martensite, but also in the high residual and hard martensite islands [8,9]. Thus, the microstructure evolution of the DP steel during paint baking and dual phase steels C.F. Kuang a,n , J. Li b , S.G. Zhang a , J. Wang b , H.F. Liu b , A.A. Volinsky c

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set Low December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  7. Schwerpunkt: Kompetenz Portrt: Claudia Eder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    .design Bildnachweis: S.1 Peter Pulkowski, S.2 thomas hartmann (l,r), S.4 Madeleine Kling (l), S.4/5 thomas hartmann (m,r), S.6 thomas hartmann (o), Peter Pulkowski (u), S.6/7 thomas hart- mann (m,r), S.8/9 thomas hartmann-fotolia.com (u), S.11 hbzett/harald Linnemann(o), S.12 thomas hartmann (ul), S.12 thomas hartmann (ol

  8. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    99.4 100.8 105.4 102.1 102.9 91.6 96.2 107.0 110.1 101.8 89.2 February ... 94.2 96.5 101.2 101.4 98.8 86.9 91.9 101.1 104.7 96.6 83.8 March...

  9. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000 January ... 88.2 87.8 82.7 75.7 69.5 76.2 98.0 97.8 89.3 79.6 - 83.4 February ... 95.6 95.2 89.4 86.5 80.1 86.3 104.9 104.7 96.1 90.2 -...

  10. Electron drift-mobility measurements in polycrystalline CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiff, Eric A.

    .1063/1.3692165] The chalcopyrite alloys CuIn1ÀxGaxSe2 (CIGS) are the basis of very promising thin film solar cells, with solar con conduction band states.8,9 Empirical optimization of CIGS for solar cells thus appears to have led to lowElectron drift-mobility measurements in polycrystalline CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells S. A. Dinca, E. A

  11. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2002, p. 48274834 Vol. 68, No. 10 0099-2240/02/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.68.10.48274834.2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    , hydroxyl, phosphoryl, and amine groups. These surface func- tional groups deprotonate with increasing p.2) and amine groups (mean pKa of 8.9). Sheath material isolated by using lysozyme and sodium dodecyl sulfate generated pKa spectra similarly dominated by carboxyls (pKa of 4.6 to 6.1) and amines (pKa of 8.1 to 9

  12. Investigating and Refining Roles: Health Educators' Preparation and Competency for Delivering Nutrition Education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette

    2012-10-19

    health professionals including nurses, therapists and health educators are being called upon to serve as informal or adjunct nutrition educators. There has been a wealth of research conducted regarding nutrition ____________ This dissertation... follows the style of the American Journal of Health Education. 2 education for nurses,2,3 medical doctors,4,5 dentists,6,7and therapists.8,9However the scholarly literature has been deafeningly silent on nutrition‘s role in the training of health...

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 ... 86.8 89.1 94.3 94.9 91.7 79.4 2002 January... 63.7 64.8 70.1 68.7 67.7 55.3 February.. 65.0 66.6 70.7 70.9 68.8 57.5 March..... 73.6 76.3 79.1 78.2 77.1 67.8...

  14. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 January... 2.8 2.9 2.8 5.8 - 8.6 February.. 3.0 3.0 3.1 5.8 - 8.9 March..... 2.2 2.2 2.6 4.1 - 6.7 April..... 1.6 1.6 2.1 3.7 - 5.8 May... 1.4 1.4 1.8 3.9 - 5.7...

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 January... 106.8 128.5 88.3 82.3 126.0 103.3 February.. 106.7 129.2 87.0 67.0 122.1 97.2 March..... 103.9 124.5 81.1 57.6 112.8 89.7 April..... 117.7 134.9 80.2 57.0 100.6...

  16. Nucleation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes X. Fan,1,2,* R. Buczko,1,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Geohegan,1 J.Y. Howe,6 S.T. Pantelides,1,4 and S. J. Pennycook1,4 1 Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 3 Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02­7], others from a condensed phase [8,9], with growth taking place either at the tip [10,11] or the root [8

  17. STM Study of Copper Growth on ZnO(0001)-Zn and ZnO(0001bar)-O Surfaces Lynn Vogel Koplitz, Olga Dulub, and Ulrike Diebold*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    -4 the production of hydro- gen by steam reforming5,6 or decomposition of methanol,7 and the water-gas shift reaction for CO removal from reformed fuels to enable their use in fuel cells.8,9 Similar catalysts have of the interaction of the Cu with ZnO substrate, and the exact role of the ZnO in the catalytic activity of Cu

  18. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 January... 2.8 2.8 3.3 5.3 - 8.6 February.. 2.9 2.9 3.7 5.2 - 8.9 March..... 2.6 2.6 3.4 3.8 - 7.2 April..... 1.6 1.6 NA 2.5 - NA May... 1.6 1.6 1.3 2.5 - 3.8 June.........

  19. DOI: 10.1002/ejic.201000555 Flexible and Redox-Active Coordination Polymer: Control of the Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    )oxamethyl]- methane (Na4TCM) in DMF/water. The X-ray structure of 1 reveals that the pyridyl pendant arms their structures in re- sponse to external stimuli are interesting[1,3b,8,9] due to their potential to be applied for the production of small and monodis- persed metal nanoparticles.[3a,10,11] Metal nanoparticles less than 10 nm

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 3677 Life in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleigh, Matt

    '+,-&',.'/.,0&$%&'8.9'MNE$8OC"G8$'?G8.&E%' ' +&7E#$&'D8E&%'8.9'+&7E#$&$' ' 67E#8G' +&7E#$&' P#:=&$' +&7E! "G8""! 9! K! #$%$!&'()! *'+,!J-!.-'/,0),! 123)!4! 6G66! 968""! 5! F! #$%$!&'()! *'+,!J-!.-'/,0),! D-!.-'/,0),! D>!*E9! "566! 9G8""! I! ""! #$%$!&'()! *'+,!J-!.-'/,0),! 123)!:! ""66! H8"9! K! "9! #$!:;0

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Q: GW 487 & NB & OH

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision: GW ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  12. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of V2O5 Nanostructures Ying Wang and Guozhong Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    , nanotube and nanocable arrays of V2O5 or V2O5·nH2O, which demonstrated greatly enhanced intercalation process and set- up has been reported previously [8,9]. We have also prepared nanotube arrays of V2O5·nH2O of nickel nanorods through sol electrophoretic deposition. Ni-nanorod arrays have been grown from commercial

  13. Differences among Beefmaster sires in their offspring in birth, growth and carcass traits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehr, Harry Bartel

    2002-01-01

    were 37.38 ± 0.26 kg, 220.40 ± 1.68 kg, 398.57 ± 7.03 kg, and 471.46 ± 8.89 kg, respectively. The carcass traits averaged 290.38 ± 2.36 kg, 74.175 ± .624 cm², 2.51 ± 0.04 %, 525.90 ± 6.91, 3.22 ± 0.06, respectively, for hot carcass weight, longissimus...

  14. What changes in children's drawing procedures? Relational complexity as a constraint on representational redescription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bill

    ) and older (8-9 years) groups were asked to draw three types of objects: a man, a house, and an animal. Both groups were then asked to draw a man, a house and an animal that does not exist (e.g., a man with two.g., a house with no windows, where windows are the last elements of a normal drawing procedure). (3) Middle

  15. A program toward a fusion reactor* P.-H. Rebut,+ M. L. Watkins, D. J. Gambier, and D. Boucher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A program toward a fusion reactor* P.-H. Rebut,+ M. L. Watkins, D. J. Gambier, and D. Boucher, with beryllium as the first-wall material. A fusion triple product (n,r, Ti ) of 8-9 x 10" m - 3 set keV has been between the model and JET data. The main predictions are also consistent with statistical scaling laws

  16. Electromigration process for the purification of molten silicon during crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (San Pedro, CA); Shlichta, Paul J. (San Pedro, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A process for the purification of molten materials during crystal growth by electromigration of impurities to localized dirty zones. The process has particular applications for silicon crystal growth according to Czochralski techniques and edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) conditions. In the Czochralski crystal growing process, the impurities are electromigrated away from the crystallization interface by applying a direct electrical current to the molten silicon for electromigrating the charged impurities away from the crystal growth interface. In the EFG crystal growth process, a direct electrical current is applied between the two faces which are used in forming the molten silicon into a ribbon. The impurities are thereby migrated to one side only of the crystal ribbon. The impurities may be removed or left in place. If left in place, they will not adversely affect the ribbon when used in solar collectors. The migration of the impurity to one side only of the silicon ribbon is especially suitable for use with asymmetric dies which preferentially crystallize uncharged impurities along one side or face of the ribbon.

  17. Localization of vacancies and mobility of lithium ions in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as obtained by {sup 6,7}Li NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baklanova, Ya. V., E-mail: baklanovay@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Arapova, I. Yu.; Buzlukov, A.L.; Gerashenko, A.P.; Verkhovskii, S.V.; Mikhalev, K.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 Kovalevskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Denisova, T.A.; Shein, I.R.; Maksimova, L.G. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectra and the {sup 7}Li spin–lattice relaxation rate were measured on polycrystalline samples of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, synthesized at 1050 K and 1300 K. The {sup 7}Li NMR lines were attributed to corresponding structural positions of lithium Li1 and Li2 by comparing the EFG components with those obtained in the first-principles calculations of the charge density in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. For both samples the line width of the central {sup 7}Li transition and the spin–lattice relaxation time decrease abruptly at the temperature increasing above ?500 K, whereas the EFG parameters are averaged (??{sub Q}?=42 (5) kHz) owing to thermally activated diffusion of lithium ions. - Graphical abstract: Path of lithium ion hopping in lithium zirconate Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline samples Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with monoclinic crystal structure synthesized at different temperatures were investigated by {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectroscopy. • Two {sup 6,7}Li NMR lines were attributed to the specific structural positions Li1 and Li2. • The distribution of vacancies was clarified for both lithium sites. • The activation energy and pathways of lithium diffusion in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} were defined.

  18. San Francisco State University Region F'2009 F'2010 F'2011 F'2012 F'2013 F'2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University Headcount Region F'2009 F'2010 F'2011 F'2012 F'2013 F'2014 Bay Area2 2,917 2,633 2,525 2,572 2,310 2,195 San Diego 1,187 1,207 1,153 1,156 1,105 1,150 Southern CA 4.2% 5.1% Northern CA 9.6% 8.9% 8.5% 8.4% 7.7% 7.4% San Diego 3.9% 4.1% 3.9% 3.8% 3.7% 3.9% Southern CA

  19. FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS FISICAS Y MATEMATICAS SECRETARIA ACADEMICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, Carlos E.

    -2 LC-304 David Montoya S. Científica Astronomía G. RUBILAR L : MI - VI 1-2 LC-304 Cristofer Leon Lagos-2-2(3) No tiene ING. CIVILES T1 1 MA 5 A-411 Evelyn Acuña Ortega LU 8-9 A-102 AA I.C.Matemática VI 3-4 A-103 AA. GALLARDO A-108 AA A-109 AA 115 8 A-413 Yerka Freire Vidal A-111 AA A-112 AA 115 9 A-414 Evelyn Acuña Ortega

  20. TRIUMAH 2012 RESULTS INDIVIDUAL OVERALL PLACE * distance measured in miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    M 1824 0.909 10.66 4.15 15.719 9 Clapp William M 2529 1.212 10.41 4 15.622 10 CoughlinSmith Chris M Litzinger John M 4049 0.833 9.29 3.51 13.633 35 Podratz Anne F 4049 1.030 8.9 3.68 13.610 36 Olson Bill M Puumala Matthew M 3039 0.818 8.92 3.3 13.038 57 Davies Tricia F 50+ 0.848 8.85 3.28 12.978 58 Johansen

  1. ResuMatcher: A Personalized Resume-Job Matching System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Shiqiang

    2015-04-02

    .7 Comparison of the Two Approaches - Java Developer . . . . . . . . . 58 8.8 Comparison of the Two Approaches - Python Developer . . . . . . . 58 8.9 Comparison of the Two Approaches - Average . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 viii 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Motivation... the jobs, which makes job searching tedious and blind task. For example, I used keyword “Java” to search jobs with location restriction Mountain View, CA on the job searching site indeed.com, the web site returned about 7,000 jobs (Figure 1.1). The number...

  2. 2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovar, B.

    2012-02-01

    A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

  3. BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2006-04-01

    This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

  4. 1 M-M@0?t$N@0=--3 2 O"J,?t 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Atsushi

    + · · · + anZ = dZ. [ ¿ZL@] Nc1.2 $HDjM1.4 $h$j, a1Z + · · · + anZ = aZ a Z+ { 0 } ($?$@1 $D) B8:$9$k. $3 ai a1Z + · · · + anZ = aZ , a a1, . . . , an t . $h$C$Fd . B ja d. 0J¿e$h$j a = d k k. 1.7 a1

  5. GWU Personnel: Dr. J. Rene van Dorp VCU Personnel: Dr. Jason R. W. Merrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 March Point Cherry Point Ferndale Port Angeles Where does Oil TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT 2010 SERVES AS A DETAILED INFORMATION SOURCE TO ALL! 02/13/2014 - 1 of 25 #12-15 13-14 12-13 11-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  6. The colliding-wind WC9+OB system WR 65 and dust formation by WR stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, P M

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the WC9+OB system WR 65 in the infrared show variations of its dust emission consistent with a period near 4.8~yr, suggesting formation in a colliding-wind binary (CWB) having an elliptical orbit. If we adopt the IR maximum as zero phase, the times of X-ray maximum count and minimum extinction to the hard component measured by Oskinova & Hamann fall at phases 0.4--0.5, when the separation of the WC9 and OB stars is greatest. We consider WR 65 in the context of other WC8-9+OB stars showing dust emission.

  7. Jerusalem Post, 2004.09.28: "Jerusalem envelope security fence may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    BSD This payload avoids bytes 00, 09, 23. Effect: Removes file named x. Bytes Explanation eb 47 ip += 71 59 cx = *sp++ 89 ca dx = cx 83 c2 18 dx += 24 89 11 *(int*)cx = dx 31 c0 ax ^= ax 89 41 04 *(int*)(cx+4) = ax 83 c2 13 dx += 19 89 51 08 *(int*)(cx+8) = dx 83 c2 08 dx += 8 89 51 0c *(int*)(cx+12) = dx #12;83 c2

  8. An E. coli System for the Diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis Ana Maria Cujba, Konstantin Gizdov, James Long, Joseph MacKinnon, James McAvoy, Martyna Sroka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Peter

    .62 1.27 Filters 15.00 24.30 19.05 LDR 1.00 1.62 1.27 Arduino 7.00 11.34 8.89 Raspberry Pi 26.00 42 and Raspberry Pi. ·Price is suitable for developing countries; less than £100 to make and is small enough to fit.12 33.02 Pi Starter kit 15.00 24.30 19.05 TOTAL 65.00 105.30 82.55 BBa_K1352001 ­ Aberdeen 2014

  9. Transport of entrained air bubbles in fresh concrete due to pressure variations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, Ravi Kumar

    1993-01-01

    in the concrete has very low permeability to the flow of the water. The magnitude is in the order of 1. 55 x 10 in'/sec (10" cm'/sec). Assuming average values for the rate of flow or freezing and the permeability of the material, a critical flow length, which... 8-8. Measured Sample Weight Data. 147 Table 8-9. List of AEA's and Measured Surface Tension Results. . 148 Table 8-10. Linear Traverse Results - El Paso Samples. 149 Table C-1. Design Factorial Test Conditions. Table C-2. Standard Order of 2...

  10. Supplement 16, Part 3, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Trematoda And Cestoda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

    1967-01-01

    .) Acanthoparyphium spinulo- Martin, W. E.; and Bils, R. sum F., 1964 a, pis. figs. 1-11 excretory concretions; formation and fine structure Acanthopsolus oculatus Bauer, 0. N., [1949 b], I63 (Levinsen) Lena river [Myoxocephalus sp.] Acanthopsolus oculatus.... Rausch 1959 Alaria (Paralar?a) mustelae Dubois, G., 196? b, II8 mustelae Key Alaria (B?ralaria) mustelae Dubois, G., 1963 b, II8, 124, canadensis Webster et Wolf- 127, 128, 139, figs. 8-9 gang "1956 [n. rank] Syn.: Alaria canadensis Webster et...

  11. Voces del Capitolio: Spanish-Language Media in the Statehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Dennis Xavier

    2012-01-01

    D%E9"&:A8$%8B3&"#:A8&? :>&9DH:G8";8&>:A$E&C:A& B"C&B8"8%&H:$8&"G%&8? %&8? G%%&D:B8&9DH:G8";8&H:$97C&9BBA%B&"JJ%789;=&C:8?" 8&"EEG%BB%B&9BBA%B&9DH:G8";8&8:& L9BH";97BST"89;:B3&? :

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 2 GW-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  3. Forecasting technology costs via the Learning Curve - Myth or Magic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberth, Stephan

    Gas Turbine (CCGT) where data provided by Colpier was already converted from ‘costs per installed capacity’ to ‘costs per electricity produced’ (2002). The focus has been on technologies that remained in their growth stages in order to avoid... Electricity Usc(90)/kWh - TWh 1981 1997 15 3.6 Cleason Colpier 2002 Nuclear Instalation US$(90)/W - GW 1975 1993 19 2.0 Kouvaritakis et al. (2000) in M&S 2001 SCGT Instalation US$(90)/W - GW 1956 1981 14 8.9 IIASA-WEC (1998), p.50 Solar Production $/Wp - MWp...

  4. Rock Chalk Report, March 6, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-06

    WEB VERSION JOIN THE WILLIAMS EDUCATION FUND VISIT THE KU STORE BUY TICKETS March 06, 2013 Jayhawks Head to Fayetteville for NCAA Indoor Championships The second-ranked Kansas women’s track & field team will journey... to Fayetteville, Ark. this weekend as it searches for the program’s first team title at the 2013 NCAA Indoor Championships March 8-9. Nine individuals and one relay team will compete in 10 events for the Kansas women while one KU male will make the trip...

  5. A Four-Coordinate Fe(III) Porphyrin Cation Ming Fang, Scott R. Wilson, and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    or AgCF3SO3, which produces a color change from yellow to red (Figure 2). NMR, MALDI-TOF, and elemental coordinating anions (i.e., CB11H6Br6 -, SbF6 -, ClO4 -, and CF3SO3 -) all have exactly the same porphyrin 1H ppm for CB11H6Br6 -, -31.5 ppm for SbF6 -, 13 ppm for ClO4 -, and 39.3 ppm for CF3SO3 -.8,9 Possible

  6. Cottons Resistant to Wilt and Root Knot and the Effect of Potash Fertilizer in East Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, P. A. (Paul Allen)

    1943-01-01

    times. The plants suf- fered frop drought and aphid injury during V- summer. As may be seen ;- l'able 4, Coker 100 W. R. Str. 39-5, Coker 4-1,-1, Miller 610, and mlton Dixie Triumph all showed strong wilt resistance ~nd produced large yields of good... 4-in-1, Str. 8.8 Coker W. R. 3%5- ---------- 1U.S Cook (Rhyne)*---- _.------- 4.9 Deltapine 14 144-51 27.3 Delta-~Isie W. R.. ,- ---- - --------------- 8.9 Dixie V'Tiumph W. R. 22- 5.6 Wonder Dixie Tr. W. R. 9 ------------- 15.3 Mebane (Bryant...

  7. FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS FISICAS Y MATEMATICAS SECRETARIA ACADEMICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, Carlos E.

    -2 Roberto Molina Cáceres ECO 2-5 Roberto Molina Cáceres 2 43 520129 CALCULO I 4-2(5) no tiene 3443 Geología) CALCULO NUMERICO 3-2(4) 3310 I.Civil 4 1 LU 1-2 A-311 M. CAMPOS MI 8 a 11 LC-301 Camila Soto R.(2) 521218 COMPL. CALCULO 3-3(4) 521227 3311-18 I.C.Elec, Elen. 4 0 MA 3-4 A-113 Ernesto Cáceres VI 8-9 A-102

  8. DOE F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFO IO?-90)

  9. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office Edgemont LTSP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFO IO?-90)DOE

  10. DOE ORDER 5480.14, PHASE I - INSTALLATION ASSESSMENT FOR THE BETTIS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFO IO?-90)DOE

  11. DOE-LM/GJ1131-2006

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFO

  12. DOE-MIRMISBWG

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFOFEE-13-1998

  13. DOE/EV-0005/10 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89) EFOFEE-13-19980

  14. DOE/EV-0005/11 Formerly Utilized M.ED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)

  15. DOE/EV-0005/13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I

  16. DOE/EV-0005/16 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I6

  17. DOE/EV-0005/17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 1 1

  18. DOE/EV-0005/18

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 1 18

  19. DOE/EV-0005/19 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 1

  20. DOE/EV-0005/21 ORNL-5714

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 11

  1. DOE/EV-0005/27

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 117

  2. DOE/EV-0005/31 ORNL-5799

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67 1171

  3. DOE/EV-0005/8

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67

  4. DOE/OR/20722-131

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3 \L.O3-I67131

  5. DOE/OR/20722-141

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)3

  6. DOE/OR/20722-22 UC-70A DBaffu Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322 UC-70A

  7. DOE/OR0 TEttiNICi41.l SERVICES DIU.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322 UC-70A15:32

  8. DOEFIX'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322

  9. DOEFk58

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322DOEFk58 -/

  10. DOEIALl62350-64

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322DOEFk58

  11. DOEIEV-0005/20 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322DOEFk5820

  12. DOEIEV-0005/37 ANL=OHS/HP-83406 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - 1325.8. (8-89)322DOEFk5820//,

  13. EIA Energy Efficiency-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 RelativeSoutheast Region About U.S. Natural Gas1: "The8,9:-

  14. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable Coal Reserves and8.9. U.S.

  15. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable Coal Reserves and8.9. U.S.2 -

  16. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable Coal Reserves and8.9. U.S.2

  17. Tag: FPE | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable Coal Reserves and8.9. U.S.2FPE

  18. Tag: History | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Tag: community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. EIA Energy Conferences & Presentations, April 8, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 20091.5.5. Percent8.9.

  2. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Table 4. Estimation Results for PAD District Regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. AAC R18-9 Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Microsoft Word - Chapter 9_021411

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. EA-1789: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. EA-1919: Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  9. EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. EIS-0265-SA-89: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  11. campbell-98.pdf

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  12. campbell-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. canfield | The Ames Laboratory

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  14. canon-bio.pptx

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  15. carbon capture rd index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. carbon storage r d review | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. carbon storage rd index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. carbon storage | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. carlson-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. carraher | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. carter | The Ames Laboratory

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  2. carverintro.ppt

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  3. cbenetti | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. cbertoni | The Ames Laboratory

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  5. cbj7362.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. ccelania | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. ccowan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. ccpi mesaba | netl.doe.gov

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  9. ccpi-aep | netl.doe.gov

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  10. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

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  11. WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 09-1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  12. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

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  13. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9, 2010

  15. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

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  16. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,June 5-6, 2009

  20. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,June 5-6,Art

  2. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,June 5-6,ArtDon

  3. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,June

  4. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArt Tackett

  5. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArt

  6. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm

  7. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm

  8. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm

  9. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm

  10. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm

  11. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm7

  12. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm78

  13. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided6 MEETING8-9,JuneArtGovernm783

  14. United States Government Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeetingBSH Home03/02DO F 1325.8 (8-89)

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices,Flight....131 2.2538,16,7, 2015 |8,9, 2015 |

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices,Flight....131 2.2538,16,7, 2015 |8,9, 2015

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices,Flight....131 2.2538,16,7, 2015 |8,9, 20152,

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices,Flight....131 2.2538,16,7, 2015 |8,9,

  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3.9.3.3.b.8.9.

  20. Table 9. U.S. Steam Coal Exports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global Crude Oil Prices Brent396,0138. U.S.7. U.S.8.9.

  1. Mössbauer investigations of hyperfine interactions features of {sup 57}Fe nuclei in BiFeO{sub 3} ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, Alexey, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Presniakov, Igor, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Rusakov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Matsnev, Mikhail; Gorchakov, Dmitry; Glazkova, Iana [Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belik, Alexey [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-10-27

    New results of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer studies on BiFeO{sub 3} powder sample performed at various temperatures above and below magnetic phase transitions point T{sub N} ? 640K are reported. We have performed self-consistent calculations of the lattice contributions to the EFG tensor, taking into account dipole moments of the O{sup 2?} and Bi{sup 3+} ions. Low-temperature {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at T < T{sub N} were analyzed assuming an anharmonic cycloidal modulation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. The cycloidal modulation of the iron spin was described with the elliptic Jacobi function sn[(±4K(m)/?)x,m]. The good fit of the experimental spectra was obtained for the anharmonicity m = 0.44 ± 0.04 (T = 4.9K) resulting from the easy-axis magnetic anisotropy.

  2. Defect behavior of polycrystalline solar cell silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, D.K.; Park, S.H.; Hwang, I.G.; Mohr, J.B.; Hanly, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    The major objective of this study, conducted from October 1988 to September 1991, was to gain an understanding of the behavior of impurities in polycrystalline silicon and the influence of these impurities on solar cell efficiency. The authors studied edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and cast poly-Si materials and solar cells. With EFG Si they concentrated on chromium-doped materials and cells to determine the role of Cr on solar cell performance. Cast poly-Si samples were not deliberately contaminated. Samples were characterized by cell efficiency, current-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), surface photovoltage (SPV), open-circuit voltage decay, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. They find that Cr forms Cr-B pairs with boron at room temperature and these pairs dissociate into Cr{sub i}{sup +} and B{sup {minus}} during anneals at 210{degrees}C for 10 min. Following the anneal, Cr-B pairs reform at room temperature with a time constant of 230 h. Chromium forms CrSi{sub 2} precipitates in heavily contaminated regions and they find evidence of CrSi{sub 2} gettering, but a lack of chromium segregation or precipitation to grain boundaries and dislocations. Cr-B pairs have well defined DLTS peaks. However, DLTS spectra of other defects are not well defined, giving broad peaks indicative of defects with a range of energy levels in the band gap. In some high-stress, low-efficiency cast poly-Si they detect SiC precipitates, but not in low-stress, high-efficiency samples. SPV measurements result in nonlinear SPV curves in some materials that are likely due to varying optical absorption coefficients due to locally varying stress in the material.

  3. Application of a Hough search for continuous gravitational waves on data from the 5th LIGO science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

    2014-03-17

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range $\\mathrm{50-1000 Hz}$ with the first derivative of frequency in the range $-8.9 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s to zero in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run. Our results employ a Hough transform technique, introducing a $\\chi^2$ test and analysis of coincidences between the signal levels in years 1 and 2 of observations that offers a significant improvement in the product of strain sensitivity with compute cycles per data sample compared to previously published searches. Since our search yields no surviving candidates, we present results taking the form of frequency dependent, 95$%$ confidence upper limits on the strain amplitude $h_0$. The most stringent upper limit from year 1 is $1.0\\times 10^{-24}$ in the $\\mathrm{158.00-158.25 Hz}$ band. In year 2, the most stringent upper limit is $\\mathrm{8.9\\times10^{-25}}$ in the $\\mathrm{146.50-146.75 Hz}$ band. This improved detection pipeline, which is computationally efficient by at least two orders of magnitude better than our flagship Einstein$@$Home search, will be important for "quick-look" searches in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector era.

  4. Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

    2008-09-30

    Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

  5. Irrigation Water Quality Standards and Salinity Management Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, Guy

    2003-04-30

    Barleyhay a 6.0 7.4 9.5 13.0 20 Bermudagrass 6.9 8.5 10.8 14.7 23 Clover,Berseem 1.5 3.2 5.9 10.3 19 Corn(forage) 1.8 3.2 5.2 8.6 16 Hardinggrass 4.6 5.9 7.9 11.1 18 Orchardgrass 1.5 3.1 5.5 9.6 18 Perennialrye 5.6 6.9 8.9 12.2 19 Sudangrass 2.8 5.1 8.6 14....2 9.8 Clover,Berseem 1.0 2.1 3.9 6.8 Corn(forage) 1.2 2.1 3.5 5.7 Hardinggrass 3.1 3.9 5.3 7.4 Orchardgrass 1.0 2.1 3.7 6.4 Perennialrye 3.7 4.6 5.9 8.1 Sudangrass 1.9 3.4 5.7 9.6 Tallfescue 2.6 3.9 5.7 8.9 Tallwheatgrass 5.0 6.6 9.0 13.0 Trefoil,big 1...

  6. TrekISM Issue 61 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1989-01-01

    , Dearborn MI July 8-9, Radisson South Hotel, Minneap9lis MN (will be at both cons both days) *for ticket & hotel information for Creationcons, write to: 145 Jericho Trunpike, Mineola NY 11501; ph (516) SHOWMAN 7 '(ou. Kr"!l G~16 fIND GEaR~ Coulel Do l3...?ITtlt liRtI lifE: a.,88E~ 1N.sT'Mt. Ttf6t*'SIWlItU.IlsnfotD~ ~c5rO To u.. Bool(,AIt,SrCoul.:lc;&T THf;m. Nor 7?~u.~rO"'}r WORK IN SpRee :t/VI F~omI{"'NS~S?? II OKAY 11L.R?Ftf1'(lKNOkJ'KtAAIs FRo~~~B/AJ QUJRlds mom I(fllVSttS lIND MRTfxpLlfINS A...

  7. Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

    2002-12-31

    the summer season, May - October. Site Date Mean Daily Discharge (cfs) Temperature (?C) Conductivity (?S/cm) DO (mg/L) % O2 Saturation 1 4 Aug 2001 6.60 N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa 18 May 2002 242 23.1 162 8.8 103.5 9 Jul... 2002 0.47 29.6 238 5.9 77.0 2 4 Aug 2001 6.60 N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa 18 May 2002 242 23.4 165 8.9 105.1 9 Jul 2002 0.47 31.1 243 6.1 82.5 3 4 Aug 2001 6.60 N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa N/Aa 18 May 2002 242 23.3 167 8.4 99.2 9...

  8. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7?GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ?8.9?GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0}?=?132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24?GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  9. Polarization field engineering of GaN/AlN/AlGaN superlattices for enhanced thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sztein, Alexander, E-mail: asztein@umail.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bowers, John E.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A novel polarization field engineering based strategy to simultaneously achieve high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials is demonstrated. Polarization based electric fields are used to confine electrons into two-dimensional electron gases in GaN/AlN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N superlattices, resulting in improved electron mobilities as high as 1176 cm{sup 2}/Vs and in-plane thermal conductivity as low as 8.9?W/mK. The resulting room temperature ZT values reach 0.08, a factor of four higher than InGaN and twelve higher than GaN, demonstrating the potential benefits of this polarization based engineering strategy for improving the ZT and efficiencies of thermoelectric materials.

  10. Search for New Phenomena in Dijet Angular Distributions in Proton-Proton Collisions at s = 8 TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-06-04

    A search for new phenomena in LHC proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=8 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb?¹. The angular distributions are studied in events with at least two jets; the highest dijet mass observed is 5.5 TeV. All angular distributions are consistent with the predictions of the standard model. In a benchmark model of quark contact interactions, a compositeness scale below 8.1 TeV in a destructive interference scenario and 12.0 TeV in a constructive interference scenario is excluded at 95% C.L.; median expected limits are 8.9 TeV formore »the destructive interference scenario and 14.1 TeV for the constructive interference scenario.« less

  11. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  12. Vol. xx No. xx, pp.1!A8, 200x 1 3X=Q!&5;=QO@J8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanda, Takayuki

    ) 9q:]EE5$DL?.4pAC5;=Q8&5f=j CNG=%m%"%F%#%/%98&5f=j *1 Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka==J,$H$O$$$($J$$!% $3$l$KBP$7$F!$4D6-$H0lBN$H$J$j%m%"%C%H$NCN@-$r¡B8=$9$k $H$$$&4D6-CNG=$N%"%W%m!¡%A$,$"$k!%$3$l$KDI@W$9$k$H$$$C$?%;%s%7% 5f$b9T$o$l$F$$$k[9]!%$3$l$i$N4D6-CNG=$N%"%W%m!¡%A$K$h$ 5f$O!$%m%"%C%H$X$N1~MQ

  13. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acciarri, R; Artrip, D; Baller, B; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Carls, B; Chen, H; Deptuch, G; Epprecht, L; Dharmapalan, R; Foreman, W; Hahn, A; Johnson, M; Jones, B J P; Junk, T; Lang, K; Lockwitz, S; Marchionni, A; Mauger, C; Montanari, C; Mufson, S; Nessi, M; Back, H Olling; Petrillo, G; Pordes, S; Raaf, J; Rebel, B; Sinins, G; Soderberg, M; Spooner, N; Stancari, M; Strauss, T; Terao, K; Thorn, C; Tope, T; Toups, M; Urheim, J; Van de Water, R; Wang, H; Wasserman, R; Weber, M; Whittington, D; Yang, T

    2015-01-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  14. IP Routing Table Compression Using TCAM and Distance-one Merge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollapalli, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2011-02-22

    1 1000 1100 2 2 1100 1100 2 3 1010 1110 3 4 1000 1110 4 5 1111 1111 2 6 1100 1110 4 7 1110 1110 5 8 1010 1111 6 9 1011 1111 6 10 0000 1110 7 11 0010 1110 7 12 0100 1110 7 13 0110 1110 7 14 0100 1100 8 16 Table III.4. Example Routing Table after... Compression Entry Prefix Mask Next Hop 1&2 1000 1000 2 3 1010 1110 3 4&6 1000 1010 4 7 1110 1110 5 8&9 1010 1110 6 10,11,12&13 0000 1000 7 14 0100 1100 8 pruning step of [19] but more efficient. As seen earlier, this approach could also lead to a corrupted...

  15. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Acciarri; M. Adamowski; D. Artrip; B. Baller; C. Bromberg; F. Cavanna; B. Carls; H. Chen; G. Deptuch; L. Epprecht; R. Dharmapalan; W. Foreman; A. Hahn; M. Johnson; B. J. P. Jones; T. Junk; K. Lang; S. Lockwitz; A. Marchionni; C. Mauger; C. Montanari; S. Mufson; M. Nessi; H. Olling Back; G. Petrillo; S. Pordes; J. Raaf; B. Rebel; G. Sinins; M. Soderberg; N. Spooner; M. Stancari; T. Strauss; K. Terao; C. Thorn; T. Tope; M. Toups; J. Urheim; R. Van de Water; H. Wang; R. Wasserman; M. Weber; D. Whittington; T. Yang

    2015-04-23

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  16. Bounds on the interior geometry and pressure profile of static fluid spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Martin; Matt Visser

    2003-06-10

    It is a famous result of relativistic stellar structure that (under mild technical conditions) a static fluid sphere satisfies the Buchdahl--Bondi bound 2M/R <= 8/9; the surprise here being that the bound is not 2M/R <= 1. In this article we provide further generalizations of this bound by placing a number of constraints on the interior geometry (the metric components), on the local acceleration due to gravity, on various combinations of the internal density and pressure profiles, and on the internal compactness 2m(r)/r of static fluid spheres. We do this by adapting the standard tool of comparing the generic fluid sphere with a Schwarzschild interior geometry of the same mass and radius -- in particular we obtain several results for the pressure profile (not merely the central pressure) that are considerably more subtle than might first be expected.

  17. Molecular Structures in T=1 states of 10B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Kuchera; G. V. Rogachev; V. Z. Goldberg; E. D. Johnson; S. Cherubini; M. Gulino; M. La Cognata; L. Lamia; S. Romano; L. E. Miller; R. G. Pizzone; G. G. Rapisarda; M. L. Sergi; C. Spitaleri; R. E. Tribble; W. H. Trzaska; A. Tumino

    2011-11-14

    Multi-center (molecular) structures can play an important role in light nuclei. The highly deformed rotational band in 10Be with band head at 6.179 MeV has been observed recently and suggested to have an exotic alpha:2n:alpha configuration. A search for states with alpha:pn:alpha two-center molecular configurations in 10B that are analogous to the states with alpha:2n:alpha structure in 10Be has been performed. The T=1 isobaric analog states in 10B were studied in the excitation energy range of E=8.7-12.1 MeV using the reaction 1H(9Be,alpha)6Li*(T=1, 0+, 3.56 MeV). An R-matrix analysis was used to extract parameters for the states observed in the (p,alpha) excitation function. Five T=1 states in 10B have been identified. The known 2+ and 3- states at 8.9 MeV have been observed and their partial widths have been measured. The spin-parities and partial widths for three higher lying states were determined. Our data support theoretical predictions that the 2+ state at 8.9 MeV (isobaric analog of the 7.54 MeV state in 10Be) is a highly clustered state and can be identified as a member of the alpha:np:alpha rotational band. The next member of this band, the 4+ state, has not been found. A very broad 0+ state at 11 MeV that corresponds to pure alpha+6Li(0+,T=1) configuration is suggested and it might be related to similar structures found in 12C, 18O and 20Ne.

  18. Investigating CXOU J163802.6–471358: A new pulsar wind nebula in the norma region?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobsen, Simone J.; Watson, Darach; Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first analysis of the extended source CXOU J163802.6–471358, which was discovered serendipitously during the Chandra X-ray survey of the Norma region of the Galactic spiral arms. The X-ray source exhibits a cometary appearance with a point source and an extended tail region. The complete source spectrum is fitted well with an absorbed power law model and jointly fitting the Chandra spectrum of the full source with one obtained from an archived XMM-Newton observation results in best fit parameters N {sub H} =1.5{sub ?0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 23} cm{sup ?2} and ?=1.1{sub ?0.6}{sup +0.7} (90% confidence uncertainties). The unabsorbed luminosity of the full source is then L{sub X}?4.8×10{sup 33}d{sub 10}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1} with d {sub 10} = d/10 kpc, where a distance of 10 kpc is a lower bound inferred from the large column density. The radio counterpart found for the source using data from the Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey epoch-2 shows an elongated tail offset from the X-ray emission. No infrared counterpart was found. The results are consistent with the source being a previously unknown pulsar driving a bow shock through the ambient medium.

  19. Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

  20. Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

  1. CONSTRAINING THE EXOZODIACAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: COMPLETE RESULTS FROM THE KECK NULLER MID-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M.; Bryden, G.; Doré, O.; Traub, W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Millan-Gabet, R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Absil, O. [Département d'Astrophysique, Géophysique et Océanographie, Université de Liège, 17 Allée du Six Août, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Wyatt, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Danchi, W.; Kuchner, M.; Stapelfeldt, K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Defrère, D.; Hinz, P. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ragland, S. [Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Scott, N. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy, Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Woillez, J., E-mail: Bertrand.Mennesson@jpl.nasa.gov [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    Forty-seven nearby main-sequence stars were surveyed with the Keck Interferometer mid-infrared Nulling instrument (KIN) between 2008 and 2011, searching for faint resolved emission from exozodiacal dust. Observations of a subset of the sample have already been reported, focusing essentially on stars with no previously known dust. Here we extend this previous analysis to the whole KIN sample, including 22 more stars with known near- and/or far-infrared excesses. In addition to an analysis similar to that of the first paper of this series, which was restricted to the 8-9 ?m spectral region, we present measurements obtained in all 10 spectral channels covering the 8-13 ?m instrumental bandwidth. Based on the 8-9 ?m data alone, which provide the highest signal-to-noise measurements, only one star shows a large excess imputable to dust emission (? Crv), while four more show a significant (>3?) excess: ? Leo, ? UMa, ? Lep, and ? Oph. Overall, excesses detected by KIN are more frequent around A-type stars than later spectral types. A statistical analysis of the measurements further indicates that stars with known far-infrared (? ? 70 ?m) excesses have higher exozodiacal emission levels than stars with no previous indication of a cold outer disk. This statistical trend is observed regardless of spectral type and points to a dynamical connection between the inner (zodi-like) and outer (Kuiper-Belt-like) dust populations. The measured levels for such stars are clustering close to the KIN detection limit of a few hundred zodis and are indeed consistent with those expected from a population of dust that migrated in from the outer belt by Poynting-Robertson drag. Conversely, no significant mid-infrared excess is found around sources with previously reported near-infrared resolved excesses, which typically have levels of the order of 1% over the photospheric flux. If dust emission is really at play in these near-infrared detections, the absence of a strong mid-infrared counterpart points to populations of very hot and small (submicron) grains piling up very close to the sublimation radius. For solar-type stars with no known infrared excess, likely to be the most relevant targets for a future exo-Earth direct imaging mission, we find that their median zodi level is 12 ± 24 zodis and lower than 60 (90) zodis with 95% (99%) confidence, if a lognormal zodi luminosity distribution is assumed.

  2. Gasification Studies Task 4 Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitty, Kevin; Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald; Smith, Philip; Sutherland, James; Thornock, Jeremy; Boshayeshi, Babak; Hunsacker, Isaac; Lewis, Aaron; Waind, Travis; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-02-01

    A key objective of the Task 4 activities has been to develop simulation tools to support development, troubleshooting and optimization of pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifiers. The overall gasifier models (Subtask 4.1) combine submodels for fluid flow (Subtask 4.2) and heat transfer (Subtask 4.3) with fundamental understanding of the chemical processes (Subtask 4.4) processes that take place as coal particles are converted to synthesis gas and slag. However, it is important to be able to compare predictions from the models against data obtained from actual operating coal gasifiers, and Subtask 4.6 aims to provide an accessible, non-proprietary system, which can be operated over a wide range of conditions to provide well-characterized data for model validation. Highlights of this work include: • Verification and validation activities performed with the Arches coal gasification simulation tool on experimental data from the CANMET gasifier (Subtask 4.1). • The simulation of multiphase reacting flows with coal particles including detailed gas-phase chemistry calculations using an extension of the one-dimensional turbulence model’s capability (Subtask 4.2). • The demonstration and implementation of the Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) radiation algorithm in the ARCHES code (Subtask 4.3). • Determination of steam and CO{sub 2} gasification kinetics of bituminous coal chars at high temperature and elevated pressure under entrained-flow conditions (Subtask 4.4). In addition, attempts were made to gain insight into the chemical structure differences between young and mature coal soot, but both NMR and TEM characterization efforts were hampered by the highly reacted nature of the soot. • The development, operation, and demonstration of in-situ gas phase measurements from the University of Utah’s pilot-scale entrained-flow coal gasifier (EFG) (Subtask 4.6). This subtask aimed at acquiring predictable, consistent performance and characterizing the environment within the gasifier.

  3. PREPARATION AND TESTING OF CORROSIONAND SPALLATION-RESISTANT COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, John

    2014-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding and involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing to determine the diffusion rate of Zn through the alloys has been completed. However, an analytical solution does not exist to model the diffusion of zinc through the alloys. For this reason, a finite difference algorithm using MATLAB was developed. It makes use of the hopscotch algorithm. The model allows the user to specify the dimensions of the metal parts, the Zn concentration at the bondline, the mesh size, time step, and Zn diffusivity. The experimentally measured values of diffusivity for Zn in APMT and Rene 80/CM 247LC are approximately 2.7 × 10-12 and 4 × 10-14 m2/s, respectively. While the qualitative behavior of the model appears correct, a comparison of the diffusion predictions with the experimental results from earlier in the project indicates that the expected Zn concentration is significantly higher than that measured experimentally. The difference depends on the assumed initial concentration, which is difficult to quantify exactly under experimental conditions for t = 0. In addition to the diffusion work, the coefficients of thermal expansions were determined for each of the alloys as a function of temperature. This information has been entered into a finite element model using ANSYS so that appropriate force-applying structures can be designed for use in joining structures composed of APMT and the nickel alloys. Finite element modeling has been performed to finalize the fabrication geometry for the corrosion-testing phase. The addition of another bolt increases stress uniformity away from the region where the clamping is applied. It appears that a bolt spacing of approximately 25 mm in each jig is appropriate. This will allow the fabrication of 50-mm-wide sections of joints for the corrosion-testing task. Gasifier sampling activities continue to determine what types of trace contaminants may occur in cleaned syngas that could lead to corrosion or deposition in turbines firing coal syngas. The EERC has several pilot-scale gasifiers that are continually used in a variety of test configurations as determined by the needs of the projects that are funding the tests. We are sampling both noncombusted and combusted syngas produced during some of the pilot-scale gasifier tests. This year sampling was performed of both syngas and combusted syngas while the entrained-flow gasifier (EFG) was firing subbituminous coal from the Antelope Mine in Wyoming. Results of scanning electron microscope analyses of the syngas before combustion showed no submicron particles, only flakes of iron oxide that had likely formed on steel surfaces inside the combustor. As shown in the 2013 annual report, soot was also collected from the syngas when the much-lower-temperature fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) was fired, indicating that the much higher temperature of the EFG prevented soot formation. However, particles collected from the combusted syngas consist almost entirely of submicron soot, and little to no vaporized metals made it past the warm-gas filters and scrubbers in the high-temperature EFG system which could then deposit in a turbine system burning a higher hydrogen syngas. These results are consistent with the analyses of the particulates collected from combusted syngas when the lowertemperature FBG system is

  4. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Levshakov; Wilhelm H. Kegel; Fumio Takahara

    1997-12-23

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  5. Search for excited electrons in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. Abazov

    2008-01-06

    We present the results of a search for the production of an excited state of the electron, e*, in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb^-1. We search for e* in the process ppbar -> e* e, with the e* subsequently decaying to an electron plus photon. No excess above the standard model background is observed. Interpreting our data in the context of a model that describes e* production by four-fermion contact interactions and e* decay via electroweak processes, we set 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section ranging from 8.9 fb to 27 fb, depending on the mass of the excited electron. Choosing the scale for contact interactions to be Lambda = 1 TeV, excited electron masses below 756 GeV are excluded at the 95% C.L.

  6. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  7. First Simultaneous NIR/X-ray Detection of a Flare from SgrA*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eckart; F. K. Baganoff; M. Morris; M. W. Bautz; W. N. Brandt; G. P. Garmire; R. Genzel; T. Ott; G. R. Ricker; C. Straubmeier; T. Viehmann; R. Schödel

    2004-06-17

    We report on the first simultaneous near-infrared/X-ray detection of the Sgr A* counterpart which is associated with the massive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The observations have been carried out using the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope and the ACIS-I instrument aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We also report on quasi-simultaneous observations at a wavelength of 3.4 mm using the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array. A flare was detected in the X-domain with an excess 2-8 keV luminosity of about 6$\\times10^{33}$ erg/s. A fading flare of Sgr A* with $>$2 times the interim-quiescent flux was also detected at the beginning of the NIR observations, that overlapped with the fading part of the X-ray flare. Compared to 8-9 hours before the NIR/X-ray flare we detected a marginally significant increase in the millimeter flux density of Sgr A* during measurements about 7-9 hours afterwards. We find that the flaring state can be conveniently explained with a synchrotron self-Compton model involving up-scattered sub-millimeter photons from a compact source component, possibly with modest bulk relativistic motion. The size of that component is assumed to be of the order of a few times the Schwarzschild radius. The overall spectral indices $\\alpha_{NIR/X-ray}$ ($S_{\

  8. Design and test results of a pulsed quadrupole magnet with a 2. mu. s rise time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bywater, J.A.; Lari, R.J.; Ratner, L.G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Fujisaki, M.; Krisch, A.D.; Terwilliger, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    Major polarization losses will be encountered during acceleration of polarized protons in the Brookhaven AGS due to eight intrinsic depolarizing resonances. Pulsing a set of 12 vertical tune shift quadrupole magnets with a 2 ..mu..s rise time, 3 ms fall, and 60 ms repetition rate should reduce these losses. This requires a gradient of 1.87 T/M over the 8.89 x 12.7 cm vacuum chamber. A ferrite core quadrupole magnet has been designed, built, and magnetically measured. The pole tip has a hyperbolic shape and the coil consists of four parallel 0.318 cm by 0.453 cm turns per pole. This approximates a current sheet 0.318 cm thick and curves to lie along a flux line. Placed as close to the vacuum chamber as possible, it minimizes the inductance of the magnet and the voltage of the power supply. Proper spacing of the four turns assures a more uniform gradient over a large aperture. Two slabs of ferrite are bonded together and machined to form one pole of half length. These are bonded end-to-end, and a prewound coil on a fiberglass support is attached. Four such pole assemblies are then assembled around the vacuum chamber and electrically connected together. The design, construction, and measurements are presented.

  9. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ? 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ? 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec{sup 2} (2.58 × 10{sup 9} km{sup 2}, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ?0.076 just outside the AR core and ?0.59 in the core.

  10. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  11. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  12. Isotopic and internal CX{sub 3} (X=D,H) rotational motion effects in the Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCX{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CX{sub 3} intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, C. A.; Gasmi, K.; Skowronek, S.; Gonzalez Urena, A. [Unidad de Laseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Paseo Juan XXIII-1, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-06-28

    Photodepletion and action spectra of the laser-induced Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3} fragmentation have been measured over the 16 075-16 380 cm{sup -1} range. The observed band and peak structures allowed us to estimate the vibrational and rotational structures of the excited complex at the transition state configuration. The relative reaction probability P{sub R}(E) for the intracluster Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CD{sub 3} reaction has been determined over the cited energy range. P{sub R}(E) shows a peak structure with an energy spacing of 8.9 cm{sup -1} which was attributed to an internal rotation of the CD{sub 3} group in the intermediate state. A comparison with previous Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCH{sub 3} photofragmentation spectra reveals the dynamical role of the internal CX{sub 3} (X=H,D) motion which is manifested by the presence of rotational resonances in the laser-induced intracluster reaction.

  13. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dos Santos, R.

    2012-07-01

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  14. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  15. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Westenskow, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  17. Integrated Disposal Facility FY2011 Glass Testing Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of glass (Certa and Wells 2010). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 8.9 x 10{sup 14} Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally {sup 99}Tc (t{sub 1/2} = 2.1 x 10{sup 5}), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2011 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses.

  18. The main injector chromaticity correction sextupole magnets: Measurements and operating schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; Bogacz, A.; Brown, B.C.; Harding, D.J.; Fang, S.J.; Martin, P.S.; Glass, H.D.; Sim, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) is a high intensity proton synchrotron which will be used to accelerate protons and antiprotons from 8.9 GeV/c to 150 GeV/c. The natural chromaticities of the machine for the horizontal and the vertical Planes are {minus}33.6 and {minus}33.9 respectively. The {Delta}p/p of the beam at injection is about 0.002. The chromaticity requirements of the FMI, are primarily decided by the {Delta}p/p = 0.002 of the beam at injection. This limits the final chromaticity of the FMI to be {plus_minus}5 units. To correct the chromaticity in the FMI two families of sextupole magnets will be installed in the lattice, one for each plane. A sextupole magnet suitable for the FMI needs has been designed and a number of them are being built. New chromaticity compensation schemes have been worked out in the light of recently proposed faster acceleration ramps. On an R/D sextupole magnet the low current measurements have been carried out to determine the electrical properties. Also, using a Morgan coil, measurements have been performed to determine the higher ordered multipole components up to 18-poles. An overview of these result are presented here.

  19. Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

  20. Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24

    Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

  1. Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianjun, E-mail: xianjun.huang@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); College of Electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Hu, Zhirun [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Liu, Peiguo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-11-15

    This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of the screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.

  2. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappoccio, Salvatore Rocco

    2005-08-01

    We present the measurement of the t{bar t} cross section in the lepton plus jets channel with {ge} 1 and {ge} 2 secondary vertex tags. We use the scalar sum of transverse energies of the event (H{sub T}) to discriminate t{bar t} from the other backgrounds. We also use the transverse mass of the leptonic W-boson (M{sub T}{sup W}) to further reduce the Non-W backgrounds. We use a combination of data and Monte Carlo to estimate the backgrounds from electroweak processes, single top, fake leptons, W+ Light Flavor fake tags, and real W+ Heavy Flavor production. We obtain a value of {sigma} {sub {ge}1} = 8.7{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -0.9}{sup +1.2}(sys) pb for the {ge}1 tag cross section, and {sigma}{sub {ge}2} = 8.7{sub -1.6}{sup +1.8}(stat){sub -1.3}{sup +1.9}(sys) pb for the {ge}2 tag cross section. The authors also present a measurement of the t{bar t} cross section by fitting the N{sub jet} spectrum. They combine the =1 and {ge}2 tag cross sections to obtain {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.9{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}(syst)pb.

  3. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura; Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. A? precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some A? fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with A? peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-? peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  4. The Black Hole in the Compact, High-dispersion Galaxy NGC 1271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Jonelle L; Gebhardt, Karl; Y?ld?r?m, Ak?n; Gültekin, Kayhan; Husemann, Bernd; Richstone, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    Located in the Perseus cluster, NGC 1271 is an early-type galaxy with a small effective radius of 2.2 kpc and a large stellar velocity dispersion of 276 km/s for its K-band luminosity of 8.9x10^{10} L_sun. We present a mass measurement for the black hole in this compact, high-dispersion galaxy using observations from the integral field spectrograph NIFS on the Gemini North telescope assisted by laser guide star adaptive optics, large-scale integral field unit observations with PPAK at the Calar Alto Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging observations. We are able to map out the stellar kinematics on small spatial scales, within the black hole sphere of influence, and on large scales that extend out to four times the galaxy's effective radius. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp rise in the velocity dispersion. Through the use of orbit-based stellar dynamical models, we determine that the black hole has a mass of (3.0^{+1.0}_{-1.1}) x 10^9 M_sun and the H-band stellar...

  5. Issues with the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) ExoEarth Biosignature Case: A Critique of the 2015 AURA Report "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths: the future of UVOIR Astronomy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elvis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths" advocates a 12-meter optical/near-IR space telescope for launch ~2035. The goal that sets this large size is the detection of biosignatures from Earth-like planets in their habitable zones around G-stars. The discovery of a single instance of life elsewhere in the universe would be a profound event for humanity. But not at any cost. At 8-9B USD this High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) would take all the NASA astrophysics budget for nearly 20 years, unless new funds are found. For a generation NASA could build no "Greater Observatories" matching JWST in the rest of the spectrum. This opportunity cost prompted me to study the driving exobiosphere detection case for HDST. I find that: (1) the focus on G-stars is not well justified; (2) only G-stars require the use of direct imaging; (3) in the chosen 0.5 - 2.5 micron band, the available biosignatures are ambiguous and a larger sample does not help; (4) the expected number of exobiospheres is 1, with a 5% chance of zero; (5...

  6. A medium-energy photoemission and ab-initio investigation of cubic yttria-stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousland, G. P.; Cui, X. Y.; Smith, A. E.; Stampfl, C. M.; Wong, L.; Tayebjee, M.; Yu, D.; Triani, G.; Evans, P. J.; Ruppender, H.-J.; Jang, L.-Y.; Stampfl, A. P. J.

    2014-04-14

    Experimental and theoretical investigations into the electronic properties and structure of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia are presented. Medium-energy x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements have been carried out for material with a concentration of 8-9?mol.?% yttria. Resonant photoemission spectra are obtained for a range of photon energies that traverse the L2 absorption edge for both zirconium and yttrium. Through correlation with results from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, based on structural models proposed in the literature, we assign photoemission peaks appearing in the spectra to core lines and Auger transitions. An analysis of the core level features enables the identification of shifts in the core level energies due to different local chemical environments of the constituent atoms. In general, each core line feature can be decomposed into three contributions, with associated energy shifts. Their identification with results of DFT calculations carried out for proposed atomic structures, lends support to these structural models. The experimental results indicate a multi-atom resonant photoemission effect between nearest-neighbour oxygen and yttrium atoms. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra for zirconium and yttrium are also presented, which correlate well with calculated Zr- and Y-4d electron partial density-of-states and with Auger electron peak area versus photon energy curve.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-86-053-1933, Gray Pprinting Company, Fostoria, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, M.S.; Boiano, J.M.; Fidler, A.T.; Cantor, F.

    1988-10-01

    The Gray Printing Company, located in Fostoria, Ohio was studied for potential employee exposures to solvents used in the offset-printing process at that site. The company produced 30 monthly magazines plus various commercial catalogs and brochures. The employment at the site was 185 persons. Equipment used in the production of printed material included photographic-typesetting and sheet-fed and roll fed offset lithographic printing processes. Over two workdays the sheet fed press operator's isopropanol exposures ranged from 247 to 501 mg/m/sup 3/ with personal breathing zone naphtha concentrations of 0.03 to 8.9 mg/m/sup 3/. The web press operator's naphtha exposures ranged from 0.03 to 7.7 mg/m/sup 3/. These workers were also exposed to low concentrations of isopropanol. The highest short term isopropanol exposure was 726 mg/m/sup 3/. Short term exposures to blanket and roller cleaning solvent were low, less than 10 mg/m/sup 3/. A higher than expected reporting of symptoms related to central nervous system depression, difficulty in concentrating, dizziness, cough, chest pain, and dry skin were noted among workers. The authors conclude that there was an increased prevalence of neurotoxic, respiratory, and skin problems among workers using organic solvents. Due to the prevalence of these symptoms, the authors recommend measures for reducing employee exposure to solvents.

  8. Formaldehyde Anti-Inversion at z=0.68 in the Gravitational Lens B0218+357

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiger, Benjamin; 10.1088/0004-637X/709/1/386

    2010-01-01

    We report new observations of the 110-111 (6 cm) and 211-212 (2 cm) transitions of ortho-formaldehyde (o-H2CO) in absorption at z=0.68466 toward the gravitational lens system B0218+357. Radiative transfer modeling indicates that both transitions are anti-inverted relative to the 4.6 K cosmic microwave background (CMB), regardless of the source covering factor, with excitation temperatures of ~1 K and 1.5-2 K for the 110-111 and 211-212 lines, respectively. Using these observations and a large velocity gradient radiative transfer model that assumes a gradient of 1 km s^-1 pc^-1, we obtain a molecular hydrogen number density of 2x10^3 cm^-3 < n(H2) < 1x10^4 cm^-3 and a column density of 2.5x10^13 cm^-2 < N(o-H2CO) < 8.9x10^13 cm^-2, where the allowed ranges conservatively include the range of possible source covering factors in both lines. The measurements suggest that H2CO excitation in the absorbing clouds in the B0218+357 lens is analogous to that in Galactic molecular clouds: it would show H2CO ...

  9. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey IX: The Isolated Galaxy Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchin, R F; Davies, J I; Karachentsev, I D; Keenan, O C; Momjian, E; Rodriguez, R; Taber, T; Taylor, R

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Arecibo L-band Feed Array to map three regions, each of 5 square degrees, around the isolated galaxies NGC 1156, UGC 2082, and NGC 5523. In the vicinity of these galaxies we have detected two dwarf companions: one near UGC 2082, previously discovered by ALFALFA, and one near NGC 1156, discovered by this project and reported in an earlier paper. This is significantly fewer than the 15.4 $^{+1.7}_{-1.5}$ that would be expected from the field HI mass function from ALFALFA or the 8.9 $\\pm$ 1.2 expected if the HI mass function from the Local Group applied in these regions. The number of dwarf companions detected is, however, consistent with a flat or declining HI mass function as seen by a previous, shallower, HI search for companions to isolated galaxies.We attribute this difference in Hi mass functions to the different environments in which they are measured. This agrees with the general observation that lower ratios of dwarf to giant galaxies are found in lower density environments.

  10. Can galaxy growth be sustained through HI-rich minor mergers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehnert, M D; Minchin, R

    2015-01-01

    Local galaxies with specific star-formation rates (star-formation rate per unit mass; sSFR~0.2-10/Gyr) as high as distant galaxies (z~1-3), are very rich in HI. Those with low stellar masses, log M_star (M_sun)=8-9, for example, have M_HI/M_star~5-30. Using continuity arguments of Peng et al. (2014), whereby the specific merger rate is hypothesized to be proportional to the specific star-formation rate, and HI gas mass measurements for local galaxies with high sSFR, we estimate that moderate mass galaxies, log M_star (M_sun)=9-10.5, can acquire sufficient gas through minor mergers (stellar mass ratios ~4-100) to sustain their star formation rates at z~2. The relative fraction of the gas accreted through minor mergers declines with increasing stellar mass and for the most massive galaxies considered, log M_star (M_sun)=10.5-11, this accretion rate is insufficient to sustain their star formation. We checked our minor merger hypothesis at z=0 using the same methodology but now with relations for local normal gal...

  11. Romania program targets methanol and Fischer-Tropsch research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Currently, the chemical organic industry, the petrochemical and engine fuels industry in Romania are entirely based on hydrocarbons from oil. To reduce the oil dependence of this sector and to ensure the stipulated growth rate of 8-9%, research and development programs have been set up with a view to the diversification of raw materials. In research on hydrocarbons from alcohol conversion, three process variants are known, i.e. olefins from methanol, gasolines from methanol and a combined gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons from methanol. The Romanian process of methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is very flexible, with all the variants mentioned being carried out in the same plant by modifying the catalysts. In research on hydrocarbons from synthesis gas a modern process is being developed for gasification of brown coal in a fluidized bed, under pressure, in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. In the field of carbon oxide hydrogenation, studies have been carried out on selective Fischer-Tropsch processes in which the reaction products are high value hydrocarbon fractions.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy Results for the Self-Magnetic Pinch Electron Beam Diode on the ITS-6 Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Hahn, Kelly; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Welch, Dale R.; Yitzhak, Maron

    2012-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' RITS-6 accelerator facility [1] (operating at 7.5 MV and 180 kA) investigating plasma formation and propagation in relativistic electron beam diodes used for flash x-ray radiography. High resolution, visible and ultraviolet spectra were collected in the anode-cathode (A-K) vacuum gap of the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode [2-4]. Time and space resolved spectra are compared with time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) calculations [5-7] and Lsp, hybrid particle-in-cell code simulations [8,9]. Results indicate the presence of a dense (>1x1017cm-3), low temperature (few eV), on-axis plasma, composed of hydrocarbon and metal ion species, which expands at a rate of several cm/s from the anode to the cathode. In addition, cathode plasmas are observed which extend several millimeters into the A-K gap [10]. It is believed that the interaction of these electrode plasmas cause premature impedance collapse of the diode and subsequent reduction in the total radiation output. Diagnostics include high speed imaging and spectroscopy using nanosecond gated ICCD cameras, streak cameras, and photodiode arrays.

  13. Stellar and Planetary Properties of K2 Campaign 1 Candidates and Validation of 18 Systems, Including a Planet Receiving Earth-like Insolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montet, Benjamin T; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John Asher; Hogg, David W; Bowler, Brendan P; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Mann, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 18 candidates as planets and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is EPIC 201912552, a bright (K=8.9) M2 dwarf hosting a 2.24 \\pm 0.25 Earth radius planet with an equilibrium temperature of 271 \\pm 16 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages that enabled this analysis: isochrones, a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties, and vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive pr...

  14. Large-angle production of charged pions by 3 GeV/c - 12.9 GeV/c protons on beryllium, aluminium and lead targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARP Collaboration

    2007-09-21

    Measurements of the double-differential $\\pi^{\\pm}$ production cross-section in the range of momentum $100 \\MeVc \\leq p beryllium, proton--aluminium and proton--lead collisions are presented. The data were taken with the HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN PS. The pions were produced by proton beams in a momentum range from 3 \\GeVc to 12.9 \\GeVc hitting a target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) placed inside a solenoidal magnet. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross-sections at six incident proton beam momenta (3 \\GeVc, 5 \\GeVc, 8 \\GeVc, 8.9 \\GeVc (Be only), 12 \\GeVc and 12.9 \\GeVc (Al only)) and compared to previously available data.

  15. PSR J1906+0722: An Elusive Gamma-ray Pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Ackermann, M; Allen, B; de Angelis, A; Aulbert, C; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bock, O; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Champion, D J; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cuéllar, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Desiante, R; Drell, P S; Eggenstein, H B; Favuzzi, C; Fehrmann, H; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Jóhannesson, G; Kramer, M; Krauss, F; Kuss, M; Laffon, H; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Machenschalk, B; Manfreda, A; Marelli, M; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torne, P; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yassine, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top ten most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of $8.9$ Hz, a characteristic age of $49$ kyr, and spin-down power $1.0 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar ($\\Delta f / f \\approx 4.5\\times10^{-6}$). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the pr...

  16. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 1. Drilling operations and descriptions of boreholes in vicinity of KOA and OAK craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Skipp, B.; Major, R.P.; Tracey, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    From mid-1984 through mid-1985, the United States Geological Survey engaged in an investigation of two craters formed from high-yield, near-surface nuclear bursts at Enewatak Atoll. The craters studied, KOA and OAK, resulted from 1.4- and 8.9-megaton, near-surface bursts detonated near the northern perimeter of the Enewetak lagoon on May 12 and June 28, 1958, respectively. At that time, Enewetak was a part of the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). OAK and KOA are among the only high-yield nuclear explosion craters available for studies of cratering processes and crater-related effects. The objects of this program were: (1) to identify major crater dimensions, morphology, and structures; (2) to provide a data base for material-properties, shock-metamorphic, and other types of related studies; and (3) to gain a better understanding of both the process that formed the excavational crater and that altered that initial feature to its present form. These data from the Enewetak craters are needed for verification of cratering prediction models (code validation), which is important to the analysis of survivability of various strategic defense systems.

  17. Surface Tension and Negative Pressure Interior of a Non-Singular `Black Hole'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Pawel O

    2015-01-01

    The constant density interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a divergent pressure when its radius $R\\le\\frac{9}{8}R_s=\\frac{9}{4}GM$. We show that this divergence is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite redshifted surface tension on a spherical surface of radius $R_0=3R\\sqrt{1-\\frac{8}{9}\\frac{R}{R_s}}$. For $r < R_0$ the interior Schwarzschild solution exhibits negative pressure. When $R=R_s$, the surface is localized at the Schwarzschild radius itself, $R_0=R_s$, and the solution has constant negative pressure $p =-\\bar\\rho$ everywhere in the interior $r

  18. Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

    2011-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

  19. Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

    2011-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

  20. The WEI6K, a 6-kW 7-m Small Wind Turbine: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Kyle K.; McCleer, Patrick J.; Hahlbeck, Edwin C.; DOE Project Office - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-21

    This project was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under a DOE solicitation “Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development.” The objective of this project has been to design a new small wind turbine with improved cost, reliability and performance in grid-connected residential and small business applications, in order to achieve the overall DOE goal of cost effectiveness in Class 3 wind resources that can now be achieved in Class 5 resources. The scope of work for this project has been to complete the preliminary design of an improved small wind turbine, including preliminary loads and strength analyses; analysis and design of all major components; systems integration and structural dynamic analysis; estimation of life-cycle cost of energy; and design documentation and review. The project did not entail hardware fabrication or testing. The WEI6K Turbine resulting from this project is an upwind horizontal-axis wind turbine rated at 6 kW. It features a 3-blade 7-m diameter rotor. The generator is a direct-drive permanent magnet synchronous machine generating 3-phase power at 240 VAC. The turbine is maintained oriented in to the wind via active yaw control using electromechanical servos. Power is regulated with active blade pitch control. The turbine is presently designed to be placed on a 100-foot (30m) tower. The turbine is predicted to generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy (COE) between 7.3 and 8.9 ¢/kWh at an IEC Class II site, with an average wind speed of 8.5 m/s at hub height, depending upon whether the customer uses a guyed truss tower (the lower figure) or a monopole tower. For the NREL Reference Site, with a mean wind speed of 5.35 m/s at 10 m height, the turbine would generate at a levelized cost of energy of between 9.7 and 11.9 ¢/kWh. The lowest of these numbers is presently competitive with retail electricity rates in most of the country. The 8.9 ¢/kWh is still competitive with retail rates in many regions of the country with high electricity costs. The study further concludes that several design changes could shave 10-14% from the cost of energy determined in the preliminary design. These changes include a new tower design that offers tilt-up capability without guy wires and takes better advantage of the lowered loads produced by pitch control; design a family of airfoils more appropriate for pitch regulation on a turbine of this size; tune the pitch controller properly to minimize shedding of power during turbulent operation in the transition from Region 2 to 3; value engineer the pitch system to shave costs, including consideration of a collective pitch system; and refine the design of the hub and main frame castings to minimize weight and cost. We are generally encouraged by the results. These preliminary numbers show that we can produce a turbine that is competitive with retail electric rates at relatively windy IEC Class II sites. With further improvements in the design, we believe the turbine could be competitive at sites with lesser wind resource.

  1. MULTIWAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE OLD NOVA V842 CENTAURUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sion, Edward M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Walter, Frederic [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Henden, Arne [AAVSO 49 Bay State Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Godon, Patrick, E-mail: edward.sion@villanova.edu, E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: anjum@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: brian.warner@uct.ac.za, E-mail: pwoudt@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: frederick.walter@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: arne@aavso.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We present ground-based optical and near infrared photometric observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COS spectroscopic observations of the old nova V842 Cen (Nova Cen 1986). Analysis of the optical light curves reveals a peak at 56.5 {+-} 0.3 s with an amplitude of 8.9 {+-} 4.2 mma, which is consistent with the rotation of a magnetic white dwarf primary in V842 Cen that was detected earlier by Woudt et al., and led to its classification as an intermediate polar. However, our UV lightcurve created from the COS time-tag spectra does not show this periodicity. Our synthetic spectral analysis of an HST COS spectrum rules out a hot white dwarf photosphere as the source of the FUV flux. The best-fitting model to the COS spectrum is a full optically thick accretion disk with no magnetic truncation, a low disk inclination angle, low accretion rate and a distance less than half the published distance that was determined on the basis of interstellar sodium D line strengths. Truncated accretion disks with truncation radii of 3 R{sub wd} and 5 R{sub wd} yielded unsatisfactory agreement with the COS data. The accretion rate is unexpectedly low for a classical nova only 24 yr after the explosion when the accretion rate is expected to be high and the white dwarf should still be very hot, especially if irradiation of the donor star took place. Our low accretion rate is consistent with those derived from X-ray and ground-based optical data.

  2. Aligned and exchange-coupled L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt-based magnetic films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; George, T. A.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Films of aligned L1{sub 0}-structure (Fe,Co)Pt with fcc Fe(Co,Pt) are synthesized by co-sputtering Fe, Co, and Pt on an (001) MgO substrate with in situ heating at 830 deg. C. The nanostructures and magnetic properties of the films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The compositions of the samples (Fe,Co){sub x}Pt{sub 1-x} are designed to maintain an atomic Fe: Co ratio of 65: 35 while increasing the Fe,Co content in each successive sample. In samples with low Fe and Co concentration, the XRD patterns exhibit three strong peaks, namely L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (001), L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (002), and MgO (002). A fourth peak is observed in samples with high Fe and Co concentration and identified as fcc (002). The XRD patterns confirm the formation of L1{sub 0}-ordered (Fe,Co)Pt and its epitaxial growth on MgO. TEM shows that the (Fe,Co)Pt films form isolated magnetic grains of about 100 nm in diameter. Hysteresis-loop measurements show that the increase of the Fe,Co concentration from 57.3 to 68.3 at % enhances the saturation magnetization M{sub s} from 1245 emu/cm{sup 3} to 1416 emu/cm{sup 3}, and the coercivity decreases from 32 kOe to 8.9 kOe. The nominal maximum energy product per grain is 64 MGOe.

  3. On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2012-11-01

    We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

  4. Study of eclipsing binary and multiple systems in ob associations. II. The cygnus ob region: V443 Cyg, V456 Cyg, and V2107 Cyg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak??, V.; Bak??, H.; Hensberge, H.; Bilir, S.; Y?lmaz, F.; K?ran, E.; Demircan, O.; Zejda, M.; Mikulášek, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Three presumably young eclipsing binary systems in the direction of the Cygnus OB1, OB3, and OB9 associations are studied. Component spectra are reconstructed and their orbits are determined using light curves and spectra disentangling techniques. V443 Cyg and V456 Cyg have circular orbits while the light curve of V2107 Cyg imposes a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.045 ± 0.03). V443 Cyg harbors F-type stars, not young early-A stars as previously suggested in the literature based solely on photometry. It appears to be situated in the foreground (distance 0.6 ± 0.2 kpc) of the young stellar populations in Cygnus. V456 Cyg, at a distance of 0.50 ± 0.03 kpc, consists of a slightly metal-weak A-type star and an early-F star. The age of both systems, on or very near to the main sequence, remains uncertain by an order of magnitude. V2107 Cyg is a more massive system (8.9 ± 2 and 4.5 ± 1.2 M {sub ?}) at 1.5 ± 0.5 kpc and, also kinematically, a strong candidate-member of Cyg OB1. The more massive component is slightly evolved and appears to undergo non-radial ?Cep-type pulsations. The Doppler signal of the secondary is barely detectable. A more extensive, asteroseismological study is necessary to fix masses more precisely. Nevertheless, the position of the primary in the H-R diagram confines the age reasonably well to 20 ± 5 Myr, indicating that for Cyg OB1 has a similar extent of star formation history as that established for Cyg OB2.

  5. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  6. Commercial Development of an Advanced, High-Temperature, Linear-Fresnel Based Concentrating Solar Power Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viljoen, Nolan; Schuknecht, Nathan

    2012-05-28

    Included herein is SkyFuel’s detailed assessment of the potential for a direct molten salt linear Fresnel collector. Linear Fresnel architecture is of interest because it has features that are well suited for use with molten salt as a heat transfer fluid: the receiver is fixed (only the mirrors track), the receiver diameter is large (reducing risk of freeze events), and the total linear feet of receiver can be reduced due to the large aperture area. Using molten salt as a heat transfer fluid increases the allowable operating temperature of a collector field, and the cost of thermal storage is reduced in proportion to that increase in temperature. At the conclusion of this project, SkyFuel determined that the cost goals set forth in the contract could not be reasonably met. The performance of a Linear Fresnel collector is significantly less than that of a parabolic trough, in particular due to linear Fresnel’s large optical cosine losses. On an annual basis, the performance is 20 to 30% below that of a parabolic trough per unit area. The linear Fresnel collector and balance of system costs resulted in an LCOE of approximately 9.9¢/kWhre. Recent work by SkyFuel has resulted in a large aperture trough design (DSP Trough) with an LCOE value of 8.9 ¢/kWhre calculated with comparative financial terms and balance of plant costs (White 2011). Thus, even though the optimized linear Fresnel collector of our design has a lower unit cost than our optimized trough, it cannot overcome the reduction in annual performance.

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, T., E-mail: t-kawai@hosp.yoka.hyogo.jp; Kaminou, T., E-mail: kaminout@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Fujioka, S.; Ito, H. [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hakuai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ihaya, T. [Sanin Rosai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  8. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, T., E-mail: t.kawai@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Fujioka, S.; Ito, H. [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hakuai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 {+-} 3.5 and 4.4 {+-} 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 {+-} 16.6 and 145.8 {+-} 26.8 {Omega}, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 {+-} 7.9 and 57.5 {+-} 7.6{sup o}C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  9. A testing and HVAC design methodology for air-to-air heat pipe heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P.; Ciepliski, D.L.; Besant, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Air-to-air heat pipe heat exchangers were tested using ASHRAE Standard 84-1991 as a guide. Some changes are introduced for the test facility and methods of calculating effectiveness. ASME PTC 19.1-1985 is used as a guide for uncertainty analysis. Tests were done for a range of mass flux [1.574 to 2.912 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s)], ratios of mass flow rates (0.6 to 1.85), supply air temperatures ({minus}10 C to 40 C), and heat exchanger tilt angles ({minus}8.9{degree} to 11.2{degree}). Because humidity changes in the exhaust and supply air streams were negligible, only the effectiveness of sensible and of total energy was considered. Measured and calculated results show significant variations in the effectiveness of sensible and of total energy, and uncertainties with each independent variable. For balanced exhaust and supply flow rates at {minus}10 C supply air temperature and 1.574 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s) mass flux, the measured effectiveness for sensible and total energy was calculated to be 0.48 and 0.44, respectively, with uncertainties of 0.057 and 0.052. These measurements decreased to 0.42 and 0.37, with uncertainties of 0.016 and 0.018 for a mass flux of 2.912 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s). Because water vapor condensation effects were small or negligible, the difference between the effectiveness for the sensible and total energy was within the overlapping uncertainty range of each. Based on counterflow heat exchanger theory and convective heat transfer equations, expressions are presented to extrapolate the effectiveness data between and beyond the measured data points. These effectiveness equations, which represent the variation in effectiveness with several independent operating variables, are used for HVAC design that is aimed at achieving minimum life-cycle costs.

  10. Magnetic hardening of Ce1+xFe11–yCoyTi with ThMn12 structure by melt spinning

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Chen; Sun, Kewei; Pinkerton, Frederick E.; Kramer, M. J.

    2015-04-15

    A recent study on the intrinsic magnetic properties of CeFe11–yCoyTi has revealed that substituting one Co for Fe retains the favorable magnetocrystalline anisotropy Ha found in the ternary Fe end member, while enhancing the Curie temperature Tc and saturation magnetization 4?Ms. These findings warrant further optimization around Co substitution y = 1 to try to exploit the hard magnetic properties of these Ce-based magnets. Both Ce and Co concentrations in Ce1+xFe11–yCoyTi have been optimized in the range of x = 0 – 0.2 and y = 0 –1.5. It was found that Co substitution effectively enhances all hard magnetic properties,more »although the values are still lower than those predicted from the intrinsic magnetic properties. Specifically, Tc increases from 210 °C to 285 – 350 °C; 4?M19 (magnetization at 19 kOe) from 8.9 kG to 10.5 – 11.5 kG, remanence Br from 3.1 kG to 4.1 – 4.5 kG, and most importantly, Hci from 1.1 kOe to 1.5 kOe. As a result, the room temperature energy product (BH)max has been increased by over 100% from 0.7 MGOe in Ce1.1Fe11Ti to 1.5 MGOe in Ce1.05Fe9.75Co1.25Ti. Microscopy analysis indicates that the addition of Co refines the grain size and promotes chemical homogeneity at the microscopic scale. As a result, the beneficial effect of Co on the microstructure contributes to the improved hard magnetic properties.« less

  11. THE HERSCHEL EXPLOITATION OF LOCAL GALAXY ANDROMEDA (HELGA). VI. THE DISTRIBUTION AND PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATIONS IN M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J. M. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gear, W. K.; Smith, M. W. L.; Ford, G.; Eales, S. A.; Gomez, H. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Fritz, J.; Baes, M.; De Looze, I.; Gentile, G.; Gordon, K.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, G. J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); O'Halloran, B. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service, Paris, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roman-Duval, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) data set. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalog and characterize the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith et al. A total of 326 GMCs in the mass range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} M {sub ?} are identified; their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M {sup –2.34}, in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same correlation of cloud mass to L {sub CO} observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalog and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit, suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon et al., we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.3 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.°9 to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Last, we comment on the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have on the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system.

  12. Optical observations of the type Ic supernova 2007gr in NGC 1058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Juncheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Junzheng [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Steele, Thea, E-mail: cjc09@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present extensive optical observations of the normal Type Ic supernova (SN) 2007gr, spanning from about one week before maximum light to more than one year thereafter. The optical light and color curves of SN 2007gr are very similar to those of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, but the spectra show remarkable differences. The optical spectra of SN 2007gr are characterized by unusually narrow lines, prominent carbon lines, and slow evolution of the line velocity after maximum light. The earliest spectrum (taken at t = –8 days) shows a possible signature of helium (He I ?5876 at a velocity of ?19,000 km s{sup –1}). Moreover, the larger intensity ratio of the [O I] ?6300 and ?6364 lines inferred from the early nebular spectra implies a lower opacity of the ejecta shortly after the explosion. These results indicate that SN 2007gr perhaps underwent a less energetic explosion of a smaller-mass Wolf-Rayet star (?8-9 M{sub ?}) in a binary system, as favored by an analysis of the progenitor environment through pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. In the nebular spectra, asymmetric double-peaked profiles can be seen in the [O I] ?6300 and Mg I] ?4571 lines. We suggest that the two peaks are contributed by the blueshifted and rest-frame components. The similarity in velocity structure and the different evolution of the strength of the two components favor an aspherical explosion with the ejecta distributed in a torus or disk-like geometry, but inside the ejecta the O and Mg have different distributions.

  13. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    Reclamation of mine-sites with acid overburden requires the use of alkaline amendments and represents a potential high-volume use of alkaline dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by products. In a greenhouse study, 25-cm columns of acid mine spoil were amended with two FGD by-products; lime injection multistage burners (LIMB) fly ash or pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) fly ash at rates of 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32% by weight (0, 40, 80, 160, and 320 tons/acre). Amended spoil was covered with 20 cm of acid topsoil amended with the corresponding FGD by-product to pH 7. Column leachate pH increased with FGD amendment rate while leachate Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased, Leachate Ca, S, and Mg decreased with LIMB amendment rate and increased with PFBC amendment. Leachate concentrations of regulated metals were decreased or unaffected by FGD amendment except for Se which was increased by PFBC. Spoil pH was increased up to 8.9 by PFBC, and up to 9.2 by LIMB amendment. Spoil pH also increased with depth with FGD amendments of 16 and 32%, Yield of fescue was increased by FGD amendment of 4 to 8%. Plant tissue content of most elements was unaffected by FGD amendment rate, and no toxicity symptoms were observed. Plant Ca and Mg were increased by LIMB and PFBC respectively, while plant S, Mn and Sr were decreased. Plant Ca and B was increased by LIMB, and plant Mg and S by PFBC amendment. These results indicate dry FGD by-products are effective in ameliorating acid, spoils and have a low potential for creating adverse environmental impacts.

  14. Estimating the variable cost for high-volume and long-haul transportation of densified biomass and biofuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Md. S. Roni; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This article analyzes rail transportation costs of products that have similar physical properties as densified biomass and biofuel. The results of this cost analysis are useful to understand the relationship and quantify the impact of a number of factors on rail transportation costs of denisfied biomass and biofuel. These results will be beneficial and help evaluate the economic feasibility of high-volume and long-haul transportation of biomass and biofuel. High-volume and long-haul rail transportation of biomass is a viable transportation option for biofuel plants, and for coal plants which consider biomass co-firing. Using rail optimizes costs, and optimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to transportation. Increasing bioenergy production would consequently result in lower GHG emissions due to displacing fossil fuels. To estimate rail transportation costs we use the carload waybill data, provided by Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board for products such as grain and liquid type commodities for 2009 and 2011. We used regression analysis to quantify the relationship between variable transportation unit cost ($/ton) and car type, shipment size, rail movement type, commodity type, etc. The results indicate that: (a) transportation costs for liquid is $2.26/ton–$5.45/ton higher than grain type commodity; (b) transportation costs in 2011 were $1.68/ton–$5.59/ton higher than 2009; (c) transportation costs for single car shipments are $3.6/ton–$6.68/ton higher than transportation costs for multiple car shipments of grains; (d) transportation costs for multiple car shipments are $8.9/ton and $17.15/ton higher than transportation costs for unit train shipments of grains.

  15. Direct measurement of the extraordinary optical momentum using a nano-cantilever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antognozzi; S. Simpson; R. Harniman; J. Senior; R. Hayward; H. Hoerber; M. R. Dennis; A. Y. Bekshaev; K. Y. Bliokh; F. Nori

    2015-06-13

    Radiation pressure has been known since Kepler's observation that a comet's tail is always oriented away from the sun, and in the past centuries this phenomenon stimulated remarkable discoveries in electromagnetism, quantum physics and relativity [1-3]. In modern terms, the pressure of light is associated with the momentum of photons, which plays a crucial role in a variety of systems, from atomic [4-7] to astronomical [8,9] scales. Experience from these cases leads us to assume that the direction of the optical momentum and the radiation-pressure force are naturally aligned with the propagation of light, i.e., its wavevector. Here we report the direct observation of an extraordinary optical momentum and force directed perpendicular to the wavevector, and proportional to the optical spin (i.e., degree of circular polarization). This transverse spin-dependent optical force, a few orders of magnitude weaker than the usual radiation pressure, was recently predicted for evanescent waves [10] and other structured fields [11]. Fundamentally, it can be associated with the enigmatic "spin momentum," introduced by Belinfante in field theory 75 years ago [12-14]. We measure this unusual transverse momentum using a nano-cantilever with extremely low compliance (capable of femto-Newton resolution), which is immersed in an evanescent optical field directly above the total-internal-reflecting glass surface. Such sensors, perpendicular to a substrate, have already shown an extreme force resolution in various systems [15-19]. Our findings revisit fundamental momentum properties of light, while the experimental technique opens the way for precision measurements of fine optical forces in structured fields at subwavelength scales.

  16. DC 12m telescope. Preliminary calculations. Investigation of elevation axis position.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guarino, V. J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-18

    This paper examines some simple calculations of a 2D model of a telescope in order to understand how different design parameters affect the design. For the design of a telescope it is assumed that they need a design that minimizes deflections of the dish and also minimizes the size of the motors and torques needed to rotate in elevation. A common belief is that a lighter dish and minimum counterweight is desirable. However, these calculations show this is not necessarily true. The torque needed for rotation depends on the moment of inertia and if the telescope is balanced about the elevation axis. A light dish with no CW requires that the elevation axis be several meters in front of the dish (8-9m) in order to be balanced. This is not practical from a structural point of view. If the elevation axis is only 2m in front of the dish and there is no counterweight then the telescope will be unbalanced and the toruqes required will be very high - much higher than the torques needed only to overcome inertia. A heavy dish though can act as its own counterweight and the elevation axis only has to be 2-3m in front of the dish in order to achieve a balanced telescope. Also the struts that support the camera from the dish place a load on the dish which will put a bending moment on the dish. This bending moment will deform the dish and require it to be stiffer. A counterweight structure performs two functions. First, it allows the telescope to be balanced about the elevation axis. Second, it applies a force on the dish that opposes the forces from the camera struts, thereby reducing the bending moment and deformations of the dish.

  17. Designing the Microbial Research Commons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhlir, Paul F

    2011-10-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

  18. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng; Pan, Xiaoning; Zhou, Yin; Wang, Xiaochun; Du, Weiliang; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  19. Association between health status and the performance of excessively variable spirometry tests in a population-based study in six U. S. cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisen, E.A.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Fay, M.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-12-01

    The relationship between 6 chronic respiratory symptoms and the performance of an excessively variable FEV1 (test failure) was examined among 8,522 white adults in 6 U.S. cities. A total of 747 (8.9%) performed an excessively variable FEV1 according to the American Thoracic Society criterion. After adjusting for smoking, age, and city of residence in 6 separate logistic regression models, the odds ratios for FEV1 failure among men were 2.32, 1.39, 1.40, 1.82, 2.61, 1.92 for moderate breathlessness, chronic cough, phlegm, wheeze, asthma, and recurrent chest illness, respectively. Among women, FEV1 failure was significantly associated with moderate breathlessness, chronic phlegm, wheeze, and asthma with odds ratios of 1.55, 1.45, 1.62, and 1.95, respectively. When all symptoms were evaluated simultaneously in a single logistic regression model, only breathlessness and asthma remained associated with FEV1 failure; odds ratio = 1.97 for asthma and 2.03 for breathlessness among men and 1.53 for both asthma and breathlessness among women. The 11-yr mortality experience of subjects with test failure, as defined by 2 different criteria, was compared to that of the quartile of the cohort with the highest cross-sectional test results. After adjusting for age, gender, and smoking, the relative risks of mortality were 1.62 and 1.98 for subjects with an FEV1 failure as defined by the ATS and 6-Cities criteria, respectively, and 1.99 and 1.90 for the groups with FVC failure as defined by the 2 criteria. Thus, test failure is almost as strong a predictor of mortality as poor FEV1.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  1. Evaluation of measurement accuracies of the Higgs boson branching fractions in the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ono; A. Miyamoto

    2013-03-19

    Precise measurement of Higgs boson couplings is an important task for International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments and will facilitate the understanding of the particle mass generation mechanism. In this study, the measurement accuracies of the Higgs boson branching fractions to the $b$ and $c$ quarks and gluons, $\\Delta Br(H\\to b\\bar{b},\\sim c\\bar{c},\\sim gg)/Br$, were evaluated with the full International Large Detector model (\\texttt{ILD\\_00}) for the Higgs mass of 120 GeV at the center-of-mass (CM) energies of 250 and 350 GeV using neutrino, hadronic and leptonic channels and assuming an integrated luminosity of $250 {\\rm fb^{-1}}$, and an electron (positron) beam polarization of -80% (+30%). We obtained the following measurement accuracies of the Higgs cross section times branching fraction ($\\Delta (\\sigma \\cdot Br)/\\sigma \\cdot Br$) for decay of the Higgs into $b\\bar{b}$, $c\\bar{c}$, and $gg$; as 1.0%, 6.9%, and 8.5% at a CM energy of 250 GeV and 1.0%, 6.2%, and 7.3% at 350 GeV, respectively. After the measurement accuracy of the cross section ($\\Delta\\sigma/\\sigma$) was corrected using the results of studies at 250 GeV and their extrapolation to 350 GeV, the derived measurement accuracies of the branching fractions ($\\Delta Br/Br$) to $b\\bar{b}$, $c\\bar{c}$, and gg were 2.7%, 7.3%, and 8.9% at a CM energy of 250 GeV and 3.6%, 7.2%, and 8.1% at 350 GeV, respectively.

  2. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  3. Cyclization Phenomena in the Sol-Gel Polymerization of a,w-Bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and Incorporation of the Cyclic Structures into Network Silsesquioxane Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, T.M.; Carpenter, J.P.; Dorhout, P.K.; Greaves, J.; Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.; Shea, K.J.; Small, J.H.

    1999-01-04

    Intramolecular cyclizations during acid-catalyzed, sol-gel polymerizations of ct,co- bis(tietioxysilyl)aWmes substintidly lengtien gelties formonomers witietiylene- (l), propylene- (2), and butylene-(3)-bridging groups. These cyclizations reactions were found, using mass spectrometry and %i NMR spectroscopy, to lead preferentially to monomeric and dimeric products based on six and seven membered disilsesquioxane rings. 1,2- Bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (1) reacts under acidic conditions to give a bicyclic drier (5) that is composed of two annelated seven membered rings. Under the same conditions, 1,3- bis(triethoxysilyl)propane (2), 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (3), and z-1,4- bis(triethoxysilyl)but-2-ene (10) undergo an intramolecular condensation reaction to give the six membemd and seven membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes 6, 7, and 11. Subsequently, these cyclic monomers slowly react to form the tricyclic dirners 8,9 and 12. With NaOH as polymerization catalyst these cyclic silsesquioxanes readily ~aeted to afford gels that were shown by CP MAS z%i NMR and infr=d spectroscopes to retain some cyclic structures. Comparison of the porosity and microstructwe of xerogels prepared from the cyclic monomers 6 and 7 with gels prepared directly from their acyclic precursors 2 and 3, indicate that the final pore structure of the xerogels is markedly dependent on the nature of the precursor. In addition, despite the fact that the monomeric cyclic disilsesquioxane species can not be isolated from 1-3 under basic conditions due to their rapid rate of gelation, spectroscopic techniques also detected the presence of the cyclic structures in the resulting polymeric gels.

  4. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ? 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  5. Outcomes of Node-Negative Breast Cancer 5 Centimeters and Larger Treated With and Without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Jennifer; Truong, Pauline; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline H.; Kennecke, Hagen; Nichol, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) remains controversial for the rare presentation of pT3pN0cM0 breast cancer. The present analysis examined locoregional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in pT2 = 5.0-cm and pT3 >5.0-cm tumors treated with mastectomy, stratified by PMRT use. Materials and Methods: Between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2000, the British Columbia provincial database yielded 100 node-negative patients with tumors {>=}5 cm of 19,846 nonmetastatic breast cancer patients (0.5%). Of these 100 patients, 44 (44%) had received adjuvant PMRT. Results: The PMRT group contained significantly more pT3 >5-cm cases (p = 0.001) and margin-positive cases (p = .03). With a median follow-up of 10 years, the cumulative 10-year LRR rate was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-10.5) in the PMRT group vs. 8.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.2-18.2) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). Regarding LRR in the no-PMRT group, all patients had Grade 3 histologic features (LRR 17%, 5 of 29) and had not received hormonal therapy (LRR 15%, 5 of 34). The 10-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 85.8% (95% confidence interval 71.0-93.4) in the PMRT group vs. 74.6% (95% confidence interval 59.9-84.5) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). On multivariate analysis, adjusted for the prognostic and predictive variables, PMRT did not significantly improve the LRR or breast cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a low LRR rate for node-negative breast cancer {>=}5 cm. Our results indicate that PMRT should be considered for Grade 3 histologic features and patients not undergoing hormonal therapy.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  7. Symmetry energy systematics and its high density behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen

    2015-06-30

    We explore the systematics of the density dependence of nuclear matter symmetry energy in the ambit of microscopic calculations with various energy density functionals, and find that the symmetry energy from subsaturation density to supra-saturation density can be well determined by three characteristic parameters of the symmetry energy at saturation density $\\rho_0 $, i.e., the magnitude $E_{\\text{sym}}({\\rho_0 })$, the density slope $L$ and the density curvature $K_{\\text{sym}}$. This finding opens a new window to constrain the supra-saturation density behavior of the symmetry energy from its (sub-)saturation density behavior. In particular, we obtain $L=46.7 \\pm 12.8$ MeV and $K_{\\text{sym}}=-166.9 \\pm 168.3$ MeV as well as $E_{\\text{sym}}({2\\rho _{0}}) \\approx 40.2 \\pm 12.8$ MeV and $L({2\\rho _{0}}) \\approx 8.9 \\pm 108.7$ MeV based on the present knowledge of $E_{\\text{sym}}({\\rho_{0}}) = 32.5 \\pm 0.5$ MeV, $E_{\\text{sym}}({\\rho_c}) = 26.65 \\pm 0.2$ MeV and $L({\\rho_c}) = 46.0 \\pm 4.5$ MeV at $\\rho_{\\rm{c}}= 0.11$ fm$^{-3}$ extracted from nuclear mass and the neutron skin thickness of Sn isotopes. Our results indicate that the symmetry energy cannot be stiffer than a linear density dependence.In addition, we also discuss the quark matter symmetry energy since the deconfined quarks could be the right degree of freedom in dense matter at high baryon densities.

  8. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

  9. Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-03-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of solid phase calcium was produced. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. These research results demonstrate the potential of using cyanobacterial catalyzed “whitings” as a method to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere.

  10. Dependence of polar hole density on magnetic and solar conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoegy, W.R.; Grebowsky, J.M. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    The dependence of electron density in the polar F region ionization hole on solar activity, universal time (UT), magnetic activity, season, and hemisphere is studied using data from the Langmuir probes on Atmosphere Explorer C and Dynamics Explorer 2. The AE-C data were obtained during solar minimum when the 3-month average 10.7-cm solar flux index varied from 70 to 140; the DE 2 data were obtained near solar maximum when 10.7-cm solar flux index varied from 120 to 220. The polar hole is a region on the nightside of the polar cap where reduced ionization exists because of the long transport time of ionization from the dayside across the polar cap. The behavior of this region as a function of 10.7-cm solar flux (F10.7), UT, and Kp is statistically modeled for equinox, summer, and winter conditions for each hemisphere separately. The strongest dependencies are observed in F10.7 and UT; the Kp dependence is weak because it poorly represents the complexities of convection across the polar cap. A strong hemispherical difference due to the offset of the magnetic poles from the Earth's rotation axis is observed in the UT dependence of the ionization hole: there is a density minimum at about 20.3 hours UT in the south and at about 4.8 hours UT in the north; the minimum to maximum UT density variation is about a factor of 8.9 in the south and about a factor of 2.1 in the north. There is a seasonal variation in the dependence of ion density (N{sub i}) on solar flux (F10.7). Use of the relationship (N{sub i}{approximately}F10.7{sup D}) yields values of D of approximately unity (1.) in the summer polar hole and about 2.1 during equinox. There is an overall asymmetry in the density level between hemispheres; it was found that the winter hole density is about a factor of 10 greater in the north than in the south. The Utah State University time dependent ionosphere model gives similar UT behavior to that found in the AE-C and DE 2 data.

  11. SS 383: A NEW S-TYPE YELLOW SYMBIOTIC STAR?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baella, N. O.; Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    Symbiotic stars are key objects in understanding the formation and evolution of interacting binary systems, and are probably the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. However, the number of known symbiotic stars is much lower than predicted. We aim to search for new symbiotic stars, with particular emphasis on the S-type yellow symbiotic stars, in order to determine their total population, evolutionary timescales, and physical properties. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) color-color diagram has been previously used to identify new symbiotic star candidates and show that yellow symbiotics are located in a particular region of that diagram. Candidate symbiotic stars are selected on the basis of their locus in the 2MASS (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) diagram and the presence of H? line emission in the Stephenson and Sanduleak H? survey. This diagram separates S-type yellow symbiotic stars from the rest of the S-type symbiotic stars, allowing us to select candidate yellow symbiotics. To establish the true nature of the candidates, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy is obtained. We have identified the H? emission line source SS 383 as an S-type yellow symbiotic candidate by its position in the 2MASS color-color diagram. The optical spectrum of SS 383 shows Balmer, He I, He II, and [O III] emission lines, in combination with TiO absorption bands that confirm its symbiotic nature. The derived electron density (?10{sup 8-9} cm{sup –3}), He I emission line intensity ratios, and position in the [O III] ?5007/H? versus [O III] ?4363/H? diagram indicate that SS 383 is an S-type symbiotic star, with a probable spectral type of K7-M0 deduced for its cool component based on TiO indices. The spectral type and the position of SS 383 (corrected for reddening) in the 2MASS color-color diagram strongly suggest that SS 383 is an S-type yellow symbiotic. Our result points out that the 2MASS color-color diagram is a powerful tool in identifying new S-type yellow symbiotics.

  12. Combustion and inorganic emissions of ground waste tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A.; Steciak, J.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study was undertaken to assess the combustion characteristics and emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} gases from ground waste tires. Results were contrasted with those obtained from burning pulverized coal. Laboratory bench-scale experiments were conducted in a drop-tube, laminar-flow furnace, in air at fuel-lean conditions, at gas temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1600 K. Two particle size cuts were burned from both materials, 75-90 {mu}m and 180-212 {mu}m. Blends of coal and tire particles, at equal weight ratios, were also burned. Pyrometric and cinematographic observations revealed that the coal particles exhibited distinct volatile and char combustion phases, while tire particles exhibited a distinct primary volatile phase followed by a char combustion phase, which was accompanied by burning of secondary pyrolysis products. SO{sub 2} emissions of burning ground tires increased from 160 to 500 ppm as the temperature increased from 1300 K to 1600 K. Combustion of coal produced SO{sub 2} emissions in the neighborhood of 200-300 ppm (corresponding to 40 to 60 wt% of its sulfur content) independent of the gas temperature. The blend of coal and tire particles (equal mass ratios) exhibited SO{sub 2} values which fell in between the above. NO{sub x} emissions were constant at approximately 175 ppm for tire crumb (corresponding to approximately 45 wt% of its fuel nitrogen content) and 625 ppm for coal (corresponding to 55 wt% of its fuel nitrogen content) in the temperature range studied. CO{sub 2} emissions from tire were 8-9 molar %, while for coal particles they were 5-7 molar %; the upper limits corresponded to approximately 100% combustion efficiency. As a means to reduce the SO{sub 2} emissions, pulverized coal and tire crumb were fluidized together with particles of a calcium bearing sorbent - calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA has been identified as an effective SO{sub 2} scrubbing agent in previous studies.

  13. Institutional, Retrospective Analysis of 777 Patients With Brain Metastases: Treatment Outcomes and Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoni, Delphine; Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Pop, Marius; Schumacher, Catherine; Lefebvre, François; Noël, Georges

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the prognostic factors and survival of a series of 777 patients with brain metastases (BM) from a single institution. Methods and Materials: Patients were treated with surgery followed by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or with WBRT alone in 16.3% and 83.7% of the cases, respectively. The patients were RPA (recursive partitioning analysis) class I, II, and III in 11.2%, 69.6%, and 18.4% of the cases, respectively; RPA class II-a, II-b, and II-c in 8.3%, 24.8%, and 66.9% of the cases, respectively; and with GPA (graded prognostic assessment) scores of 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0 in 35%, 27.5%, 18.2%, and 8.6% of the cases, respectively. Results: The median overall survival (OS) times according to RPA class I, II, and III were 20.1, 5.1, and 1.3 months, respectively (P<.0001); according to RPA class II-a, II-b, II-c: 9.1, 8.9, and 4.0 months, respectively (P<.0001); and according to GPA score 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0: 2.5, 4.4, 9.0, and 19.1 months, respectively (P<.0001). By multivariate analysis, the favorable independent prognostic factors for survival were as follows: for gastrointestinal tumor, a high Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (P=.0003) and an absence of extracranial metastases (ECM) (P=.003); for kidney cancer, few BM (P=.002); for melanoma, few BM (P=.01), an absence of ECM (P=.002), and few ECM (P=.0002); for lung cancer, age (P=.007), a high KPS (P<.0001), an absence of ECM (P<.0001), few ECM and BM (P<.0001 and P=.0006, respectively), and control of the primary tumor (P=.004); and for breast cancer, age (P=.001), a high KPS (P=.007), control of the primary tumor (P=.05), and few ECM and BM (P=.01 and P=.0002, respectively). The triple-negative subtype was a significant unfavorable factor (P=.007). Conclusion: Prognostic factors varied by pathology. Our analysis confirms the strength of prognostic factors used to determine the GPA score, including the genetic subtype for breast cancer.

  14. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chugh, Rashmi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Janet Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  15. Development and Application of an Oversize Reusable DOT 7A Type A Overpack Container at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tharp, Tim; Martin, David; Franco, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Waste Management personnel at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) are concluding a multi-year effort to dispose of a large backlog of low-level waste. Six containers presented a particularly difficult technical challenge in that they each contained large robust equipment (mostly salt baths) with elevated levels of highly enriched uranium (exceeding U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) fissile-excepted quantities). The equipment was larger than the standard 1.2 m x 1.2 m x 1.8 m (4 ft x 4 ft x 6 ft) DOT Specification 7A Type A box and would have been very difficult to size-reduce because of several inches of steel plate (along with insulating block and concrete) in the equipment design. A critical breakthrough for the success of the project involved procuring and developing two oversize reusable DOT Specification 7A Type A (fissile tested) containers (referred to as the CTI Model 7AF-690-SC) that could be used as overpacks for the original boxes of equipment. The 7A Type A overpack containers are approximately 3.5 m long x 2.7 m wide x 2.8 m high (11.7 ft x 8.9 ft x 9.2 ft) with a maximum gross weight of 10,660 kg (23,500 lb) and a payload capacity of 6,804 kg (15,000 lbs). The boxes were designed and fabricated using a split cavity design that allowed the gasketed and bolted closure to lie along the horizontal centerline of the box. The central closure location in this design allows for strengthening of box corners that tend to be points of weakness or failure in 49CFR173.465 drop tests. By combining the split cavity design with large diameter tubing and diagonal cross bracing, drop test requirements of 49CFR173.465(1) and (2) were met and demonstrated through finite element analysis modeling. The development and use of this new container dramatically reduced the need for down-sizing the equipment and allowed the project to meet objectives within cost and schedule targets. (authors)

  16. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

  17. Applied & Computational MathematicsChallenges for the Design and Control of Dynamic Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D L; Burns, J A; Collis, S; Grosh, J; Jacobson, C A; Johansen, H; Mezic, I; Narayanan, S; Wetter, M

    2011-03-10

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was passed with the goal 'to move the United States toward greater energy independence and security.' Energy security and independence cannot be achieved unless the United States addresses the issue of energy consumption in the building sector and significantly reduces energy consumption in buildings. Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 40% of the U.S. energy consumption and emit 50% of CO{sub 2} emissions in the U.S. which is more than twice the total energy consumption of the entire U.S. automobile and light truck fleet. A 50%-80% improvement in building energy efficiency in both new construction and in retrofitting existing buildings could significantly reduce U.S. energy consumption and mitigate climate change. Reaching these aggressive building efficiency goals will not happen without significant Federal investments in areas of computational and mathematical sciences. Applied and computational mathematics are required to enable the development of algorithms and tools to design, control and optimize energy efficient buildings. The challenge has been issued by the U.S. Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu (emphasis added): 'We need to do more transformational research at DOE including computer design tools for commercial and residential buildings that enable reductions in energy consumption of up to 80 percent with investments that will pay for themselves in less than 10 years.' On July 8-9, 2010 a team of technical experts from industry, government and academia were assembled in Arlington, Virginia to identify the challenges associated with developing and deploying newcomputational methodologies and tools thatwill address building energy efficiency. These experts concluded that investments in fundamental applied and computational mathematics will be required to build enabling technology that can be used to realize the target of 80% reductions in energy consumption. In addition the finding was that there are tools and technologies that can be assembled and deployed in the short term - the next 3-5 years - that can be used to significantly reduce the cost and time effective delivery of moderate energy savings in the U.S. building stock. Simulation tools, which are a core strength of current DOE computational research programs, provide only a part of the answer by providing a basis for simulation enabled design. New investments will be required within a broad dynamics and control research agenda which must focus on dynamics, control, optimization and simulation of multi-scale energy systems during design and operation. U.S. investments in high performance and high productivity computing (HP2C) should be leveraged and coupled with advances in dynamics and control to impact both the existing building stock through retrofits and also new construction. The essential R&D areas requiring investment are: (1) Characterizing the Dynamics of Multi-scale Energy Systems; (2) Control and Optimization Methodologies of Multi-scale Energy Systems Under Uncertainty; and (3) Multiscale Modeling and Simulation Enabled Design and Operation. The concept of using design and control specific computational tools is a new idea for the building industry. The potential payoffs in terms of accelerated design cycle times, performance optimization and optimal supervisory control to obtain and maintain energy savings are huge. Recent advances in computational power, computer science, and mathematical algorithms offer the foundations to address the control problems presented by the complex dynamics of whole building systems. The key areas for focus and associated metrics with targets for establishing competitiveness in energy efficient building design and operation are: (1) Scalability - Current methodology and tools can provide design guidance for very low energy buildings in weeks to months; what is needed is hours to days. A 50X improvement is needed. (2) Installation and commissioning - Current methodology and tools can target a three month window for commissioni

  18. A Preliminary Cost Study of the Dual Mode Inverter Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.

    2005-01-28

    In 1998, the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) started a program to investigate alternate field weakening schemes for permanent magnet (PM) motors. The adjective ''alternate'' was used because at that time, outside research emphasis was on motors with interior-mounted PMs (IPMs). The PEEMRC emphasis was placed on motors with surface-mounted PMs (SPMs) because of the relative ease of manufacturing SPM motors compared with the IPM motors. Today the PEEMRC is continuing research on SPMs while examining the IPMs that have been developed by industry. Out of this task--the goal of which was to find ways to drive PM motors that inherently have low inductance at high speeds where their back-emf exceeds the supply voltage--ORNL developed and demonstrated the dual mode inverter control (DMIC) [1,2] method of field weakening for SPM motors. The predecessor of DMIC is conventional phase advance (CPA), which was developed by UQM Technologies, Inc. [3]. Fig. 1 shows the three sets of anti-parallel thyristors in the dashed box that comprise the DMIC. If one removes the dashed box by shorting each set of anti-parallel thyristors, the configuration becomes a conventional full bridge inverter on the left driving a three phase motor on the right. CPA may be used to drive this configuration ORNL's initial analyses of CPA and DMIC were based on driving motors with trapezoidal back-emfs [4-6], obtained using double layer lapped stator windings with one slot per pole per phase. A PM motor with a sinusoidal back-emf obtained with two poles per slot per phase has been analyzed under DMIC operation as a University of Tennessee-Knoxville (UTK) doctoral dissertation [7]. In the process of this research, ORNL has completed an analysis that explains and quantifies the role of inductance in these methods of control. The Appendix includes information on the equations for the three components of phase inductance, L{sub gap}, L{sub slot}, and L{sub endturns}. PM motors inherently have a lower inductance because of the increase in effective air gap caused by the magnet, which is in the denominator of the equation for L{sub gap}. L{sub gap} accounts for about half of the phase inductance. Because of the low inductance, there is a propensity for currents to exceed the motor's rated value. DMIC solves this problem for low-inductance PM motors and, in addition, provides a number of safety features that protect against uncontrolled generator mode operation [8,9]; however, the DMIC topology adds a pair of anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three phases, thereby introducing additional silicon costs as well as additional voltage drops during operation. It poses the tradeoff question; under what conditions can the beneficial features of DMIC offset its additional silicon cost and voltage drop losses? The purpose of this report is to address the tradeoff question. Sections of the report will: (1) review the role of self-inductance in performance and control of PM motors, (2) discuss the bounding inductances for motors with trapezoidal back-emfs under CPA control, (3) discuss the bounding inductances for trapezoidal back-emfs under DMIC, (4) discuss the bounding inductances for the PM synchronous motor (PMSM), (5) present the analysis showing how DMIC minimizes current in PMSMs, (6) present the results of a cost study conducted for two motors driven using a CPA inverter and for two motors driven using DMIC, (7) discuss estimating life cycle cost benefits, and (8) present conclusions.

  19. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  20. COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Yadong Li

    2000-11-01

    Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

  1. Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

    2010-01-11

    The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

  2. Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-09-01

    In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

  3. Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-09-01

    In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

  4. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

  5. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore »from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1?;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004–2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr?¹,ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr?¹. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr?¹. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004–2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3–3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr?¹), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870–2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).« less