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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electronic Properties of Graphene 8-9 October 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Properties of Graphene 8-9 October 2010 The program will focus on the properties of graphene, a single-atom-thick layer of carbon. Discovered in 2004, graphene has quickly become one as the potential it offers to future nano-electronics applications. Originally, the interest in graphene

Petta, Jason

2

March 8-9, 2004/ARR Some of the Major Considerations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 8-9, 2004/ARR 1 Some of the Major Considerations in Designing a Ceramic Breeder Blanket Pressure (from EU Study) · He-cooled ceramic breeder blanket in conjunction with a Rankine steam power Blanket box with stiffening grid and exploded back wall Blanket breeder unit Cool. Tin/Tout =300/500°C

Raffray, A. René

3

Indo-Australian Geothermal Energy Capacity Building Workshop February 8-9 2010, NGRI, Hyderabad.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indo-Australian Geothermal Energy Capacity Building Workshop February 8-9 2010, NGRI, Hyderabad. Geothermal energy is known to be one of the clean energy without smoke and also without environmental hazards. In the present scenario, the details of geothermal energy, its importance and usage in other countries

Harinarayana, T.

4

Optimization of the Ballistic Guide Design for the SNS FNPB 8.9 A Neutron Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optimization of the ballistic guide design for the SNS Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline 8.9 A line is described. With a careful tuning of the shape of the curve for the tapered section and the width of the straight section, this optimization resulted in more than 75% increase in the neutron flux exiting the 33 m long guide over a straight m=3.5 guide with the same length.

Takeyasu M. Ito; Christopher B. Crawford; Geoffrey L. Greene

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Data:Cfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved for this page. ItCfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f No revision has been

7

Domain Motions of EF-G Bound to the 70S Ribosome: Insights from a Hand-Shaking between Multi-Resolution Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Health Research, Inc. at the § Wadsworth Center, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12201-0509 USA of translo- case (EF-G) in the ribosome-bound form against data from cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM). We that gives excellent agreement between the flexibly docked structure of GDP EF-G and the cryo-EM density map

Wriggers, Willy

8

A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United

9

AAPG Low-Temperature Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United2

10

AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90)to:DEPARTMENT OF

11

Task 8.9 - Advanced ceramic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced ceramic materials such as Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CFCCs) have had promising results on the companion program entitled ``Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine`` (CSGT). In particular, CFCCs have outperformed monolithic tiles in structural integrity as a combustor liner. Also, CFCCs have provided the higher temperature operation and improved emissions performance that is required for the ATS combustor. The demonstrated advantages on CSGT justified work to explore the use of advanced ceramic composite materials in other gas turbine components. Sub-tasks include development of a practical, cost effective component fabrication process, development of finite element stress analysis to assure 30,000 hours of component life, and fabrication of a demonstration article.

NONE

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

EFG IO?-90)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntownRockyDeparttient,ofREQUEST FOR75'E.

13

PVMaT cost reductions in the EFG high volume PV manufacturing line: Annual report, 5 August 1998--4 August 1999[PhotoVoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Edge-defined Film-fed Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by ASE Americas researchers during the first year of this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology 5A2 program. Significant accomplishments in each of three task are as follows. Task 1--Manufacturing Systems: Researchers completed key node analysis, started statistical process control (SPC) charting, carried out design-of-experiment (DoE) matrices on the cell line to optimize efficiencies, performed a capacity and bottleneck study, prepared a baseline chemical waste analysis report, and completed writing of more than 50% of documentation and statistical sections of ISO 9000 procedures. A highlight of this task is that cell efficiencies in manufacturing were increased by 0.4%--0.5% absolute, to an average in excess of 14.2%, with the help of DoE and SPC methods. Task 2--Low-Cost Processes: Researchers designed, constructed, and tested a 50-cm-diameter, edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) cylinder crystal growth system to successfully produce thin cylinders up to 1.2 meters in length; completed a model for heat transfer; successfully deployed new nozzle designs and used them with a laser wafer-cutting system with the potential to decrease cutting labor costs by 75% and capital costs by 2X; achieved laser-cutting speeds of up to 8X and evaluation of this system is proceeding in production; identified laser-cutting conditions that reduce damage for both Q-switched Nd:YAG and copper-vapor lasers with the help of a breakthrough in fundamental understanding of cutting with these short-pulse-length lasers; and found that bulk EFG material lifetimes are optimized when co-firing of silicon nitride and aluminum is carried out with rapid thermal processing (RTP). Task 3--Flexible Manufacturing: Researchers improved large-volume manufacturing of 10-cm {times} 15-cm EFG wafers by developing laser-cutting fixtures, adapting carriers and fabricating adjustable racks for etching and rinsing facilities, and installing a high-speed data collection net work; initiated fracture studies to develop methods to reduce wafer breakage; and started a module field studies program to collect data on field failures to help identify potential manufacturing problems. New encapsulants, which cure at room temperature, are being tested to improve flexibility and provide higher yields for thin wafers in lamination.

Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

8/9 Tribuna Complutense 9 de diciembre de 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ción, la creatividad, la solidari- dad y el respeto medioambiental entre los jóvenes. De ello dieron fe

15

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC logosParallelPresentations NUG

16

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC logosParallelPresentations

17

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Minutes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC logosParallelPresentationsMinutes

18

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC

19

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 8-9, 1996  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC NUG MeetingAttendee ERSUG

20

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 8-9, 1996 Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC NUG MeetingAttendee ERSUGAgenda

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 8-9, 1996 Minutes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC NUG MeetingAttendeeMinutes

22

Echo 8-9 Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESEInformation Smart Wind Farm Jump

23

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif DirectorateUser's Group Meeting 2.4.14 AnA

24

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif DirectorateUser's Group Meeting 2.4.14

25

NERSC Users Group Meeting April 8-9, 1998 Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif DirectorateUser's Group Meeting 2.4.14A Case

26

I EFG Kww United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH: l ._ .r. .- .'A

27

Data:068c2cb8-9f67-41a8-9a2d-9091b85ad20b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions6ae4e73fc No revision1b85ad20b No revision has been approved for

28

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUBBERT AND WILLIS: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING THE 1960'S 1960:the graphs for fracturing and hydraulic conductivity withof fracturing distribution, as well as to define hydraulic

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or loss of well mechanical integrity Fluid Flow Surveystubing or loss of well mechanical integrity. Once every 5of cement Well Plugging Run mechanical integrity test logs:

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Setterholm, 1997 Sette rholm,_1997 Setterhoim, 1997 NURE,1981 NÜRE, 1981a NURE, 1979 NURE, 1979 a NURE, 1981 b NURE, 1981 c NÜRE;

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

case histories (e.g. , Chelyabinsk, Tomsk, and others),site in the world, the Chelyabinsk- Mayak site. Dr. Andrei o n s (according to Chelyabinsk-65 meteostation> and water

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Instructions for use 8.9 JPY/kWh+ 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 4/5, pp. 218-223 2010 Andronova, N. G. and Schlesinger M. E. (2000), Causes of Global Temperature), The Role of Atmospheric Nuclear Explosions on the Stagnation of Global Warming in the Mid 20th Century% 10 2012 2012 (A)(B)(C) pp. 141-144 9/11 #12;6. 21 21 GST (Global-mean Surface Temperature) Fig. 2

Tachizawa, Kazuya

33

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U Rad data Indicate depleted uranium contamination NC7-34depleted waters • Mgas-yMaasy = 0.0072+/-0.0001 for U t na Total uranium (

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

OpenEI maintenance March 8-9, 2013 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN)ChangeOnPACen 2014Version 2OpenEI Town

35

2012 National Electricity Forum: February 8-9, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-TypeWelcome6 ProjectsEnergy 2 Fuel

36

Hanford Site Small Businesses Secure $8.9 Billion in Subcontracts |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThis road mapFWorkers

37

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 8-9, 1996 Attendee List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC NUG MeetingAttendee

38

Agenda for Multi Topic workshop Oct 8-9 2014.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office ofReportingEnergyRetrospective Plan Update as of Agenda for

39

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Russia and adjoining countries, b) for long isolation times, the suitability of the site will be affected by global climate changes,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryStudies Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryStudies Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer Somers About UsDepartment of

42

HEPAP December 8-9, 2014 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut Regions National11-12, 2005 High Energy3909December

43

EfG KMOJ- United States Government I@,&  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS;/:4,4 (; . 1.; e octo:

44

March 8-9, 2013 Friday 9:00-3:00, Saturday 10:00-3:00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, learn how energy efficiency and indoor air quality are related. Be sure to have your infrared portrait, Pots, and People; Plastics to Oil; and much more! All ages welcome. Teachers and groups, please contact

Bashir, Rashid

45

Differences in physical activity and sedentary time in relation to weight in 8-9 year old children.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer of clothing 4 cm above the navel using International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2008, 5:67 http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/5/1/67 Seca 200 circumference measuring tape [28]. Inter-rater reliability of anthropometric... - ferences in physical activity have also been demonstrated between obese and non-obese adults [15] adolescents [6,16] and children [3,11,17,18], with obese individuals showing lower levels of physical activity. Sex-by-weight interactions have been observed...

Purslow, Lisa R; Hill, Claire; Saxton, Jenny; Corder, Kirsten; Wardle, Jane

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Presentation to 12th ATF User's Meeting and ATF Program Advisory Committee Brookhaven National Laboratory January 8-9, 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design PassivePostdoctoralKanareykin,URobotsProcessPreparing7,

47

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007, Discussion Session Highlights, Comments, and Action Items  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DC 20585 AprilJohansenofDepartment ofList

48

Volume 114A, number 8,9 PHYSICSLETTERS 17 March 1986 MODE LOCKING, THE BELOUSOV-ZHABOTINSKY REACTION,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devil's staircase observed by Maselko and Swinney as well as chaos and other experimentally observed periodic sequences. An interesting property of the devil's staircase observed here is that it remains complete through a wide range of parameters, in contrast to the devil's staircases observed in critical

49

7SVF@S69W6I8@9YS6`TPGVUDPIT M86-E01034 -0302 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a thermometer (that indicates the maximum and minimum range of the temperature) and as text below the thermometer, with the temperature displaying in those units you have chosen. A flashing thermometer indicates

Meagher, Mary

50

ABB Response to Smart Grid RFI. November 1, 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFG

51

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C 4, supplment au no 8-9, Tome 28, Aot-Septembre 1967, page'c 3-34 LE CENTRE INTERSTITIEL LITHIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-34 LE CENTRE INTERSTITIEL LITHIUM DANS LE FLUORURE DE LITHIUM IRRADI� par Y. FARGE(l) Laboratoire de A apparaît dans des cristaux de fluorurede lithium fortement irradiés aux électrons ou aux neutrons'irradiation;ce centre, effet primaire de l'irradiation, serait l'interstitiel lithium qui formerait un ion moléculaire

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on Statistical Machine Translation, pages 232239, Sofia, Bulgaria, August 8-9, 2013 c 2013 Association for Computational Linguistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Munich ­ (schmid|fraser)@cis.uni-muenchen.de 3 University of Edinburgh ­ dnadir@inf.ed.ac.uk 4 Qatar. For our ex- periments, we use standard phrase-based Moses systems and operation sequence models (OSM). 1-based Moses system (DE-EN, EN-DE, EN-FR and FR-EN) or with an operation sequence model (RU-EN, DE- EN), cf

Reyle, Uwe

53

CoRoT's view on variable B8/9 stars: spots versus pulsations: Evidence for differential rotation in HD 174648  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. There exist few variability studies of stars in the region in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram between the A and B-star pulsational instability strips. With the aid of the high precision continuous measurements of the CoRoT space satellite, low amplitudes are more easily detected, making a study of this neglected region worthwhile. Aims. We collected a small sample of B stars observed by CoRoT to determine the origin of the different types of variability observed. Methods. We combine literature photometry and spectroscopy to measure the fundamental parameters of the stars in the sample, and compare asteroseismic modelling of the light curves with (differentially rotating) spotted star models. Results. We found strong evidence for the existence of spots and differential rotation in HD 174648, and formulated hypotheses for their origin. We show that the distinction between pulsations and rotational modulation is difficult to make solely based on the light curve, especially in slowly rotating stars.

Degroote, P; Samadi, R; Aerts, C; Kurtz, D W; Noels, A; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Bloemen, S; Baglin, A; Baudin, F; Catala, C; Michel, E; Auvergne, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Lovley lands $8.9m grant for microbial studies Page 1 Vol. XVII, Issue 39 for the Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts July 26, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the production of electricity. The grant, from the U.S. Department of Energy, is part of a larger $103 million effort involving six national laboratories, 16 universities and research hospitals, and four private; another looked at the same bacterium's ability to produce electricity from mud and other organic waste

Lovley, Derek

55

Journees des Jeunes Chercheurs 11`eme edition, 8-9 Avril 1999, Lausanne 145 ROMERO: UN P `ELERINAGE ROBOTIQUE `A SANTA FE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposition une popu- lation de vrais robots. Afin, de rendre r´ealit´e ce r^eve, notre travail poursuit deux buts: (1) construire un robot bon march´e, modulaire et extensible et (2) utiliser une population de ces robots pour faire des exp´eriences dans le domaine de la robotique ´evolutive. Ce papier pr

Teuscher, Christof

56

NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense July 8-9, 2010 CORRECTED 9/15/10 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public: Leonard David, Space.Com Reporter (newsspace@aol.com); Tad Friend, New Yorker Staff Writer (tad

Waliser, Duane E.

57

The Second International Symposium on the Frontier of Applied Mathematics was held at Tsinghua University on 8-9 June 2006. It was also an occasion to celebrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREFACE The Second International Symposium on the Frontier of Applied Mathematics was held of mathematical methods." This volume provides an introduction to frontier research of certain areas of applied

Zhang, Meirong

58

Data:F7513911-6922-46d8-9e77-dac4e175e7b3 | Open Energy Information  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Data:69766b33-4d1e-4cc8-9c13-7ae88acbea01 | Open Energy Information  

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62

Data:1fdafaa7-fba5-4de8-9cb2-8005b75f7dc2 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d No529a57c00c0 No revision has75f38de27dd-9676-67406d29c468 No

63

Data:29392d38-2bd9-40b8-9fb1-ea9a5d2e5709 | Open Energy Information  

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64

Data:B05eebda-4b6a-44d8-9b3b-ebc664db4398 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revision has been approved for this page.af74fa257cc No revision

65

Data:B8aa971d-62a8-4af8-9aa7-e9fda9771af6 | Open Energy Information  

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66

Data:5cb34ba8-9c34-46c9-acc5-6d95ad6e65cb | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currentlyf44b5cdc3c No revision has been

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68

Data:4a6749a7-6107-4bf8-9bca-463692d7c7d5 | Open Energy Information  

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69

Data:4bda531d-b72b-49a8-9d01-1f1ffee21a76 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b Nobfef8fa58cf7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under

70

Data:09ddb1c8-9a7d-462d-be17-0bb03852a18b | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable-1a29da98863b No revision has been approved for this page. It is

71

Data:0d506e47-0127-4332-b2f8-9c0da3486c56 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable-1a29da98863bcec555c-6237-4cd1-931a-4d87b7a8618b3a1290e102a46 No

72

Data:9f8227f8-89b7-466c-9180-fc08a4229f7c | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision hasdb5-b05c-76b1be5a4007 No revision has85daa6d76

73

Data:A45e571e-607a-48f3-a0a8-9b273309e21e | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision-b209-069dd1fd7c05a97219c78 Noa9b16c55c7a0 Noed1f5fc93309e21e No revision has

74

Data:A88711e8-9c20-4ad8-84b4-e3182e6036a7 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No revision82e6036a7 No revision has been approved for this

75

Data:A8cfb15d-d06c-42b8-9b12-6012e22c2666 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No revision82e6036a7 No revision

76

Data:Aa31bf99-7310-47c8-9b2d-47d252613ad8 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No0a794995 Noaf5f-795951ea1924 No30299f59086947d252613ad8 No

77

Data:Aa7e63f3-917b-4841-8ac8-9c39196a7afd | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No0a794995ed1-8279-0f89b49fba66 No revision has

78

Data:Af4273e8-9bef-46e2-8862-6c225011f190 | Open Energy Information  

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79

Data:9227d6b8-9cf3-4c39-821b-5b1752c23277 | Open Energy Information  

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80

Data:934913f7-b14c-4bd8-9fa3-57eaa219b4eb | Open Energy Information  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Data:962cfcca-ebe5-4c90-86d8-9a2248fae8c4 | Open Energy Information  

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82

Data:978d8818-4d6f-48d8-9bf0-923051e7ada7 | Open Energy Information  

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83

Data:981be5e8-9e0a-4ae1-a99d-6a978cb8e27d | Open Energy Information  

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84

Data:D728c4e5-f135-426f-acd8-9b39e35dbdb7 | Open Energy Information  

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85

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86

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87

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Data:7be3cbec-a8f6-48f8-9a40-2116ebba1d80 | Open Energy Information  

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89

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90

Data:7cbed229-3ab3-44c8-9fbe-6706959e335d | Open Energy Information  

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91

Data:7efc5745-5301-43d8-9c9d-ebf33f167754 | Open Energy Information  

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Data:7fb28492-4cc1-45b8-9fa5-36d38248bbda | Open Energy Information  

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Data:8049672c-1cc3-44b8-9ab9-e345633fcc69 | Open Energy Information  

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94

Data:34f3ac1f-faca-4ed8-9cd9-7899509bc90c | Open Energy Information  

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95

Data:36b10acb-4407-45e8-89bf-72c9ddcd304c | Open Energy Information  

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96

Data:3c42138a-7a21-41f8-9b48-b5ac19eb7a9b | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffef-15f046e6d97ebecdcfa-6fb6-40ac-bf5c-d48387b933279ef4875b8 No revisionac19eb7a9b No

97

Summary of a two-page feature article in the Berner Zeitung newspaper of Switzerland Sat/Sun 8/9 September 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/9 September 2012 Reinventing the toilet for the poor One of the sessions at the recently held 3rd International Conference on Research for Development 2012 was devoted to the topic of improving sanitation sanitation hasn't been able to keep pace with the rapid growth," says Dr. Koottatep, an environmental

Richner, Heinz

98

Data:F3b0e7fe-5d9e-40e8-89ba-1c48c1beefd1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has been approved for this page. It ise7c5ddfdbf9 Noabed3a4e456e Noefc6b4c2e1a755ea9a62df No1c48c1beefd1

99

Data:6b9c7c2c-66d1-44f8-9f5e-1cbcaa6a193d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approvedea02758d3 Nob05268d8cdd50af6aae37bbaa846018e-1cbcaa6a193d No revision has

100

Data:225b952f-75c8-44c8-9e4b-2e63f6a9a928 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d No529a57c00c098f5e77d9 No6eee65cb81db No revision has been

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Data:B6310e32-5c72-48e8-9b69-b4a3c1d195fe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revisionb6dbbdc091c No revision57b27257aa84 No revision

102

Data:Bb0f9a4a-0436-40b8-9e2c-54c7d71872c9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08d442d74d244 NoBaf7195f-f419-4861-9c6a-e1ffda04c71b No revisione2c-54c7d71872c9 No

103

Data:C118ee36-835f-44a8-9c51-b2c599f7d5f8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2bb71-d4159a938742 No revision has been approvedcf16e2831b94c-f0bbf2aa47d2 No5af057db No-b2c599f7d5f8 No

104

Data:C1d7e720-d25c-44e8-9e0a-7058a738a2d5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2bb71-d4159a938742 No revision has beena032db6d83 No revision has been56977fa8c Noc5d6328d1285058a738a2d5

105

Data:53cfa2c8-9d75-460a-a760-64b2d0ef54d3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b3da-78f7ef0b79f6 No revision has been approvedcf-06c0d7f9fc42 No revision has

106

Data:5e8c1abd-cc61-477c-86f8-9f1c78a58de7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approved for this page. It1f847bdc66d-c7fa8bd9d9fe9cb-68db9051f6d8d791b8fbb54

107

Data:A7c49e8e-d79d-42d8-9da6-0406b9e30bc0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No revision hasf32924 Noda8782cb0511019473 No revision

108

Data:Ac6a66e7-9a41-4b96-bcd8-9b7caf435c56 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under

109

Data:D1cd6d37-c8ed-46f8-9ebc-e9c8821b43c4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved fordbab-cdc7-4e74-8b49-bbf94bd37d77 No revision hasc8821b43c4 No revision has

110

Data:Da3223a8-9c4e-439c-b7ad-d33a3e55a916 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has beenadf9-4884-b0c1-529b3bb19f9c No2-d6f420785d1d Noe22218df8d4d No revision has

111

Data:7f4c4d4e-c9be-4cc8-9e95-a9badf7e801b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No revision has been approved for this page. It1733c619382 No revision has

112

JOURNAL RE PHYSIQUE CoLIoque C5, s u p p l e m e n t au no 8-9, Tome 33, Aoiit-Septembre 1972, p a g e C5-73 NUCLIDES FAR OFF THE STABILITY LINE AND SUPER-HEAVY NUCLEI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Section 4 i s devoted t o heavy nuclei i n the region o f the neutron shell N = 126. Fission compe- t i and the very strong diminution o f f i s s i o n barriers due t o rotational energy. A b r i e f review i grtce ii des trans- f e r t s d'un grand nombre de neutrons depuis des cibles lourdes vers l e

Boyer, Edmond

114

A Novel Process for Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions by Dense Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- phatic chains and naphthenic rings.8,9 Apart from carbon and hydrogen, small amounts of nitrogen, oxy

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

115

FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS FISICAS Y MATEMATICAS SECRETARIA ACADEMICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. RIVAS JU 8-9 LC-302 A. RIVAS 24 7 523377 PROC. ESTOCASTICOS 3-2(4) 525223 3334 Ing. Estadística 6-0-2(4) 523391 3334 Ing. Estadística elec 0 MA 8-9 LC-302 T. FAOUZI MI 8-9 LC-302 T. FAOUZI 25 30 523401 MODELOS

Pérez, Carlos E.

116

14 Journal of Crystal Growth 104 (1990) 14--19 North-Holland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobil Solar Energy Corporation, 4 Suburban Park Drive, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821, USA and J acting through EFG technique from a furnace configuration nor- the sheet thickness. This provides

Hutchinson, John W.

117

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS PETITION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

participation under the above referenced subcontract. The subcontract is entitled "PVMaT Cost Reductions in the EFG High Volume Manufacturing Line." The Photovoltaic Manufacturing...

118

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around 8-9% for good coking coal (IISI, 1982). Dryingof steam coal and coking coal to be $15/t (IEA, 1995). This

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland 2 Analysis of Market Demand and Supply...

120

You have remarkable ideas. share them at the Falling Walls lab!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the falling wallS lab + conference berlin 8/9 nov 2012 aPPlYnoW!www.falling-walls.com/lab THE FALLING WALLS

Heermann, Dieter W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training...

122

Tunable wavelength soft photoionization of ionic liquid vapors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiTFSI and acetamide for lithium batteries. Electrochemistrysuch as fuel cells, 3-5 batteries 6,7 and solar cells. 8,9

Strasser, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taken together, refrigerators and freezers account for 8.9%Freezers   Refrigerator and Freezer Cases  without Doors Refrigerator, Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezers Rulemaking

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that displays energy usage graphs (measured by ACme’s) of8.9. In this graph, we re-aggregate energy usage based on

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SOLID-TO-COOLANT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY RATIO IN HELIUM-COOLED DIVERTOR MODULES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-7), and the He-cooled modular divertor with integrated pin array (HEMP) (Ref. 8-9). These designs rely on jet

126

NEES EFRC Poster Session  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEES EFRC Poster Session May 8-9 2014, Sandia, Albuquerque, NM 1. Lithographically Patterned GoldManganese Dioxide CoreShell Nanowires for High Power Supercapacitors -...

127

Iwrb Becomes Wetlands International  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal:  Wader Study Group Bulletin Attachment Size p00008-p00009.pdf 299.06 KB Volume:  79 Year:  1996 Pages:  8-9

129

Heritage Drive EastCampusDrive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .c/14 axmb Auxiliary Maintenance Building . . . . i/5,6 b-34, b-38, b-41, b-51 (Service Halls and Cannon Center (canc) . . . . . . . . . .d­f/8,9 hlra Helaman Recreation Area Intramural Recreation Area . . . . .a,b/4­6 itb Information Technology Building . . .c/8,9 swkt

Hart, Gus

130

The Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO? Slurry (PHICCOS) feeding system : design, coupled multiscale analysis, and technoeconomic assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continuous conveying of a solid feedstock like pulverized coal into a pressurized environment is a challenging task required in multiple industrial processes. Plants based on pressurized, entrained-flow gasifiers (EFG) ...

Botero, Cristina, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cristina Ticu Department of Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-G flips outside of the ribosome, and in doing so may participate in nucleotide release and EF-G recycling. Yet unpublished data led us to believe that the observed switch I movement may be part of a ribosome

MacMillan, Andrew

132

COLBY COLLEGE 2011-2012 Introduction Page 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and COOT Page 6 Colby Garden Page 7 Composting Page 8--9 Recycling Page 10 Sustainable Seafood Page 11 a commercial food system works by taking field trips to both organic and conventional farms, restaurants

Wilson, Herb

133

Development and Testing of a BI-2212 Textured Powder Conductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Praxair powder in a 500 cP epoxy. .................................................................................................................. 23 Fig. 8: Texture vs. time for various epoxy and powder combinations. All data from an 8.9 T applied...

Damborsky, Kyle

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

134

Published: November 08, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 20319 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja207261s |J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 2031920325  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to its importance in automotive exhaust treatment and water-gas shift as well as its ability to shed an ongoing debate regarding the influence of surface structure on CO oxidation kinetics.8,9 To fully

Li, Weixue

135

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 90, 023204 (2014) Dynamics of periodic mechanical structures containing bistable elastic elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sensors [6,7], and acoustic cloaks and sonar stealth technologies [8,9]. Design strategies commonly engineered material systems leads to an interesting or ben- eficial effective dynamic behavior

Daraio, Chiara

136

Pervasive and Mobile Computing 8 (2012) 82102 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduce wasteful practices (as eco-feedback has done for energy [8,9]) Corresponding author. E and well-being. Sensing water usage also has significant implications for water conservation. Residential

Fogarty, James A.

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplitude radiofrequency fields Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a semiconductor chip Summary: , applied voltage noise or radiofrequency thermal fields common to the electrodes8,9 ). A symmetric ion trap... to the resonant force while it...

138

Preparation and Characterization of High-Purity Metal Fluorides for Photonic Applications*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is quantified directly by inductively cou- pled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and indirectly by laser,4­7 scintillators,8,9 up-con- version phosphors,10 solid-state optical refrigerators,11 and emerging crystals

Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

139

Author's personal copy Effect of polarization and morphology on the optical properties of absorbing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been studied extensively in recent years [1­4]. Potential applications include dye-sensitized solar cells [5­7], low-k dielectric materials [8,9], thermal barrier coatings [10], catalysts [11

Pilon, Laurent

140

adiposity offaster longer-distanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

separated by a coiled 1 km optical fiber, with a total loss of 8.9 dB (87%). A. J. Bennet; D. A. Evans; D. J. Saunders; C. Branciard; E. G. Cavalcanti; H. M. Wiseman; G. J....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Thomas Aquinas On the Nature and Experience of Beauty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NY: Cornell University Press. Huizinga, Johan. 2008. HomoThis, again, is one of Huizinga’s formal characteristics ofhaving no extrinsic end. Huizinga (2008), 8-9. 284 ST II-

Sevier, Christopher Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Microsoft Word - CX_HatRockEquipmentDisposition.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : 2 applicable statutory,...

143

Microsoft Word - PTPC_BAASA_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

action would not (i) threaten a violation of applicable statutory, DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : regulatory, or permit...

144

Microsoft Word - Longview-WashWay Acquisition CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : applicable statutory,...

145

Microsoft Word - FAA Augspurger CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : applicable statutory,...

146

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

147

Clculo Notas da Prova Unificada 02/06/2014 Pgina 1 de 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOBO FORTUNA 112214640 EQA OK 6,3 3,3 4,8 8,9 -- 3 6,9 AP ANA PAULA DA SILVA FALCAO 113023034 OK 2,4 1

Liu, I-Shih

148

Effect of ball milling and post-annealing on magnetic properties of Ni49.8Mn28.5Ga21.7 alloy powders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA6009, Australia c Department of Advanced Materials mechanical energy absorption [8,9]. Ni­Mn­Ga powders have been prepared by various methods, including spark

Zheng, Yufeng

149

DEC SW 40th Street  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project outcomes: Construction of GSHP District Energy Plant. Energy/Cost Savings of HW, CHW, and DHW service (~8-9%). Data Collection to Establish Model for Geothermal District System.

150

Subscriber access provided by HARVARD UNIV Chemical Reviews is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examplessballistic movement of an electron in a semiconductor,1 near- and far-field diffraction of visible light,2 with these dimensions are often referred to as meso-scale systems or "mesosys- tems".8,9 Because mesosystems bridge

Prentiss, Mara

151

A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs George Thomas and Sunita Satyapal Joint Tech Team Meeting Delivery, Storage and Fuels Pathway Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Storage...

152

The usefulness of the generalised computational model of Term Graph Rewriting Systems (TGRS) for designing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of programs written in UFO ([8,9]), a state-of-the-art object- oriented functional language, onto equivalent as follows: the next two sections introduce MONSTR and UFO and provide Term Graph Rewriting

Banach, Richard

153

Nano fabrication approaches for patterned magnetic recording media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domains into V-shaped grooves. Nano Letters, 2006. 6(10): p.of a diblock copolymer. Nano Letters, 2008. 8(9): p. Chuang,an ABC Triblock Terpolymer. Nano Letters, 2009. 9(12): p.

Choi, Chulmin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Propane situation update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12.9 MMbbls PADD 2 propane inventories million barrels Source: EIA, Weekly Petroleum Status Report, data through April 11 April 11 8.9 MMbbls PADD 2 (Midwest) propane inventories...

155

DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting On February 8-9, 2005, the Department...

156

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producing 258 million Btu annually. Over a lifetimewill produce about 2.58 billion Btu. REFERENCES Case, C.W. ,will provide 8.9 million Btu of energy :::nnual or about of

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS FISICAS Y MATEMATICAS SECRETARIA ACADEMICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DE INGENIERIA MATEMATICA. 2014-1 nº nº ASIGNATURA HRS T/P PRE ALUMNOS DE N° NUMER PROFESOR. CONTRERAS (Co) MA-JU 8-9 A-102 Horacio Sanhueza Jofre ING. CIVILES MA-JU 1-2-3 MA / JU 8-9 A-211 / 103. MAT. UNIVERSITARIA 8-4(6) NO TIENE ING. CIVILES 5 M. SELVA, L. BADILLA SEMANA 14 , 9-junio 6 74 520191

Bürger, Raimund

158

EarlyExperienceOnBlueGeneQ.pptx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6.3 27.5 Add 3.7 3.3 8.9 8.7 28.4 Triad 3.7 3.3 8.9 8.5 28.5 Store 6.0 7.3 11.3 10.5 16.0 Lesson Learned: 1. N ode m emory b andwidth i s l imited. 2. W ith h igh l evel o f c...

159

A comparison of routing sets for robust network design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

janos-us, sun, and giul39. .... sun. 10. 1. 8.7. 8.7. 9.8. 0.03. 0.06. 0.08. 1.59. 10. 2. 1.1. 1.1. 2.7. 0.03. 0.08. 0.08. 1.7. 20. 1. 8.9. 8.9 .... Design Library. Networks ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS FISICAS Y MATEMATICAS SECRETARIA ACADEMICAHORARIO DE DOCENCIA DEPARTAMENTO DE FISICA. 2014-2.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. / AYUDANTE 1 84 510010 Física II. Mecánica 5-4-0(7) 527103 3335 CF 2 0 LU 8-9 A-9 J. DIAZ DE VALDES MA 10-2(3) no tiene I. CIVILES T1 1 MA 5 A-411 E. MONTILLA LU 8-9 A-513 Fracisca Guerrero M. 3333 ICM VI 3-4 (Coor.) A

Pérez, Carlos E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of PetroleumSGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

Stanford University

162

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 48, NUMBER 13 1 OCTOBER 1993-1 Determination of the absolute sign of nuclear quadrupole interactions by laser radio-frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 48, NUMBER 13 1 OCTOBER 1993-1 Determination of the absolute sign of nuclear quadrupole interactions by laser radio-frequency double-resonance experiments Tilo Blasberg the quadrupole moment of nuclear spins I > + with the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor leads to a splitting

Suter, Dieter

163

Electric field gradient, generalized Sternheimer shieldings and electric field gradient polarizabilities by multiconfigurational SCF response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric field gradient, generalized Sternheimer shieldings and electric field gradient at the nuclei, the generalized Sternheimer shielding constants and the EFG electric dipole polarizabilities discussed by Egstro¨m and co-workers4 and recently in a more general way by Fowler and co-workers.5

Helgaker, Trygve

164

A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Latham? 'lech&cian. Appreciation is also expressed to W ~ J. r. ' ~ ?oberts, Superintendent of the Main Station Fazm? College StationZ Dr. H. M. Smith, Superinten dent of the Bleckland hxperiment Station? Templeg and Mr P. R. Johnson? Superintendent...)? hybrid '%ksa ?Significant dif fsrenoe ~Soinls 12 inches 18 inches 24 inohes Mean %8i fi cant dif fercnoe 8, 6 84 9?l 9?5 8?9 n. s 9?2 8, 9 8. 5 8?9 n, s 54. 1 46, 2 59 2 48. 5 52?0 n. s 53 6 54. 0 48 3 52. 0 neo 12 1 12?3 21...

Spears, Ben Riley

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000000 (0000) Printed 4 July 2011 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) The SAURON Project -XIX. Optical and near-infrared scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

galaxies J. Falc´on-Barroso,1,2,3 G. van de Ven,4,5 R. F. Peletier,6 M. Bureau,7 H. Jeong,8,9 R. Bacon,10 M of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea 4 July 2011 c 0000 RAS #12;2 Falc´on-Barroso et al

Bureau, Martin

166

Clculo Notas da Prova Unificada 13/06/2014 Pgina 1 de 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

111193697 EM1 OK -- 8,9 7,0 5,1 -- 2 7,0 AP 4 ADRIANO BARROSO 112208217 EQG OK -- 6,9 6,5 6,1 5,0 3 5,8 AP 5

Liu, I-Shih

167

ISSN 1754-5692 Environmental Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen production www.rsc.org/ees Volume 3 | Number 8 | August 2010 | Pages 981­1136 Downloadedby short of the $15% photovoltaic efficiency predicted from simple considerations.8,9 In particular (AM) 1.5 Global (G) solar illumination to electrical energy with negligible photovoltaic response from

Atwater, Harry

168

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL TUITION AND FEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 495.13 2575.38 32.00 2607.38 6 - 8.9 hrs 926.25 32.00 958.25 5150.75 32.00 5182.75 9 - 11.9 hrs 1389

Crews, Stephen

169

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

122 364 108 1,197 2,649 942 102.2 137.5 114.7 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 29 297 48 339 3,677 542 84.5 80.8 89.4...

170

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids J. A for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol the thermal diffusivity of gases, particularly air,8,9 and vapors10 to a high degree of precision. Although

Mandelis, Andreas

171

Review of Conservation Costs and Benefits: Five Years of Experience under the Northwest Power Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hours. Research, development and pilot projects have produced savings at costs that range from less than .10 cents to 8.9 cents per kilowatt hour. Based on the results described in this paper, the Northwest Power Planning Council has concluded...

Sheets, E.

172

Countering Aging Effects through Field Gate Sizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Using HSPICE and 70nm BPTM process numbers, we simulated the technique on four circuits (a ring oscillator, a fan-out four circuit, an ISCAS c432 and c2670). Over the lifetime of the circuit, our simulations predict a 8.89% and a 13% improvement in power...

Henrichson, Trenton D.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Journal of Membrane Science 279 (2006) 608614 Direct measurement of nanofluxes and structural relaxations of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the membrane are very important in explain- ing solvent swelling [8,9]. Besides water transport, the gas. For insufficiently hydrated Nafion® membranes, the proton transport is slow, and thus, the conversion efficiency. Originally, it was argued that the gas mainly permeates either through the hydrated ionic cluster region [10

174

D I G E S T Public Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saylor and Kelly Roscoe 19 Fort Detrick improves numbers with reliability centered maintenance, by Larry 8-9 Volume XXIV, No. 4 July/August/September 2012 Operations, Maintenance and Engineering 3 Operations, Maintenance, Engineering Successes 12 Planning and Construction Successes 28 Technical Support 36

US Army Corps of Engineers

175

A multithreaded modular software toolkit for control of complex experiments N. Sinenian,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for real-time applications.10,11 These options each have strengths and weaknesses. DDKs ease driver options are available to the experimenter. One such option is to create a control scheme from scratch control.8,9 Several options exist for the experimenter both for con- trol and data acquisition; here we

176

HOMOGENEITY ALONG Cl-COMPENSATED THM GROWN CdTe INGOT NGO-TICH-PHUOC, G. M. MARTIN, C. BELIN and E. FABRE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

195 HOMOGENEITY ALONG Cl-COMPENSATED THM GROWN CdTe INGOT NGO-TICH-PHUOC, G. M. MARTIN, C. BELIN resistivity CdTe is believed to present some potentialities as a material for y-rays detection at room carried out [8-9]. This paper presents an assessment of Cl-compen- sated, THM grown CdTe ingots : emphasis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Viticulture Instructor / Vineyard Manager Job Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as one course during the summer - teaching workshops may count as partial credit-hour teaching load. 5 this position includes a teaching load of approximately 8-9 credits per semester and one course during summer management, spray scheduling, crop load management, and coordinate with HCC Winery regarding harvest

178

Using Clustering Techniques to Improve Hit Selection in High-Throughput Screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control. This makes the correct identification of active compounds quite difficult. The incoherencies and Makarenkov,7 and Makarenkov et al.8,9 Another factor that influences the identification of active compounds plate or in the bulk of the data). This method is not statistically justified and can lead to some

Makarenkov, Vladimir

179

Steam System Optimization: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper highlights the study findings in a steam system in a plant from a multinational Petrochemical giant in an European country. The steam system operates with an annual budget of $8.9 million (local currency was converted to US Dollars...

Iordanova, N.; Venkatesan, V. V.

180

Effective optical properties of absorbing nanoporous and nanocomposite thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in particular, have been the subject of intense study.1­4 Potential applica- tions include dye-sensitized solar cells,5­7 low-k dielectric materials,8,9 biosensors,10­12 and optical devices including waveguides,13

Pilon, Laurent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Lina Galtieri CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/08/05 The CDF Group at LBNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lina Galtieri CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/08/05 1 The CDF Group at LBNL LBNL Director Review, November 8-9, 2005 Angela Galtieri #12;Lina Galtieri CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/08/05 2 Outline Status of the Tevatron LBNL Group CDFII Detector Contributions to CDFII Hardware Operation

Galtieri, Lina

182

Lina Galtieri, CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/8/06 The CDF Group at LBNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lina Galtieri, CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/8/06 The CDF Group at LBNL LBNL Director Review, November 8-9, 2006 Angela Galtieri 1 #12;Lina Galtieri, CDF Program, LBNL Director Review, 11/8/06 Status of the Tevatron LBNL Group CDFII Detector Contributions to CDFII Hardware Operation Recent

Galtieri, Lina

183

Fiber-optic communication links suitable for on-board use in modern aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electromagnetic interference, which can affect the operational performance of these RF systems installed in aircraft. In most cases, due to bundled RF cables, electromagnetic interference in aircraft may interfere to increased susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI)[8-9]. Considering other alternatives

Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

184

Laboratory measurements of spectral reflection from ice clouds of various habits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­4 It has been shown theoretically and from in situ measurements that ice cloud visi- ble and near-infrared, as described in Section 2, can be largely controlled. Zander8,9 measured the infrared reflection proper- ties preliminary comparisons between the near-IR ice cloud reflection and expectations based on the mea- sured

Liou, K. N.

185

Wide magnetic field range of Ni-P/PZT/Ni-P cylindrical layered magnetoelectric composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetoelectric (ME) composites were prepared by electroless deposition. The Ni-P layer has an amorphous with epoxy,5 electrodeposition,6,7 and electroless deposition.8,9 The objective and the develop- ment trend films with good interfacial bonding.12 Nickel is a kind of conventional magnetic material suitable

Volinsky, Alex A.

186

Proceedings of the ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition November 11-17, 2011, Denver, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the neutron transport equation in 1968. Fiveland [8-9] and Truelove [10] expanded the DOM for use in radiative to completely characterize the radiative heat transfer in a given medium, an accurate solution of the Equation FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER ANALYSIS IN HIGHLY ANISOTROPIC SCATTERING MEDIA Brian Hunter Department of Mechanical

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

187

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· A Message from the Graduate Advisor - 4 · Department Admission Requirements - 5-6 · Programs Offered - 7 · Degree Classifications ­ 8-9 · Registration ­ 10-15 · Maintaining Satisfactory Progress ­ 16-20 · Funding educational and research activities. This public service includes administrative and educational efforts both

188

A force balance model for the motion, impact and bounce of bubbles Evert Klaseboer1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass, drag and hydrodynamic lubrication ­ the last arises from the drainage of water trapped that are used in waste-water treatment, oil recovery and mineral flotation [1-3] the fluid mechanics can vary' with an effective mass [8,9]. The collision and rebound phenomenon are parameterized in terms of a coefficient

Chan, Derek Y C

189

PROOF COPY [14-0457GB] 006409PHF PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 000000 (2014)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass, drag, and hydrody-18 namic lubrication--the last arises from the drainage of water trapped that are used in waste-water treatment, oil recovery,28 and mineral flotation1­3 the fluid mechanics can vary solved but the bubble has been treated as a "particle" with an effective mass.8,9 The collision42

Chan, Derek Y C

190

Spatially selective single-grain silicon films induced by hydrogen plasma seeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

small holes. The solid-phase crystallization SPC of amorphous sili- con involves two steps, i- ation of a-Si:H SPC, such as metal-induced SPC,5 germanium-induced SPC,6 ion-beam-induced SPC,7 and plasma-induced SPC.8,9 Although the original motivation of these methods was to reduce the thermal budget

191

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C1,supplementauJournalde Physique 11, Volume3, mai 1933  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the component polymers. This is typically what is nowadays called an interpenetrating network(8)(9). Many a gel made of both species, or two interpenetrated networks(IPNs), each being made of one and microphase separationin polymer blends M. DAOUD LaboratoireLkon Brillouin, CEAICNRT,CEN Saclay, 91191 Gif

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

192

Imaging Agents DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000440  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include second harmonic generation (SHG) from ZnO nanowires[3,4] and nanorods,[5] third har- monic generation (THG) and four-wave mixing from Ag NPs,[6] Au NPs,[7] Au nanorods,[8,9] and NP antennas,[10% Ag/15% Au, where the atomic percentages were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX

Cheng, Ji-Xin

193

Spatially-correlated microstructure and superconductivity in polycrystalline Boron-doped diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially-correlated microstructure and superconductivity in polycrystalline Boron-doped diamond F are performed below 100 mK on polycrystalline Boron-doped diamond films characterized by Transmission Electron and the superconducting proximity effect.8,9 Neverthe- less, recent studies of polycrystalline diamond films10,11 did

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Equilibrium crystal shape of Bi-saturated Cu crystals at 1223K Dominique Chatain1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) embrittlement [8,9] and grain boundary facetting [10,11] due to Bi GB segregation, as well as liquid metal embrittlement [12,13] as a result of wetting of Cu grain boundaries by Bi-containing liquid. A recent study for 18h at 1223K in an atmosphere of flowing hydrogen, in the presence of a Bi drop saturated with copper

Rohrer, Gregory S.

195

Bruce A. Measure Joan M. Dukes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bruce A. Measure Chair Montana Joan M. Dukes Vice-Chair Oregon Rhonda Whiting Montana W. Bill Booth Meeting Coeur d' Alene, Idaho November 8-9, 2011 Minutes Council Chair Bruce Measure called the meeting and issues from the workshop the committee held on November 2. We had a presentation on the Hatchery Science

196

AKADEMICK KALEND PF JU PRO AKADEMICK ROK 2014/2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

termínu po dohod na stud. odd. mozný) 8.9. ­ 25.9. 2014 (dle rozpisu) 8. 9. ­ 25.9. 2014 (prbzn) Zápis.2. ­ 13.2. 2015 (dle rozpisu) Zápis student dokt. studia do letního semestru 9.2. ­ 13. 2. 2015 prbzn

South Bohemia, University of

197

July 27, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 81,463 74,201 8.9% Lower Granite 30,065 29,196 2.9% The Dalles 130,202 121,309 6.8% NWRFC Observed Percent...

198

July 20, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 81,463 74,201 8.9% Lower Granite 30,065 29,196 2.9% The Dalles 130,202 121,309 6.8% NWRFC Observed Percent...

199

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701372 Sol-Gel Inks for Direct-Write Assembly of Functional Oxides**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inks[20,21] that require a reservoir-induced coagulation to enable 3D printing, these new inks can, including sensors,[1­3] micro-fuel cells[4,5] and batteries,[6,7] photocatalysts,[8,9] solar arrays,[10

Lewis, Jennifer

200

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sludge, and non hazardous industrial waste (8,9). The solid waste materials are classified under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (10). The next section describes different methods used for managing... REVIEW.......................................................................................4 Solid Waste Management.................................................................................4 LFG Cleaning Processes...

Gokhale, Bhushan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014-2015 General Fund Operating Budget N. Revision of EMC-DeLage Lease into Lease-Purchase Agreement. Board of Control Policy 6.7. Sabbatical Leave L. Board of Control Policy 8.9. Experience Tech Fee M. FY the University's overall budget reflect and support the academic priorities? 4.Are faculty personnel policies

202

oes the structure of an adult human brain alter in response to environmen-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D oes the structure of an adult human brain alter in response to environmen- tal demands1,2 ? Here in the visual areas (used for the retention of visual- motion information8,9 ) than in the motor areas (involved

Gaser, Christian

203

Potential Carriers andPotential Carriers and Approaches for HydrogenApproaches for Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refueling Type On-Board Storage Type Compressed Gaseous Hydrogen · Pipeline · Low-P Tube Trailer · HighPotential Carriers andPotential Carriers and Approaches for HydrogenApproaches for Hydrogen © 2007 TIAX LLC Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland Matthew Hooks Stefan

204

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet as biosensors[8,9] or in drug deliv- ery.[10,11] Exfoliated graphite has been incorporated into PEM and other incorporated into PEM.[15­18] Oxidized graphite is created by the acid treatment of graphite, which exfoliates

Lee, Ilsoon

205

Enhanced absorption Hanle effect in the configuration of crossed laser beam and magnetic field F. Renzoni,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modifications of the absorptive and dispersive properties of atomic media 2­4 , and are responsible for the sub that increases the atomic absorption 8,9 . The increased atomic absorption, denoted as electromagnetic induced abEnhanced absorption Hanle effect in the configuration of crossed laser beam and magnetic field F

206

Materials Chemistry and Physics 106 (2007) 109119 Effect of alloying elements on the isothermal solidification during TLP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusion of solute atoms during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of SS 410 and 321 with nickel, alternatively termed as diffusion brazing [8,9]. The TLP bond- ing process uses a low melting filler alloy solidification during TLP bonding of SS 410 and SS 321 using a BNi-2 interlayer M.A. Arafina,1, M. Medraja,, D

Medraj, Mamoun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A facile hydrothermal route to the large-scale synthesis of CoWO4 nanorods Liang Zhen a,, Wen-Shou Wang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fabrication [8,9]. Many recent studies have demonstrated that hydrothermal process is an effectiveA facile hydrothermal route to the large-scale synthesis of CoWO4 nanorods Liang Zhen a,, Wen by a hydrothermal method using only CoCl2 and Na2WO4 as reaction reagents and distilled water as solvents

Qin, Lu-Chang

208

Appendix B: Technical Projection Tables, Bioenergy Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Straw 15.4 23.7 30.0 39.4 Energy Crops Herbaceous Energy Crops - 12.7 45.1 70.6 Woody Energy Crops - - 11.7 25.8 Forest Residues Pulpwood 8.9 6.0 13.1 40.1 Logging Residues and...

209

EWONAP Procurement Fundamentals  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

HUD's Eastern Woodlands Office of Native American Programs in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center invites you to attend the Procurement Fundamentals training instructed by Vince Franco, Compliance & Resource Development Director of the Native Learning Center in Atlanta, Georgia on September 8-9, 2014.

210

Genizah MS T-S AS 70.261  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*k T-S AS 70.261 *t Bible translation (?) *s 5 x 8.9; 4 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Text too damaged to identify, appears to be a Bible translation with Hebrew incipits *e...

Unknown

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

1882 Anal. Chem. 1902, 64, 1682-1684 Analysis of Free Intracellular Nucleotides Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1882 Anal. Chem. 1902, 64, 1682-1684 Analysis of Free Intracellular Nucleotides Using High rlbonucleotldes. The nucleotide profiles obtainedfrom peripheralbloodlymphocytesdifferfrom those obtalnedfrom Molt,322,1333-1339. intracellular nucleotides has been established,8*9ita main drawback is the lengthy analysis time, typically

Zare, Richard N.

212

Biomaterials 28 (2007) 49914999 Targeted binding of PLA microparticles with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomaterials 28 (2007) 4991­4999 Targeted binding of PLA microparticles with lipid comprised of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with incorporated poly(ethylene glycol)-lipids (PEG-lipids). Particles/O/W) technique are poly(lactic acid) (PLA) [8,9] and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) [10­12], both of which

213

Published: November 01, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2750 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp208016w |J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 27502757  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the cluster analog of the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) band in the ultraviolet6 producing, after some on an iodide anion bound to water,8,9 methanol,10 and other solvating species.11Ã?13 These studies show a strong. Previous work on charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics in iodide- doped water and methanol clusters revealed

Neumark, Daniel M.

214

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 043426 (2011) Above-threshold ionization of diatomic molecules by few-cycle laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. F. Kling8,9, 1 Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina 4 Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bistrik 7, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina 5 FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science park 104, NL-1098

Kling, Matthias

215

Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 232 (2009) 5460 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

configurations for cars [8,9]. Unfortunately, the introduction of new parameters in hybrid methods reduces.elsevier.com/locate/cam A fully adaptive hybrid optimization of aircraft engine blades L. Dumasa, , B. Druezb , N. Lecerfb 2007 Received in revised form 26 June 2008 Keywords: Optimization Genetic algorithms Hybrid methods

Dumas, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer... 35.5 3.2 8.3 8.9 7.7 7.5 Use a Personal Computer... 75.6 7.8 17.8 18.4...

217

Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61.5 67.3 89.8 89.5 82.2 69.4 71.1 74.9 See footnotes at end of table. 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 12 Energy Information Administration ...

218

Kuramoto model with coupling through an external medium David J. Schwab, Gabriel G. Plunk, and Pankaj Mehta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution and the Millennium bridge problem. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10 and syn- thetic bacteria, to semiconductor lasers. Here, we illustrate the differences these systems and even pedestrians walking on a bridge.8,9 In contrast to directly coupled oscillators, such systems have

Mehta, Pankaj

219

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

220

Perineuronal net digestionwith chondroitinase restores memory inmice with tau pathology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was performed under isoflurane anesthesia in 8–9weeks oldmale C57BL/6Smice (Har- lan, UK). In order to cover a significant portion of the PRh, the vector suspension was bilaterally injected at 4 sites (2 sites per hemisphere, each site injectedwith 0.5 ?l at a...

Yang, Sujeong; Cacquevel, Matthias; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Schneider, Bernard L.; Aebischer, Patrick; Melani, Riccardo; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Fawcett, James W.; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NOAAINMFS Developments Shrimp 1980: Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the second leading V.S. supplier in 1980, were 20 million pounds, 47 percent above 1979. Cold storage.5 Foreign shrimp 8.9 The V.S. shrimp industry ex- perienced a very difficult year in 1980. The recession

222

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and...

223

Bruce A. Measure Dick Wallace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Booth Idaho James A. Yost Idaho Tom Karier Washington Bill Bradbury Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon Council Meeting Boise Idaho March 8-9, 2011 Minutes Chairman Measure called the meeting to order at 1:30 p the entities will work closely on projects of mutual interest, share scientific information, and sponsor joint

224

Interface between Topological and Superconducting Qubits Liang Jiang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-distance entanglement generation using single photons [8,9], and extremely long coherence times using nuclear spins [10 readout, universal gates, distributed quantum communication and computation) with those of topological]. The flux qubit has two basis states, for which the SC phase of a particular SC island has two possible

Preskill, John

225

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

226

C.D. Tran, J. Near Infrared Spectrosc. 8, 89102 (2000) 89 NIR Publications 2000, ISSN 0967-0335  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C.D. Tran, J. Near Infrared Spectrosc. 8, 89­102 (2000) 89 © NIR Publications 2000, ISSN 0967-0335 Visualising chemical composition and reaction kinetics by the near infrared multispectral imaging technique and near infrared has been developed. In this instrument, an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is used

Reid, Scott A.

227

mess:Read[ans] nxt] state] => *QMyCounter[self qhd curr state],  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as such a framework. Although we have concentrated on a specific language model (UFO), we can show MONSTR by examining the different MONSTR code needed to describe different versions of UFO (e.g. [8,9], and as shown in our fleeting discussion of UFO ), especially wrt the interaction between concurrency, state and method

Banach, Richard

228

Molecular and atomic emission during single-bubble cavitation in concentrated sulfuric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular and atomic emission during single- bubble cavitation in concentrated sulfuric acid David during cavitation. Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is much brighter than occurring during single- bubble cavitation. In fact, SBSL spectra from organic liquids8,9 have been

Suslick, Kenneth S.

229

Precambrian Research 171 (2009) 122 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are exposed at Wadi Kareim and Wadi El Dabbah, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. These metavolcanic sequences, suggesting that Wadi El Dabbah lavas formed in a volcanic arc that experienced cryptic crustal contamination, whereas Wadi Kareim lavas formed in a back-arc basin. Positive initial Nd (+5.1 to +8.9) and Nd model ages

Stern, Robert J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 536546 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, direct microscopy, and optical particle counting revealed similar CADRm. The ACs performed similarly when radiation with a substantial amount of spectral power in the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm.(8,9) UV-C radiation that penetrates to microbial DNA may cause damage sufficient to interrupt cell replication. Upper-room air UVGI

Pace, Norman

231

Application of satellite observations for timely updates to global anthropogenic NOx emission inventories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inventories L. N. Lamsal,1 R. V. Martin,1,2 A. Padmanabhan,1 A. van Donkelaar,1 Q. Zhang,3 C. E. Sioris,4 K to hindcast and forecast the inventories. We evaluate our approach by comparing bottomup and hindcast emissions for 2003. The two inventories agree within 6.0% globally and within 8.9% at the regional scale

Chance, Kelly

232

M:\\Phone List\\Maths Phone List.doc Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRYANT, Prof Darryn db 51342 540 Chief Academic Advisor BULMER, Dr Michael (Drop-in S1 W8-9; Fri 11-12) m, Dr Jia j.chen15@uq 53279 749 Postgrad Coordinator Maths DONOVAN, A/Prof Diane dmd 51354 653 GOODHILL

Pollett, Phil

233

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

234

Discrete Yttrium(III) Complexes as Lactide Polymerization Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Yongping Sun, John R. Hagadorn, Eric W. Hemmesch, Victor G. Young, Jr., Maren Pink, Marc A. Hillmyer]3 in toluene at ambient temperature fol- lowed by crystallization.8,9 X-ray diffraction analyses revealed]/[Y] ratio led to slower polym- erizations and similar molecular weight distributions (entries 3-5). However

Hagadorn, John R.

235

Maximum and minimum stable random packings of Platonic solids Jessica Baker and Arshad Kudrolli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steel ball bearings 3 . In fact, work in the last decade has shown that random packing itself of the tetrahedrons 8,9 . In the case of tetrahedrons, disordered wagon-wheel packings were initially found to pack were said to be 0.76 .02 if the observed packings were extrapolated to infinite systems, but the pro

Kudrolli, Arshad

236

A physics department's role in preparing physics teachers: The Colorado learning assistant model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all students in introductory physics and increases the numbers of talented physics majors becoming, and physics.7 Many undergraduates are not learn- ing the foundational content in the sciences,8,9 and average into engineering, re- search, science, and other related fields.10 The effects may be dramatic. For example, only

Colorado at Boulder, University of

237

Power Generation in Fed-Batch Microbial Fuel Cells as a Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as capable of making electricity in fuel cells include a wealth of genera of Geobacter (3, 6), Shewanella (2-chamber, air-cathode MFCs. Introduction Electricity generation using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much,7), Pseudomonas (4), and others (1, 8-9). Electricity can be generated in MFCs using mixed cultures enriched from

238

Page n 1 / 25 OXIDATION ASSISTED FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH UNDER COMPLEX NON-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superalloy, which is employed by Snecma for turbine disc applications. This material and other nickel base time effects are observed which are attributed, in this material, to grain boundary oxidation. The main-7] and these effects are closely related to the cyclic elastic-plastic behaviour of the material [8,9]. Therefore

239

New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qianqian Duan,3 Wei Cai,2,a) Zhiguo Zhang,1,4,b) and Wenwu Cao1,4,5,c) 1 Condensed Matter Science more and more attentions, due to the relatively high exci- tation photon energy compared infrared quantum cutting, which aims at im- proving the efficiency of solar cells.8,9 In such cases, measur

Cao, Wenwu

240

Received 16 Aug 2013 | Accepted 12 Dec 2013 | Published 21 Jan 2014 Asian pollution climatically modulates mid-latitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5) reaching unprecedented high levels across many cities in recent winters. In addition to the impacts radiative transfer and indirectly by influencing cloud formation8,9. By serving as cloud condensation nuclei efficiency13­18. Presently, the estimates of the cloud adjustment by aerosols range from � 0.06 to � 1.33Wm

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

High-fidelity manipulation of a Bose-Einstein condensate using an optical standing wave K. J. Hughes, B. Deissler, J. H. T. Burke, and C. A. Sackett*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-fidelity manipulation of a Bose-Einstein condensate using an optical standing wave K. J that Bragg diffraction can provide efficient beam-splitting and reflection operations for atomic wave packets using laser cooling or Bose-Einstein condensation 8,9 . This too has been applied to atom

Sackett, Cass

242

Proposed dielectric-based microstructure laser-driven undulator T. Plettner and R. L. Byer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the possibility of future dielectric-based laser-driven particle accelerators that are expected to produce GeV=m accel- eration gradients accompanied by a low-emittance, low- energy spread, and high-repetition rate electron sources [8,9] as well as for dielectric-structure laser-driven particle accelerators are underway

Byer, Robert L.

243

U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Report of the DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification September 8-9, 2004 Arlington, VA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen

244

YANG ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China H arvesting waste energy in the living environment to power the light energy to electric energy.8,9 Heat energy will be particularly important when other sources of energy, such as sun light or mechanical vibration, are not available. Heat energy is a very conventional

Wang, Zhong L.

245

Technical Targets of the President's Freedom Car and Hydrogen Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 2.8 Cost $/ft2 $150-$200 $100-$150 Small-Scale Distributed and increase the energy efficiency of small-scale natural gas reformers and water electrolysis systems Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8-9, 2004 Arlington, Virginia #12

246

ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 8 ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM............................................................8-13 Tables: 8-1 Accident Prevention Sign Requirements..........................8-17 8-2 Accident.......................................8-24 8-9 Accident Prevention Tags.............................................8-25 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX

US Army Corps of Engineers

247

Viera Rebolledo-Dhuin, La librairie et le crdit. Rseaux et mtiers du livre Paris (1830-1870), thse d'histoire, dir. J.-Y. Mollier, Universit de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, soutenue publiquement le 3 dcembre 2011, 3 vol., 1258 p.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

des libraires, brevetés ou non, en France, en 1877-1878 ». p. 102, sources du Tableau 5 : lire « F18/2307 » au lieu de « F18/307 ». p. 103, l. 8-9 : lire « comparable à celle des boutiquiers de la capitale

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

Name Apr. 2, 2014 CPTS 111 --EXAM #2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. When writing code, indent clearly when you should indent. 10. When writing code, do your best m below, what is the correct indexing to obtain f? m = [1, ('A', 'Z'), 3.0, ('a', 'bcd', 'efg')] (a of the following code? from math import * y = math.sin(math.pi / 2) print(y) (a) 0.0 (b) A very small number. (c) 1

Broschat, Shira Lynn

249

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 17, 6 August 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psf] 5 . lzIffljb u0f]zjxfb'/ /fO{ k|d'v cltly /xg' ePsf] pQm sfo{qmddf xªsªdf /x]sf slj, ;flxTosf/, uLtsf/, kqsf/ Pj+ ljwfyL{x?sf] pkl:ylt /x]sf] lyof] . xªsª g]kfnL snf dlGb/sf cWoIf Ps/fh /fO{n] g]kfnL efiffsf] pb\\ej, rLgsf] e"lddf g]kfnL ;dfh... lgdf{0fdf g]kfnL efiffsf] dxTjsf af/]df rrf{ ub}{ efg'eQmsf] af/]df ;d]t k|i6 kf/] kl5 z'? ePsf] pQm hGdhoGtL ;df/f]xdf efg'eQmåf/f lnlvt s[lt /fdfo0fdf dfNofk{0f ul/Psf] lyof] . sfo{qmddf xªsªdf cWoog/t g]kfnL ljwfyL{x?n] /fdfo0f kf7 Pj+ efg...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

250

NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} and steric effect of Nd on valence mixing and ordering of Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} above and below Verwey transition is studied by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy and compared with GdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} that adopts a higher-symmetry charge-ordered structure typical of the Sm-Ho variants of the title phase. Differences are investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy accounting for iron valence states at their local magnetic and ionic environments. In the charge-ordered state, the orientation of the electric-field gradient (EFG) versus the internal magnetic field (B) agrees with experiment only when contribution from charges of the ordered d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup 2+} is included, proving thus the orbital ordering. The EFG magnitude indicates that only some 60% of the orbital order occurring in the Sm-Ho variants is achieved in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The consequent diminishing of the orbit contribution (of opposite sign) to the field B at the Fe{sup 2+} nucleus explains why B is larger than for the Sm-Ho variants. The decreased orbital ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} causes a corresponding decrease in charge ordering, which is achieved by decreasing both the amount of the charge-ordered iron states in the sample and their fractional valence separation as seen by the Moessbauer isomer shift. The charge ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} is more easily suppressed by the oxygen nonstoichiometry (w) than in the Sm-Ho variants. Also the valence mixing into Fe{sup 2.5+} is destabilized by the large size of Nd. The orientation of the EFG around this valence-mixed iron can only be accounted for when the valence-mixing electron is included in the electrostatic ligand field. This proves that the valence mixing occurs between the two iron atoms facing each other across the structural plane of the rare-earth atoms. -- Graphical Abstract: Moessbauer spectrum detects ordering of d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup II}O{sub 5} via the electric-field gradient (EFG) of the orbital, which makes the main component of the total EFG parallel with the magnetic moment B. Display Omitted

Linden, J. [Department of Physics, AAbo Akademi, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Karen, P., E-mail: pavel.karen@kjemi.uio.n [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O.Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Phone: 819-822-9600 x2718 Fax: 819-822-9605  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

place in St. Mark's Chapel. Athletes in Action Mondays from 8--9 p.m. at 18a Conley Street. Contact Street. Tuesday Night Student Suppers 5:00--7:30 p.m. at 18a Conley Street Sponsored by BeU Student.greenridgechurch.org BeU Christian Student Ministries 18a Conley Street Sunday worship at 7 p.m. Luc Aube, director

252

ISO 9001 ISO 14001 AS 9100 CERTIFIED Mini-Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO 9001 ISO 14001 AS 9100 CERTIFIED Mini-Circuits ® P.O. Box 350166, Brooklyn, New York 11235.65 9.65 14.48 4.57 8.38 5.33 5.59 4.57 25.40 12.70 8.89 4.57 2.69 35.0 #12;ISO 9001 ISO 14001 AS 9100

Wedeward, Kevin

253

Transcriptional diversity during lineage commitment of human blood progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turro2,3, Kate Downes2,3, Iain C. Macaulay7, Ewa Bielczyk-Maczynska2,3, Sophia Coe2,3, Samantha Farrow2, 3, Pawan Poudel2,3, Frances Burden2,3, Sjoert B.G. Jansen2,3, William J. Astle2,3,6, Antony Attwood2,3, Tadbir Bariana8,9, Bernard de Bono10...

Chen, Lu; Kostadima, Myrto; Martens, Joost H.A.; Canu, Giovanni; Garcia, Sara P.; Turro, Ernest; Downes, Kate; Macaulay, Iain C.; Bielczyk-Maczynska, Ewa; Coe, Sophia; Farrow, Samantha; Poudel, Pawan; Burden, Frances; Jansen, Sjoert B.G.; Astle, William J.; Attwood, Antony; Bariana, Tadbir; de Bono, Bernard; Breschi, Alessandra; Chambers, John C.; BRIDGE Consortium; Choudry, Fizzah A.; Clarke, Laura; Coupland, Paul; van der Ent, Martijn; Erber, Wendy N.; Jansen, Joop H.; Favier, Rémi; Fenech, Matthew E.; Foad, Nicola; Freson, Kathleen; van Geet, Chris; Gomez, Keith; Guigo, Roderic; Hampshire, Daniel; Kelly, Anne M.; Kerstens, Hindrik H.D.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laffan, Michael; Lentaigne, Claire; Labalette, Charlotte; Martin, Tiphaine; Meacham, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Palumbo, Emilio; van der Reijden, Bert A.; Richardson, David; Sammut, Stephen J.; Slodkowicz, Greg; Tamuri, Asif U.; Vasquez, Louella; Voss, Katrin; Watt, Stephen; Westbury, Sarah; Flicek, Paul; Loos, Remco; Goldman, Nick; Bertone, Paul; Read, Randy J.; Richardson, Sylvia; Cvejic, Ana; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Frontini, Mattia; Rendon, Augusto

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

University Libraries University of Nevada, Las Vegas United States Online Gaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of total poker revenue represented by poker. Month IPR TPR IPR% Feb-14 824,000 9,268,000 8.89% Mar-14 926,000 10,370,000 8.93% Apr-14 792,000 8,789,000 9.01% YTD 2,542,000 28,427,000 8.94% IPR: Interactive (online) poker revenue TPR: Total Poker revenue IPR%: Percentage of total poker revenue that was generated

Hemmers, Oliver

255

Very Fast Chip-level Thermal Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new technique of VLSI chip-level thermal analysis. We extend a newly developed method of solving two dimensional Laplace equations to thermal analysis of four adjacent materials on a mother board. We implement our technique in C and compare its performance to that of a commercial CAD tool. Our experimental results show that our program runs 5.8 and 8.9 times faster while keeping smaller residuals by 5 and 1 order of magnitude, respectively.

K. Nakabayashi; T. Nakabayashi; K. Nakajima

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biochemical and photochemical control of leaf disk expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) May 1957 -i- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer wishes to express his sincere appreciation to Professor James L. Liverman who directed this research and obtained grants in aid from the National Science Foundation and U0 S. Atomic Energy Commission... internode growth in pea (7), bean (8,9), oat (10), and barley (11). Theories advanced for this light mediated growth reduction are that red light causes a decreased amount of available auxin (12), an increased IAA oxidase activity (12), or a decreased...

Scott, Ralph A.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Materials Research Department Annual Report 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Research Department Annual Report 2001 P u b l i s h e d b y t h e M a t e r i a l s R e 1-3 Scientific work 4-24 A multiscale view 4-5 Metal structures 6-7 Materials mechanics 8-9 Composite materials 10-11 Nanostructured materials 12-13 The fuel cell programme 14-17 Biological physics 18

258

PROPAGATION OF OSCILLATIONS NEAR A DIFFRACTIVE POINT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Gordon equation, (1 + x)@ 2 t u '' \\Gamma \\Delta x;z u '' + 1 '' 2 u '' + j@ t u '' j p\\Gamma1 @ t u '' = 0 (p ? 1); on a half space R d + = f(x; z) = x ? 0; z 2 R d\\Gamma1 g near the origin, when incident rays reach­Airy integral operators ([8],[9]). Rigorous nonlinear geometric optics was initiated by A.J. Majda and M. Artola

Dumas, Eric

259

Publikationen 18. September 2014 / U. Ruch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-7 Prof. Dr. S. Decurtins Seiten 8-9 Dr. R. Eichler Seiten 10 Prof. R. Fasel Seite 11 PD Dr. J. Furrer Seite 12-13 Prof. R. Häner Seite 14-15 Dr. J. Hauser Seite 16 Dr. M. Hollenstein Seite 17 Prof. Dr. J.1149/2.030312jes 3. Hai, N. T. M.; Furrer, Julien; Stricker, Florian; Huynh, T. M. T.; Gjuroski, Ilche; Luedi, N

Mühlemann, Oliver

260

Cryptanalysis of S-DES Dr. K. S. Ooi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery. Other forms of security threat do exist, for example: identity theft, cyber stalking and cyber-DES Results 8.8 Difference Pair Table of S0 8.9 Difference Pair Table of S1 8.10 Difference Distribution Table of S0 8.11 Difference Distribution Table of S1 8.12 Differential Characteristic of S-DES 8.13 I/0 Table

Babinkostova, Liljana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ACC 040 Development of Manufacturing Methods for Fiber Preforms |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment

262

Anne Morrow Lindbergh: twentieth century Transcendentalist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

philosopher. Some of the Oriental 5 Miller, ed. , The Transcendentalists, 8-9. 6 Miller, eo. , The American Transcender ta] ists, 4. philosophers supplied confirmation of ideas the Transcend- 7 entalists thought were radical and new. Transcendentalism... will follow the format and style of the Americ n Historical Review. Germany. " Though Transcendentalism borrowed ideas and ex- pressions from Europe and the Orient, it was a uniquely American philosophy. Its advocates were New Englanders, well...

Moyer, Barbara Robb

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

308 Constitution Drive Menlo Park, CA 94025-1164  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESISTANCE VALUES TIME TO TRIP R1 MAX 1 HR. POST TRIP RESISTANCE STANDARD TRIP TRIPPED- STATE POWER:Released Electrical Rating Voltage: 16V MAX Current: 100A MAX Insulating Material: Cured, Flame Retardant Epoxy) Marking: TABLE I. DIMENSIONS: A B C D E F MIN MAX MIN MAX MIN MAX MIN MAX MIN MAX TYP mm: 7.9 8.9 7.9 12

Berns, Hans-Gerd

264

Magnetic structure of Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5} brownmillerite by single-crystal Mössbauer spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine orientation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments and electric field gradient (efg) axes in the brownmillerite-type strontium ferrite structure for both iron sublattices where the efg tensor is not axially symmetric, the Mössbauer spectra of powdered and oriented single-crystal Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5} were analyzed by solving the complete Hamiltonian for hyperfine interactions in the excited and ground states of the {sup 57}Fe nuclei. The magnetic moments of both octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated iron cations lie on the ac-plane of the orthorhombic unit cell and are parallel to the shortest c-axis, whilst the main efg axes are parallel to the longest crystallographic axis, b. This orientation is similar to that in Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}, in spite of the structural differences of strontium and calcium ferrite brownmillerites at low temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Mössbauer spectra of powdered and oriented single-crystal Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}, analyzed by solving the complete Hamiltonian for hyperfine interactions in the excited and ground states of the {sup 57}Fe nuclei, show that the magnetic moments of both octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated iron cations are parallel to the shortest c-axis of the orthorhombic brownmillerite unit cell . Display Omitted - Highlights: • Single-crystal Mössbauer spectroscopy is used to study magnetic structure of Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • Complete Hamiltonian for hyperfine interactions in excited and ground states was solved. • Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments are parallel to the shortest crystallographic axis c. • The orientation of nuclear electric field gradient is similar to that in Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

Waerenborgh, J.C. [UCQR, IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, CFMC-UL, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Tsipis, E.V. [UCQR, IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, CFMC-UL, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Auckett, J.E.; Ling, C.D. [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); Kharton, V.V., E-mail: kharton@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka 142432, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Change Notice for DOE-STD-3013-2000  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day with SecretaryDerivedof Meeting Tier218-891 EFG

266

. UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r 1Lcla (8.8gJ EFG

267

W89,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March 20, 1995 W.Eyergy pakW89, EFG

268

Localization of vacancies and mobility of lithium ions in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as obtained by {sup 6,7}Li NMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectra and the {sup 7}Li spin–lattice relaxation rate were measured on polycrystalline samples of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, synthesized at 1050 K and 1300 K. The {sup 7}Li NMR lines were attributed to corresponding structural positions of lithium Li1 and Li2 by comparing the EFG components with those obtained in the first-principles calculations of the charge density in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. For both samples the line width of the central {sup 7}Li transition and the spin–lattice relaxation time decrease abruptly at the temperature increasing above ?500 K, whereas the EFG parameters are averaged (??{sub Q}?=42 (5) kHz) owing to thermally activated diffusion of lithium ions. - Graphical abstract: Path of lithium ion hopping in lithium zirconate Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline samples Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with monoclinic crystal structure synthesized at different temperatures were investigated by {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectroscopy. • Two {sup 6,7}Li NMR lines were attributed to the specific structural positions Li1 and Li2. • The distribution of vacancies was clarified for both lithium sites. • The activation energy and pathways of lithium diffusion in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} were defined.

Baklanova, Ya. V., E-mail: baklanovay@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Arapova, I. Yu.; Buzlukov, A.L.; Gerashenko, A.P.; Verkhovskii, S.V.; Mikhalev, K.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 Kovalevskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Denisova, T.A.; Shein, I.R.; Maksimova, L.G. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electromigration process for the purification of molten silicon during crystal growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the purification of molten materials during crystal growth by electromigration of impurities to localized dirty zones. The process has particular applications for silicon crystal growth according to Czochralski techniques and edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) conditions. In the Czochralski crystal growing process, the impurities are electromigrated away from the crystallization interface by applying a direct electrical current to the molten silicon for electromigrating the charged impurities away from the crystal growth interface. In the EFG crystal growth process, a direct electrical current is applied between the two faces which are used in forming the molten silicon into a ribbon. The impurities are thereby migrated to one side only of the crystal ribbon. The impurities may be removed or left in place. If left in place, they will not adversely affect the ribbon when used in solar collectors. The migration of the impurity to one side only of the silicon ribbon is especially suitable for use with asymmetric dies which preferentially crystallize uncharged impurities along one side or face of the ribbon.

Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (San Pedro, CA); Shlichta, Paul J. (San Pedro, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: Genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

†, [8,9] Carrie Nielson, [10] Priya Srikanth, [10] Sylvie Giroux, [11] Scott G Wilson, [2,12,13] Hou-Feng Zheng, [14] Albert V Smith, [15,16] Stephen R Pye, [17] Paul J Leo, [18] Alexander Teumer, [19] Joo-Yeon Hwang, [20] Claes Ohlsson, [21] Fiona Mc... Email: stephen@srl.cam.ac.uk Tel : +44 1223 748668 Fax: +44 1223 748658 5   ABSTRACT Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by x...

Moayyeri, Alireza; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Karasik, David; Estrada, Karol; Xiao, Su-Mei; Nielson, Carrie; Srikanth, Priya; Giroux, Sylvie; Wilson, Scott G.; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Smith, Albert V.; Pye, Stephen R.; Leo, Paul J.; Teumer, Alexander; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ohlsson, Claes; McGuigan, Fiona; Minster, Ryan L.; Hayward, Caroline; Olmos, José M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lewis, Joshua R.; Swart, Karin M. A.; Masi, Laura; Oldmeadow, Chris; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Cheng, Sulin; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Kruk, Marcin; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Igl, Wilmar; Trummer, Olivia; Grigoriou, Efi; Luben, Robert; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Brown, Suzanne J.; Williams, Frances M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Holliday, Kate L.; Hannemann, Anke; Go, Min Jin; Garcia, Melissa; Polasek, Ozren; Laaksonen, Marika; Zhu, Kun; Enneman, Anke W.; McEvoy, Mark; Peel, Roseanne; Sham, Pak Chung; Jaworski, Maciej; Johansson, Åsa; Hicks, Andrew A.; Pludowski, Pawel; Scott, Rodney; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Sievänen, Harri; Raitakari, Olli T.; González-Macías, Jesús; Hernández, Jose L.; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Östen; Cho, Yoon Shin; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Haring, Robin; Brown, Matthew A.; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Wark, John; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C. W.; Aspelund, Thor; Richards, J. Brent; Bauer, Doug; Hofman, Albert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Dedoussis, George; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lorenc, Roman S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lips, Paul; Alen, Markku; Attia, John; Brandi, Maria Luisa; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Riancho, José A.; Campbell, Harry; Liu, Yongmei; Harris, Tamara B.; Akesson, Kristina; Karlsson, Magnus; Lee, Jong-Young; Wallaschofski, Henri; Duncan, Emma L.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Timothy D.; Rousseau, François; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steve; Wareham, Nick J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Prince, Richard L.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Reeve, Jonathan; Kaptoge, Stephen K.

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9?GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light.

Zhang, Fuli, E-mail: fuli.zhang@nwpu.edu.cn; He, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education and Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Zhao, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lan, Chuwen; Zhou, Ji [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Weihong, E-mail: zhangwh@nwpu.edu.cn; Qiu, Kepeng [School of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 552, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(5):745-752. 9. Raver-Shapira N, Marciano E, Meiri E, Spector Y, Rosenfeld N, Mosk- ovits N, Bentwich Z, Oren M: Transcriptional activation of miR- 34a contributes to p53-mediated apoptosis. Mol Cell 2007, 26(5):731-743. 10. Bommer GT, Gerin I, Feng Y... is consistent with the observed ability of miR-34 to downregulate a program of genes promoting cell cycle progression [12]. miR-34a has been reported to be involved in p53-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer and pancreatic cancer [8,9]. Tazawa et al. provided...

Ji, Qing; Hao, Xinbao; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Min; DeSano, Jeffrey; Fan, Daiming; Xu, Liang

2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Unidata Policy Committee Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The Budget Picture #12;NSF FY 2011 Budget TOTAL: $7.4 billion Increase: 8 percent #12;6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.9 9.5 10.2 10.9 0 2 4 6 8 10 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 FISCAL YEAR (FY) 9.5 3.0 ARRA Fiscal Year (FY) Total NSF Funding (dollars in billions) #12;The FY 2011 Budget Request will keep

275

Profile of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Food Industries in Florida Counties in 2011 Compiled by Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani, University of Florida, Food & Resource Economics Department, May 16, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 4.1 6.7 1.2 3.0 0.5 1.9 0.2 Cattle ranching and farming 161 257 13.7 23.3 8.9 1.0 2.3 7.2 3.9 3.1 -0 cane mills and refining 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Seasoning and dressing manufacturing 0

Florida, University of

276

Special Publication No. 2, A Bibliography On Chagas' Disease (1909-1969)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(2):207-224, Feb. 8-9. 1934.- Culture of Leishmanias and other Trypanosomidae in haemoglobin-free media. (Cultivo de leishmanias y otros tripanosomas en medios sin hemoglobina.) Tr. Roy. Soc. Trop. Med. and Hyg., 28(2): 201-204, Aug. 1956,- The in vitro.... Med. and Parasitol., 52(4):519, Dec. 1959.- The culture of Trypanosoma cruzi in media contain- ing specific serum. (El cultivo de T. cruzi en un medio que contiene suero espec?fico.) An. Acad. Brasil. Cien., 31(3):XVII-XVIII, Sept. 30. 1959...

Olivier, Margaret C.; Olivier, Louis J.; Segal, Dorothy B.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films275March 30-April8-9,

278

EM-1 Related Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement ||More Emphasisof EnergyThis photo (8-89)

279

 

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)WyomingSquare Feet 50,001. TABLE5.PDF8.9.

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007 (next release3,3, 2011 at8,9, 2011 at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007 (next release3,3, 2011 at8,9, 2011

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007 (next release3,3, 2011 at8,9, 201113,

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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284

Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3YearDecade7. U.S. Number of8.9.

285

ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report (November 2004) |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment of Energy

286

ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber Security  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment of

287

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment ofABOUT

288

ACC100 Crash Energy Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment00 Crash

289

ACC115 High Volume Processing of Composites | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment00 Crash15

290

ACQUISITION LETTER DEAR Part 933 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89)Department of

291

 

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve Class3a.86,77,1996B19.7. Space8.9.

292

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity onF. Petroleum Coke:E.6.6.2.7. Energy8.9.

293

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity onF. Petroleum Coke:E.6.6.2.7. Energy8.9.A.5.

294

A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia Isopods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

snails [6,7], honeycreeper birds [8,9], and others [10-13]. In contrast, endemism in Hawaiian marine invertebrates is strikingly lower than that in Hawaiian terrestrial organisms [14], and with the exception of intertidal Cellana limpets [15...-subunit of the Sodium Potassium ATPase (NaK; primers NaK forb/NaK rev 2; [43]). PCR-products were cleaned with a mixture of Exonuclease I (New England Biolabs) and Shrimp Alkaline Phosphatase (USB Scientific) and cycle sequenced at the University of Arizona Genetics...

Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Illinois Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005 Lease9.5 9.2 8.7 8.9

296

EIS-0265-SA-89: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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297

Chapter 9, Metering Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 Injection Begins8: VariableChapter 6: Materials Chapter8:9:

298

EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan Prioritization Process  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThreeEnergyDepartment0: DOE512:Shines with Five (8-89) EFGJuly

299

Data:Cfef2c64-7146-48df-a1bd-a928e6fbb981 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved for this page. ItCfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f No revision has

300

Data:Cff52db7-823a-492c-a288-8efee48bb6e1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved for this page. ItCfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f No revision

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Data:Cffa22dd-a22d-432d-882e-7ee099167875 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved for this page. ItCfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f No

302

Data:Cffbc2c6-f27b-4f0f-be6c-4a374ae297d7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved for this page. ItCfe68cf9-5aed-46a8-9d27-f6e4371ca37f

303

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuel Oil8 Space3531 Home346HC8.9

304

MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), UMo fuel-foils are being developed in an effort to realize high density monolithic fuel plates for use in high-flux research and test reactors. Namely, targeted are reactors that are not amenable to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel conversion via utilization of high density dispersion-based fuels, i.e. 8-9 gU/cc. LEU conversion of reactors having a need for >8-9 gU/cc fuel density will only be possible by way of monolithic fuel forms. The UMo fuel foils under development afford fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. Two primary challenges have been established with respect to UMo monolithic fuel development; namely, fuel element fabrication and in-reactor fuel element performance. Both issues are being addressed concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL); including development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fabrication processes to be discussed include: UMo alloying and casting, foil fabrication via hot rolling, fuel-clad interlayer application via co-rolling and thermal spray processes, clad bonding via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB), and fuel plate finishing.

Glenn A. Moore; Francine J. Rice; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme; W. David SwanK; DeLon C. Haggard; Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Steven E. Steffler; N. Pat Hallinan; Michael D. Chapple; Douglas E. Burkes

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Application of a Hough search for continuous gravitational waves on data from the 5th LIGO science run  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range $\\mathrm{50-1000 Hz}$ with the first derivative of frequency in the range $-8.9 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s to zero in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run. Our results employ a Hough transform technique, introducing a $\\chi^2$ test and analysis of coincidences between the signal levels in years 1 and 2 of observations that offers a significant improvement in the product of strain sensitivity with compute cycles per data sample compared to previously published searches. Since our search yields no surviving candidates, we present results taking the form of frequency dependent, 95$%$ confidence upper limits on the strain amplitude $h_0$. The most stringent upper limit from year 1 is $1.0\\times 10^{-24}$ in the $\\mathrm{158.00-158.25 Hz}$ band. In year 2, the most stringent upper limit is $\\mathrm{8.9\\times10^{-25}}$ in the $\\mathrm{146.50-146.75 Hz}$ band. This improved detection pipeline, which is computationally efficient by at least two orders of magnitude better than our flagship Einstein$@$Home search, will be important for "quick-look" searches in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector era.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mössbauer investigations of hyperfine interactions features of {sup 57}Fe nuclei in BiFeO{sub 3} ferrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New results of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer studies on BiFeO{sub 3} powder sample performed at various temperatures above and below magnetic phase transitions point T{sub N} ? 640K are reported. We have performed self-consistent calculations of the lattice contributions to the EFG tensor, taking into account dipole moments of the O{sup 2?} and Bi{sup 3+} ions. Low-temperature {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at T < T{sub N} were analyzed assuming an anharmonic cycloidal modulation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. The cycloidal modulation of the iron spin was described with the elliptic Jacobi function sn[(±4K(m)/?)x,m]. The good fit of the experimental spectra was obtained for the anharmonicity m = 0.44 ± 0.04 (T = 4.9K) resulting from the easy-axis magnetic anisotropy.

Sobolev, Alexey, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Presniakov, Igor, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Rusakov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Matsnev, Mikhail; Gorchakov, Dmitry; Glazkova, Iana [Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belik, Alexey [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section.

Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Surface Tension and Negative Pressure Interior of a Non-Singular `Black Hole'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constant density interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a divergent pressure when its radius $R\\le\\frac{9}{8}R_s=\\frac{9}{4}GM$. We show that this divergence is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite redshifted surface tension on a spherical surface of radius $R_0=3R\\sqrt{1-\\frac{8}{9}\\frac{R}{R_s}}$. For $r surface is localized at the Schwarzschild radius itself, $R_0=R_s$, and the solution has constant negative pressure $p =-\\bar\\rho$ everywhere in the interior $rsurface tension of the condensate star surface is given by $\\tau_s=\\Delta\\kappa/8\\pi G$, where $\\Delta\\kappa=\\kappa_+-\\kappa_-=2\\kappa_+=1/R_s$ is the difference of equal and opposite surface grav...

Mazur, Pawel O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

127.5 124.6 -2.3% 93.5 -26.7% 139.3 9.2% 84 160 Buffalo Gap 1 Nov-06 100.9 93.9 -6.9% 75.4 -25.2% 102.8 1.9% 61 120 Big Spring Wind Power Dec-02 27.2 24.8 -8.9% 21.4 -21.4% 27.2 0.0% 108 41 Callahan Divide Wind Feb-06 93.3 98.1 5.1% 92.6 -0.7% 101.5 8... ................................................................................................................................... 185 9.1.1 Barton Chapel Wind 1 – BRTSW_BCW1 .......................................................................................... 185 9.2 Buffalo Gap 3...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Female characters in Thomas Wolfe's four major novels: Look Homeward, Angel; Of Time and the River; The Web and the Rock; and You Can't Go Home Again.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ aqszeq aauy us 'BuTSSsu 'yes 'saTyp ~ Zq. Tsze~Tug eqq oq. m~ e~q. pygmy quqq. uTszq agq uo xgO au85~ mund egg Wyaas azs ueyea zeqsTs s~ pus zeqgom ttt!Tt; go tlT Sl!St: OZtt Ztt;g tttt OZBgattt'I. tlt etitttlA Za . Be l'tt' tttl1 exjujf'txoa ggf...ZgggueyT ylxs 89900'GB EzszegTT zan $$9Tlb 8rq QQTCey 8$9Aou za f sin zxioj 8 t 9+Qajtj uo'f &~ss QusSzp '8TGAalx zo f. sB zTLQ+ Gl[$ lx'f szegaszsqa 8 DiG~Gg eqg ~ 9 0". l ssx:0 o zeezsp eq. Tg GqtTt l GIMP/ $0 Aoyu j(X 9'lpga Zyeuueg g yzsqarjj 'p96j...

Sheffield, Jewell Frieda

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 8.9 Angstrom incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v = 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to R = 800 cm-3 for the spectrometer.

Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Courtois, P; Kreuz, M; Mironov, S; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Soldner, T; Vezzu, F; Zimmer, O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Time to grapple with collateral issues of renewable standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of states with aggressive renewable portfolio standards (RPS) are beginning to get a taste of what is likely to come as more renewable resources are added to the network. Three issues stand out: the need for more transmission capacity; the need for significant additional storage and/or balancing resources, often in the form of thermal peaking units; the costs of these requirements, plus the incremental cost of renewable resources, quickly add up. A study to examine the effect of California's 33 percent RPS mandate by 2020, for example, concludes that meeting the target will cost $8.9 billion in 2020 while saving some $6.3 billion in avoided costs, resulting in a net cost of $2.6 billion, all in 2008 dollars. To meet the target will require building eight major transmission lines and a significant amount of backup thermal generation.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Magesh Valliappan and Brian L. Evans Embedded Signal Processing Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;5 ¢¡ £¤ ¥§¦ ¨ © ¥ ¥ ¥ ¦ £ © ¥ ¡ £ ¦ ¢¡ ¨ ¥ £ ! © ¤ £ ¥¡ © ¥ ¡ £ ¦ "¡ ¤ ¤ # ¤ ¤ $ £ ©¡ ! ¦ % #& ¥¡ £ ¡ ¨ £ ¥ ' # © ( !¡ ¥¤ £ © ) 0 1 0 ' #¡ © ( ¡ & £ ¨ ¥ 2 £3 ¡ & £ ! © ¤4 576 6 6 0 8@9 A B¢C DC E F GC HI PRQ S T UV W WX Y `a degradation as linear filter plus noise · Decouple and quantify linear and additive effects · Contrast of distortion measures in frequency domain · Model degradation as linear filter plus noise · Decouple

Evans, Brian L.

317

The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Invariant-mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a $W$ boson in \\ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV using the full CDF Run II data set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a study of the dijet invariant-mass distribution in events with one identified lepton, a significant imbalance in the total event transverse momentum, and two jets. This distribution is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a $W$ boson, where the boson decays leptonically. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy collected by the Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.9 fb$^{-1}$. The data are found to be consistent with standard-model expectations, and a 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limit is set on the cross section for a $W$ boson produced in association with a new particle decaying into two jets.

T. Aaltonen

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Penetration and growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in chicken eggs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35 47 2 0 45 7.0 to 8.9 2 1 31 30 40 19 42 9.G to 10.9 1 1 5 7 5 1 1 1 1 . 0 and over 1 1 2 3 0 0 36 TABLE 9. - The percentage of shell of eggs from 72 DeKalb, 75 Hyline, and 46 Leghorn hens Per cent Shell Strain DeKalb Hyline Leghorn No.... Per cent No. Per cent No. Per cent Less than 7.1 3 7 0 0 0 0 7.2 to 8 . 1 16 35 18 24 4 9 8.2 to 9.1 14 32 34 45 23 50 9.2 to 10.1 11 24 20 27 13 28 10.2 to 11.1 1 2 3 4 5 11 1 1 . 2 and over 0 0 0 0 1 2 37 TABLE 10. - The shell...

Mountney, George Joseph

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A survey of selected aspects of health conditions and services in Texas, 1948  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6, 866, 990 189, 942 25. $ 59, 533 8. 5 1845 8, 798, 999 158, 925 23, 3 1844 8, 847, 999 184, 933 24. 9 81, 23$ 8. & 6, 958, 909 163gl76 23. 5 61, 89V 5. 9 1842 6, 699, 999 144, 926 21. 5 59, 988 5. 8 1841 6, 588, 999 137?956 29. 8 89, 424 &. 2... 81, 663 10. 1 1834 8, 953 ~ 25V 118, 693 18. 3 59, 731 8. 8 +3ouj. ee: adopted fxns Texas 3tate depart~ at of i', saith, Texas t. iv: Dix the and D~~aths, 1& 4 ta 1843. ~us Ka, Texas? state Bvreao ef itaI statistics, 1859. 28 28 24 BXRIB...

Haynes, Lemuel Lee

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I/sub 50/ concentration of 3.2 ..mu..M. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I/sub 50/ of 4 ..mu..M. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4-/sup 3/H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and /sup 14/C-mevalonic acid. From the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs.

Hawkins, D.R.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comparison of the Unique Mobility and DOE-developed ac electric drive systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison was made between the most recent DOE-developed AC electric vehicle drive systems and that which is independently under development by Unique Mobility of Golden, Colorado. The DOE-developed AC systems compared in this study are the Single-Shaft Electric Propulsion System (ETX-II) developed by Ford Motor Company and the General Electric Company under contract number DE-AC07-85NV10418, the Dual-Shaft Electric Propulsion (DSEP) System developed by Eaton Corporation under contract number DOE-AC08-84NV-10366, and the anticipated results of the Modular Electric Vehicle (MEV) system currently being developed by Ford and General Electric under contract number DE-AC07-90ID13019. The Unique Mobility brushless DC electric vehicle drive system represents their latest electric drive technology and is being developed in cooperation with BMW Technik Gmbh of Germany. Comparisons of specific volume, specific weight, efficiency and expected vehicle performance are made of the different systems based upon measured system performance data where available. One conclusion presented is that the Unique Mobility drive system under development with BMW appears to provide comparable performance to the AC systems studied.

Cole, G.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Biochemical, raw, and cooked color characteristics of individual bovine muscles in oxygen permeable and modified atmosphere packages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.07c 0.04d 0.20e 0.17fg 2 0.10d 0.19c 0.10cd 0.06e 0.21fg 3 0.06d 0.04c 0.09cd 0.10e 0.23fg 4 0.12d 0.09c 0.02d 0.23e 0.25fg 5 0.13d 0.05c 0.11cd 0.28de 0.24fg PVC a 0 0.04d 0.02c 0.03d 0.05e 0.02g 1 0.08d 0.03c 0.05d 0.10e 0...), and the M. Rectus femoris (RF). Muscle TM BF ST VL RF HOXa 0 4.89defgh 5.92ijkl 3.18jkl 4.80e 4.11fg 1 5.08cdefgh 5.34kl 3.46jkl 4.59ef 3.54g 2 4.14h 7.15fghij 2.94l 4.11ef 4.75efg 3 4.19h 5.75jkl 3.75ijkl 4.14ef 4.06fg 4 4.19h 4.95l 3...

Mies, Patrick Daniel

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Progress of the RERTR program in 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the 2001 progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners. Postirradiation examinations of microplates have continued to reveal excellent irradiation behavior of U-Mo dispersion fuels in a variety of compositions and irradiating conditions. Irradiation of two new batches of miniplates of greater sizes was completed in the ATR to investigate the swelling behavior of these fuels under prototypic conditions. These materials hold the promise of achieving the program goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium densities in the 8-9 g/cm{sup 3} range. Qualification of the U-Mo dispersion fuels has been delayed by a patent issue involving KAERI. Test fuel elements with uranium density of 6 g/cm{sup 3} are being fabricated by BWXT and are expected to begin undergoing irradiation in the HFR-Petten reactor around March 2003, with a goal of qualifying this fuel by mid-2005. U-Mo fuel with uranium density of 8-9 g/cm{sup 3} is expected to be qualified by mid-2007. Final irradiation tests of LEU {sup 99}Mo targets in the RAS-GAS reactor at BATAN, in Indonesia, had to be postponed because of the 9/11 attacks, but the results collected to date indicate that these targets will soon be ready for commercial production. Excellent cooperation is also in progress with the CNEA in Argentina, MDSN/AECL in Canada, and ANSTO in Australia. Irradiation testing of five WWR-M2 tube-type fuel assemblies fabricated by the NZChK and containing LEU UO{sub 2} dispersion fuel was successfully completed within the Russian RERTR program. A new LEU U-Mo pin-type fuel that could be used to convert most Russian-designed research reactors has been developed by VNIINM and is ready for testing. Four additional shipments containing 822 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. by September 30, 2001. Altogether, 4,562 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors had been received by that date by the U.S. under the FRR SNF acceptance policy. The RERTR program is aggressively pursuing qualification of high-density LEU U-Mo dispersion fuels, with the dual goal of enabling further conversions and of developing a substitute for LEU silicide fuels that can be more easily disposed of after expiration of the U.S. FRR SNF Acceptance Program. As in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that has always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

2002-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi {gamma}-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 {gamma}-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and {gamma}-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Langston, G. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Kondratiev, V. I. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical implementation of OSLDs for high dose-rate (HDR) in vivo dosimetry for gynecological and breast patients. To discuss how the OSLDs were characterized for an Ir-192 source, taking into account low gamma energy and high dose gradients. To describe differences caused by the dose calculation formalism of treatment planning systems.Methods: OSLD irradiations were made using the GammaMedplus iX Ir-192 HDR, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA. BrachyVision versions 8.9 and 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA, were used for calculations. Version 8.9 used the TG-43 algorithm and version 10.0 used the Acuros algorithm. The OSLDs (InLight Nanodots) were characterized for Ir-192. Various phantoms were created to assess calculated and measured doses and the angular dependence and self-absorption of the Nanodots. Following successful phantom measurements, patient measurements for gynecological patients and breast cancer patients were made and compared to calculated doses.Results: The OSLD sensitivity to Ir-192 compared to 6 MV is between 1.10 and 1.25, is unique to each detector, and changes with accumulated dose. The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment planning system and found to be in agreement for the gynecological patients to within measurement uncertainty. The range of differences between the measured and Acuros calculated doses was -10%-14%. For the breast patients, there was a discrepancy of -4.4% to +6.5% between the measured and calculated doses at the skin surface when the Acuros algorithm was used. These differences were within experimental uncertainty due to (random) error in the location of the detector with respect to the treatment catheter.Conclusions: OSLDs can be successfully used for HDR in vivo dosimetry. However, for the measurements to be meaningful one must account for the angular dependence, volume-averaging, and the greater sensitivity to Ir-192 gamma rays than to 6 MV x-rays if 6 MV x-rays were used for OSLD calibration. The limitations of the treatment planning algorithm must be understood, especially for surface dose measurements. Use of in vivo dosimetry for HDR brachytherapy treatments is feasible and has the potential to detect and prevent gross errors. In vivo HDR brachytherapy should be included as part of the QA for a HDR brachytherapy program.

Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Quasi-Coherent Oscillations in the Extreme Ultraviolet Flux of the Dwarf Nova SS Cygni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasi-coherent oscillations have been detected in the extreme ultraviolet flux of the dwarf nova SS Cygni during observations with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite of the rise and plateau phases of an anomalous outburst in 1993 August and a normal outburst in 1994 June/July. On both occasions, the oscillation turned on during the rise to outburst and persisted throughout the observation. During the 1993 outburst, the period of the oscillation fell from 9.3 s to 7.5 s over an interval of 4.4 days; during the 1994 outburst, the period fell from 8.9 s to 7.19 s (the shortest period ever observed in SS Cyg, or any other dwarf nova) within less than a day, and then rose to 8.0 s over an interval of 8.0 days. For both outbursts, the period $P$ of the oscillation was observed to correlate with the 75--120 \\AA \\ count rate $I_{\\rm EUV}$ according to $P\\propto I_{\\rm EUV}^{-0.094}$. A magnetospheric model is considered to reproduce this variation. It is found that an effective high-order multipole field is required, and that the field strength at the surface of the white dwarf is 0.1--1 MG. Such a field strength is at the lower extreme of those measured or inferred for bona fide magnetic cataclysmic variables.

Christopher W. Mauche

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

OTR measurements and modeling of the electron beam optics at the E-cooling facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optics of the electron beam accelerated in the Pelletron, intended for the electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab recycler storage ring, has been studied. The beam profile parameters were measured under the accelerating section using Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) monitor. The monitor employs a highly-reflective 2 inch-diameter aluminum OTR-screen with a thickness of 5 {micro}m and a digital CCD camera. The measurements were done in a pulse-signal mode in the beam current range of 0.03-0.8 A and at pulse durations ranging from 1 {micro}s to 4 {micro}s. Differential profiles measured in pulsed mode are compared with results obtained by modeling of the DC beam dynamics from the Pelletron cathode to the OTR monitor. The modeling was done with SAM, ULTRASAM and BEAM programs. An adjustment of the magnetic fields in the lenses of the accelerating section was done in the simulations. The simulated electron beam optics downstream of the accelerating section was in good agreement with the measurements made with pulsed beam.

Warner, A.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Rainier Mesa CAU Infiltration Model using INFILv3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation are: (1) Model Inputs - DEM, Precipitation, Air temp, Soil props, Surface geology, Vegetation; (2) Model Pre-processing - Runoff Routing and sinks, Slope and Azimuth, Soil Ksat reduction with slope (to mitigate bathtub ring), Soil-Bedrock Interface permeabilities; (3) Model Calibration - ET using PEST, Chloride mass balance data, Streamflow using PEST; (4) Model Validation - Streamflow data not used for calibration; (5) Uncertainty Analysis; and (6) Results. Conclusions are: (1) Average annual infiltration rates =11 to 18 mm/year for RM domain; (2) Average annual infiltration rates = 7 to 11 mm/year for SM domain; (3) ET = 70% of precipitation for both domains; (4) Runoff = 8-9% for RM; and 22-24% for SM - Apparently high average runoff is caused by the truncation of the lowerelevation portions of watersheds where much of the infiltration of runoff waters would otherwise occur; (5) Model results are calibrated to measured ET, CMB data, and streamflow observations; (6) Model results are validated using streamflow observations discovered after model calibration was complete; (7) Use of soil Ksat reduction with slope to mitigate bathtub ring was successful (based on calibration results); and (8) Soil-bedrock K{_}interface is innovative approach.

Levitt, Daniel G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Optical Spectroscopy Results for the Self-Magnetic Pinch Electron Beam Diode on the ITS-6 Accelerator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' RITS-6 accelerator facility [1] (operating at 7.5 MV and 180 kA) investigating plasma formation and propagation in relativistic electron beam diodes used for flash x-ray radiography. High resolution, visible and ultraviolet spectra were collected in the anode-cathode (A-K) vacuum gap of the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode [2-4]. Time and space resolved spectra are compared with time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) calculations [5-7] and Lsp, hybrid particle-in-cell code simulations [8,9]. Results indicate the presence of a dense (>1x1017cm-3), low temperature (few eV), on-axis plasma, composed of hydrocarbon and metal ion species, which expands at a rate of several cm/s from the anode to the cathode. In addition, cathode plasmas are observed which extend several millimeters into the A-K gap [10]. It is believed that the interaction of these electrode plasmas cause premature impedance collapse of the diode and subsequent reduction in the total radiation output. Diagnostics include high speed imaging and spectroscopy using nanosecond gated ICCD cameras, streak cameras, and photodiode arrays.

Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Hahn, Kelly; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Welch, Dale R.; Yitzhak, Maron

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Stellar and Planetary Properties of K2 Campaign 1 Candidates and Validation of 18 Systems, Including a Planet Receiving Earth-like Insolation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 18 candidates as planets and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is EPIC 201912552, a bright (K=8.9) M2 dwarf hosting a 2.24 \\pm 0.25 Earth radius planet with an equilibrium temperature of 271 \\pm 16 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages that enabled this analysis: isochrones, a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties, and vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive pr...

Montet, Benjamin T; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John Asher; Hogg, David W; Bowler, Brendan P; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Mann, Andrew W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Romania program targets methanol and Fischer-Tropsch research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the chemical organic industry, the petrochemical and engine fuels industry in Romania are entirely based on hydrocarbons from oil. To reduce the oil dependence of this sector and to ensure the stipulated growth rate of 8-9%, research and development programs have been set up with a view to the diversification of raw materials. In research on hydrocarbons from alcohol conversion, three process variants are known, i.e. olefins from methanol, gasolines from methanol and a combined gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons from methanol. The Romanian process of methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is very flexible, with all the variants mentioned being carried out in the same plant by modifying the catalysts. In research on hydrocarbons from synthesis gas a modern process is being developed for gasification of brown coal in a fluidized bed, under pressure, in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. In the field of carbon oxide hydrogenation, studies have been carried out on selective Fischer-Tropsch processes in which the reaction products are high value hydrocarbon fractions.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Single-crystal structure of vanadium-doped La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-precision X-ray diffraction study of single crystals of two compositions-La{sub 2}Mo{sub 1.78}V{sub 0.22}O{sub 8.89} and La{sub 2}Mo{sub 1.64}V{sub 0.36}O{sub 8.82}-was performed. In the vanadium-doped compounds, as in the structure of the metastable {beta}{sub ms} phase of pure La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9}, the La and Mo atoms and one of the three oxygen atoms are displaced from the threefold axis, on which they are located in the high-temperature {beta} phase. The structure contains two partially occupied oxygen sites. It was shown that molybdenum atoms are partially replaced by vanadium atoms, which are not involved in the disordering, are located on the threefold axis, and are shifted toward one of the oxygen atoms. This is consistent with the temperature-induced changes in the structure of La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} and the changes in the properties of these crystals caused by the introduction of vanadium atoms into the structure.

Alekseeva, O. A., E-mail: olalex@ns.crys.ras.ru; Antipin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Gagor, A.; Pietraszko, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Poland)] [Polish Academy of Sciences, Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Poland); Novikova, N. E.; Sorokina, N. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Kharitonova, E. P.; Voronkova, V. I. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)] [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improvement in surface fatigue life of hardened gears by high-intensity shot peening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two groups of carburized, hardened, and ground spur gears that were manufactured from the same heat vacuum induction melted vacuum arc melted (VIM VAR) AISI 9310 steel were endurance tested for surface fatigue. Both groups were manufactured with a standard ground 16 rms surface finish. One group was subjected to a shot peening (SP) intensity of 7 to 9A, and the second group was subjected to a SP intensity of 15 to 17A. All gears were honed after SP to a surface finish of 16 rms. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. Test conditions were a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa, a gear temperature of 350 K, and a speed of 10000 rpm. The lubricant used for the tests was a synthetic paraffinic oil with an additive package. The following results were obtained: The 10 pct. surface fatigue (pitting) life of the high intensity (15 to 17A) SPed gears was 2.15 times that of the medium intensity (7 to 9A) SPed gears, the same as that calculated from measured residual stress at a depth of 127 microns. The measured residual stress for the high intensity SPed gears was 57 pct. higher than that for the medium intensity SPed gears at a depth of 127 microns and 540 pct. higher at a depth of 51 microns.

Townsend, D.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Superconducting hot-electron nanobolometer with microwave bias and readout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new detection technique based on radio-frequency (RF) bias and readout of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer. This approach is suitable for Frequency-Division-Multiplexing (FDM) readout of large arrays using broadband low-noise RF amplifier. We call this new detector RFTES. This feasibility study was made on demonstrator devices which are made in all-Nb technology and operate at 4.2 K. The studied RFTES devices consist of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer made of ultrathin niobium films with transition temperature Tc = 5.2 K. The 0.65-THz antenna and nanobolometer are embedded as a load into a GHz-range coplanar niobium resonator (Tc = 8.9 K, Q = 4000). To heat the superconducting Nb nanobolometer close to the Tc, the RF power at resonator frequency f = 5.8 GHz is applied via a transmission line which is weakly coupled (-11 dB) to the loaded resonator. The THz-antenna of RFTES was placed in the focus of a sapphire immersion lens inside a He4-cryostat equipped with an ...

Kuzmin, A A; Shitov, S V; Abramov, N N; Ermakov, A B; Arndt, M; Wuensch, S H; Ilin, K S; Ustinov, A V; Siegel, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated Disposal Facility FY2011 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of glass (Certa and Wells 2010). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 8.9 x 10{sup 14} Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally {sup 99}Tc (t{sub 1/2} = 2.1 x 10{sup 5}), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2011 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

A medium-energy photoemission and ab-initio investigation of cubic yttria-stabilised zirconia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical investigations into the electronic properties and structure of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia are presented. Medium-energy x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements have been carried out for material with a concentration of 8-9?mol.?% yttria. Resonant photoemission spectra are obtained for a range of photon energies that traverse the L2 absorption edge for both zirconium and yttrium. Through correlation with results from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, based on structural models proposed in the literature, we assign photoemission peaks appearing in the spectra to core lines and Auger transitions. An analysis of the core level features enables the identification of shifts in the core level energies due to different local chemical environments of the constituent atoms. In general, each core line feature can be decomposed into three contributions, with associated energy shifts. Their identification with results of DFT calculations carried out for proposed atomic structures, lends support to these structural models. The experimental results indicate a multi-atom resonant photoemission effect between nearest-neighbour oxygen and yttrium atoms. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra for zirconium and yttrium are also presented, which correlate well with calculated Zr- and Y-4d electron partial density-of-states and with Auger electron peak area versus photon energy curve.

Cousland, G. P. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Cui, X. Y. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Smith, A. E. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Stampfl, C. M. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Wong, L.; Tayebjee, M.; Yu, D.; Triani, G.; Evans, P. J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Ruppender, H.-J. [OmniVac GmbH, Espensteigstrasse 16, 67661 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Jang, L.-Y. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Stampfl, A. P. J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

Candish, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G. [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lee, Richard [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Vollans, Emily [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Robar, James [Department of Medical Physics, Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Gete, Ermias [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Martin, Monty [Department of Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the design, synthesis, thermal, and photophysical properties of two phosphine oxide based electron transport/hole blocking materials, 2,6-bis(4-(diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A11) and 2,4-bis(4-(diphenyl-phosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A10) for blue electrophosphorescent organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The use of these materials in blue OLED with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2’]picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphor was demonstrated. Using the dual host device architecture with BM-A10 as the ETM yields a maximum EQE of 8.9% with a power efficiency of 21.5 lm/W (4.0V and 35 cd/m2). When BM-A11 is used as the ETM, the maximum EQE and power efficiency improves to 14.9% and 48.4 lm/W, respectively (3.0V and 40 cd/m2).

Von Ruden, Amber L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Darsell, Jens T.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. A? precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some A? fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with A? peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-? peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

344

Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

Probing large-scale wind structures in Vela X-1 using off-states with INTEGRAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vela X-1 is the prototype of the class of wind-fed accreting pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries hosting a supergiant donor. We have analyzed in a systematic way ten years of INTEGRAL data of Vela X-1 (22-50 keV) and we found that when outside the X-ray eclipse, the source undergoes several luminosity drops where the hard X-rays luminosity goes below 5x10^34 erg/s, becoming undetected by INTEGRAL. These drops in the X-ray flux are usually referred to as "off-states" in the literature. We have investigated the distribution of these off-states along the Vela X-1 ~8.9 day orbit, finding that their orbital occurrence displays an asymmetric distribution, with a higher probability to observe an off-state near the pre-eclipse than during the post-eclipse. This asymmetry can be explained by scattering of hard X-rays in a region of ionized wind, able to reduce the source hard X-ray brightness preferentially near eclipse ingress. We associate this ionized large-scale wind structure with the photo-ionization wake produc...

Sidoli, L; Fuerst, F; Torrejon, J M; Kretschmar, P; Bozzo, E; Pottschmidt, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a wood pulp processing system of the type producing both pulp and a stream of lactic acid-containing black liquor solution, the processor for production of peracid bleaching agents from hydroxy acid contained in the black liquor solution, comprising: adjusting the pH of the black liquor solution to the range of about 8-9 by exposing the solution to CO/sub 2/ carbon dioxide to form an alkaline precipitate; separating solids from the black liquor solution to produce a residual solution containing lower aliphatic hydroxy acids selected from the group consisting of lactic acid, glycolic acid, 2-hydroxybutanoic acid, xyloisosaccharinic acid, and glucoisosaccharinic acid; decarboxylating the lower aliphatic hydroxy acids to corresponding gaseous aliphatic aldehydes by admixing a powdered semiconductor with the residual solution to form a slurry; removing the gaseous aldehydes from the residual solution by sweeping gas flow as soon as they are generated to prevent further oxidation to carboxylic acids; reacting the gaseous aldehydes with oxygen to form corresponding peracids; and applying the peracids as bleaching agents to the pulp produced in the pulp processing system.

Chum, H.L.; Ratcliff, M.A.; Palasz, P.D.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human alterations to nutrient cycles1,2 and herbivore communities3–7 are affecting global biodiversity dramatically2. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems8,9. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota; et al, et al

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Realized and projected impacts of U.S. federal efficiency standards for residential appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2001 period or will take effect by the end of 2007. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions in 2020 by 8-9% compared to the levels expected without any standards. They will save a cumulative total of 25-30 quads by the year 2015, and 60 quads by 2030. The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to nearly $80 billion by 2015, and grows to $130 billion by 2030. The overall benefit/cost ratio of cumulative consumer impacts in the 1987-2050 period is 2.75:1. The cumulative cost of DOE's program to establish and implement the standards is in the range of $200-250 million.

Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael; Liu, Xiaomin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Factors affecting lead, cadmium, and arsenic levels in house dust in a smelter town in eastern Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hettstedt, a city in eastern Germany with a long history of mining and smelting of nonferrous ores, has several industrial sources of heavy metals. The indoor exposure to metals of children (5 to 14 years old) in the Hettstedt area was assessed by measuring the levels of lead, cadmium, and arsenic contamination in sedimented house dust. Factors which influence the dust loading rate and the surface loading rates of these contaminants in house dust were investigated. The geometric mean of the dust loading rate was 8.9 mg/m[sup 2] day. The geometric means of surface loading rates were 1.14, 0.024, and 0.023 [micro]g/m[sup 2] day for lead, cadmium, and arsenic, respectively. Factors that were significantly associated with surface loading rates included the city area of residence, automobile traffic near home, parent with occupational exposure to heavy metals, type of heating, housing characteristics, whether child's home is damp, number of persons living in the child's home,and parents' education. The most significant of these factors was the city area of residence, which reflects the distance from the metal sources; this factor accounted for about half of the variances explained by the regression models.

Meyer, I.; Heinrich, J. (GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Epidemiologie); Lippold, U. (Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene des Umweltbundesamtes Berlin (Germany))

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using long-term datasets from the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The Nauru and Darwin sites show significant variability in sky cover, downwelling radiative fluxes, and surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) due to El Niño and the Australian monsoon, respectively, while the Manus site shows little intra-seasonal or interannual variability. Cloud radar measurement of cloud base and top heights are used to define cloud types so that the effect of cloud type on the surface CRE can be examined. Clouds with low bases contribute 71-75% of the surface shortwave (SW) CRE and 66-74% of the surface longwave (LW) CRE at the three TWP sites, while clouds with mid-level bases contribute 8-9% of the SW CRE and 12-14% of the LW CRE, and clouds with high bases contribute 16-19% of the SW CRE and 15-21% of the LW CRE.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Very low resistance alloyed Ni-based ohmic contacts to InP-capped and uncapped n{sup +}-In{sub 0.53} Ga{sub 0.47}As  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful application of the silicide-like Ni{sub x}InGaAs phase for self-aligned source/drain contacts requires the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts between the phase and underlying InGaAs. We report Ni-based contacts to InP-capped and uncapped n{sup +}- In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (N{sub D}?=?3?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}) with a specific contact resistance (?{sub c}) of 4.0 × 10{sup ?8?}±?7 × 10{sup ?9} ?·cm{sup 2} and 4.6 × 10{sup ?8?}±?9 × 10{sup ?9} ?·cm{sup 2}, respectively, after annealing at 350?°C for 60?s. With an ammonium sulfide pre-metallization surface treatment, ?{sub c} is further reduced to 2.1 × 10{sup ?8?}±?2 × 10{sup ?9} ?·cm{sup 2} and 1.8 × 10{sup ?8?}±?1 × 10{sup ?9} ?·cm{sup 2} on epilayers with and without 10?nm InP caps, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the ammonium sulfide surface treatment results in more complete elimination of the semiconductor's native oxide at the contact interface, which is responsible for a reduced contact resistance both before and after annealing.

Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying; Choi, Won Hyuck; Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lee, Rinus T. P. [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Road, Suite 2200, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Final technical report, January 11, 1991--April 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As noted in the historical summary, this program encountered a number of changes in direction, schedule, and scope over the period 11 January 1991 to 31 December 1998. The report provides a comprehensive summary of all the varied aspects of the program over its seven and a quarter years, and highlights those aspects that provide information beneficial to future radioisotope programs. In addition to summarizing the scope of the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program provided as background, the introduction includes a discussion of the scope of the final report and offers reference sources for information on those topics not covered. Much of the design heritage of the GPHS-RTG comes from the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) RTGs used on the Lincoln Experimental Satellites (LES) 8/9 and Voyager spacecraft. The design utilized for the Cassini program was developed, in large part, under the GPHS-RTG program which produced the Galileo and Ulysses RTGs. Reports from those programs included detailed documentation of the design, development, and testing of converter components and full converters that were identical to, or similar to, components used in the Cassini program. Where such information is available in previous reports, it is not repeated here.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Methotrexate intercalated ZnAl-layered double hydroxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anticancerous drug methotrexate (MTX) has been intercalated into an ZnAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) using an anion exchange technique to produce LDH-MTX hybrids having particle sizes in the range of 100-300 nm. X-ray diffraction studies revealed increases in the basal spacings of ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrid on MTX intercalation. This was corroborated by the transmission electron micrographs, which showed an increase in average interlayer spacing from 8.9 A in pristine LDH to 21.3 A in LDH-MTX hybrid. Thermogravimetric analyses showed an increase in the decomposition temperature for the MTX molecule in the LDH-MTX hybrid indicating enhanced thermal stability of the drug molecule in the LDH nanovehicle. The cumulative release profile of MTX from ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrids in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 was successfully sustained for 48 h following Rigter-Peppas model release kinetics via diffusion. - Graphical abstract: ZnAl-layered double hydroxide intercalated with methotrexate ({approx}34% loading) promises the possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in controlled delivery. Highlights: > ZnAl-layered double hydroxide methotrexate nanohybrid has been synthesized. > XRD and TEM studies on nanohybrid revealed successful intercalation of methotrexate. > TG and CHN analyses showed {approx}34 wt% of methotrexate loading into the nanohybrid. > Possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in delivery.

Chakraborty, Manjusha; Dasgupta, Sudip; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chakraborty, Jui, E-mail: jui@cgcri.res.in [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ghosh, Swapankumar, E-mail: swapankumar.ghosh2@mail.dcu.ie [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), CSIR, Trivandrum 695019 (India); Mitra, Manoj K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Basu, Debabrata [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optics of electron beam in the Recycler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of the screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.

Huang, Xianjun, E-mail: xianjun.huang@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); College of Electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Hu, Zhirun [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Liu, Peiguo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-86-053-1933, Gray Pprinting Company, Fostoria, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gray Printing Company, located in Fostoria, Ohio was studied for potential employee exposures to solvents used in the offset-printing process at that site. The company produced 30 monthly magazines plus various commercial catalogs and brochures. The employment at the site was 185 persons. Equipment used in the production of printed material included photographic-typesetting and sheet-fed and roll fed offset lithographic printing processes. Over two workdays the sheet fed press operator's isopropanol exposures ranged from 247 to 501 mg/m/sup 3/ with personal breathing zone naphtha concentrations of 0.03 to 8.9 mg/m/sup 3/. The web press operator's naphtha exposures ranged from 0.03 to 7.7 mg/m/sup 3/. These workers were also exposed to low concentrations of isopropanol. The highest short term isopropanol exposure was 726 mg/m/sup 3/. Short term exposures to blanket and roller cleaning solvent were low, less than 10 mg/m/sup 3/. A higher than expected reporting of symptoms related to central nervous system depression, difficulty in concentrating, dizziness, cough, chest pain, and dry skin were noted among workers. The authors conclude that there was an increased prevalence of neurotoxic, respiratory, and skin problems among workers using organic solvents. Due to the prevalence of these symptoms, the authors recommend measures for reducing employee exposure to solvents.

Crandall, M.S.; Boiano, J.M.; Fidler, A.T.; Cantor, F.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Photosensitization of human leukemic cells by anthracenedione antitumor agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1,4-Diamino-substituted anthraquinone antitumor agents (mitoxantrone and ametantrone) and structurally related 1,5- and 1,8-diamino-substituted compounds (AM1 and AM2) were tested for their ability to photosensitize human leukemic cells in culture. Viability was measured using the 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and DNA and membrane damage were assessed. Following a 1-h exposure to AM2, a dose of drug required to give 50% loss of cell viability (53 microM) was obtained in the dark, which was reduced to approximately 2.4 microM following illumination for 2 min (lambda greater than 475 nm), a dose of light that was completely nontoxic to the cells in the absence of drug. A shift in the cell viability curve was also observed for AM1 but, under identical conditions, the dose modification was only 8.9. In contrast, neither ametantrone nor mitoxantrone gave a decreased viability upon illumination. DNA single-strand breaks as measured by alkaline elution correlated with cell viability. Frank DNA single-strand breaks were produced by AM2 and light, suggesting the production of free radicals. The strand breaks produced by AM2 in the dark and by mitoxantrone (with or without illumination) were protein concealed. No evidence of photo-induced membrane damage, as determined by transport of the model amino acid cycloleucine, could be observed even at supralethal doses.

Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L.; Reszka, K.; Lown, J.W. (University College and Middlesex School of Medicine, London (England))

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

The MOG Weak Field approximation II. Observational test of Chandra X-ray Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the weak field approximation limit of the covariant Scalar-Tensor-Vector Gravity (STVG) theory, so-called MOdified gravity (MOG), to the dynamics of clusters of galaxies by using only baryonic matter. The MOG effective gravitational potential in the weak field approximation is composed of an attractive Newtonian term and a repulsive Yukawa term with two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\mu$. The numerical values of these parameters have been obtained by fitting the predicted rotation curves of galaxies to observational data, yielding the best fit result: $\\alpha = 8.89 \\pm 0.34$ and $\\mu= 0.042\\pm 0.004$ kpc$^{-1}$~\\cite{rah13}. We extend the observational test of this theory to clusters of galaxies, using data for the ionized gas and the temperature profile of nearby clusters obtained by the Chandra X-ray telescope. Using the MOG virial theorem for clusters, we compare the mass profiles of clusters from observation and theory for eleven clusters. The theoretical mass profiles for the inner parts of clusters exceed the observational data. However, the observational data for the inner parts of clusters (i.e., $r<0.1 r_{500}$) is scattered, but at distances larger than $\\sim 300$ kpc, the observed and predicted mass profiles converge. Our results indicate that MOG as a theory of modified gravity is compatible with the observational data from the the solar system to Mega parsec scales without invoking dark matter.

J. W. Moffat; S. Rahvar

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gasification Studies Task 4 Topical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key objective of the Task 4 activities has been to develop simulation tools to support development, troubleshooting and optimization of pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifiers. The overall gasifier models (Subtask 4.1) combine submodels for fluid flow (Subtask 4.2) and heat transfer (Subtask 4.3) with fundamental understanding of the chemical processes (Subtask 4.4) processes that take place as coal particles are converted to synthesis gas and slag. However, it is important to be able to compare predictions from the models against data obtained from actual operating coal gasifiers, and Subtask 4.6 aims to provide an accessible, non-proprietary system, which can be operated over a wide range of conditions to provide well-characterized data for model validation. Highlights of this work include: • Verification and validation activities performed with the Arches coal gasification simulation tool on experimental data from the CANMET gasifier (Subtask 4.1). • The simulation of multiphase reacting flows with coal particles including detailed gas-phase chemistry calculations using an extension of the one-dimensional turbulence model’s capability (Subtask 4.2). • The demonstration and implementation of the Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) radiation algorithm in the ARCHES code (Subtask 4.3). • Determination of steam and CO{sub 2} gasification kinetics of bituminous coal chars at high temperature and elevated pressure under entrained-flow conditions (Subtask 4.4). In addition, attempts were made to gain insight into the chemical structure differences between young and mature coal soot, but both NMR and TEM characterization efforts were hampered by the highly reacted nature of the soot. • The development, operation, and demonstration of in-situ gas phase measurements from the University of Utah’s pilot-scale entrained-flow coal gasifier (EFG) (Subtask 4.6). This subtask aimed at acquiring predictable, consistent performance and characterizing the environment within the gasifier.

Whitty, Kevin; Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald; Smith, Philip; Sutherland, James; Thornock, Jeremy; Boshayeshi, Babak; Hunsacker, Isaac; Lewis, Aaron; Waind, Travis; Kelly, Kerry

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Status and progress of the RERTR program in the year 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners during the year 2000 and discusses the main activities planned for the year 2001. The past year was characterized by important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments containing 503 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 3,740 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Postirradiation examinations of three batches of microplates have continued to reveal excellent irradiation behavior of U-MO dispersion fuels in a variety of compositions and irradiating conditions. h-radiation of two new batches of miniplates of greater sizes is in progress in the ATR to investigate me swelling behavior of these fuels under prototypic conditions. These materials hold the promise of achieving the program goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium densities in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Qualification of the U-MO dispersion fuels is proceeding on schedule. Test fuel elements with 6 gU/cm{sup 3} are being fabricated by BWXT and are scheduled to begin undergoing irradiation in the HFR-Petten in the spring of 2001, with a goal of qualifying this fuel by the end of 2003. U-Mo with 8-9 gU/cm{sup 3} is planned to be qualified by the end of 2005. Joint LEU conversion feasibility studies were completed for HFR-Petten and for SAFARI-1. Significant improvements were made in the design of LEU metal-foil annular targets that would allow efficient production of fission {sup 99}Mo. Irradiations in the RAS-GAS reactor showed that these targets can formed from aluminum tubes, and that the yield and purity of their product from the acidic process were at least as good as those from the HEU Cintichem targets. Progress was made on irradiation testing of LEU UO{sub 2} dispersion fuel and on LEU conversion feasibility studies in the Russian RERTR program. Conversion of the BER-11reactor in Berlin, Germany, was completed and conversion of the La Reins reactor in Santiago, Chile, began. These are exciting times for the program. In the fuel development area, the RERTR program is aggressively pursuing qualification of high-density LEU U-Mo dispersion fuels, with the dual goal of enabling fi.uther conversions and of developing a substitute for LEU silicide fuels that can be more easily disposed of after expiration of the FRR SNF Acceptance Program. The {sup 99}Mo effort has reached the point where it appears feasible for all the {sup 99}Mo producers of the world to agree jointly to a common course of action leading to the elimination of HEU use in their processes. As in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that has always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

The WEI6K, a 6-kW 7-m Small Wind Turbine: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under a DOE solicitation “Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development.” The objective of this project has been to design a new small wind turbine with improved cost, reliability and performance in grid-connected residential and small business applications, in order to achieve the overall DOE goal of cost effectiveness in Class 3 wind resources that can now be achieved in Class 5 resources. The scope of work for this project has been to complete the preliminary design of an improved small wind turbine, including preliminary loads and strength analyses; analysis and design of all major components; systems integration and structural dynamic analysis; estimation of life-cycle cost of energy; and design documentation and review. The project did not entail hardware fabrication or testing. The WEI6K Turbine resulting from this project is an upwind horizontal-axis wind turbine rated at 6 kW. It features a 3-blade 7-m diameter rotor. The generator is a direct-drive permanent magnet synchronous machine generating 3-phase power at 240 VAC. The turbine is maintained oriented in to the wind via active yaw control using electromechanical servos. Power is regulated with active blade pitch control. The turbine is presently designed to be placed on a 100-foot (30m) tower. The turbine is predicted to generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy (COE) between 7.3 and 8.9 ¢/kWh at an IEC Class II site, with an average wind speed of 8.5 m/s at hub height, depending upon whether the customer uses a guyed truss tower (the lower figure) or a monopole tower. For the NREL Reference Site, with a mean wind speed of 5.35 m/s at 10 m height, the turbine would generate at a levelized cost of energy of between 9.7 and 11.9 ¢/kWh. The lowest of these numbers is presently competitive with retail electricity rates in most of the country. The 8.9 ¢/kWh is still competitive with retail rates in many regions of the country with high electricity costs. The study further concludes that several design changes could shave 10-14% from the cost of energy determined in the preliminary design. These changes include a new tower design that offers tilt-up capability without guy wires and takes better advantage of the lowered loads produced by pitch control; design a family of airfoils more appropriate for pitch regulation on a turbine of this size; tune the pitch controller properly to minimize shedding of power during turbulent operation in the transition from Region 2 to 3; value engineer the pitch system to shave costs, including consideration of a collective pitch system; and refine the design of the hub and main frame castings to minimize weight and cost. We are generally encouraged by the results. These preliminary numbers show that we can produce a turbine that is competitive with retail electric rates at relatively windy IEC Class II sites. With further improvements in the design, we believe the turbine could be competitive at sites with lesser wind resource.

Wetzel, Kyle K.; McCleer, Patrick J.; Hahlbeck, Edwin C.; DOE Project Office - Keith Bennett

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine: A comprehensive program from machine QA to TPS validation and patient QA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) IMAT solution. Methods: The program was developed and tested out for a Millennium120 MLC on iX Clinacs and a HighDefinition MLC on a Novalis TX, using a variety of measurement equipment including Gafchromic film, 2D ion chamber arrays (Seven29 and StarCheck, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) with inclinometer and Octavius phantom, the Delta4 systam (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the portal imager (EPID). First, a number of complementary machine QA tests were developed to monitor the correct interplay between the accelerating/decelerating gantry, the variable dose rate and the MLC position, straining the delivery to the maximum allowed limits. Second, a systematic approach to the validation of the dose calculation for RA was adopted, starting with static gantry and RA specific static MLC shapes and gradually moving to dynamic gantry, dynamic MLC shapes. RA plans were then optimized on a series of artificial structures created within the homogeneous Octavius phantom and within a heterogeneous lung phantom. These served the double purpose of testing the behavior of the optimization algorithm (PRO) as well as the precision of the forward dose calculation. Finally, patient QA on a series of clinical cases was performed with different methods. In addition to the well established in-phantom QA, we evaluated the portal dosimetry solution within the Varian approach. Results: For routine machine QA, the ''Snooker Cue'' test on the EPID proved to be the most sensitive to overall problem detection. It is also the most practical one. The ''Twinkle'' and ''Sunrise'' tests were useful to obtain well differentiated information on the individual treatment delivery components. The AAA8.9 dose calculations showed excellent agreement with all corresponding measurements, except in areas where the 2.5 mm fixed fluence resolution was insufficient to accurately model the tongue and groove effect or the dose through nearly closed opposing leafs. Such cases benefited from the increased fluence resolution in AAA10.0. In the clinical RA fields, these effects were smeared out spatially and the impact of the fluence resolution was considerably less pronounced. The RA plans on the artificial structure sets demonstrated some interesting characteristics of the PRO8.9 optimizer, such as a sometimes unexpected dependence on the collimator rotation and a suboptimal coverage of targets within lung tissue. Although the portal dosimetry was successfully validated, we are reluctant to use it as a sole means of patient QA as long as no gantry angle information is embedded. Conclusions: The all-in validation program allows a systematic approach in monitoring the different levels of RA treatments. With the systematic approach comes a better understanding of both the capabilities and the limits of the used solution. The program can be useful for implementation, but also for the validation of major upgrades.

Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Behrens, Claus F.; Samsoee, Eva; Sjoelin, Maria; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Sjoestroem, David; Clermont, Christian; Hambach, Lionel; Sergent, Francois [7Sigma, QA-team in Radiotherapy Physics, 3150 Tildonk, Belgium and Department of Radiotherapy, Clinique Ste. Elisabeth, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Department of Oncology, Division of Radiophysics, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Radiotherapy, Clinique Ste. Elisabeth, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Surface Tension and Negative Pressure Interior of a Non-Singular `Black Hole'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constant density interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a divergent pressure when its radius $R\\le\\frac{9}{8}R_s=\\frac{9}{4}GM$. We show that this divergence is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite redshifted surface tension on a spherical surface of radius $R_0=3R\\sqrt{1-\\frac{8}{9}\\frac{R}{R_s}}$. For $r surface is localized at the Schwarzschild radius itself, $R_0=R_s$, and the solution has constant negative pressure $p =-\\bar\\rho$ everywhere in the interior $rsurface tension of the condensate star surface is given by $\\tau_s=\\Delta\\kappa/8\\pi G$, where $\\Delta\\kappa=\\kappa_+-\\kappa_-=2\\kappa_+=1/R_s$ is the difference of equal and opposite surface gravities between the exterior and interior Schwarzschild solutions. The First Law, $dM=dE_v+\\tau_s dA$ is recognized as a purely mechanical classical relation at zero temperature and zero entropy, describing the volume energy and surface energy change respectively. Since there is no event horizon, the Schwarzschild time t of such a non-singular gravitational condensate star is a global time, fully consistent with unitary time evolution in quantum theory. The $p=-\\bar\\rho$ interior acts as a defocusing lens for light passing through the condensate, leading to imaging characteristics distinguishable from a classical black hole. A further observational test of gravitational condensate stars with a physical surface vs. black holes is the discrete surface modes of oscillation which should be detectable by their gravitational wave signatures.

Pawel O. Mazur; Emil Mottola

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Estimating the variable cost for high-volume and long-haul transportation of densified biomass and biofuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article analyzes rail transportation costs of products that have similar physical properties as densified biomass and biofuel. The results of this cost analysis are useful to understand the relationship and quantify the impact of a number of factors on rail transportation costs of denisfied biomass and biofuel. These results will be beneficial and help evaluate the economic feasibility of high-volume and long-haul transportation of biomass and biofuel. High-volume and long-haul rail transportation of biomass is a viable transportation option for biofuel plants, and for coal plants which consider biomass co-firing. Using rail optimizes costs, and optimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to transportation. Increasing bioenergy production would consequently result in lower GHG emissions due to displacing fossil fuels. To estimate rail transportation costs we use the carload waybill data, provided by Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board for products such as grain and liquid type commodities for 2009 and 2011. We used regression analysis to quantify the relationship between variable transportation unit cost ($/ton) and car type, shipment size, rail movement type, commodity type, etc. The results indicate that: (a) transportation costs for liquid is $2.26/ton–$5.45/ton higher than grain type commodity; (b) transportation costs in 2011 were $1.68/ton–$5.59/ton higher than 2009; (c) transportation costs for single car shipments are $3.6/ton–$6.68/ton higher than transportation costs for multiple car shipments of grains; (d) transportation costs for multiple car shipments are $8.9/ton and $17.15/ton higher than transportation costs for unit train shipments of grains.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Md. S. Roni; Sandra D. Eksioglu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

RP-5 RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first quarterly technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Project. The report summarizes the work progress, effort and activities that took place during the period of July 12, 2002 (project inception) to September 30, 2002. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines. This technical report covers all meetings and discussions that were conducted to identify and analyze potential renewable energy technologies and verify its feasibility and suitability for the project. The report covers the two-day Energy Charrette that was held at the Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA) Headquarters Building on May 8-9, 2002 to brainstorm, evaluate and present all available renewable energy options along with their implementations. Although the Energy Charrette was held prior to awarding of the DOE Grant, the outcome of the Charrette forms the basis of the activities that took place after July 12, 2002. Therefore, the Energy Charrette is frequently referenced and discussed in this report. The report also discusses the Energy Meeting that took place on September 24, 2002 between IEUA and CH2M Hill to follow up on the various presentations and recommendations resulting from the Energy Charrette. It should be noted that no final equipment data or capacities have been presented in the report, as the Conceptual Design has not started yet. This report covers continuing effort and work to complete the Request for Proposal (RFP) for this project. The Executive Summary Section covers more details on the scope of work, which consists of the conceptual, preliminary and final design, and what has been accomplished during the report period. Tools and methods utilized in this project to identify renewable energy technologies are included in the ''Experimental'' Section. Finally, Project achievements, implications and importance in improving this kind of technology are summarized in the ''Conclusion'' Section.

Neil Clifton, P.E.; Eliza Jane Whitman; Jamal A. Zughbi, P.E.

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Two delayed critical uranium (93.2) metal cylindrical annuli with central Be moderation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two cylindrical annuli of uranium metal were assembled to delayed criticality in 1963 with beryllium metal in the center to study the effects of beryllium to provide data for verification of neutron transport theory methods including cross section data for criticality safety calculations. These systems were assembled on a vertical assembly machine in the East cell of the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility. The annuli was divided into two halves with the upper fixed half supported by a 0.010-in-thick, 30-in-diam stainless steel (type 304) diaphragm. The lower half which was hydraulically movable was supported on a very low mass tower consisting of mainly three 0.125-in-thick vertical pieces 120{degree} apart. These systems, when assembled to delayed criticality, were located in 35 x 35 x 30 ft. high experimental room, 11.7 ft from the 5-ft-thick West wall, 12.7 ft. from the 2-ft-thick North wall and 9.2 ft. above the concrete floor. When assembled the positive reactor period measured was +403 sec for the nominal 15-in-OD assembly and +31 sec for nominal 13-in-OD assembly. The reactivity effects of nearby materials such as the support ring (+) for the diaphragm, the diaphragm ({minus}) and the lower support stand(+) were evaluated. The total reactivity worths of the nearby support materials were 8.9 and 5.4 cents for the 15-in-OD and 13-in-OD assemblies, respectively. The reactivity effect of each of the components was measured for the nominal 13-in-OD assembly and they were {minus}11.2 cents for the diaphragm, +4.4 cents for the support ring, and +12.2 cents for the support stand.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Bentzinger, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DEEP ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: THE DYNAMICAL-MASS-SIZE RELATION AND FIRST CONSTRAINTS ON THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present dynamical and structural scaling relations of quiescent galaxies at z = 2, including the dynamical-mass-size relation and the first constraints on the fundamental plane (FP). The backbone of the analysis is a new, very deep Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectrum of a massive, compact, quiescent galaxy at z = 2.0389. We detect the continuum between 3700 and 22,000 A and several strong absorption features (Balmer series, Ca H+K, G band) from which we derive a stellar velocity dispersion of 318 {+-} 53 km s{sup -1}. We perform detailed modeling of the continuum emission and line indices and derive strong simultaneous constraints on the age, metallicity, and stellar mass. The galaxy is a dusty (A{sub V} = 0.77{sup +0.36}{sub -0.32}) solar metallicity (log(Z/Z{sub Sun }) = 0.02{sup +0.20}{sub -0.41}) post-starburst galaxy, with a mean-luminosity-weighted log(age/yr) of 8.9 {+-} 0.1. The galaxy formed the majority of its stars at z > 3 and currently has little or no ongoing star formation. We compile a sample of three other z {approx} 2 quiescent galaxies with measured velocity dispersions, two of which are also post-starburst like. Their dynamical-mass-size relation is offset significantly less than the stellar-mass-size relation from the local early-type relations, which we attribute to a lower central dark matter fraction. Recent cosmological merger simulations agree qualitatively with the data, but cannot fully account for the evolution in the dark matter fraction. The z {approx} 2 FP requires additional evolution beyond passive stellar aging to be in agreement with the local FP. The structural evolution predicted by the cosmological simulations is insufficient, suggesting that additional, possibly non-homologous, structural evolution is needed.

Toft, S.; Gallazzi, A.; Zirm, A.; Wold, M.; Zibetti, S.; Grillo, C.; Man, A., E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

China`s macro economic trends and power industry structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since China adopted an open door policy in 1978, its economy has grown rapidly. Between 1980 and 1993, China`s real GNP growth averaged 9.4 percent per year. Economists at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences forecast that GNP will increase by 11.5 percent in 1994. During the rest of the decade, the Chinese government plans to reduce its annual GNP growth rate to 8-9 percent. During the 2001-2010 period, the economic growth rate is projected to decline to 6.5 percent per year. Table 1 compares China`s economic growth to other Asia-Pacific Economies, and includes projections to 2010. During the 1980s, China`s GDP growth rate was only second to that of South Korea. In the 1990`s, China is projected to have the highest economic growth in the Asia-Pacific region. China`s rapid economic growth is due to dramatic increases in the effective labor supply and effective capital stock. For the remainder of the 1990s, the effective labor supply should continue to increase rapidly because: (1) Chinese state enterprises are over-staffed and labor system reforms will move millions of these workers into more productive activities; (2) reforms in the wage system will provide increased incentives to work harder; (3) relaxation of migration controls from rural to urban areas will cause nominal labor in the industrial sector to accelerate; (4) differentials in personal income will increase and develop peer pressure on workers to work harder and earn more money; and (5) at China`s low personal income level, Chinese people are willing to trade leisure for more income as wages increase.

Binsheng Li; Johnson, C.J.; Hagen, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Designing the Microbial Research Commons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

Uhlir, Paul F

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period February 1, 1995, through April 30, 1995, for Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30246. The objective of Phase II of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. Tasks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of Phase II have been completed in prior quarters. Their results have been discussed in the applicable quarterly reports and in their respective topical reports. With the exception of Task 7, final editions of these topical reports have been submitted to the DOE. This quarterly report, then, addresses only Task 4 and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, {open_quotes}Design and Test of Critical Components.{close_quotes} These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: (1) Catalytic Combustion - Subtasks 8.2 and 8.5, (2) Recuperator - Subtasks 8.1 and 8.7, (3) Autothermal Fuel Reformer - Subtask 8.3, (4) High Temperature Turbine Disc - Subtask 8.4, (5) Advanced Control System (MMI) - Subtask 8.6, and (6) Ceramic Materials - Subtasks 8.8 and 8.9. Major technological achievements from Task 8 efforts during the quarter are as follows: (1) The subscale catalytic combustion rig in Subtask 8.2 is operating consistently at 3 ppmv of NO{sub x} over a range of ATS operating conditions. (2) The spray cast process used to produce the rim section of the high temperature turbine disc of Subtask 8.4 offers additional and unplanned spin-off opportunities for low cost manufacture of certain gas turbine parts.

Karstensen, K.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Utility DSM Programs from 1989 through 1998: Continuation or cross roads?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past five years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been collecting data annually from U.S. electric utilities on their demand-side management (DSM) programs, both current and projected. The latest data cover activities for 1993 and projections for 1994 and 1998. In 1993, 991 utilities operated DSM programs. That year, they spent $2.8 billion, a 13% increase over 1992 expenditures. These and earlier DSM programs saved 44,000 GWh of energy and reduced potential peak demand by 40,000 MW, 30% and 22% increases over the 1992 values, respectively. While some people predict the demise of electric-utility DSM programs, the data do not paint so bleak a picture. In most parts of the country, DSM programs grew in 1993 and utilities (as of Spring 1994) projected continued growth through 1998. Expenditures grew from 1.3% of revenues in 1992 to 1.5% in 1993, and are expected to grow 2.5% per year faster than inflation, which is equivalent to revenue growth. Thus, DSM spending is expected to stay constant at 1.5% of revenues through 1998. Because of the cumulative effect of DSM programs, energy savings are expected to grow from 1.2% of sales in 1992 to 1.6% in 1993 and 3.0% in 1998. Potential-peak reductions are expected to increase from 5.9% of peak demand in 1992 to 6.8% in 1993 and 8.9% in 1998. However, the growth in spending is not as rapid as the 8% annual real growth projected a year earlier. Actual expenditures in 1993 were 6.5% lower than projected early that year. Energy savings, on the other hand, were the same as projected earlier. Potential peak reductions were actually 9% higher than previously projected.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "8-89 efg 07-90" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Little Knife field - US Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

G. Palmiotti

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Deceleration of Antiprotons in Support of Antiproton Storage/Utilization Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimatter has the highest energy density known to mankind. Many concepts have been studied that use antimatter for propulsion. All of these concepts require the development of high density storage. H-bar Technologies, under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has undertaken the first step toward development of high density storage. Demonstration of the ability to store antiprotons in a Penning Trap provides the technology to pursue research in alternative storage methods that may lead to eventually to high density concepts. H-bar Technologies has undertaken research activity on the detailed design and operations required to decelerate and redirect the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) antiproton beam to lay the groundwork for a source of low energy antiprotons. We have performed a detailed assessment of an antiproton deceleration scheme using the FNAL Main Injector, outlining the requirements to significantly and efficiently lower the energy of antiprotons. This task shall require a combination of: theoretical/computation simulations, development of specialized accelerator controls programming, modification of specific Main Injector hardware, and experimental testing of the modified system. Testing shall be performed to characterize the system with a goal of reducing the beam momentum from 8.9 GeV/c to a level of 1 GeV/c or less. We have designed an antiproton degrader system that will integrate with the FNAL decelerated/transferred beam. The degrader shall be designed to maximize the number of low energy antiprotons with a beam spot sized for acceptance by the Mark I test hardware.

Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P. [Hbar Technologies, LLC, 1275 Roosevelt Rd, Suite 103, West Chicago, IL 60185 (United States); Pearson, J. Boise [Propulsion Research Center, XD20, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center AL 35812 (United States); Lewis, Raymond A. [RLewis Co., Boalsburg, PA 16827 (United States)

2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Association between health status and the performance of excessively variable spirometry tests in a population-based study in six U. S. cities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between 6 chronic respiratory symptoms and the performance of an excessively variable FEV1 (test failure) was examined among 8,522 white adults in 6 U.S. cities. A total of 747 (8.9%) performed an excessively variable FEV1 according to the American Thoracic Society criterion. After adjusting for smoking, age, and city of residence in 6 separate logistic regression models, the odds ratios for FEV1 failure among men were 2.32, 1.39, 1.40, 1.82, 2.61, 1.92 for moderate breathlessness, chronic cough, phlegm, wheeze, asthma, and recurrent chest illness, respectively. Among women, FEV1 failure was significantly associated with moderate breathlessness, chronic phlegm, wheeze, and asthma with odds ratios of 1.55, 1.45, 1.62, and 1.95, respectively. When all symptoms were evaluated simultaneously in a single logistic regression model, only breathlessness and asthma remained associated with FEV1 failure; odds ratio = 1.97 for asthma and 2.03 for breathlessness among men and 1.53 for both asthma and breathlessness among women. The 11-yr mortality experience of subjects with test failure, as defined by 2 different criteria, was compared to that of the quartile of the cohort with the highest cross-sectional test results. After adjusting for age, gender, and smoking, the relative risks of mortality were 1.62 and 1.98 for subjects with an FEV1 failure as defined by the ATS and 6-Cities criteria, respectively, and 1.99 and 1.90 for the groups with FVC failure as defined by the 2 criteria. Thus, test failure is almost as strong a predictor of mortality as poor FEV1.

Eisen, E.A.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Fay, M.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk {<=}20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade {>=}3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% {+-} 2.9% and 96.1% {+-} 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% {+-} 5.9%, 76.4% {+-} 8.8%, and 77.5% {+-} 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

Zilli, Thomas, E-mail: thomaszilli@inwind.it [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Jorcano, Sandra [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Rouzaud, Michel; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Toscas, Jose Ignacio [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Casanova, Nathalie; Wang, Hui [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Escude, Lluis; Molla, Meritxell; Linero, Dolors [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, Damien C. [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Miralbell, Raymond [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

VARIABLE AND EXTREME IRRADIATION CONDITIONS IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM INFERRED FROM THE INITIAL ABUNDANCE OF {sup 10}Be IN ISHEYEVO CAIs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for short-lived {sup 10}Be in 21 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from Isheyevo, a rare CB/CH chondrite, showed that only 5 CAIs had {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B ratios higher than chondritic correlating with the elemental ratio {sup 9}Be/{sup 11}B, suggestive of in situ decay of this key short-lived radionuclide. The initial ({sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be){sub 0} ratios vary between {approx}10{sup -3} and {approx}10{sup -2} for CAI 411. The initial ratio of CAI 411 is one order of magnitude higher than the highest ratio found in CV3 CAIs, suggesting that the more likely origin of CAI 411 {sup 10}Be is early solar system irradiation. The low ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al){sub 0} [{<=} 8.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}] with which CAI 411 formed indicates that it was exposed to gradual flares with a proton fluence of a few 10{sup 19} protons cm{sup -2}, during the earliest phases of the solar system, possibly the infrared class 0. The irradiation conditions for other CAIs are less well constrained, with calculated fluences ranging between a few 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} protons cm{sup -2}. The variable and extreme value of the initial {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios in carbonaceous chondrite CAIs is the reflection of the variable and extreme magnetic activity in young stars observed in the X-ray domain.

Gounelle, Matthieu [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et de Cosmochimie du Museum, CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, CP52, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75005 Paris (France); Chaussidon, Marc; Rollion-Bard, Claire, E-mail: gounelle@mnhn.fr [Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques, CRPG-CNRS, BP 20, F-54501 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

SEARCH FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN VERY-HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS AND GIANT RADIO PULSES IN THE CRAB PULSAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays (E {sub {gamma}} > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On {approx}8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Federici, S., E-mail: schroedter@veritas.sao.arizona.edu, E-mail: mccann@kicp.uchicago.edu, E-mail: nepomuk.otte@gmail.com [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F. [German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig (Germany)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

SS 383: A NEW S-TYPE YELLOW SYMBIOTIC STAR?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Symbiotic stars are key objects in understanding the formation and evolution of interacting binary systems, and are probably the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. However, the number of known symbiotic stars is much lower than predicted. We aim to search for new symbiotic stars, with particular emphasis on the S-type yellow symbiotic stars, in order to determine their total population, evolutionary timescales, and physical properties. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) color-color diagram has been previously used to identify new symbiotic star candidates and show that yellow symbiotics are located in a particular region of that diagram. Candidate symbiotic stars are selected on the basis of their locus in the 2MASS (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) diagram and the presence of H? line emission in the Stephenson and Sanduleak H? survey. This diagram separates S-type yellow symbiotic stars from the rest of the S-type symbiotic stars, allowing us to select candidate yellow symbiotics. To establish the true nature of the candidates, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy is obtained. We have identified the H? emission line source SS 383 as an S-type yellow symbiotic candidate by its position in the 2MASS color-color diagram. The optical spectrum of SS 383 shows Balmer, He I, He II, and [O III] emission lines, in combination with TiO absorption bands that confirm its symbiotic nature. The derived electron density (?10{sup 8-9} cm{sup –3}), He I emission line intensity ratios, and position in the [O III] ?5007/H? versus [O III] ?4363/H? diagram indicate that SS 383 is an S-type symbiotic star, with a probable spectral type of K7-M0 deduced for its cool component based on TiO indices. The spectral type and the position of SS 383 (corrected for reddening) in the 2MASS color-color diagram strongly suggest that SS 383 is an S-type yellow symbiotic. Our result points out that the 2MASS color-color diagram is a powerful tool in identifying new S-type yellow symbiotics.

Baella, N. O.; Pereira, C. B. [Observatório Nacional, Rua José Cristino 77, CEP 20921-400, São Cristóvão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Miranda, L. F. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Institutional, Retrospective Analysis of 777 Patients With Brain Metastases: Treatment Outcomes and Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the prognostic factors and survival of a series of 777 patients with brain metastases (BM) from a single institution. Methods and Materials: Patients were treated with surgery followed by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or with WBRT alone in 16.3% and 83.7% of the cases, respectively. The patients were RPA (recursive partitioning analysis) class I, II, and III in 11.2%, 69.6%, and 18.4% of the cases, respectively; RPA class II-a, II-b, and II-c in 8.3%, 24.8%, and 66.9% of the cases, respectively; and with GPA (graded prognostic assessment) scores of 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0 in 35%, 27.5%, 18.2%, and 8.6% of the cases, respectively. Results: The median overall survival (OS) times according to RPA class I, II, and III were 20.1, 5.1, and 1.3 months, respectively (P<.0001); according to RPA class II-a, II-b, II-c: 9.1, 8.9, and 4.0 months, respectively (P<.0001); and according to GPA score 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0: 2.5, 4.4, 9.0, and 19.1 months, respectively (P<.0001). By multivariate analysis, the favorable independent prognostic factors for survival were as follows: for gastrointestinal tumor, a high Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (P=.0003) and an absence of extracranial metastases (ECM) (P=.003); for kidney cancer, few BM (P=.002); for melanoma, few BM (P=.01), an absence of ECM (P=.002), and few ECM (P=.0002); for lung cancer, age (P=.007), a high KPS (P<.0001), an absence of ECM (P<.0001), few ECM and BM (P<.0001 and P=.0006, respectively), and control of the primary tumor (P=.004); and for breast cancer, age (P=.001), a high KPS (P=.007), control of the primary tumor (P=.05), and few ECM and BM (P=.01 and P=.0002, respectively). The triple-negative subtype was a significant unfavorable factor (P=.007). Conclusion: Prognostic factors varied by pathology. Our analysis confirms the strength of prognostic factors used to determine the GPA score, including the genetic subtype for breast cancer.

Antoni, Delphine, E-mail: Dantoni@strasbourg.unicancer.fr [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France)] [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France); Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Pop, Marius; Schumacher, Catherine [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France)] [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France); Lefebvre, François [Biostatistics Department, Strasbourg University, Strasbourg (France)] [Biostatistics Department, Strasbourg University, Strasbourg (France); Noël, Georges [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France)] [Radiotherapy Department, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, Strasbourg (France)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development and Application of an Oversize Reusable DOT 7A Type A Overpack Container at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Management personnel at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) are concluding a multi-year effort to dispose of a large backlog of low-level waste. Six containers presented a particularly difficult technical challenge in that they each contained large robust equipment (mostly salt baths) with elevated levels of highly enriched uranium (exceeding U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) fissile-excepted quantities). The equipment was larger than the standard 1.2 m x 1.2 m x 1.8 m (4 ft x 4 ft x 6 ft) DOT Specification 7A Type A box and would have been very difficult to size-reduce because of several inches of steel plate (along with insulating block and concrete) in the equipment design. A critical breakthrough for the success of the project involved procuring and developing two oversize reusable DOT Specification 7A Type A (fissile tested) containers (referred to as the CTI Model 7AF-690-SC) that could be used as overpacks for the original boxes of equipment. The 7A Type A overpack containers are approximately 3.5 m long x 2.7 m wide x 2.8 m high (11.7 ft x 8.9 ft x 9.2 ft) with a maximum gross weight of 10,660 kg (23,500 lb) and a payload capacity of 6,804 kg (15,000 lbs). The boxes were designed and fabricated using a split cavity design that allowed the gasketed and bolted closure to lie along the horizontal centerline of the box. The central closure location in this design allows for strengthening of box corners that tend to be points of weakness or failure in 49CFR173.465 drop tests. By combining the split cavity design with large diameter tubing and diagonal cross bracing, drop test requirements of 49CFR173.465(1) and (2) were met and demonstrated through finite element analysis modeling. The development and use of this new container dramatically reduced the need for down-sizing the equipment and allowed the project to meet objectives within cost and schedule targets. (authors)

Tharp, Tim [B and W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [B and W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Martin, David [Container Technologies Industries, LLC, Helenwood, TN 37755 (United States)] [Container Technologies Industries, LLC, Helenwood, TN 37755 (United States); Franco, Paul [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The RERTR Program : a status report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners since its inception in 1978. A brief summary of the results that the program had attained by the end of 1997 is followed by a detailed review of the major events, findings, and activities that took place in 1998. The past year was characterized by exceptionally important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments of spent fuel from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 2,231 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Fuel development activities began to yield solid results. Irradiations of the first two batches of microplates were completed. Preliminary postirradiation examinations of these microplates indicate excellent irradiation behavior of some of the fuel materials that were tested. These materials hold the promise of achieving the pro am goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium density in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Progress was made in the Russian RERTR program, which aims to develop and demonstrate the technical means needed to convert Russian-supplied research reactors to LEU fuels. Feasibility studies for converting to LEU fuel four Russian-designed research reactors (IR-8 in Russia, Budapest research reactor in Hungary, MARIA in Poland, and WWR-SM in Uzbekistan) were completed. A new program activity began to study the feasibility of converting three Russian plutonium production reactors to the use of low-enriched U0{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, so that they can continue to produce heat and electricity without producing significant amounts of plutonium. The study of an alternative LEU core for the FRM-II design has been extended to address, with favorable results, the transient performance of the core under hypothetical accident conditions. A major milestone was accomplished in the development of a process to produce molybdenum-99 from fission targets utilizing LEU instead of HEU. Targets containing LEU metal foils were irradiated in the RAS-GAS reactor at BATAN, Indonesia, and molybdenum-99 was successfully extracted through the ensuing process. These are exciting times for the program and for all those involved in it, and last year's successes augur well for the future. However, as in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that have always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Reduction of a Redox-Active Ligand Drives Switching in a Cu(I) Pseudorotaxane by a Bimolecular Mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of a redox-active ligand is shown to drive reversible switching of a Cu(I) [2]pseudorotaxane ([2]PR{sup 2+}) into the reduced [3]pseudorotaxane ([3]PR{sup 2+}) by a bimolecular mechanism. The unreduced pseudorotaxanes [2]PR{sup 2+} and [3]PR{sup 2+} are initially self-assembled from the binucleating ligand, 3,6-bis(5-methyl-2-pyridine)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (Me2BPTZ), and a preformed copper-macrocycle moiety (Cu-M{sup 2+}) based on 1,10-phenanthroline. X-ray crystallography revealed a syn geometry of the [3]PR{sup 2+}. The UV-vis-NIR spectra show low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions that red shift from 808 nm for [2]PR{sup 2+} to 1088 nm for [3]PR{sup 2+}. Quantitative analysis of the UV-vis-NIR titration shows the stepwise formation constants to be K{sub 1} = 8.9 x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} and K{sub 2} = 3.1 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, indicative of negative cooperativity. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and coulometry of Me{sub 2}BPTZ, [2]PR{sup 2+}, and [3]PR{sup 2+} shows the one-electron reductions at E{sub 1/2} = -0.96, -0.65, and -0.285 V, respectively, to be stabilized in a stepwise manner by each Cu{sup 2+} ion. CVs of [2]PR{sup 2+} show changes with scan rate consistent with an EC mechanism of supramolecular disproportionation after reduction: [2]PR{sup 0} + [2]PR{sup 2+} = [3]PR{sup 2+} + Me{sub 2}BPTZ{sup 0} (K*{sub D}, k{sub d}). UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry was used to confirm the 1:1 product stoichiometry for [3]PR{sup 2+}:Me{sub 2}BPTZ. The driving force ({Delta}G*{sub D} = -5.1 kcal mol{sup -1}) for the reaction is based on the enhanced stability of the reduced [3]PR{sup 2+} over reduced [2]PR{sup 0} by 365 mV (8.4 kcal mol{sup -1}). Digital simulations of the CVs are consistent with a bimolecular pathway (k{sub d} = 12,000 s{sup -1} M{sup -1}). Confirmation of the mechanism provides a basis to extend this new switching modality to molecular machines.

McNitt, Kristy A.; Parimal, Kumar; Share, Andrew I.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Witlicki, Edward H.; Pink, Maren; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Plaisier, Christina L.; Le, Nga; Heeringa, Lee P.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; Flood, Amar H.; (Calvin); (Indiana)

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Operating experience with a liquid-hydrogen fueled Buick and refueling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of liquid-hydrogen storage and refueling systems for vehicular applications was made in a recently completed project. The vehicle used in the project was a 1979 Buick Century sedan with a 3.8-L displacement turbocharged V6 engine and an automatic transmission. The vehicle had a fuel economy for driving in the high altitude Los Alamos area that was equivalent to 2.4 km/L of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis. About 22% less energy was required using hydrogen rather than gasoline to go a given distance based on the Environmental Protection Agency estimate of 7.2 km/L of gasoline for this vehicle. At the end of the project the engine had been operated for 138 h and the car driven 3633 km during the 17 months that the vehicle was operated on hydrogen . Two types of onboard liquid-hydrogen storage tanks were tested in the vehicle: the first was an aluminum Dewar with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 110 L; the second was a Dewar with an aluminum outer vessel, two copper vapor-cooled thermal radiation shields, and a stainless steel inner vessel with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 155 L. The Buick had an unrefueled range of about 274 km with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km with the second. The Buick was fueled at least 65 times involving a minimum of 8.1 kL of liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and a semiautomatic refueling station. A refueling time of nine minutes was achieved, and liquid hydrogen losses during refueling were measured. The project has demonstrated that liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle, and its refueling, can be accomplished over an extended period without any major difficulties; nevertheless, appropriate testing is still needed to quantitatively address the question of safety for liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle.

Stewart, W.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5? + 0.7 ?, where ? and ? were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, ?0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, ?0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup difference in any direction. Conclusions: Daily random setup errors and CTV-to-PTV margins for treatment of head-and-neck cancer were affected by imaging quality. Our data indicated that larger margins were associated with MVFBCT and MVCBCT, compared with smaller margins for KVCBCT. IGRT modalities with better image quality are encouraged in clinical practice.

Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hu, Angie Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Lee, Steve P.; Lee, Percy; DeMarco, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David of Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Radiographic and Histopathologic Observations After Combined EGFR Inhibition and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the radiographic and histopathologic changes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas were treated on a prospective Phase I trial combining SRS and gefitinib. The SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy in three fractions. The planning target volume was the T{sub 1}-weighted contrast-enhancing (T{sub 1}C) lesion plus 2 mm. Gefitinib was given at 250 mg daily. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed to characterize the volumetric changes in the T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} abnormalities after treatment. Two patients underwent resection for suspected recurrence. Results: The median pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} volume was 40.9 and 184.1 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The median post-SRS percentage of increases in the T{sub 1}C volume at 1, 2-4, and 5-7 months was 8.9%, 41.3%, and 99.6%, respectively. The median percentage increase in the T{sub 2} volume likewise showed a trend upward after SRS, from 18.0% at 1 month to 37.8% at 5-7 months. For the 2 patients who underwent resection after SRS for an increasing T{sub 1}C volume, the histopathologic analysis revealed therapy-induced vascular injury and necrosis. One patient with an asymptomatic increase in the T{sub 1}C volume after SRS was treated conservatively. After a peak T{sub 1}C volume increase at 9 months, the T{sub 1}C volume had declined to 50% of the maximal volume at 15 months. The patients with the most dramatic increase in T{sub 1}C volume experienced the longest overall survival. Conclusion: Patients experienced a notable increase in magnetic resonance imaging T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} volumes after the combination of SRS and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition. The tissue changes were consistent with a potent treatment effect.

Schwer, Amanda L.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; McCammon, Robert; Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Kleinschmidt-De Masters, B.K. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@UCDenver.edu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

DISCOVERY OF AN ENERGETIC PULSAR ASSOCIATED WITH SNR G76.9+1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of PSR J2022+3842, a 24 ms radio and X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant G76.9+1.0, in observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope, and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The pulsar's spin-down rate implies a rotation-powered luminosity E-dot = 1.2x10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, a surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 1.0 x 10{sup 12} G, and a characteristic age of 8.9 kyr. PSR J2022+3842 is thus the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab pulsar, as well as the most rapidly rotating young, radio-bright pulsar known. The radio pulsations are highly dispersed and broadened by interstellar scattering, and we find that a large ({delta}f/f {approx} 1.9 x 10{sup -6}) spin glitch must have occurred between our discovery and confirmation observations. The X-ray pulses are narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) and visible up to 20 keV, consistent with magnetospheric emission from a rotation-powered pulsar. The Chandra X-ray image identifies the pulsar with a hard, unresolved source at the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology of G76.9+1.0 and embedded within faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. The spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to the extended structure seen around the Vela pulsar. The combined Chandra and RXTE pulsar spectrum is well fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N{sub H} = (1.7 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} and photon index {Gamma} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2; this implies that the Chandra point-source flux is virtually 100% pulsed. For a distance of 10 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of PSR J2022+3842 is L{sub X}(2-10 keV) = 7.0 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. Despite being extraordinarily energetic, PSR J2022+3842 lacks a bright X-ray wind nebula and has an unusually low conversion efficiency of spin-down power to X-ray luminosity, L{sub X}/ E-dot = 5.9x10{sup -5}.

Arzoumanian, Z. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Safi-Harb, S. [Canada Research Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L., E-mail: Zaven.Arzoumanian@nasa.gov [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Box 248, Penticton, BC, V2A 6J9 (Canada)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Helical Tomotherapy for Whole-Brain Irradiation With Integrated Boost to Multiple Brain Metastases: Evaluation of Dose Distribution Characteristics and Comparison With Alternative Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dose distribution characteristics achieved with helical tomotherapy (HT) for whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) with integrated boost (IB) to multiple brain metastases in comparison with alternative techniques. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions for 23 patients with 81 metastases treated with WBRT (30 Gy/10 fractions) and IB (50 Gy) were analyzed. The median number of metastases per patient (N{sub mets}) was 3 (range, 2-8). Mean values of the composite planning target volume of all metastases per patient (PTV{sub mets}) and of the individual metastasis planning target volume (PTV{sub ind} {sub met}) were 8.7 ± 8.9 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.3-35.5 cm{sup 3}) and 2.5 ± 4.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.19-24.7 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Dose distributions in PTV{sub mets} and PTV{sub ind} {sub met} were evaluated with respect to dose conformity (conformation number [CN], RTOG conformity index [PITV]), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity (homogeneity index [HI], ratio of maximum dose to prescription dose [MDPD]). The dependence of dose conformity on target size and N{sub mets} was investigated. The dose distribution characteristics were benchmarked against alternative irradiation techniques identified in a systematic literature review. Results: Mean ± standard deviation of dose distribution characteristics derived for PTV{sub mets} amounted to CN = 0.790 ± 0.101, PITV = 1.161 ± 0.154, TC = 0.95 ± 0.01, HI = 0.142 ± 0.022, and MDPD = 1.147 ± 0.029, respectively, demonstrating high dose conformity with acceptable homogeneity. Corresponding numbers for PTV{sub ind} {sub met} were CN = 0.708 ± 0.128, PITV = 1.174 ± 0.237, TC = 0.90 ± 0.10, HI = 0.140 ± 0.027, and MDPD = 1.129 ± 0.030, respectively. The target size had a statistically significant influence on dose conformity to PTV{sub mets} (CN = 0.737 for PTV{sub mets} ?4.32 cm{sup 3} vs CN = 0.848 for PTV{sub mets} >4.32 cm{sup 3}, P=.006), in contrast to N{sub mets}. The achieved dose conformity to PTV{sub mets}, assessed by both CN and PITV, was in all investigated volume strata well within the best quartile of the values reported for alternative irradiation techniques. Conclusions: HT is a well-suited technique to deliver WBRT with IB to multiple brain metastases, yielding high-quality dose distributions. A multi-institutional prospective randomized phase 2 clinical trial to exploit efficacy and safety of the treatment concept is currently under way.

Levegrün, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.levegruen@uni-due.de [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Pöttgen, Christoph; Wittig, Andrea; Lübcke, Wolfgang; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Stuschke, Martin [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Applied & Computational MathematicsChallenges for the Design and Control of Dynamic Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was passed with the goal 'to move the United States toward greater energy independence and security.' Energy security and independence cannot be achieved unless the United States addresses the issue of energy consumption in the building sector and significantly reduces energy consumption in buildings. Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 40% of the U.S. energy consumption and emit 50% of CO{sub 2} emissions in the U.S. which is more than twice the total energy consumption of the entire U.S. automobile and light truck fleet. A 50%-80% improvement in building energy efficiency in both new construction and in retrofitting existing buildings could significantly reduce U.S. energy consumption and mitigate climate change. Reaching these aggressive building efficiency goals will not happen without significant Federal investments in areas of computational and mathematical sciences. Applied and computational mathematics are required to enable the development of algorithms and tools to design, control and optimize energy efficient buildings. The challenge has been issued by the U.S. Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu (emphasis added): 'We need to do more transformational research at DOE including computer design tools for commercial and residential buildings that enable reductions in energy consumption of up to 80 percent with investments that will pay for themselves in less than 10 years.' On July 8-9, 2010 a team of technical experts from industry, government and academia were assembled in Arlington, Virginia to identify the challenges associated with developing and deploying newcomputational methodologies and tools thatwill address building energy efficiency. These experts concluded that investments in fundamental applied and computational mathematics will be required to build enabling technology that can be used to realize the target of 80% reductions in energy consumption. In addition the finding was that there are tools and technologies that can be assembled and deployed in the short term - the next 3-5 years - that can be used to significantly reduce the cost and time effective delivery of moderate energy savings in the U.S. building stock. Simulation tools, which are a core strength of current DOE computational research programs, provide only a part of the answer by providing a basis for simulation enabled design. New investments will be required within a broad dynamics and control research agenda which must focus on dynamics, control, optimization and simulation of multi-scale energy systems during design and operation. U.S. investments in high performance and high productivity computing (HP2C) should be leveraged and coupled with advances in dynamics and control to impact both the existing building stock through retrofits and also new construction. The essential R&D areas requiring investment are: (1) Characterizing the Dynamics of Multi-scale Energy Systems; (2) Control and Optimization Methodologies of Multi-scale Energy Systems Under Uncertainty; and (3) Multiscale Modeling and Simulation Enabled Design and Operation. The concept of using design and control specific computational tools is a new idea for the building industry. The potential payoffs in terms of accelerated design cycle times, performance optimization and optimal supervisory control to obtain and maintain energy savings are huge. Recent advances in computational power, computer science, and mathematical algorithms offer the foundations to address the control problems presented by the complex dynamics of whole building systems. The key areas for focus and associated metrics with targets for establishing competitiveness in energy efficient building design and operation are: (1) Scalability - Current methodology and tools can provide design guidance for very low energy buildings in weeks to months; what is needed is hours to days. A 50X improvement is needed. (2) Installation and commissioning - Current methodology and tools can target a three month window for commissioni

Brown, D L; Burns, J A; Collis, S; Grosh, J; Jacobson, C A; Johansen, H; Mezic, I; Narayanan, S; Wetter, M

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced 1,2 . The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils 3 and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin?s daily production.4 There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO2 projects when coupled together. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology in Louisiana-Texas Gulf-coast sandstone reservoirs 5,6 . Application seems to mostly confine itself to low pressure sandstone reservoirs 7 . The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils 8,9 . A review of earlier literature 5,10,11 provides an excellent discussion on the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. Although the technology is proven in light oil sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. However, the theories associated with the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process are not lithology dependent. It was anticipated that this project would show that the application of the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates could be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project were the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential.

Mark Kovar; Scott Wehner

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Preliminary Cost Study of the Dual Mode Inverter Controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) started a program to investigate alternate field weakening schemes for permanent magnet (PM) motors. The adjective ''alternate'' was used because at that time, outside research emphasis was on motors with interior-mounted PMs (IPMs). The PEEMRC emphasis was placed on motors with surface-mounted PMs (SPMs) because of the relative ease of manufacturing SPM motors compared with the IPM motors. Today the PEEMRC is continuing research on SPMs while examining the IPMs that have been developed by industry. Out of this task--the goal of which was to find ways to drive PM motors that inherently have low inductance at high speeds where their back-emf exceeds the supply voltage--ORNL developed and demonstrated the dual mode inverter control (DMIC) [1,2] method of field weakening for SPM motors. The predecessor of DMIC is conventional phase advance (CPA), which was developed by UQM Technologies, Inc. [3]. Fig. 1 shows the three sets of anti-parallel thyristors in the dashed box that comprise the DMIC. If one removes the dashed box by shorting each set of anti-parallel thyristors, the configuration becomes a conventional full bridge inverter on the left driving a three phase motor on the right. CPA may be used to drive this configuration ORNL's initial analyses of CPA and DMIC were based on driving motors with trapezoidal back-emfs [4-6], obtained using double layer lapped stator windings with one slot per pole per phase. A PM motor with a sinusoidal back-emf obtained with two poles per slot per phase has been analyzed under DMIC operation as a University of Tennessee-Knoxville (UTK) doctoral dissertation [7]. In the process of this research, ORNL has completed an analysis that explains and quantifies the role of inductance in these methods of control. The Appendix includes information on the equations for the three components of phase inductance, L{sub gap}, L{sub slot}, and L{sub endturns}. PM motors inherently have a lower inductance because of the increase in effective air gap caused by the magnet, which is in the denominator of the equation for L{sub gap}. L{sub gap} accounts for about half of the phase inductance. Because of the low inductance, there is a propensity for currents to exceed the motor's rated value. DMIC solves this problem for low-inductance PM motors and, in addition, provides a number of safety features that protect against uncontrolled generator mode operation [8,9]; however, the DMIC topology adds a pair of anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three phases, thereby introducing additional silicon costs as well as additional voltage drops during operation. It poses the tradeoff question; under what conditions can the beneficial features of DMIC offset its additional silicon cost and voltage drop losses? The purpose of this report is to address the tradeoff question. Sections of the report will: (1) review the role of self-inductance in performance and control of PM motors, (2) discuss the bounding inductances for motors with trapezoidal back-emfs under CPA control, (3) discuss the bounding inductances for trapezoidal back-emfs under DMIC, (4) discuss the bounding inductances for the PM synchronous motor (PMSM), (5) present the analysis showing how DMIC minimizes current in PMSMs, (6) present the results of a cost study conducted for two motors driven using a CPA inverter and for two motors driven using DMIC, (7) discuss estimating life cycle cost benefits, and (8) present conclusions.

McKeever, J.W.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Customized Dose Prescription for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Insights From a Multicenter Analysis of Dosimetry Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rate in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologically effective dose (BED) and risk group. Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 3,928 permanent brachytherapy patients with postimplant dosimetry results. The mean prostate-specific antigen level was 8.9 ng/mL. {sup 125}I was used in 2,293 (58%), {sup 103}Pd in 1,635, and supplemental external beam radiotherapy in 882 (22.5%) patients. The patients were stratified into low- (n = 2,188), intermediate- (n = 1,188), and high- (n = 552) risk groups and into three BED groups of < 140 Gy (n = 524), 140-200 Gy (n = 2284), and >200 Gy (n = 1,115). Freedom from biochemical disease progression (biochemical freedom from failure [bFFF]) was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions and calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors compared using the log-rank test. Results: The 10-year prostate-specific antigen bFFF rate for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions was 79.2% and 70%, respectively. The corresponding bFFF rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 84.1% and 78.1%, 76.8% and 63.6%, and 64.4% and 58.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the three BED groups was 56.1% and 41.4%, 80% and 77.9%, and 91.1% and 82.9% (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the low-risk patients by dose group was 69.8% and 49.8%, 86% and 85.2%, and 88.1% and 88.3% for the low-, intermediate, and high-dose group, respectively (p <0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the intermediate-risk patients by dose group was 52.9% and 23.1%, 74.1% and 77.7%, and 94.3% and 88.8% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for high-risk patients by dose group was 19.2% and 41.7%, 61.8% and 53.2%, and 90% and 69.6% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: These data suggest that permanent brachytherapy dose prescriptions can be customized to risk status. In low-risk patients, achieving a BED of {>=}140 Gy might be adequate for prostate-specific antigen control. However, high-risk disease might require a BED dose of {>=}200 Gy.

Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute at South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. B.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z