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Sample records for 703-605-6000 1-800-553-6847 tdd

  1. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Rd Alexandra, VA 22312 www.ntis.gov Phone: (800) 553-NTIS (6847) or (703) 605-6000 Fax: (703) 605-6900 Email:...

  2. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... TDD, Post Closure Administration and Community and ... Continue closure activities of two tanks at Savannah River Site. ... and Immobilization Plant - Richland, WA Hanford's ...

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (2003) Savannah River Salt Waste Processing Facility ... Support, TDD, Post Closure Administration and Community and Regulatory ...

  4. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  5. EM's Budget Outlook by Terry Tyborowski

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pad. Nevada WVDP Moab SPRU TD&D Prog. Support ETEC BRNL Sandia SLAC Other LLNL EM Total FY ... Savannah River Oak Ridge Idaho Paducah Portsmouth WIPP Moab WVDP Brookhaven ETEC Los ...

  6. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  7. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/081.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 From: Tom Fitzsimmons STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, Washington 98504-7600 (360) 407-6000 TDD Only (Hearing Impaired) (360) 407-6006...

  8. WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL NUCLEAR SAFETY RELATED R AND D REPORT FOR CY2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-10-15

    The Engineering and Technology Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks associated with key waste processing project decisions. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment (TDD). The Office of Waste Processing TDD program prioritizes and approves research and development scopes of work that address nuclear safety related to processing of highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Thirteen of the thirty-five R&D approved work scopes in FY2009 relate directly to nuclear safety, and are presented in this report.

  9. Accommodations for Hearing Disabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hearing Disabilities Accommodations for Hearing Disabilities hearing-41429_960_720.png The Department offers a variety of accommodations to individuals with hearing disabilities. Available computer and telecommunications access products include: Visual Redundancy on Computers Interpreter Hearing Aid Compatible Phones Speech Amplification Telephone Speech Amplification, Meeting or Conversation. Teletypewriter (TTY) or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) TTY with refreshable braille

  10. Accomp_24X30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hearing Disabilities Accommodations for Hearing Disabilities hearing-41429_960_720.png The Department offers a variety of accommodations to individuals with hearing disabilities. Available computer and telecommunications access products include: Visual Redundancy on Computers Interpreter Hearing Aid Compatible Phones Speech Amplification Telephone Speech Amplification, Meeting or Conversation. Teletypewriter (TTY) or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) TTY with refreshable braille

  11. Microsoft Word - DOE Comment Letter.FINAL.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    / 6 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW CENTER INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC REPRESENTATION 600 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Suite 312 Washington, DC 20001-2075 Telephone: 202-662-9535 TDD: 202-662-9538 Fax: 202-662-9634 January 8, 2006 Anthony J. Como SEA Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: Comments on Department of Energy's Special Environmental Analysis Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, VA Dear Mr. Como: The

  12. This report has been photostated to fill YOU request as our sup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (GPO). Information about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or, telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours appear below: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC

  13. This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governm

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (GPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers and hours appear below. National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(89/4Q) SHOKT-TERM

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4Q) SHOKT-TERM t . t QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (QPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers and hours

  15. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this GaN-ready substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a GaN-ready substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  16. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTIUTINS IE DE-AC27-08RV14800/071 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Account code: De-obligating TDD funds for Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Fund 01250 Appr Year 2010 Ailottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Ciass 25200 Program 1111412 Project 0004263 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 Amount:

  17. Notices Ave. SW., Room 3E207, Washington, DC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5295 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 55 / Tuesday, March 22, 2016 / Notices Ave. SW., Room 3E207, Washington, DC 20202. Telephone: (202) 453-6891 or by email: ddra@ed.gov. If you use a TDD or a TTY, call the FRS, toll free, at 1-800-877-8339. If you request an application from ED Pubs, be sure to identify this program as follows: CFDA number 84.022A. VIII. Other Information Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document and a copy of the application package in an

  18. CONTINUATON SHEETREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINUATON SHEETREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTNUTO SETDE-AC27-08RV14800/070 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) De-obligating WEPS TDD funds for ATL Aluminum Solubility Sample Analysis Fund 01250 Appr Year 2009 Allottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25200 Program 1110676 Project 0004022 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 Amount: -$3,155.93

  19. Record of Decision; Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    89 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 70 / Wednesday, April 12, 1995 / Notices who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 7705. Dated: April 5, 1995. Thomas W. Payzant, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. [FR Doc. 95-8927 Filed 4-11-95; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M Advisory Council on Education

  20. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  1. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-04-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded Technology Development and Deployment (TDD) to solve technical problems associated with waste tank closure for sites such as Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the tasks supported by this funding at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) was In-Tank Elutriation. Elutriation is the process whereby physical separation occurs based on particle size and density. This report satisfies the first phase of Task WP_1.3.1.1 In-Tank Elutriation, which is to assess the feasibility of this method of separation in waste tanks at Hanford Site and SRS. This report includes an analysis of scoping tests performed in the Engineering Development Laboratory of SRNL, analysis of Hanford's inadvertent elutriation, the viability of separation methods such as elutriation and hydrocyclones and recommendations for a path forward. This report will demonstrate that the retrieval of Hanford salt waste tank S-112 very successfully decreased the tank's inventories of radionuclides. Analyses of samples collected from the tank showed that concentrations of the major radionuclides Cs-136 and Sr-90 were decreased by factors of 250 and 6 and their total curie tank inventories decreased by factors of 60,000 and 2000. The total tank curie loading decreased from 300,000 Ci to 55 Ci. The remaining heel was nearly all innocuous gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. However, in the process of tank retrieval approximately 85% of the tank gibbsite was also removed. Significant amounts of money and processing time could be saved if more gibbsite could be left in tanks while still removing nearly all of the radionuclides. There were factors which helped to make the elutriation of Tank S-112 successful which would not necessarily be present in all salt tanks. 1. The gibbsite particles in the tank were surprisingly large, as much as 200 {micro}m. The gibbsite crystals had probably grown in size over a period of decades. 2. The radionuclides were apparently either in the form of soluble compounds, like cesium, or micrometer sized particles of actinide oxides or hydroxides. 3. After the initial tank retrieval the tank contained cobble which is not conducive to elutriation. Only after the tank contents were treated with thousands of gallons of 50 wt% caustic, were the solids converted to sand which is compatible with elutriation. Discussions between SRNL and PNNL resulted in plans to test elutriation in two phases; in Phase 1 particles would be separated by differences in settling velocity in an existing scaled tank with its associated hardware and in Phase 2 additional hardware, such as a hydrocyclone, would be added downstream to separate slow settling partciels from liquid. Phase 1 of in-tank elutriation was tested for Proof of Principle in theEngineering Development Laboratory of SRNL in a 41" diameter, 87 gallon tank. The tank had been previously used as a 1/22 scale model of Hanford Waste Tank AY-102. The objective of the testing was to determine which tank operating parameters achieved the best separation between fast- and slow-settling particles. For Phase 1 testing a simulated waste tank supernatant, slow-settling particles and fast-settling particles were loaded to the scaled tank. Because this was a Proof of Principle test, readily available solids particles were used that represented fast-settling and slow-settling particles. The tank contents were agitated using rotating mixer jet pumps (MJP) which suspended solids while liquids and solids were drawn out of the tank with a suction tube. The goal was to determine the optimum hydraulic operating conditions to achieve clean separation in which the residual solids in the tank were nearly all fast-settling particles and the solids transferred out of the tank were nearly all slow-settling particles. Tests were conducted at different pump jet velocities, suction tube diameters and suction tube elevations. Testing revealed that the most important variable was jet velocity which translates to a d