National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 70-2011 estimates state

  1. Distribution System State Estimation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This Notice shall be affixed to any reproductions of these data in whole or in part. Executive Summary State estimation is a key enabler for any number of "smart grid" applications ...

  2. State Energy Production Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Production Estimates 1960 Through 2012 2012 Summary Tables Table P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2012 Alabama 19,455 215,710 9,525 0 Alaska 2,052 351,259...

  3. Grid State Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-10-09

    This software code is designed to track generator state variables in real time using the Ensemble Kalman Filter method with the aid of PMU measurements. This code can also be used to calibrate dynamic model parameters by augmenting parameters in the state variable vector.

  4. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  5. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  6. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  7. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  8. Parallel State Estimation Assessment with Practical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Rice, Mark J.; Huang, Zhenyu

    2014-10-31

    This paper presents a full-cycle parallel state estimation (PSE) implementation using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. The developed code is able to solve large-size power system state estimation within 5 seconds using real-world data, comparable to the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) rate. This achievement allows the operators to know the system status much faster to help improve grid reliability. Case study results of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) system with real measurements are presented. The benefits of fast state estimation are also discussed.

  9. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  10. Sub-Second Parallel State Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Wang, Shaobu; Huang, Zhenyu

    2014-10-31

    This report describes the performance of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) sub-second parallel state estimation (PSE) tool using the utility data from the Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) and discusses the benefits of the fast computational speed for power system applications. The test data were provided by BPA. They are two-days’ worth of hourly snapshots that include power system data and measurement sets in a commercial tool format. These data are extracted out from the commercial tool box and fed into the PSE tool. With the help of advanced solvers, the PSE tool is able to solve each BPA hourly state estimation problem within one second, which is more than 10 times faster than today’s commercial tool. This improved computational performance can help increase the reliability value of state estimation in many aspects: (1) the shorter the time required for execution of state estimation, the more time remains for operators to take appropriate actions, and/or to apply automatic or manual corrective control actions. This increases the chances of arresting or mitigating the impact of cascading failures; (2) the SE can be executed multiple times within time allowance. Therefore, the robustness of SE can be enhanced by repeating the execution of the SE with adaptive adjustments, including removing bad data and/or adjusting different initial conditions to compute a better estimate within the same time as a traditional state estimator’s single estimate. There are other benefits with the sub-second SE, such as that the PSE results can potentially be used in local and/or wide-area automatic corrective control actions that are currently dependent on raw measurements to minimize the impact of bad measurements, and provides opportunities to enhance the power grid reliability and efficiency. PSE also can enable other advanced tools that rely on SE outputs and could be used to further improve operators’ actions and automated controls to mitigate effects of severe events on the grid. The power grid continues to grow and the number of measurements is increasing at an accelerated rate due to the variety of smart grid devices being introduced. A parallel state estimation implementation will have better performance than traditional, sequential state estimation by utilizing the power of high performance computing (HPC). This increased performance positions parallel state estimators as valuable tools for operating the increasingly more complex power grid.

  11. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  12. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  13. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  14. A Testbed for Deploying Distributed State Estimation in Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian

    2012-07-22

    Abstract—With the increasing demand, scale and data information of power systems, fast distributed applications are becoming more important in power system operation and control. This paper proposes a testbed for evaluating power system distributed applications, considering data exchange among distributed areas. A high-performance computing (HPC) version of distributed state estimation is implemented and used as a distributed application example. The IEEE 118-bus system is used to deploy the parallel distributed state estimation, and the MeDICi middleware is used for data communication. The performance of the testbed demonstrates its capability to evaluate parallel distributed state estimation by leveraging the HPC paradigm. This testbed can also be applied to evaluate other distributed applications.

  15. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis ...

  16. ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, W. F. Feltz, R. D. Knuteson, and D. D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois L. Strow University of Maryland College Park, Maryland C. Barnet Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology Baltimore, Maryland E. Fetzer National Aeronautics Space Administration Jet

  17. Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-04-01

    Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

  18. Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-12-12

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

  19. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

  20. Sub-second State Estimation Implementation and its Evaluation with Real Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-07-31

    This paper describes the performance of a parallel state estimation (PSE) tool implemented using advanced computing techniques. The developed code is able to solve state estimation of large-size, practical power systems within one second. Benchmark tests against a commercial tool shows that the computational speed is 10 times faster. Benefits brought by the sub-second state estimation are also discussed.

  1. Integration of remote measurement calibration with state estimation; A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adibi, M.M. ); Clements, K.A. ); Kafka, R.J. ); Stovall, J.P. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper describes the integration of measurement calibration and state estimation methodologies for increasing the confidence level in the real-time data base. The objectives are to improve performance of state estimators and to reduce the system engineering effort which goes into its installations and the related measurement calibrations.

  2. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  3. Load Modeling and State Estimation Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom McDermott

    2010-05-07

    The project objective was to provide robust state estimation for distribution systems, comparable to what has been available on transmission systems for decades. This project used an algorithm called Branch Current State Estimation (BCSE), which is more effective than classical methods because it decouples the three phases of a distribution system, and uses branch current instead of node voltage as a state variable, which is a better match to current measurement.

  4. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  5. Dynamic State Estimation and Parameter Calibration of DFIG based on Ensemble Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Rui; Huang, Zhenyu; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng; Meng, Da

    2015-07-30

    With the growing interest in the application of wind energy, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) plays an essential role in the industry nowadays. To deal with the increasing stochastic variations introduced by intermittent wind resource and responsive loads, dynamic state estimation (DSE) are introduced in any power system associated with DFIGs. However, sometimes this dynamic analysis canould not work because the parameters of DFIGs are not accurate enough. To solve the problem, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is proposed for the state estimation and parameter calibration tasks. In this paper, a DFIG is modeled and implemented with the EnKF method. Sensitivity analysis is demonstrated regarding the measurement noise, initial state errors and parameter errors. The results indicate this EnKF method has a robust performance on the state estimation and parameter calibration of DFIGs.

  6. Implementing nonquadratic objective functions for state estimation and bad data rejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldick, R.; Clements, K.A.; Pinjo-Dzigal, Z.; Davis, P.W.

    1997-02-01

    Using a nonquadratic objective function for network state estimation can combine several estimation and bad data rejection techniques into one algorithm; e.g., the benefits of maximum likelihood least squares estimation can be coupled with the bad data rejection properties of least absolute value estimation. For such estimators, the authors describe an efficient implementation, one that builds naturally on existing least squares software, that is based on an iterative Gauss-Newton solution of the KKT optimality conditions. The authors illustrate the behavior of a quadratic-linear and a quadratic-constant objective function on a set of test networks. The former is closely related to the Huber M-estimator. The latter shows somewhat better bad data rejection properties, perhaps because it arises from a natural model of meter failure.

  7. Integrated State Estimation and Contingency Analysis Software Implementation using High Performance Computing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Rice, Mark J.; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-31

    Power system simulation tools are traditionally developed in sequential mode and codes are optimized for single core computing only. However, the increasing complexity in the power grid models requires more intensive computation. The traditional simulation tools will soon not be able to meet the grid operation requirements. Therefore, power system simulation tools need to evolve accordingly to provide faster and better results for grid operations. This paper presents an integrated state estimation and contingency analysis software implementation using high performance computing techniques. The software is able to solve large size state estimation problems within one second and achieve a near-linear speedup of 9,800 with 10,000 cores for contingency analysis application. The performance evaluation is presented to show its effectiveness.

  8. Capturing Dynamics in the Power Grid: Formulation of Dynamic State Estimation through Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Meng, Da; Elbert, Stephen T.; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng

    2014-03-31

    With the increasing complexity resulting from uncertainties and stochastic variations introduced by intermittent renewable energy sources, responsive loads, mobile consumption of plug-in vehicles, and new market designs, more and more dynamic behaviors are observed in everyday power system operation. To operate a power system efficiently and reliably, it is critical to adopt a dynamic paradigm so that effective control actions can be taken in time. The dynamic paradigm needs to include three fundamental components: dynamic state estimation; look-ahead dynamic simulation; and dynamic contingency analysis (Figure 1). These three components answer three basic questions: where the system is; where the system is going; and how secure the system is against accidents. The dynamic state estimation provides a solid cornerstone to support the other 2 components and is the focus of this study.

  9. Estimation of the Dynamic States of Synchronous Machines Using an Extended Particle Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Meng, Da; Lu, Shuai

    2013-11-11

    In this paper, an extended particle filter (PF) is proposed to estimate the dynamic states of a synchronous machine using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. A PF propagates the mean and covariance of states via Monte Carlo simulation, is easy to implement, and can be directly applied to a non-linear system with non-Gaussian noise. The extended PF modifies a basic PF to improve robustness. Using Monte Carlo simulations with practical noise and model uncertainty considerations, the extended PFs performance is evaluated and compared with the basic PF and an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The extended PF results showed high accuracy and robustness against measurement and model noise.

  10. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results Austin Brown, Philipp Beiter, Donna Heimiller, Carolyn Davidson, Paul Denholm, Jennifer Melius, Anthony Lopez, Dylan Hettinger, David Mulcahy, and Gian Porro National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-64503 July 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable

  11. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results Austin Brown, Philipp Beiter, Donna Heimiller, Carolyn Davidson, Paul Denholm, Jennifer Melius, Anthony Lopez, Dylan Hettinger, David Mulcahy, and Gian Porro Webinar, 02/24/16 Philipp Beiter Energy Markets and Policy Analyst NREL Presenter: 2 PRELIMINARY - NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION, PUBLICATION, QUOTATION, OR CITATION Topics I. U.S. Renewable Energy Trends 1. Capacity and Generation 2. Capacity

  12. Table 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption, Expenditure, and Price Estimates, 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 State-Level Energy Consumption, Expenditure, and Price Estimates, 2010 Rank Consumption Consumption per Capita Expenditures 1 Expenditures 1 per Capita Prices 1 Trillion Btu Million Btu Million Dollars 2 Dollars 2 Dollars 2 per Million Btu 1 Texas 11,769.9 Wyoming 948.1 Texas 137,532 Alaska 8,807 Hawaii 30.75 2 California 7,825.7 Alaska 898.5 California 117,003 Louisiana 8,661 District of Columbia 26.19 3 Florida 4,381.9 Louisiana 894.4 New York 61,619 Wyoming 7,904 Connecticut 25.63 4

  13. Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Porro, C.; Augustine, C.; Roberts, B.

    2012-09-01

    Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties such as depth to basement and formation thickness are well known. The availability of this data reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin. This study estimates the magnitude of recoverable geothermal energy from 15 major known U.S. sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by (Muffler, 1979). A qualitative recovery factor was determined for each basin based on data on flow volume, hydrothermal recharge, and vertical and horizontal permeability. Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient information was gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data were insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission databases. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size, temperature distribution, and a probable quantitative recovery factor.

  14. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-30

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  15. Pre-Commercial Demonstration of Direct Non-Iterative State Estimator (DNSE+)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelic, Dino

    2015-04-24

    The objective of this DOE co-funded project is to demonstrate functionality and performance of a production-grade Direct Non-iterative State Estimator (DNSE) through its integration with NYPA’s Energy Management System (EMS) and an enhanced Real Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) synchrophasor platform from Electric Power Group (EPG). A production-grade DNSE aims to overcome a major obstacle to the operational use of synchrophasor data in Synchro-Phasor Management Systems (SPMS) by providing SPMS applications with a consistent and a complete synchrophasor data foundation in the same way that a traditional EMS State Estimator (SE) provides to EMS applications. Specifically, the DNSE uses synchrophasor measurements and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) measurements, together with the complete power system model, to simultaneously obtain the complete state of the entire utility’s operating model at rates that are close to the synchrophasor data rates. The full system coverage property is what distinguishes the DNSE from the linear synchrophasor SEs (which cover only parts of the operating model that are visible through synchrophasor measurements), and DNSE differs from traditional EMS SE in that the solution is obtained without iterations, without initial values (hence the “direct” in the name), and at a much higher execution rate. This presentation provides an overview of the project objectives, a brief description of the main tasks including the development work to productize and optimize DNSE from its current MATLAB code base, RTDMS enhancement for interfacing with the DNSE, factory acceptance testing, field installation, testing and demonstration, as well as the current status of the project execution.

  16. Steady state estimation of soil organic carbon using satellite-derived canopy leaf area index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-12-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a key role in the global carbon cycle that is important for decadal-to-century climate prediction. Estimation of soil organic carbon stock using model-based methods typically requires spin-up (time marching transient simulation) of the carbon-nitrogen (CN) models by performing hundreds to thousands years long simulations until the carbon-nitrogen pools reach dynamic steady-state. This has become a bottleneck for global modeling and analysis, especially when testing new physical and/or chemical mechanisms and evaluating parameter sensitivity. Here we report a new numerical approach to estimate global soil carbon stock that can avoid the long term spin-up of the CN model. The approach uses canopy leaf area index (LAI) from satellite data and takes advantage of a reaction-based biogeochemical module NGBGC (Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module) that was recently developed and incorporated in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Although NGBGC uses the same CN mechanisms as used in CLM4CN, it can be easily configured to run prognostic or steady state simulations. In this approach, monthly LAI from the multi-year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was used to calculate potential annual average gross primary production (GPP) and leaf carbon for the period of the atmospheric forcing. The calculated potential annual average GPP and leaf C are then used by NGBGC to calculate the steady-state distributions of carbon and nitrogen in different vegetation and soil pools by solving the steady-state reaction-network in NGBGC using the Newton-Raphson method. The new approach was applied at point and global scales and compared with SOC derived from long spin-up by running NGBGC in prognostic mode, and SOC from the empirical data of the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). The steady-state solution is comparable to the spin-up value when the MODIS LAI is close to the LAI from the spin-up solution, and largely captured the variability of the HWSD SOC across the different dominant plant functional types (PFTs) at global scale. The numerical correlation between the calculated and HWSD SOC was, however, weak at both point and global scales, suggesting that the models used in describing biogeochemical processes in CLM needs improvements and/or HWSD needs updating as suggested by other studies. Besides SOC, the steady state solution also includes all other state variables simulated by a spin-up run, such as NPP, GPP, total vegetation C etc., which makes the developed approach a promising tool to efficiently estimate global SOC distribution and evaluate and compare different aspects simulated by different CN mechanisms in the model.

  17. Steady state estimation of soil organic carbon using satellite-derived canopy leaf area index

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Yilin; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-12-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a key role in the global carbon cycle that is important for decadal-to-century climate prediction. Estimation of soil organic carbon stock using model-based methods typically requires spin-up (time marching transient simulation) of the carbon-nitrogen (CN) models by performing hundreds to thousands years long simulations until the carbon-nitrogen pools reach dynamic steady-state. This has become a bottleneck for global modeling and analysis, especially when testing new physical and/or chemical mechanisms and evaluating parameter sensitivity. Here we report a new numerical approach to estimate global soil carbon stock that can avoid the long term spin-up of themore » CN model. The approach uses canopy leaf area index (LAI) from satellite data and takes advantage of a reaction-based biogeochemical module NGBGC (Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module) that was recently developed and incorporated in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Although NGBGC uses the same CN mechanisms as used in CLM4CN, it can be easily configured to run prognostic or steady state simulations. In this approach, monthly LAI from the multi-year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was used to calculate potential annual average gross primary production (GPP) and leaf carbon for the period of the atmospheric forcing. The calculated potential annual average GPP and leaf C are then used by NGBGC to calculate the steady-state distributions of carbon and nitrogen in different vegetation and soil pools by solving the steady-state reaction-network in NGBGC using the Newton-Raphson method. The new approach was applied at point and global scales and compared with SOC derived from long spin-up by running NGBGC in prognostic mode, and SOC from the empirical data of the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). The steady-state solution is comparable to the spin-up value when the MODIS LAI is close to the LAI from the spin-up solution, and largely captured the variability of the HWSD SOC across the different dominant plant functional types (PFTs) at global scale. The numerical correlation between the calculated and HWSD SOC was, however, weak at both point and global scales, suggesting that the models used in describing biogeochemical processes in CLM needs improvements and/or HWSD needs updating as suggested by other studies. Besides SOC, the steady state solution also includes all other state variables simulated by a spin-up run, such as NPP, GPP, total vegetation C etc., which makes the developed approach a promising tool to efficiently estimate global SOC distribution and evaluate and compare different aspects simulated by different CN mechanisms in the model.« less

  18. WPN 00-4- Estimated 25% State Cost Share Requirement for the Weatherization Assistance Program for Program Year 2001

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide estimated figures for the states to begin their planning for the enacted 25% cost share requirement for funding of the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program beginning with Program Year 2001.

  19. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  20. Tracking shocked dust: State estimation for a complex plasma during a shock wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxtoby, Neil P.; Ralph, Jason F.; Durniak, Celine; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2012-01-15

    We consider a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma crystal excited by an electrostatically-induced shock wave. Dust particle kinematics in such a system are usually determined using particle tracking velocimetry. In this work we present a particle tracking algorithm which determines the dust particle kinematics with significantly higher accuracy than particle tracking velocimetry. The algorithm uses multiple extended Kalman filters to estimate the particle states and an interacting multiple model to assign probabilities to the different filters. This enables the determination of relevant physical properties of the dust, such as kinetic energy and kinetic temperature, with high precision. We use a Hugoniot shock-jump relation to calculate a pressure-volume diagram from the shocked dust kinematics. Calculation of the full pressure-volume diagram was possible with our tracking algorithm, but not with particle tracking velocimetry.

  1. Evaluation of Various Methods for Estimating Global Solar Radiation in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel O.

    2011-12-23

    Global solar radiation Rg is an important input for crop models to simulate crop responses. Because the scarcity of long and continuous records of Rg is a serious limitation in many countries, Rg is estimated using models. For crop-model application, empirical Rg models that use commonly measured meteorological variables, such as temperature and precipitation, are generally preferred. Although a large number of models of this kind exist, few have been evaluated for conditions in the United States. This study evaluated the performances of 16 empirical, temperature- and/or precipitation-based Rg models for the southeastern United States. By taking into account spatial distribution and data availability, 30 locations in the region were selected and their daily weather data spanning eight years obtained. One-half of the data was used for calibrating the models, and the other half was used for evaluation. For each model, location-specific parameter values were estimated through regressions. Models were evaluated for each location using the root-mean-square error and the modeling efficiency as goodness-of-fit measures. Among the models that use temperature or precipitation as the input variable, the Mavromatis model showed the best performance. The piecewise linear regression–based Wu et al. model (WP) performed best not only among the models that use both temperature and precipitation but also among the 16 models evaluated, mainly because it has separate relationships for low and high radiation levels. The modeling efficiency of WP was from ~5% to more than 100% greater than those of the other models, depending on models and locations.

  2. Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

  3. A Two-Stage Kalman Filter Approach for Robust and Real-Time Power System State Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinghe; Welch, Greg; Bishop, Gary; Huang, Zhenyu

    2014-04-01

    As electricity demand continues to grow and renewable energy increases its penetration in the power grid, realtime state estimation becomes essential for system monitoring and control. Recent development in phasor technology makes it possible with high-speed time-synchronized data provided by Phasor Measurement Units (PMU). In this paper we present a two-stage Kalman filter approach to estimate the static state of voltage magnitudes and phase angles, as well as the dynamic state of generator rotor angles and speeds. Kalman filters achieve optimal performance only when the system noise characteristics have known statistical properties (zero-mean, Gaussian, and spectrally white). However in practice the process and measurement noise models are usually difficult to obtain. Thus we have developed the Adaptive Kalman Filter with Inflatable Noise Variances (AKF with InNoVa), an algorithm that can efficiently identify and reduce the impact of incorrect system modeling and/or erroneous measurements. In stage one, we estimate the static state from raw PMU measurements using the AKF with InNoVa; then in stage two, the estimated static state is fed into an extended Kalman filter to estimate the dynamic state. Simulations demonstrate its robustness to sudden changes of system dynamics and erroneous measurements.

  4. Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate natural gas storage capacity that was released in 2006.

  5. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  6. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  7. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  8. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

    2009-06-01

    Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

  9. Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacity seems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. The report presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

  10. Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

    2006-11-01

    On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

  11. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  12. Distribution System State Estimation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... These all acknowledge government support through this project. All are available through IEEE Xplore. The project has fostered and supported many other collaborations: MultiSpeak ...

  13. Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Sanchez, Marla Christine; Brown, Richard; Homan, Gregory; Webber, Carrie

    2008-06-03

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2006, US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products saved 4.8 EJ of primary energy and avoided 82 Tg C equivalent. We project that US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products will save 12.8 EJ and avoid 203 Tg C equivalent over the period 2007-2015. A sensitivity analysis examining two key inputs (carbon factor and ENERGY STAR unit sales) bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 54 Tg C and 107 Tg C (1993 to 2006) and between 132 Tg C and 278 Tg C (2007 to 2015).

  14. A High-Speed, Real-Time Visualization and State Estimation Platform for Monitoring and Control of Electric Distribution Systems: Implementation and Field Results: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A High-Speed, Real-Time Visualization and State Estimation Platform for Monitoring and Control of Electric Distribution Systems: Implementation and Field Results Preprint B. Lundstrom, P. Gotseff, J. Giraldez, and M. Coddington National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2015 IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting Denver, Colorado July 26-30, 2015 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5D00-63260 April 2015 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance

  15. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomenpelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same precision and confidence.

  16. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  17. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  18. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  19. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  20. Electrochemical state and internal variables estimation using a reduced-order physics-based model of a lithium-ion cell and an extended Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzel, KD; Aldrich, LL; Trimboli, MS; Plett, GL

    2015-03-15

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the present value of electrochemical internal variables in a lithium-ion cell in real time, using readily available measurements of cell voltage, current, and temperature. The variables that can be estimated include any desired set of reaction flux and solid and electrolyte potentials and concentrations at any set of one-dimensional spatial locations, in addition to more standard quantities such as state of charge. The method uses an extended Kalman filter along with a one-dimensional physics-based reduced-order model of cell dynamics. Simulations show excellent and robust predictions having dependable error bounds for most internal variables. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  2. Estimates of mercury flux into the United States from non-local and global sources : results from a 3-D CTM simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Streets, D.; Kim, M.; Crist, K.; Ohio Univ.

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of Hg concentration and deposition in the United States to emissions in China was investigated by using a global chemical transport model: Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART). Two forms of gaseous Hg were included in the model: elemental Hg (HG(0)) and oxidized or reactive Hg (HGO). We simulated three different emission scenarios to evaluate the model's sensitivity. One scenario included no emissions from China, while the others were based on different estimates of Hg emissions in China. The results indicated, in general, that when Hg emissions were included, HG(0) concentrations increased both locally and globally. Increases in Hg concentrations in the United States were greatest during spring and summer, by as much as 7%. Ratios of calculated concentrations of Hg and CO near the source region in eastern Asia agreed well with ratios based on measurements. Increases similar to those observed for HG(0) were also calculated for deposition of HGO. Calculated increases in wet and dry deposition in the United States were 5-7% and 5-9%, respectively. The results indicate that long-range transcontinental transport of Hg has a non-negligible impact on Hg deposition levels in the United States.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo estimation of complex-time correlations for the study of the ground-state dynamic structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rota, R.; Casulleras, J.; Mazzanti, F.; Boronat, J.

    2015-03-21

    We present a method based on the path integral Monte Carlo formalism for the calculation of ground-state time correlation functions in quantum systems. The key point of the method is the consideration of time as a complex variable whose phase δ acts as an adjustable parameter. By using high-order approximations for the quantum propagator, it is possible to obtain Monte Carlo data all the way from purely imaginary time to δ values near the limit of real time. As a consequence, it is possible to infer accurately the spectral functions using simple inversion algorithms. We test this approach in the calculation of the dynamic structure function S(q, ω) of two one-dimensional model systems, harmonic and quartic oscillators, for which S(q, ω) can be exactly calculated. We notice a clear improvement in the calculation of the dynamic response with respect to the common approach based on the inverse Laplace transform of the imaginary-time correlation function.

  4. Estimating Methods

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

  5. A Phenomenological Model of Bulk Force in a Li-Ion Battery Pack and Its Application to State of Charge Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, S; Kim, Y; Siegel, JB; Samad, NA; Stefanopoulou, AG

    2014-09-19

    A phenomenological model of the bulk force exerted by a lithium ion cell during various charge, discharge, and temperature operating conditions is developed. The measured and modeled force resembles the carbon expansion behavior associated with the phase changes during intercalation, as there are ranges of state of charge (SOC) with a gradual force increase and ranges of SOC with very small change in force. The model includes the influence of temperature on the observed force capturing the underlying thermal expansion phenomena. Moreover the model is capable of describing the changes in force during thermal transients, when internal battery heating due to high C-rates or rapid changes in the ambient temperature, which create a mismatch in the temperature of the cell and the holding fixture. It is finally shown that the bulk force model can be very useful for a more accurate and robust SOC estimation based on fusing information from voltage and force (or pressure) measurements. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email oa@electrochem.org. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P.

    2011-05-23

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  7. Demagnetization using a determined estimated magnetic state

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denis, Ronald J; Makowski, Nathanael J

    2015-01-13

    A method for demagnetizing comprising positioning a core within the electromagnetic field generated by a first winding until the generated first electrical current is not substantially increasing, thereby determining a saturation current. A second voltage, having the opposite polarity, is then applied across the first winding until the generated second electrical current is approximately equal to the magnitude of the determined saturation current. The maximum magnetic flux within the core is then determined using the voltage across said first winding and the second current. A third voltage, having the opposite polarity, is then applied across the first winding until the core has a magnetic flux equal to approximately half of the determined maximum magnetic flux within the core.

  8. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 26.24 - W...

  9. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 28.49 - W...

  10. How EIA Estimates Natural Gas Production

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes estimates monthly and annually of the production of natural gas in the United States. The estimates are based on data EIA collects from gas producing states and data collected by the U. S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) in the Department of Interior. The states and MMS collect this information from producers of natural gas for various reasons, most often for revenue purposes. Because the information is not sufficiently complete or timely for inclusion in EIA's Natural Gas Monthly (NGM), EIA has developed estimation methodologies to generate monthly production estimates that are described in this document.

  11. Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates 1 Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates Executive summary The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) relies on data from state and other federal agencies and does not currently collect survey data directly from crude oil producers. Summarizing the estimation process in terms of percent of U.S. production: * 20% is based on state agency data, including North Dakota and

  12. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  13. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  14. secretary of state | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    state

  15. Types of Cost Estimates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

  16. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  17. State energy price and expenditure report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

  18. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  19. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  20. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The objective of this Guide is to improve the quality of cost estimates and further strengthen the DOE program/project management system. The original 25 separate chapters and three appendices have been combined to create a single document.

  1. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates.

  2. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  3. Derived Annual Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    74-1988 For Methodology Concerning the Derived Estimates Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat and Power by Industry Group, 1974-1988 Total Energy *** Electricity...

  4. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W...

  5. Kalman filter data assimilation: Targeting observations and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellsky, Thomas Kostelich, Eric J.; Mahalov, Alex

    2014-06-15

    This paper studies the effect of targeted observations on state and parameter estimates determined with Kalman filter data assimilation (DA) techniques. We first provide an analytical result demonstrating that targeting observations within the Kalman filter for a linear model can significantly reduce state estimation error as opposed to fixed or randomly located observations. We next conduct observing system simulation experiments for a chaotic model of meteorological interest, where we demonstrate that the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) with targeted observations based on largest ensemble variance is skillful in providing more accurate state estimates than the LETKF with randomly located observations. Additionally, we find that a hybrid ensemble Kalman filter parameter estimation method accurately updates model parameters within the targeted observation context to further improve state estimation.

  6. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  7. Solid-State Lighting Technical Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-16

    A page that contains links to technical reports of studies estimating the energy savings potential of solid-state lighting in numerous applications.

  8. State energy price and expenditure report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7: Hydroelectric Power Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Hydroelectric Power Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Million ...

  10. REQUESTS FOR RETIREMENT ESTIMATE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REQUEST FOR RETIREMENT ANNUITY ESTIMATE Instructions: Please read and answer the following questions thoroughly to include checking all applicable boxes. Unanswered questions may delay processing. Print and Fax back your request form to 202.586.6395 or drop request to GM-169. The request will be assigned to your servicing retirement specialist. They will confirm receipt of your request. SECTION A Request Submitted _____________________ ______________________ ________________________

  11. State energy price and expenditure report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

  12. Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio ...

  13. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20 Table E16. Motor Gasoline Price and Expenditure Estimates, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Prices Expenditures Expenditures per Person State Dollars per Million Btu State Million...

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  15. State Energy Profiles and Estimates (SEDS) report Archives

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Hydropower Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel Wind Geothermal Solar Energy in Brief How much U.S. electricity is generated from renewable energy?...

  16. Load Modeling and State Estimation Methods for Power Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  17. Use of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

  18. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Impacts of Future Heat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Future Heat Waves on Mortality in the Eastern United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Impacts of Future Heat Waves on ...

  19. State energy price and expenditure report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

  20. Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2012-10-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  1. Automated Estimating System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-15

    AES6.1 is a PC software package developed to aid in the preparation and reporting of cost estimates. AES6.1 provides an easy means for entering and updating the detailed cost, schedule information, project work breakdown structure, and escalation information contained in a typical project cost estimate through the use of menus and formatted input screens. AES6.1 combines this information to calculate both unescalated and escalated cost for a project which can be reported at varying levelsmore » of detail. Following are the major modifications to AES6.0f: Contingency update was modified to provide greater flexibility for user updates, Schedule Update was modified to provide user ability to schedule Bills of Material at the WBS/Participant/Cost Code level, Schedule Plot was modified to graphically show schedule by WBS/Participant/Cost Code, All Fiscal Year reporting has been modified to use the new schedule format, The Schedule 1-B-7, Cost Schedule, and the WBS/Participant reprorts were modified to determine Phase of Work from the B/M Cost Code, Utility program was modified to allow selection by cost code and update cost code in the Global Schedule update, Generic summary and line item download were added to the utility program, and an option was added to all reports which allows the user to indicate where overhead is to be reported (bottom line or in body of report)« less

  2. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  3. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Impacts of Future Heat Waves on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mortality in the Eastern United States (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Impacts of Future Heat Waves on Mortality in the Eastern United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Impacts of Future Heat Waves on Mortality in the Eastern United States Background: It is anticipated that climate change will influence heat-related mortality in the future. However, the estimation of excess mortality

  4. State energy price and expenditure report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

  5. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption Estimates, Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption Estimates per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Total Energy...

  6. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery in the United States. The quantitative estimates of...

  7. RPS Collaborative Webinar: Using AVERT to Estimate the Emissions Benefits of Clean Energy Policies and Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State policymakers and various stakeholders frequently have need to estimate the emissions impacts of particular renewable energy and energy efficiency policies. However, it can be challenging and...

  8. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  9. United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    l 0 United States Office of Research and Environmental Protection Agency Development Washington, DC 20460 EPA 600/R-94/209 January 1993 Offsite Environment itoring Report adiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89193-3478 , 702/798-2100 April 20, 1995 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S.

  10. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

  11. UNITED STATES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License ... STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCENSE .- Pursuant to the ...

  12. The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-28

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.

  13. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  14. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  15. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claassen, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  16. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  17. United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee when ... with section 1222's requirements, referred to in the ... States v. 14.02 Acres of Land More or Less in Fresno ...

  18. Examples of Cost Estimation Packages

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

  19. Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    > Derived Annual Estimates - Executive Summary Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption, 1974-1988 Figure showing Derived Estimates Executive Summary This...

  20. Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry Authors: Younes, W ; Ressler, J J Publication Date: 2013-08-21 OSTI Identifier: 1116982 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-648552 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States

  1. Solar Energy in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar power is more affordable, accessible, and prevalent in the United States than ever before. Since 2008, U.S. installations have grown seventeen-fold from 1.2 gigawatts (GW) to an estimated 20...

  2. Solar Design Standards for State Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 2010 to 2012, solar photovoltaic systems have been installed at seven state government facilities, providing an estimated 650 kW of power. In one building, a 50 kW system has reduced energy ...

  3. California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas ... Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production California Lease Condensate Proved ...

  4. California (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ... Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production California Shale Gas Proved ...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6: Geothermal Energy Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Geothermal Energy Electric Power Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    consumption estimates by individual energy source in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). ... conventional hydroelectric power (HY) * solar thermal direct use energy and ...

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy sources are based on consumption estimates from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). ... hydropower and geothermal, wind, wood, waste, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. ...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    energy sources are based on consumption estimates from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). ... hydropower and geothermal, wind, wood, waste, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. ...

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total b Thousand Cords Trillion Btu...

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    F29: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power ... There are no direct fuel costs for wind energy. Totals may not equal sum of ...

  11. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    onp5fGonal Ruord United States of America . I. .' - PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9t?lh CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Wash!ogtm. 0.C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty for pwate use. sco Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad I.) s ~lJ"er"ment Prlntlng OffIce 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER -...~-- -~- -- --- H 45' 78 ' cCJ~GRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 213: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WAXM.UG Mr. OBERSTAR.

  12. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    onSres;eional atecord United States of America :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 981h CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washwtn. D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty for plvate use. $300 Congressmnal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prtnttng Offlce 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H 45' 78 * C.QvGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE .-. June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND. Mr. Whxrdhr?. Mr. OBERsThx. Mi. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of

  13. State energy price and expenditure report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

  14. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  15. Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-estimating-historical Cost: Free Language: English Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation Screenshot...

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 Purpose All of the estimates contained in the state energy consumption data tables are developed using the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is main- tained and operated by ...

  17. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  18. Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

  19. Estimates of Green potentials. Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danchenko, V I

    2003-02-28

    Optimal Cartan-type covers by hyperbolic discs of carriers of Green {alpha}-potentials are obtained in a simply connected domain in the complex plane and estimates of the potentials outside the carriers are presented. These results are applied to problems on the separation of singularities of analytic and harmonic functions. For instance, uniform and integral estimates in terms of Green capacities of components of meromorphic functions are obtained.

  20. NREL Estimates Economically Viable U.S. Renewable Generation - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Estimates Economically Viable U.S. Renewable Generation November 19, 2015 Analysts at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing, for the first time, a method for measuring the economic potential of renewable energy across the United States. A study applying this new method found that renewable energy generation is economically viable in many parts of the United States largely due to rapidly declining technology costs. The report,

  1. Numerical estimation of the relative entropy of entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinchenko, Yuriy; Friedland, Shmuel; Gour, Gilad

    2010-11-15

    We propose a practical algorithm for the calculation of the relative entropy of entanglement (REE), defined as the minimum relative entropy between a state and the set of states with positive partial transpose. Our algorithm is based on a practical semidefinite cutting plane approach. In low dimensions the implementation of the algorithm in matlab provides an estimation for the REE with an absolute error smaller than 10{sup -3}.

  2. United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southern Research Station General Technical Report SRS-68 Bats of the Savannah River Site and Vicinity Michael A. Menzel, Jennifer M. Menzel, John C. Kilgo, W. Mark Ford, Timothy C. Carter, and John W. Edwards Authors: Michael A. Menzel, 1 Jennifer M. Menzel, 2 John C. Kilgo, 3 W. Mark Ford, 2 Timothy C. Carter, 4 and John W. Edwards 5 1 Graduate Research Assistant, Division of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, West Virginia University, Morgantown,

  3. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty BACKGROUND: The spatial

  4. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define

  5. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  6. State Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PAGE | 1 Produced by Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability (OE) State Overview Population: 0.63 million (<1% total U.S.) Housing Units: 0.32 million (<1% total U.S.) Business Establishments: 0.02 million (<1% total U.S.) Annual Energy Consumption Electric Power: 5.5 TWh (<1% total U.S.) Coal: 0 MSTN (0% total U.S.) Natural Gas: 392 Bcf (2% total U.S.) Motor Gasoline: 7,800 Mbarrels (<1% total U.S.) Distillate Fuel: 3,900 Mbarrels

  7. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act

  8. United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) .

  9. States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,.' &I ,J?5.8 = , sr; i&L:E%, 7-e;, iB 1 L Unitbd ' States Government ma.morandum DATE: $I$! 24 ml1 Department of Energy y;;;z EM-421 .- Elimination of the Landis Machine Company site SVWECT: The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the Landis Machine Company site in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based' on the above, the Landis Machine Company site is

  10. Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices and Channels by Herbert J. Bomelburg February 1977 Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission -..- Pacific Northwest Laboratories Th% report was preparrd is an accceullt r.84 work spoi.wr~d by the Un~ted States Governmect. Kettker t > ~ United States nor the L'nited states 'rl:clczr 1tcgl;l;:cry Cornmiszion. :or ally c! their e m p i o y e ~ , nor any of chcrr contractors, subcontraao~r, a . tlveir rrn~invct?t-, r.~aies any H r r l

  11. Temperature estimates from zircaloy oxidation kinetics and microstructures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    This report reviews state-of-the-art capability to determine peak zircaloy fuel rod cladding temperatures following an abnormal temperature excursion in a nuclear reactor, based on postirradiation metallographic analysis of zircaloy microstructural and oxidation characteristics. Results of a comprehensive literature search are presented to evaluate the suitability of available zircaloy microstructural and oxidation data for estimating anticipated reactor fuel rod cladding temperatures. Additional oxidation experiments were conducted to evaluate low-temperature zircaloy oxidation characteristics for postirradiation estimation of cladding temperature by metallographic examination. Results of these experiments were used to calculate peak cladding temperatures of electrical heater rods and nuclear fuel rods that had been subjected to reactor temperature transients. Comparison of the calculated and measured peak cladding temperatures for these rods indicates that oxidation kinetics is a viable technique for estimating peak cladding temperatures over a broad temperature range. However, further improvement in zircaloy microstructure technology is necessary for precise estimation of peak cladding temperatures by microstructural examination.

  12. Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If the customer has a ratio of estimated monthly kilowatt-hour (kWh) usage to line extension mileage that is less than or equal to 1,000, the utility must provide the comparison at no cost. If the...

  13. Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S.; Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

  14. Phase estimation with nonunitary interferometers: Information as a metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahder, Thomas B.

    2011-05-15

    Determining the phase in one arm of a quantum interferometer is discussed taking into account the three nonideal aspects in real experiments: nondeterministic state preparation, nonunitary state evolution due to losses during state propagation, and imperfect state detection. A general expression is written for the probability of a measurement outcome taking into account these three nonideal aspects. As an example of applying the formalism, the classical Fisher information and fidelity (Shannon mutual information between phase and measurements) are computed for few-photon Fock and N00N states input into a lossy Mach-Zehnder interferometer. These three nonideal aspects lead to qualitative differences in phase estimation, such as a decrease in fidelity and Fisher information that depends on the true value of the phase.

  15. State Energy Program Retrospective Evaluation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of a major national evaluation of the State Energy Program (SEP), under the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Retrospective Evaluation of SEP's Program Year (PY) 2008, a typical year in SEP operations, was a multiyear, peer-reviewed, statistically robust effort led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is the most comprehensive, detailed analysis ever conducted of SEP. The purpose of the evaluation was to develop independent estimates of key program outcomes, including:

  16. Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry You are accessing a...

  17. SECPOP90: Sector population, land fraction, and economic estimation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, S.L.; Rollstin, J.A.; Ridgely, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    In 1973 Mr. W. Athey of the Environmental Protection Agency wrote a computer program called SECPOP which calculated population estimates. Since that time, two things have changed which suggested the need for updating the original program - more recent population censuses and the widespread use of personal computers (PCs). The revised computer program uses the 1990 and 1992 Population Census information and runs on current PCs as {open_quotes}SECPOP90.{close_quotes} SECPOP90 consists of two parts: site and regional. The site provides population and economic data estimates for any location within the continental United States. Siting analysis is relatively fast running. The regional portion assesses site availability for different siting policy decisions; i.e., the impact of available sites given specific population density criteria within the continental United States. Regional analysis is slow. This report compares the SECPOP90 population estimates and the nuclear power reactor licensee-provided information. Although the source, and therefore the accuracy, of the licensee information is unknown, this comparison suggests SECPOP90 makes reasonable estimates. Given the total uncertainty in any current calculation of severe accidents, including the potential offsite consequences, the uncertainty within SECPOP90 population estimates is expected to be insignificant. 12 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. State Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Total Percent of U.S. total Alabama 1,652 0.0 Alaska 152 0.0 Arizona 912,975 19.9 Arkansas 2,724 0.1 California 2,239,983 48.8 Colorado 49,903 1.1 Connecticut 33,627 0.7 Delaware 3,080 0.1 District of Columbia 1,746 0.0 Florida 22,061 0.5 Georgia 99,713 2.2 Guam 39 0.0 Hawaii 126,595 2.8 Idaho 1,423 0.0 Illinois 8,176 0.2 Indiana 12,912 0.3 Iowa 4,480 0.1 Kansas 523 0.0 Kentucky 2,356 0.1 Louisiana 27,704 0.6 Maine 993 0.0 Maryland 30,528 0.7 Massachusetts 143,539 3.1 Michigan 3,416 0.1

  19. BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type cell battery pack with cells linked in series. BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type cell battery pack with cells linked in series. BatPRO is the user-friendly, Windows-based version of BatPaC, a software modeling tool designed for policymakers and researchers who are interested in estimating the cost of lithium-ion batteries after they have reached a mature state of development and are being

  20. $100 billion mistake: is the windfall revenue estimate too high

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelson, R.J.

    1980-04-26

    An economic analysis of the Windfall Profits Tax (as proposed at the time) suggests that the estimate of a $227 billion revenue over the next decade may be as much as $100 billion too high. This judgment is based on provisions in the law allowing states to deduct severance taxes up to 15 percent on oil before federal taxes are paid and offering tax incentives for tertiary projects. The arithmetic, particularly in the case of enhanced oil recovery, illustrates how the incentives could shift more production from a 70% to a 30% tax rate than the Federal government had estimated. (DCK)

  1. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscapting Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-30

    Guidance to help Federal agencies estimate unmetered landscaping water use as required by Executive Order 13514

  2. Biomass Feedstock Availability in the United States: 1999 State Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-01-01

    Interest in using biomass feedstocks to produce power, liquid fuels, and chemicals in the U.S. is increasing. Central to determining the potential for these industries to develop is an understanding of the location, quantities, and prices of biomass resources. This paper describes the methodology used to estimate biomass quantities and prices for each state in the continental United States.

  3. Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,116 3,110 5,336 7,994 10,371 11,415 2007-2013 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 Lower 48 States 2,116 3,110 5,336 7,994 10,371 11,415 2007-2013 Alabama 0 0 0 2007-2010 Arkansas 279...

  4. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  5. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  6. Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

  7. State Energy Program awards $5 million to states for State Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Energy Program awards 5 million to states for State Energy Planning and Innovative Energy Practices State Energy Program awards 5 million to states for State Energy...

  8. New Methodology for Natural Gas Production Estimates

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    A new methodology is implemented with the monthly natural gas production estimates from the EIA-914 survey this month. The estimates, to be released April 29, 2010, include revisions for all of 2009. The fundamental changes in the new process include the timeliness of the historical data used for estimation and the frequency of sample updates, both of which are improved.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5: Wood and Biomass Waste Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2013 State Prices Expenditures Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Total b Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Total b Residential...

  10. New Study: Renewable Energy for State Renewable Portfolio Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A new study estimates that 2.2 billion in benefits come from reduced greenhouse gas emissions and 5.2 billion from reductions in other air pollution for state renewable portfolio ...

  11. Geographic Perspective on the Current Biomass Resource Availability in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the biomass resources available in the United States and map the results using geographic information systems (GIS).

  12. Robust bearing estimation for 3-component stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLAASSEN,JOHN P.

    2000-02-01

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the inherent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, and finally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The algorithm was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. It demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted from these findings.

  13. Robust Bearing Estimation for 3-Component Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claassen, John P.

    1999-06-03

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the in- herent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular, the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, andjinally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The method was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. The method demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted fiom these findings.

  14. ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES USING VARYING LEVELS OF INFORMATION Decision and Information Sciences Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government, and operated by the University of

  15. Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

    2005-09-01

    Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

  16. Time and Resource Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-08

    RESTORE is a computer software tool that allows one to model a complex set of steps required to accomplish a goal (e.g., repair a ruptured natural gas pipeline and restore service to customers). However, the time necessary to complete step may be uncertain and may be affected by conditions, such as the weather, the time of day, the day of the week. Therefore, "nature" can influence which steps are taken and the time needed tomore » complete each step. In addition, the tool allows one to model the costs for each step, which also may be uncertain. RESTORE allows the user to estimate the time and cost, both of which may be uncertain, to achieve an intermediate stage of completion, as well as overall completion. The software also makes it possible to model parallel, competing groups of activities (i.e., parallel paths) so that progreSs at a ‘merge point’ can proceed before other competing activities are completed. For example, RESTORE permits one to model a workaround and a simultaneous complete repair to determine a probability distribution for the earliest time service can be restored to a critical customer. The tool identifies the ‘most active path’ through the network of tasks, which is extremely important information for assessing the most effective way to speed-up or slow-down progress. Unlike other project planning and risk analysis tools, RESTORE provides an intuitive, graphical, and object-oriented environment for structuring a model and setting its parameters.« less

  17. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  18. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  19. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  20. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  1. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  2. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  3. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  4. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  5. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  6. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  7. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  8. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  9. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  10. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  11. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  12. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric ...

  14. STATE OF WASHINGTON August

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATE OF WASHINGTON August 29, 2012 The Honorable Stephen Chu, Secretary United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary Chu: As you...

  15. Solid State Lighting Reliability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Partners: Auburn University Cree SAS Institute PPG Industries State of North Carolina ... Consortium Auburn University SAS Institute Cree Lighting PPG Industries State of North ...

  16. Notes on a New Coherence Estimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickel, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    This document discusses some interesting features of the new coherence estimator in [1] . The estimator is d erived from a slightly different viewpoint. We discuss a few properties of the estimator, including presenting the probability density function of the denominator of the new estimator , which is a new feature of this estimator . Finally, we present an appr oximate equation for analysis of the sensitivity of the estimator to the knowledge of the noise value. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The preparation of this report is the result of an unfunded research and development activity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  17. Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008, current version: 10/2015) Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site REAC/TS PO Box 117, MS-39 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (865)576-3131 http://orise.orau.gov/reacts prepared by: Stephen L. (Steve) Sugarman, MS, CHP, CHCM Health Physics Project Manager Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Coordinator Early Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008,

  18. U.S. States - SEDS - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1960-2013 (complete) Released: July 24, 2015 | Next release: June 24, 2016 Comprehensive state-level estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures by source and sector. Estimates for 2014 and revisions for previous years by energy source will be released on the SEDS updates page starting in October 2015. + EXPAND ALL Change State Consumption All states United States Summary 2013 1960-2013 Consumption overview: primary energy source and end-use sectors HTML PDF Consumption

  19. Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is adjusting its estimates of natural gas production in Texas for 2004 and 2005 to correctly account for carbon dioxide (CO2) production.

  20. Cell Total Activity Final Estimate.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WSSRAP Cell Total Activity Final Estimate (calculated September 2002, Fleming) (Waste streams & occupied cell volumes from spreadsheet titled "cell waste volumes-8.23.02 with ...

  1. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation ... Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the ...

  2. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The thickness of ...

  3. An Estimator of Propagation of Cascading Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian; Wierzbicki, Kevin; Carreras, Benjamin A; Lynch, Vickie E; Newman, David E

    2006-01-01

    The authors suggest a statistical estimator to measure the extent to which failures propagate in cascading failures such as large blackouts.

  4. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use Prepared for U.S. Department of ... PNNL would like to thank the Federal Water Working Group of the Interagency Energy ...

  5. Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are...

  6. ORISE: Radiation Dose Estimates and Other Compendia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Medicine" (M. Stabin, in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine, S. Treves, ed., Springer-Verlag, 1995). The compendium of dose estimates for pregnant women was published...

  7. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  8. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  9. Estimating externalities of biomass fuel cycles, Report 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of the biomass fuel cycle, in which biomass is combusted to produce electricity. The major objectives of this study were: (1) to implement the methodological concepts which were developed in the Background Document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles, and by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the biomass fuel cycle; (2) to develop, given the time and resources, a range of estimates of marginal (i.e., the additional or incremental) damages and benefits associated with selected impact-pathways from a new wood-fired power plant, using a representative benchmark technology, at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information available to support energy decision making and the estimation of externalities, and by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The demonstration of methods, modeling procedures, and use of scientific information was the most important objective of this study. It provides an illustrative example for those who will, in the future, undertake studies of actual energy options and sites. As in most studies, a more comprehensive analysis could have been completed had budget constraints not been as severe. Particularly affected were the air and water transport modeling, estimation of ecological impacts, and economic valuation. However, the most important objective of the study was to demonstrate methods, as a detailed example for future studies. Thus, having severe budget constraints was appropriate from the standpoint that these studies could also face similar constraints. Consequently, an important result of this study is an indication of what can be done in such studies, rather than the specific numerical estimates themselves.

  10. Power, Optimization, Waste Estimating, Resourcing Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    Planning, Optimization, Waste Estimating, Resourcing tool (POWERtool) is a comprehensive relational database software tool that can be used to develop and organize a detailed project scope, plan work tasks, develop bottoms-up field cost and waste estimates for facility Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), equipment, and environmental restoration (ER) projects and produces resource-loaded schedules.

  11. Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dam, A. S.

    2002-02-26

    Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

  12. California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated ... Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production California Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves ...

  13. Property:Estimated End Date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimated End Date Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Estimated End Date Property Type String Pages using the property "Estimated End Date" Showing 4 pages using this...

  14. Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Document explains how to use estimated ...

  15. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Estimate the Capacity Value of Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We present a method to estimate the capacity value of storage. Our method uses a dynamic program to model the effect of power system outages on the operation and state of charge of storage in subsequent periods. We combine the optimized dispatch from the dynamic program with estimated system loss of load probabilities to compute a probability distribution for the state of charge of storage in each period. This probability distribution can be used as a forced outage rate for storage in standard reliability-based capacity value estimation methods. Our proposed method has the advantage over existing approximations that it explicitly captures the effect of system shortage events on the state of charge of storage in subsequent periods. We also use a numerical case study, based on five utility systems in the U.S., to demonstrate our technique and compare it to existing approximation methods.

  16. Shell model estimate of electric dipole moment in medium and heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji

    2011-05-06

    The nuclear electric dipole moment (EDM) and the nuclear Schiff moment for the lowest 1/2{sup +} state of {sup 129}Xe are investigated in terms of the nuclear shell model. We estimate the upper limit for the EDM of neutral {sup 129}Xe atom using the Schiff moment. We also estimate the upper limit of the nuclear EDM, which may be directly measured through ionic atoms.

  17. Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portfolio Standards to Date - News Releases | NREL Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards to Date May 30, 2014 A new report, prepared by analysts from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), reviews estimates of the costs and benefits of compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) in the United States and explores how costs and benefits may evolve

  18. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  19. State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program ...

  20. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  1. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

  2. Parameter estimation with Sandage-Loeb test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin E-mail: jfzhang@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2014-12-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion rate of the universe in the redshift range of 2 ∼< z ∼< 5 by detecting redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-α forest of distant quasars. We discuss the impact of the future SL test data on parameter estimation for the ΛCDM, the wCDM, and the w{sub 0}w{sub a}CDM models. To avoid the potential inconsistency with other observational data, we take the best-fitting dark energy model constrained by the current observations as the fiducial model to produce 30 mock SL test data. The SL test data provide an important supplement to the other dark energy probes, since they are extremely helpful in breaking the existing parameter degeneracies. We show that the strong degeneracy between Ω{sub m} and H{sub 0} in all the three dark energy models is well broken by the SL test. Compared to the current combined data of type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background, and Hubble constant, the 30-yr observation of SL test could improve the constraints on Ω{sub m} and H{sub 0} by more than 60% for all the three models. But the SL test can only moderately improve the constraint on the equation of state of dark energy. We show that a 30-yr observation of SL test could help improve the constraint on constant w by about 25%, and improve the constraints on w{sub 0} and w{sub a} by about 20% and 15%, respectively. We also quantify the constraining power of the SL test in the future high-precision joint geometric constraints on dark energy. The mock future supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation data are simulated based on the space-based project JDEM. We find that the 30-yr observation of SL test would help improve the measurement precision of Ω{sub m}, H{sub 0}, and w{sub a} by more than 70%, 20%, and 60%, respectively, for the w{sub 0}w{sub a}CDM model.

  3. Fuel Cells in the States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Fuel Cells in the States States State and Regional State and Regional Initiatives ... Jennifer Gangi Jennifer Gangi Program Director Program Director Fuel Cells 2000 Fuel Cells ...

  4. State Energy Strategic Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most state energy offices across the country are required to have current and long-term strategic energy management plans in place. These strategic plans help to ensure that state agencies are...

  5. FY 2005 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Preliminary Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The

  6. AASG STATE GDR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003198MLTPL00 AASG State Geothermal Data Repository for the National Geothermal Data System. http://repository.stategeothermaldata.org/repository/

  7. AASG State Geological Survey

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

  8. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

  9. Estimating electron drift velocities in magnetron discharges...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating ... OSTI Identifier: 1172974 Report Number(s): LBNL-5865E DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal ...

  10. ARM - Evaluation Product - Quantitative Precipitation Estimates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Precipitation rates from...

  11. A simple method to estimate interwell autocorrelation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizarro, J.O.S.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    The estimation of autocorrelation in the lateral or interwell direction is important when performing reservoir characterization studies using stochastic modeling. This paper presents a new method to estimate the interwell autocorrelation based on parameters, such as the vertical range and the variance, that can be estimated with commonly available data. We used synthetic fields that were generated from stochastic simulations to provide data to construct the estimation charts. These charts relate the ratio of areal to vertical variance and the autocorrelation range (expressed variously) in two directions. Three different semivariogram models were considered: spherical, exponential and truncated fractal. The overall procedure is demonstrated using field data. We find that the approach gives the most self-consistent results when it is applied to previously identified facies. Moreover, the autocorrelation trends follow the depositional pattern of the reservoir, which gives confidence in the validity of the approach.

  12. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "education level" (which depends on the amount and structure of information used for teaching) and (b) the distance of the point at which the estimate is made from the area for...

  13. gtp_flow_power_estimator.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This simple spreadsheet model estimates either the flow rate required to produce a specified level of power output, or the power output that can be produced from a specified flow rate.

  14. Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

  15. Preliminary CBECS End-Use Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For the past three CBECS (1989, 1992, and 1995), we used a statistically-adjusted engineering (SAE) methodology to estimate end-use consumption. The core of the SAE methodology...

  16. Thermal Hydraulic Simulations, Error Estimation and Parameter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Hydraulic Simulations, Error Estimation and Parameter Sensitivity Studies in Drekar::CFD Thomas M. Smith, John N. Shadid, Roger P. Pawlowski, Eric C. Cyr and Timothy M. Wildey Sandia National Laboratories September, 2013 CASL-U-2013-0203-001 SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-XXXX Unlimited Release Printed September 2013 Thermal Hydraulic Simulations, Error Estimation and Parameter Sensitivity Studies in Drekar::CFD Thomas M. Smith, John N. Shadid, Roger P. Pawlowski, Eric C. Cyr and Timothy M.

  17. Chapter 3: FY 2005 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2005 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed—NEMS-GPRA05 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA05 for the long term.

  18. Chapter 3: FY 2006 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2006 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed–NEMS-GPRA06 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA06 for the long term.

  19. Estimated recharge rates at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Walters, T.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitors the distribution of contaminants in ground water at the Hanford Site for the U.S. Department of Energy. A subtask called {open_quotes}Water Budget at Hanford{close_quotes} was initiated in FY 1994. The objective of this subtask was to produce a defensible map of estimated recharge rates across the Hanford Site. Methods that have been used to estimate recharge rates at the Hanford Site include measurements (of drainage, water contents, and tracers) and computer modeling. For the simulations of 12 soil-vegetation combinations, the annual rates varied from 0.05 mm/yr for the Ephrata sandy loam with bunchgrass to 85.2 mm/yr for the same soil without vegetation. Water content data from the Grass Site in the 300 Area indicated that annual rates varied from 3.0 to 143.5 mm/yr during an 8-year period. The annual volume of estimated recharge was calculated to be 8.47 {times} 10{sup 9} L for the potential future Hanford Site (i.e., the portion of the current Site bounded by Highway 240 and the Columbia River). This total volume is similar to earlier estimates of natural recharge and is 2 to 10x higher than estimates of runoff and ground-water flow from higher elevations. Not only is the volume of natural recharge significant in comparison to other ground-water inputs, the distribution of estimated recharge is highly skewed to the disturbed sandy soils (i.e., the 200 Areas, where most contaminants originate). The lack of good estimates of the means and variances of the supporting data (i.e., the soil map, the vegetation/land use map, the model parameters) translates into large uncertainties in the recharge estimates. When combined, the significant quantity of estimated recharge, its high sensitivity to disturbance, and the unquantified uncertainty of the data and model parameters suggest that the defensibility of the recharge estimates should be improved.

  20. Synchrophasor Based Tracking Three-Phase State Estimator and It's Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, A. G.; Thorp, James; Centeno, Virgilio; Gardner, Matthew; Novosel, Damir; Hu, Yi; Elizondo, David

    2013-08-31

    Electric power infrastructure is one of the critical resources of the nation. Its reliability in the face of natural or man-made catastrophes is of paramount importance for the economic and public health wellbeing of a modern society. Maintaining high levels of security for the high voltage transmission back bone of the electric supply network is a task requiring access to modern monitoring tools. These tools have been made particularly effective with the advent of synchronized phasor measurement units (PMUs) which became available in late 1990s, and have now become an indispensable for optimal monitoring, protection and control of the power grid. The present project was launched with an objective of demonstrating the value of the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) using PMUs and its applications on the Dominion Virginia Power High Voltage transmission grid. Virginia Tech is the birth place of PMUs, and was chosen to be the Principal Investigator of this project. In addition to Dominion Virginia Power, Quanta Technology of Raleigh, NC was selected to be co-Principal Investigators of this project.

  1. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for Multiple Methods Compare to a proxy non- renewable ... offer an upfront rebate per watt in exchange for the RECs ... generating units, fuel usage, utility revenues, ...

  2. New Wind Energy Resource Potential Estimates for the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the wind energy resource mapping efforts conducted at NREL and by Truepower.

  3. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

  4. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide: Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process, from the first step of defining the estimate's purpose to the last step of updating the estimate to reflect actual costs and changes. PDF icon Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Key Resources PMCDP EVMS PARS IIe FPD Resource Center PM Newsletter Forms and Templates More Documents & Publications

  5. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrongs estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  6. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore » of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  7. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Ane E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  8. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Slosar, Anze; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrongs estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  9. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  10. Robust estimation procedure in panel data model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariff, Nurul Sima Mohamad; Hamzah, Nor Aishah

    2014-06-19

    The panel data modeling has received a great attention in econometric research recently. This is due to the availability of data sources and the interest to study cross sections of individuals observed over time. However, the problems may arise in modeling the panel in the presence of cross sectional dependence and outliers. Even though there are few methods that take into consideration the presence of cross sectional dependence in the panel, the methods may provide inconsistent parameter estimates and inferences when outliers occur in the panel. As such, an alternative method that is robust to outliers and cross sectional dependence is introduced in this paper. The properties and construction of the confidence interval for the parameter estimates are also considered in this paper. The robustness of the procedure is investigated and comparisons are made to the existing method via simulation studies. Our results have shown that robust approach is able to produce an accurate and reliable parameter estimates under the condition considered.

  11. State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Chris Wagner, National Association of State Energy Officials View the Presentation PDF ...

  12. Nevada State Air Regulations and State Implementation Plan Webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Nevada and its state implementation plan. Author State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Published State of Nevada, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided...

  13. Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... HomeSolid-State Lighting Permalink ECIS-Veeco: Research Driving Down the Costs of Efficient LED Lighting Energy, Energy Efficiency, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & ...

  14. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OR Ohio State Uuiversity, Columbus, OH (*) Stauffer Tenescal Co., Richmond, CA Tocco Induction Heating Division, Cleveland, OH Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co., Utica, NY Tltaniua...

  15. State Energy Strategic Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) presentation at a TAP webinar held on April 3, 2013 and dealing with state energy strategic planning.

  16. By Coal Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    California (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total...

  17. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume tracking methodology helped the USACE Buffalo District track soil quantity changes from projected excavation work over time and across space, providing the basis for an explanation of some of the project cost and schedule variances.

  18. Estimating vehicle height using homographic projections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo; Gee, Timothy F; Ghebretati, Jr., Frezghi H; Goddard, James S; Karnowski, Thomas P; Ziock, Klaus-peter

    2013-07-16

    Multiple homography transformations corresponding to different heights are generated in the field of view. A group of salient points within a common estimated height range is identified in a time series of video images of a moving object. Inter-salient point distances are measured for the group of salient points under the multiple homography transformations corresponding to the different heights. Variations in the inter-salient point distances under the multiple homography transformations are compared. The height of the group of salient points is estimated to be the height corresponding to the homography transformation that minimizes the variations.

  19. The Status of Clean Energy in the United States

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Status of Clean Energy in the United States Tribal Energy Program Review May 6, 2015 Travis Lowder, NREL 2 Lazard's Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) Estimates Source: Lazard 2013 3 Lazard's Capital Cost Estimates Source: Lazard 2013 4 EIA Estimates (2012 data) 5 Solar PV 6 Solar PV Installed Capacity and Weighted Average System Cost $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Wtd. Avg. System Price ($/W)

  20. Appalachian State | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appalachian State Jump to: navigation, search Name Appalachian State Facility Appalachian State Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  1. Energy Standards for State Agencies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State departments and agencies are encouraged to employ the latest energy-conservation practices in the design, construction, renovation, operation and maintenance of state facilities. All state ...

  2. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  3. State Fact Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy provides joint funding to university, national laboratory, and industrial partners at the state level to research, develop, and demonstrate sustainable bio-based fuels and products. Learn how these states are expanding promising bioenergy research into commercial production.

  4. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2010-07-28

    The document lays-out step by step instructions to estimate landscaping water using two alternative approaches: evapotranspiration method and irrigation audit method. The evapotranspiration method option calculates the amount of water needed to maintain a healthy turf or landscaped area for a given location based on the amount of water transpired and evaporated from the plants. The evapotranspiration method offers a relatively easy one-stop-shop for Federal agencies to develop an initial estimate of annual landscape water use. The document presents annual irrigation factors for 36 cities across the U.S. that represents the gallons of irrigation required per square foot for distinct landscape types. By following the steps outlined in the document, the reader can choose a location that is a close match their location and landscape type to provide a rough estimate of annual irrigation needs without the need to research specific data on their site. The second option presented in the document is the irrigation audit method, which is the physical measurement of water applied to landscaped areas through irrigation equipment. Steps to perform an irrigation audit are outlined in the document, which follow the Recommended Audit Guidelines produced by the Irrigation Association.[5] An irrigation audit requires some knowledge on the specific procedures to accurately estimate how much water is being consumed by the irrigation equipment.

  5. Estimating the uncertainty in underresolved nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorin, Alelxandre; Hald, Ole

    2013-06-12

    The Mori-Zwanzig formalism of statistical mechanics is used to estimate the uncertainty caused by underresolution in the solution of a nonlinear dynamical system. A general approach is outlined and applied to a simple example. The noise term that describes the uncertainty turns out to be neither Markovian nor Gaussian. It is argued that this is the general situation.

  6. State of the States 2009: Renewable Energy Development and the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    manual, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.nrel.govapplyingtechnologiesstatelocalactivitieswebinar2009 State of the States 2009: Renewable Energy Development and...

  7. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report from Fuel Cells 2000 describes the state of fuel cell technologies across the United States.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings and Cost Estimate Summary DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate Summary The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate ...

  9. Request for Retirement Annuity Estimates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Retirement Annuity Estimates Request for Retirement Annuity Estimates Upon request, Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer provides retirement estimates for Headquarters employees. Retirement estimates are processed on a first-come first-served basis. Also, taken into consideration is the proposed retirement date. The Request for Retirement Annuity Estimate form must be completed and submitted to the appropriate specialists. Retirement estimates are completed within 30 days of

  10. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Water Use Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use Document describes a systematic approach to estimate industrial water use in evaporative cooling ...

  11. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Landscaping Water Use Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use Document describes the step-by-step instructions to estimate landscaping water using two alternative ...

  12. Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive ...

  13. A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation...

  14. Error estimates for fission neutron outputs (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error estimates for fission neutron outputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error estimates for fission neutron outputs You are accessing a document from the...

  15. Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters A water heater's ...

  16. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Best Estimate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) products: ... Title: Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) ...

  17. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop -...

  18. Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters A water heater's...

  19. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  20. Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of...

  1. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for ... PDF icon Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for ...

  2. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests...

  3. A Review of Cost Estimation in New Technologies - Implications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Review of Cost Estimation in New Technologies - Implications for Energy Process Plants This report reviews literature on cost estimation in several areas involving major capital ...

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK Statistical Summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK Statistical Summary (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK Statistical Summary (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1) ...

  5. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation of net ...

  6. Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and ...

  7. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1: methodology. Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity

  8. Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Biogas has received increased attention as an alternative energy source in the United States. The factsheet provides information about the biogas (methane) potential from various sources in the country (by county and state) and estimates the power generation and transportation fuels production (renewable natural gas) potential from these biogas sources. It provides valuable information to the industry, academia and policy makers in support of their future decisions.

  9. CosmoSIS: Modular cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuntz, J.; Paterno, M.; Jennings, E.; Rudd, D.; Manzotti, A.; Dodelson, S.; Bridle, S.; Sehrish, S.; Kowalkowski, J.

    2015-06-09

    Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. Here we present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmic shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. Lastly, we illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis

  10. CosmoSIS: Modular cosmological parameter estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zuntz, J.; Paterno, M.; Jennings, E.; Rudd, D.; Manzotti, A.; Dodelson, S.; Bridle, S.; Sehrish, S.; Kowalkowski, J.

    2015-06-09

    Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. Here we present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmicmore » shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. Lastly, we illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis« less

  11. Multipartite secure state distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duer, W.; Briegel, H.-J.; Calsamiglia, J.

    2005-04-01

    We introduce the distribution of a secret multipartite entangled state in a real-world scenario as a quantum primitive. We show that in the presence of noisy quantum channels (and noisy control operations), any state chosen from the set of two-colorable graph states (Calderbank-Shor-Steane codewords) can be created with high fidelity while it remains unknown to all parties. This is accomplished by either blind multipartite entanglement purification, which we introduce in this paper, or by multipartite entanglement purification of enlarged states, which offers advantages over an alternative scheme based on standard channel purification and teleportation. The parties are thus provided with a secret resource of their choice for distributed secure applications.

  12. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal

  13. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal

  14. State Biomass Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most state governments have designated contacts for biomass conversion programs. The following contacts used by the Bioenergy Technologies Office may also be good contacts for you to find out about...

  15. United States Government

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    States Government Department of Energy memorandum Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: SUBJECT: JAN 1 7 2014 CBFO:OESH:GTB:MN:14-1404:UFC...

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation ... Station Unit 1, Unit 2 2,330 19,200 20.0 Exelon Nuclear Byron Generating Station Unit 1, ...

  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation ... Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2 2,264 18,926 24.3 Exelon Nuclear PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2 ...

  18. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) New Jersey nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010 Oyster Creek Unit 1 615 4,601 14.0 Exelon ...

  19. NetState

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    NetState is a distributed network monitoring system. It uses passive sensors to develop status information on a target network. Two major features provided by NetState are version and port tracking. Version tracking maintains information about software and operating systems versions. Port tracking identifies information about active TOP and UDP ports. Multiple NetState sniffers can be deployed, one at each entry point of the target network. The sniffers monitor network traffic, then send the information tomore » the NetState server. The information is stored in centralized database which can then be accessed via standard SQL database queries or this web-based GUI, for further analysis and display.« less

  20. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical...

  1. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  2. Generalized REGression Package for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-15

    GREG computes modal (maximum-posterior-density) and interval estimates of the parameters in a user-provided Fortran subroutine MODEL, using a user-provided vector OBS of single-response observations or matrix OBS of multiresponse observations. GREG can also select the optimal next experiment from a menu of simulated candidates, so as to minimize the volume of the parametric inference region based on the resulting augmented data set.

  3. Knowledge Based Estimation of Material Release Transients

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-07-29

    KBERT is an easy to use desktop decision support tool for estimating public and in-facility worker doses and consequences of radioactive material releases in non-reactort nuclear facilities. It automatically calculates release and respirable fractions based on published handbook data, and calculates material transport concurrently with personnel evacuation simulations. Any facility layout can be modeled easily using the intuitive graphical user interface.

  4. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Durbin, Samuel; Wilke, Jason; Margraf, J.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  5. FY 2006 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 State Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or

  6. FY 2007 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    state tables preliminary Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of Chief Financial Officer state tables preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other

  7. FY 2008 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Table Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Table Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments

  8. FY 2009 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE

  9. FY 2010 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the

  10. FY 2011 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Tables Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0054 March 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated

  11. FY 2012 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0066 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and

  12. FY 2013 State Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0079 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and

  13. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  14. State of the Lab!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Authors: Detter, John C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-07-09 OSTI Identifier: 1087610 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-25114 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: DHS

  15. State Energy Finance Programs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Startup America Policy Challenge: Clean Energy Startup America Policy Challenge: Clean Energy December 15, 2011 - 12:05pm Addthis The Startup America Policy Challenge wants your ideas on how we can accelerate innovation in clean energy and position the United States to lead in this critical sector. | Photo Courtesy of JBEI. The Startup America Policy Challenge wants your ideas on how we can accelerate innovation in clean energy and position the United States to lead in this critical sector. |

  16. Table 17. Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of tot

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of total natural gas proved reserves, 2014" "million barrels and billion cubic feet" ,"Total Wet Natural Gas Proved Reserves",,,,"Estimated content of proved reserves" " State and Subdivision",,2014,,,"Natural Gas Plant Liquids",,"Dry Natural Gas" ,,"billion cubic feet",,,"million barrels",,"billion cubic feet"

  17. Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada | Department of Energy Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions

  18. Process for estimating likelihood and confidence in post detonation nuclear forensics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.; Craft, Charles M.

    2014-07-01

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) must provide answers to questions of concern to the broader community, including an estimate of uncertainty. There is significant uncertainty associated with post-detonation TNF. The uncertainty consists of a great deal of epistemic (state of knowledge) as well as aleatory (random) uncertainty, and many of the variables of interest are linguistic (words) and not numeric. We provide a process by which TNF experts can structure their process for answering questions and provide an estimate of uncertainty. The process uses belief and plausibility, fuzzy sets, and approximate reasoning.

  19. DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource | Department of Energy Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas

  20. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  1. NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques to triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009.

  2. ESTIMATE OF RADIUM-226 CONCENTRATIONS IN RUBBLED PCB WAREHOUSE ON VICINITY PROPERTY B

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ESTIMATE OF RADIUM-226 CONCENTRATIONS IN RUBBLED PCB WAREHOUSE ON VICINITY PROPERTY B ADJACENT TO THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE MAY 1987 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I-B-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE This report describes the assumptions and methodology used to estimate radium-226 concentrations in the structural material of a PCB

  3. Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates: Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates M. Melaina and M. Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-56412 September 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at

  4. Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

    2000-09-01

    If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

  5. Methods to estimate stranded commitments for a restructuring US electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-01-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for US investor-owned electric utilities range widely, from as little as $20 billion to as much as $500 billion (more than double the shareholder equity in US utilities). These potential losses are a consequence of the above-market book values for some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts, deferred income taxes, regulatory assets, and public-policy programs. Because of the wide range of estimates and the potentially large dollar amounts involved, state and federal regulators need a clear understanding of the methods used to calculate these estimates. In addition, they may want simple methods that they can use to check the reasonableness of the estimates that utilities and other parties present in regulatory proceedings. This report explains various top-down and bottom-up methods to calculate stranded commitments. The purpose of this analysis is to help regulators and others understand the implications of different analytical approaches to estimating stranded-commitment amounts. Top-down methods, because they use the utility as the unit of analysis, are simple to apply and to understand. However, their aggregate nature makes it difficult to determine what specific assets and liabilities affect their estimates. Bottom-up methods use the individual asset (e.g., power plant) or liability (e.g., power-purchase contract, fuel-supply contract, and deferred income taxes) as the unit of analysis. These methods have substantial data and computational requirements.

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Energy Data 2013: Production 2 Table P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2013 Alabama 469.2 211.8 60.3 426.5 0.0 295.8 295.8 1,463.5 Alaska 24.9 379.9 1,090.1 ...

  7. Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Report describes an analysis of water rate escalations across the United States. Federal agencies are encouraged to use the Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States report to estimate long-term water escalation rates of potable water for water efficiency projects. Using the trends from this study, federal agencies can select escalation rates from

  8. State Energy Price System: 1982 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    The State Energy Price System (STEPS) contains estimates of energy prices for ten major fuels (electricity, natural gas, metallurgical coal, steam coal, distillate, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene/jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas), by major end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility), and by state through 1982. Both physical unit prices and prices per million Btu are included in STEPS. Major changes in STEPS data base for 1981 and 1982 are described. The most significant changes in procedures for the updates occur in the residential sector distillate series and the residential sector kerosene series. All physical unit and Btu prices are shown with three significant digits instead of with four significant digits as shown in the original documentation. Details of these and other changes are contained in this report, along with the updated data files. 31 references, 65 tables.

  9. Position estimation of transceivers in communication networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, Claudia A.; Dowla, Farid

    2008-06-03

    This invention provides a system and method using wireless communication interfaces coupled with statistical processing of time-of-flight data to locate by position estimation unknown wireless receivers. Such an invention can be applied in sensor network applications, such as environmental monitoring of water in the soil or chemicals in the air where the position of the network nodes is deemed critical. Moreover, the present invention can be arranged to operate in areas where a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available, such as inside buildings, caves, and tunnels.

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  11. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  12. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    f&E F 1325.8 J ;rgy!w, United States Government m e m o randum 7-L 0 cI - 2, Department of Energy I~27 DATE: !-jEC -2 3 1293 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site summaries and elimination recommendations for the following sites: f' l M itts & Merrel Co., Saginaw, M ichigan l North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina l

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric utilities 616,632 IPP & CHP 451,791 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,093,606,005 Electric utilities 2,382,473,495 IPP & CHP 1,711,132,510 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,842,005 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,400,375 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,160,342 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 Nitrogen Oxide

  15. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Bradford; Stephen Holbrook; Scott B. Smithson

    2004-12-09

    The focus of this project is direct detection of DNAPL's specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from multi-fold surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine state-of-the-art GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects.

  16. Thermodynamically constrained correction to ab initio equations of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Martin; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2014-07-07

    We show how equations of state generated by density functional theory methods can be augmented to match experimental data without distorting the correct behavior in the high- and low-density limits. The technique is thermodynamically consistent and relies on knowledge of the density and bulk modulus at a reference state and an estimation of the critical density of the liquid phase. We apply the method to four materials representing different classes of solids: carbon, molybdenum, lithium, and lithium fluoride. It is demonstrated that the corrected equations of state for both the liquid and solid phases show a significantly reduced dependence of the exchange-correlation functional used.

  17. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand how cross-state transactions have been used to meet RPS compliance. Data on regional renewable energy flow use generator-specific information primarily sourced from EIA, SNL Energy, and FERC Form 1 filings. The renewable energy examined through this method may or may not have actually been used to meet RPS compliance.

  18. State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) provides grants and technical assistance to states and U.S. territories to promote energy conservation and reduce the growth of energy demand in ways that are consistent with national energy goals. PDF icon 48100_weather_sep_fsr3.pdf More Documents & Publications State Energy Program

  19. NREL: State and Local Governments - State Solar Technical Assistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What suite of solar PV policies and finance or incentive programs could be implemented in your state to maximize economic development opportunities? If your state agency implements ...

  20. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State and Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE is leading a State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative to help States better understand risks to their energy infrastructure so they can be better prepared to make informed...

  1. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Clean Energy Policies Analysis...

  2. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CELLS 2000 STATE OF THE STATES: FUEL CELLS IN AMERICA June 2011 Foreword by Connecticut ... Jennifer Gangi and Elizabeth Delmont of Fuel Cells 2000, an activity of Breakthrough ...

  3. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  4. Estimates of Savings Achievable from Irrigation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Fuchs, Heidi; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

    2014-03-28

    This paper performs a literature review and meta-analysis of water savings from several types of advanced irrigation controllers: rain sensors (RS), weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC), and soil moisture sensors (SMS).The purpose of this work is to derive average water savings per controller type, based to the extent possible on all available data. After a preliminary data scrubbing, we utilized a series of analytical filters to develop our best estimate of average savings. We applied filters to remove data that might bias the sample such as data self-reported by manufacturers, data resulting from studies focusing on high-water users, or data presented in a non-comparable format such as based on total household water use instead of outdoor water use. Because the resulting number of studies was too small to be statistically significant when broken down by controller type, this paper represents a survey and synthesis of available data rather than a definitive statement regarding whether the estimated water savings are representative.

  5. Development of surface mine cost estimating equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-26

    Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

  6. Bluegrass State Getting Greener

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To help reduce Kentucky’s energy appetite, the state set a goal of 25-percent energy reduction by 2025 and is using Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the energy-efficiency of its buildings.

  7. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  8. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Menxmmhmz 9 1 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo...

  9. Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act ...

  10. State Energy Efficiency Resource Standards: Design, Status, and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, D.; Zinaman, O.

    2014-05-01

    An energy efficiency resource standard (EERS) is a policy that requires utilities or other entities to achieve a specified amount of energy savings through customer energy efficiency programs within a specified timeframe. EERSs may apply to electricity usage, natural gas usage, or both. This paper provides an overview of the key design features of EERSs for electricity, reviews the variation in design of EERSs across states, and provides an estimate of the amount of savings required by currently specified EERSs in each state. As of December, 2013, 23 states have active and binding EERSs for electricity. We estimate that state EERSs will require annual electricity savings of approximately 8-11% of total projected demand by 2020 in states with EERSs, however the level of savings targeted by the policies varies significantly across states. In addition to the variation in targeted savings, the design of EERSs varies significantly across states leading to differences in the suite of incentives created by the policy, the flexibility of compliance with the policy, the balance of benefits and costs of the policy between producers and consumers, and the certainty with which the policy will drive long-term savings.

  11. Types of Possible Survey Errors in Estimates Published in the Weekly

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

    Natural Gas Storage Report Types of Possible Survey Errors in Estimates Published in the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Release date: March 1, 2016 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects and publishes natural gas storage information on a monthly and weekly basis. The Form EIA-191, Monthly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report, is a census survey that collects field-level information from all underground natural gas storage operators in the United States known to EIA.

  12. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-097 Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE): An ARM Value-Added Product S McFarlane T Shippert J Mather June 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  13. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-115 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product C Flynn D Turner A Koontz D Chand C Sivaraman July 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that

  14. Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method over the Southern Great Plains Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget Method over the Southern Great Plains Williams, Ian University of Chicago Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Concentration gradients of CO2 and H2O at the transition between the

  15. Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in

  16. State authorization manual. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugler-Jones, S.

    1990-10-01

    The State Authorization Manual (SAM) (Vol. I) provides guidance for States applying for program revisions to their authorized RCRA State program. The SAM is an updated version of the 1988 State Consolidated RCRA Authorization Manual (SCRAM). It focuses on program revision applications rather than initial applications since most States have received initial authorization for the RCRA program. The SCRAM should continue to be used to assist States not yet authorized under the RCRA program.

  17. Pension_Estimate_System-PIA.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar Watch a recording of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's Nov. 30, 2010, presentation about passive solar building design, and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications. It's one in a series of Webinars to support state and local projects funded by Sustainable Energy Resources for

  18. CASL - North Carolina State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC NC State University has a proven record of working with industry and government to advance research in support of solving nuclear...

  19. Resources for State Energy Officials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action

    2012-06-01

    Provides a summary of State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) information resources available to state energy officials, organized by topic.

  20. Fermilab Today | Kansas State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kansas State University Feb. 27, 2013 NAME: Kansas State University HOME TOWN: Manhattan, Kan. MASCOT: Willie the Wildcat COLORS: Royal purple COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 1993...

  1. Fermilab Today | Wayne State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wayne State University May 29, 2013 NAME: Wayne State University HOME TOWN: Detroit, Mich. COLORS: Green and gold COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 1995 WORLDWIDE PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  2. Estimating Terrorist Risk with Possibility Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Darby

    2004-11-30

    This report summarizes techniques that use possibility theory to estimate the risk of terrorist acts. These techniques were developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as part of the National Infrastructure Simulation Analysis Center (NISAC) project. The techniques have been used to estimate the risk of various terrorist scenarios to support NISAC analyses during 2004. The techniques are based on the Logic Evolved Decision (LED) methodology developed over the past few years by Terry Bott and Steve Eisenhawer at LANL. [LED] The LED methodology involves the use of fuzzy sets, possibility theory, and approximate reasoning. LED captures the uncertainty due to vagueness and imprecision that is inherent in the fidelity of the information available for terrorist acts; probability theory cannot capture these uncertainties. This report does not address the philosophy supporting the development of nonprobabilistic approaches, and it does not discuss possibility theory in detail. The references provide a detailed discussion of these subjects. [Shafer] [Klir and Yuan] [Dubois and Prade] Suffice to say that these approaches were developed to address types of uncertainty that cannot be addressed by a probability measure. An earlier report discussed in detail the problems with using a probability measure to evaluate terrorist risk. [Darby Methodology]. Two related techniques are discussed in this report: (1) a numerical technique, and (2) a linguistic technique. The numerical technique uses traditional possibility theory applied to crisp sets, while the linguistic technique applies possibility theory to fuzzy sets. Both of these techniques as applied to terrorist risk for NISAC applications are implemented in software called PossibleRisk. The techniques implemented in PossibleRisk were developed specifically for use in estimating terrorist risk for the NISAC program. The LEDTools code can be used to perform the same linguistic evaluation as performed in PossibleRisk. [LEDTools] LEDTools is a general purpose linguistic evaluation tool and allows user defined universes of discourse and approximate reasoning rules, whereas PossibleRisk uses predefined universes of discourse (risk, attack, success, loss, and consequence) and rules. Also LEDTools has the capability to model a large number of threat scenarios with a graph and to integrate the scenarios (paths from the graph) into the linguistic evaluation. Example uses of PossibleRisk and LEDTools for the possibilistic evaluation of terrorist risk are provided in this report.

  3. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-1-2013_Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide_20130312.electronic.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Publicly Available Methods for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide in Saline Formations 12 March 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-1-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

  4. New developments in capital cost estimating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, R.A.; Zocher, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The new developments in cost engineering revolve around the ability to capture information that in the past could not be automated. The purpose of automation is not to eliminate the expert cost engineer. The goal is to use available technology to have more information available to the professionals in the cost engineering field. In that sense, the demand for expertise increases in order to produce the highest quality estimate and project possible from all levels of cost engineers. We cannot overemphasize the importance of using a good source of expert information in building these types of programs. ''Garbage in, garbage out'' still applies in this form of programming. Expert systems technology will become commonplace in many vertical markets; it is important to undersand what can and cannot be accomplished in our field, and where this technology will lead us in the future.

  5. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  6. State Bioenergy Primer: Information and Resources for States...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... interconnection requirements for smaller bioenergy ... Total 6.922 Quadrillion Btu Renewable 7% Coal 22% Natural Gas ... (DOE) estimates that the land resources of the United ...

  7. Qualified Energy Conservation Bond State-by-State Summary Tables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides a list of qualified energy conservation bond state summary tables. Author: Energy Programs Consortium

  8. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-05-20

    Wide-field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper we introduced the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing an rms scatter in the residuals of rms{sub z} = 0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored {Lambda}CDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the rms scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mag for the SDSS data and 0.28 mag for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mag for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  2. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D B

    1992-02-01

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  3. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing

  4. Tracking intruder states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedinger, L.L.; Mueller, W.F.; Yu, C.H.

    1992-12-31

    The deformation-driving effects of intruder states are studied by analysis of various types of data on rotational bands in rare-earth deformed nuclei. The sensitivity of four measurables (bandhead energy, B(E2) value, neutron i{sub 13/2} crossing frequency, and signature splitting) to increase deformation in an intruder band is shown. The analysis of signature splitting systematics is extended to know superdeformed bands.

  5. Tracking intruder states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedinger, L.L.; Mueller, W.F.; Yu, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation-driving effects of intruder states are studied by analysis of various types of data on rotational bands in rare-earth deformed nuclei. The sensitivity of four measurables (bandhead energy, B(E2) value, neutron i[sub 13/2] crossing frequency, and signature splitting) to increase deformation in an intruder band is shown. The analysis of signature splitting systematics is extended to know superdeformed bands.

  6. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: November 9, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG036) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-01 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department of Energy's Radio Communications Systems" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) complex-wide radio systems infrastructure supports and facilitates activities such as site emergency response,

  7. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 .*. United States Government . memorandum DATE: JUNZO 1994 -... REPLY TO A?TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) Authority Determination -- Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, SUBJECT: Connecticut To' The File The attached review, documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the Combustion Engineering (CE) Site in Windsor, Connecticut, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CE

  8. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9 4797 DATE: p; 4 ' 2 ' ?Qj REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Action Program TO: The File I have reviewed the attached site summaries and elimination recommendations for the following sites: l Mitts & Merrel Co., Saginaw, Michigan l North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina l National Smelt & Refining, Cleveland, Ohio l Sutton, Steele & Steele, Dallas, Texas l Norfolk Naval Station, Virginia

  9. Spectroscopy of tetraquark states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santopinto, Elena; Galata, Giuseppe

    2007-04-15

    A complete classification of qqqq tetraquark states in terms of the spin-flavor, color, and spatial degrees of freedom was constructed. The permutation symmetry properties of both the spin-flavor and orbital parts of the qq and qq subsystems are discussed. This complete classification is general and model independent and it is useful both for model builders and experimentalists. The total wave functions are also explicitly constructed in the hypothesis of ideal mixing; this basis for tetraquark states will enable the eigenvalue problem to be solved for a definite dynamical model. An evaluation of the tetraquark spectrum was obtained from the Iachello mass formula for normal mesons, here generalized to tetraquark systems. This mass formula is a generalization of the Gell-Mann Okubo mass formula, whose coefficients have been upgraded by a study of the latest PDG data. The ground-state tetraquark nonet was identified with f{sub 0}(600),{kappa}(800),f{sub 0}(980),a{sub 0}(980). The diquark-antidiquark limit was also studied.

  10. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ? 0, T ? 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  11. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr⁻¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.

  12. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Qualitymore » Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr⁻¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.« less

  13. State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2003 | Department of Energy Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 This 2003 American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) report brings up to date the review of state policies with regard to CHP that ACEEE completed in 2002. The report describes the current activities of states with programs during the initial survey and also reviews new

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615_Cost Estimating Panel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cost Estimate (ICE) - Same Basis as Project Cost Estimate (PCE) Sa e as s as ojec Cos s a e ( C ) - Reconcilable with PCE to Facilitate Validation * Independent Cost Review...

  15. New DOE Report Estimates LED Savings in Common Lighting Applications...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Report Estimates LED Savings in Common Lighting Applications New DOE Report Estimates LED Savings in Common Lighting Applications July 24, 2015 - 11:00am Addthis The U.S. ...

  16. Property:EstimatedCostLowUSD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name EstimatedCostLowUSD Property Type Quantity Description the low estimate of cost in USD Use this type to express a monetary value in US Dollars. The default unit is one...

  17. Property:EstimatedCostHighUSD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name EstimatedCostHighUSD Property Type Quantity Description the high estimate of cost in USD Use this type to express a monetary value in US Dollars. The default unit is one...

  18. Property:EstimatedCostMedianUSD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name EstimatedCostMedianUSD Property Type Quantity Description the median estimate of cost in USD Use this type to express a monetary value in US Dollars. The default unit is one...

  19. Electronegativity estimation of electronic polarizabilities of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Keyan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfxue@chem.dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2010-03-15

    On the basis of the viewpoint of structure-property relationship in solid state matters, we proposed some useful relations to quantitatively calculate the electronic polarizabilities of binary and ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors, by using electronegativity and principal quantum number. The calculated electronic polarizabilities are in good agreement with reported values in the literature. Both electronegativity and principal quantum number can effectively reflect the detailed chemical bonding behaviors of constituent atoms in these semiconductors, which determines the magnitude of their electronic polarizabilities. The present work provides a useful guide to compositionally design novel semiconductor materials, and further explore advanced electro-optic devices.

  20. EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy Information Administration estimates of crude oil and liquid fuels supply disruptions

  1. Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Excel tool helps agencies estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings. For example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office

  2. Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Appliances & Electronics » Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage of products varies depending on product age and features. Enter a wattage value for your own product for the most accurate estimate. Wattage

  3. Estimating Motor Efficiency in the Field | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimating Motor Efficiency in the Field Estimating Motor Efficiency in the Field Some utility companies and public agencies offer rebates to encourage customers to upgrade their existing standard efficiency motors to premium efficiency motors. It is important to know the efficiency of the existing motor and how it is being used to accurately estimate potential annual energy and dollar savings. This tip sheet provides suggested actions and estimates of savings from improved efficiency. Motor

  4. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface Title: The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set merges together key surface measurements at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate data application. Data from the original site locations can be found in the ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set. Authors:

  5. Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review | Department of Energy Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications. PDF icon Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech

  6. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.; Doris, E.

    2010-02-01

    Future manufacturing of renewable energy equipment in the United States provides economic development opportunities for state and local communities. However, demand for the equipment is finite, and opportunities are limited. U.S. demand is estimated to drive total annual investments in renewable energy equipment to $14-$20 billion by 2030. Evidence from leading states in renewable energy manufacturing suggests that economic development strategies that target renewable energy sector needs by adapting existing policies attract renewable energy manufacturing more than strategies that create new policies. Literature suggests that the states that are most able to attract direct investment and promote sustained economic development can leverage diverse sets of durable assets--like human capital and modern infrastructure--as well as low barriers to market entry. State marketing strategies for acquiring renewable energy manufacturers are likely best served by an approach that: (1) is multi-faceted and long-term, (2) fits within existing broad-based economic development strategies, (3) includes specific components such as support for renewable energy markets and low barriers to renewable energy deployment, and (4) involves increased differentiation by leveraging existing assets when applicable.

  7. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA). State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, Eric; Oteri, Frank; Tegen, Suzanne; Doris, Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    Future manufacturing of renewable energy equipment in the United States provides economic development opportunities for state and local communities. However, demand for the equipment is finite, and opportunities are limited. U.S. demand is estimated to drive total annual investments in renewable energy equipment to $14-$20 billion by 2030. Evidence from leading states in renewable energy manufacturing suggests that economic development strategies that target renewable energy sector needs by adapting existing policies attract renewable energy manufacturing more than strategies that create new policies. Literature suggests that the states that are most able to attract direct investment and promote sustained economic development can leverage diverse sets of durable assetslike human capital and modern infrastructureas well as low barriers to market entry. State marketing strategies for acquiring renewable energy manufacturers are likely best served by an approach that: (1) is multi-faceted and long-term, (2) fits within existing broad-based economic development strategies, (3) includes specific components such as support for renewable energy markets and low barriers to renewable energy deployment, and (4) involves increased differentiation by leveraging existing assets when applicable.

  8. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity State Profiles Renewable Electricity State Profiles Data for 2010 | Release Date: January 21, 2012 | Next Release: January 30, 2013 Other Renewable Electricity State Profiles Choose a State: Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity State Profiles Renewable Electricity State Profiles Data for 2010 | Release Date: January 21, 2012 | Next Release: January 30, 2013 Other Renewable Electricity State Profiles Choose a State: Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity State Profiles Renewable Electricity State Profiles Data for 2010 | Release Date: January 21, 2012 | Next Release: January 30, 2013 Other Renewable Electricity State Profiles Choose a State: Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New

  12. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-10-01

    As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

  13. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  14. United States Government

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOEF 1325.8 {Rev 11*12-91) United States Government Department of Energy (DOE) memorandum Savannah River Operations Office (SR) DATE: OEC 19 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: AMMS (Hintze, 803-952-8422) suBJECT: Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Award Fee Determination for Evaluation Period October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013 To: Charlene Smith, Contracting Officer, Contract DE-AC09-09SR22505 SRR has provided safe, timely, and cost-effective managen1ent and execution of the Liquid Waste program* at the

  15. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    30/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -.- +-+ HQ ]002 rFG (07-;1) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: October 29, 2002 REPLY TO 1G-36 (A02DN028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-01 ATTN OF; SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site TO: Eugene Schmitt, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office ' INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) and its site contractor, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser-Hill), contracted in January

  16. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    12.'6/0.2 ...... 13:27 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 1]003 OE F f325.8 EFG (07.-0) United States Government Deparment of Energy memorandum DATE: 05 2002 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A02AT015) Audit Report Numbser: OAS-L-03-04 SUBJECT: Follow-Up Audit on Internet Privacy TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our follow-up review of the Department of Energy's Internet Privacy initiatives. This review was performed from June 2002 to October 2002 at

  17. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    03/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC

  18. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    .. a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and

  19. United States Government

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    cr--ceut w.:3 i-Kun: TO:202 586 1660 P.002/006 DOE F 1325. EFG (07.PO) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: September 24, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-24 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A04AL004) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's Secure Transportation Asset Program" TO: Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs, National Nuclear Security Administration INTRODUCTION AND OBIECTV E The Secure Transportation Asset (STA)

  20. United States Government Departmen

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Departmen of Energy memorandum DATE: December 20, 2005 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-03 REPLY TO A1TN OF; IG-36 (A05SR025) SUBJECT: Audit of "Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site" TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site stores approximately 36

  1. UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT By application dated ;!ay 11, 1959, as a~zen:ii:d Hay 25, 1959, the a--T+- I-r-- cant requests that its license SW-33 be amend,ed to authorizt? proced- ures for t>e CCLl-ect conversion of LT6 to '3$ and by applicaticn datzci June 29, 1959, a.3 n:odifizd July 15, 1059, the shipment of uranium rdioxide pellets. Based on our rexiew of the information finished by the applicant, it is hereby determined that the applicant is qualified, by training and

  2. Unite2 States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    +39J t% (3740~ - Unite2 States Government m e m o randuin L3 DATE: AU6 3, 9 %g4 REPLY TO All-N OF: m -421 (U. A. W illiams, 427-1719) -. - >' SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Toukay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recouwndations were made to

  3. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE F t325.8 (s8s) Dl? l 36-z EFG (07-90) United States Government m e m o randum Department of Energy DATE: LUG 2 ' 3 1394 ",cl,'," EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites,

  4. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites,

  5. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' z United States Government &mtrne&' of Energy DATE: &uG 3, 9 394 REPLY TO AITN OF: EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Toukay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were

  6. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    73258 18.89, /J" c. j _- /;I_ EFG (07.90) United States Government Department of Energy I memorandum W Y fir ,"1 ti2,ej ? r-l DATE: CE' .' 2 :12; REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) b/fad; 0' \/A a5 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites ReGbbial Action Program TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site summar recommendations for the following sites: ies and elimination '4B : M itts & Merrel Co., Saginaw, M ichigan North Carolina

  7. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    COE F r31ffs (S-89) EFG (37-90) United States Government memorandum f;' "* 5 P ,A ~4&t&y Department o F7 q;' 3 j-1 - ("J 1 [--A Q ' f ' -\' ( --_-_ -- DATE: MAY 29 l%H R' ;J$ EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Radiation Applications Incorporated Site Tc: The File I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the Radiation Applications Incorporated Site in New York City. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination

  8. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development

  9. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,. .1 ! 8-L EFi 107 39, 3 United States Government Department of Energy m e m o randum q es. F;,;4 p JAN 3 1 I991 DATE 16% 1 c N W /- e [ q$ ';;','," EM-421 2 & t, SUBJECT Elimination of the Wash-Rite Company Site from FUSRAP T O The F ile I have reviewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Wash-Rite Company site in Indianapolis, Indiana. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Wash-Rite

  10. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -_ ._ i,;PA.il--l-( ---.~ .-.---.-- .-.-_ L.. ,' 3:. /,y. ; .' ( * ' . bABDFUWW.64 iii4 ! .' - , _ ., - \ *Q@e Menwmzdzkm /-5*-i .-, ? r' / .j CJ ' 7, l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO : FROM : SUBJECT: Reautor Materiala Brash, Bew York DATE : Au-t 2 % 1950 B.S. Pearson, Chief, Admbidratios Serviwr/ w ' Branch, Pittsburgh W fJ3lUAL~FBR~lFICATES MATDl!ALS,-3 @ * l . - -- E&red ia Copy lo. laf &8tewial Tramfor Cerfiiioatu Nor, 303-Z 353-2, 71bds 958-2 and %pZ eoverhg 6hipnsnt6 of sirc~ni\rp~

  11. Unied States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Unied States Government Departmenz oT energy iemorandum DATE: MAY 13 1985 F tPLY TO ATTN OF. E-24 UIECTr: Authorization for Remedial Action - 123 Avenue F, Lodi, New Jersey I TO E. L. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Office 3 We recently authorized cleanup at three vicinity properties at Lodi, New Jersey (121 Avenue F, 3 Hancock Street, and 64 Trudy Drive) in our memorandum to J. LaGrone dated May 6, 1985, but did not authorize work on the property at 123 Avenue

  12. * City, State, Country:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2015 Information and/or Documents NEEDED to CREATE a NEW Event: Information needed: * Official Name of the Event * Name of Organizing Institution * Organizer Contact Name, email and phone number * Event's web site * Date(s) of event * Location the event will take place at * City, State, Country: * Per Diem amounts for lodging and M&IE (meals) * Three to four sentences on how this event is in support of SLAC/DOE and/or the Office of Science mission, therefore representation from SLAC

  13. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  14. IL Wted States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Tis&: p/WI-3 . IL Wted States Government ' 1, -1. \ k. 4 4L La. -iF 1 I ' __, 7, Department of Energy memorandum <jj ' 5 - ; +- ,I 12 ~ DATE: OCT 08 1992 REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) rn. I \ SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at the Former C. H. Schnoor & Company Site, Springdale, Pennsylvania TO: Manager, DOE Oak Ridge Field Office This is to notify you that the former C. H. Schnoor & Company facility in Springdale, Pennsylvania, is designated for

  15. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .8 - EFgzk3) United States Government tiemorandum 0 wt;? -J Department of Energy DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Diamond Magnesium Site in Painesville, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The former Diamond Magnesium Company site located at 720 Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is owned by Uniroyal

  16. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action

  17. Solid state optical microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  18. Solid state optical microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  19. * United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive

  20. - United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 my EFG (07.90) . - United States Government . * Department of. Energy * inemorandum DATE: DEC :! ;j 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W.'A. W illiams, 903-8149) : NY 41 I .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination recommendation for the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Company. I have determined that the potential for radiological contamination is low because of the lim

  1. United States Government

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 (02/06) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum Hanford Site DATE: AUG 30 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: SED:PJG/lO-SED-0161 SUBJECT: CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN IN RESPONSE TO OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY (HSS) BERYLLIUM ASSESSMENT TO: I. R. Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, EM-i, HQ Attached please find the Richland Operations Office (RL)/Office of River Protection (ORP) Corrective Action Plan (CAP) developed in response to the HSS beryllium inspection at

  2. United States Government

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    325.6 (02/98) United States Government Department of Energy rme rm ora nd um Rich land Operations Office DATE: MAY 1 7 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: AMSE:ARH/1O-AMSE-0070 SUBJECT: HANFORD ANALYTICAL SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT (HASQARD) FOCUS GROUP CHARTER TO: MEMO TO FILE Attached is a copy of the HASQARD Focus Group Charter. This Charter has been signed to document the cooperation of the Hanford site contractors, RI. and ORP in harmonizing quality assurance requirements for

  3. United States Goveinment *

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    wx l ,320.o -. yt!$L, . : I __ United States Goveinment * -memorandum @95861 Department of Energy **J-E: OCT 0 8 19% REPLY TO ATfFd OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) [YfZ f;T ! i Fi.1 y: 29 - susJlEcr: Authorization for Remedial Action at Granite City Steel Site, Granite City, Illinois lo: Manager, DOE Oak Ridge Field Office This is to notify you that the Granite City Steel site in Granite City, Illinois, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action

  4. Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Region Proved Reserves 1 Unproved Resources Total Technically Recoverable Resources 2 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate (billion barrels)<//td> 48 States 3 Onshore 14.2 112.6 126.7 48 States 3 Offshore 4.6 50.3 54.8 Alaska 3.6 35.0 38.6 Total U.S. 22.3 197.9 220.2 Dry Natural Gas 4 (trillion cubic feet)<//td> Conventionally Reservoired Fields 5 105.5 904.0 1,009.5 48 States 3 Onshore Gas 6 81.4 369.7 451.1 48

  5. Category:States | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    States Jump to: navigation, search This category contains all states of the United States of America. Click on a state to view that state's page. Pages in category "States" The...

  6. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,594 22,239 23,555 24,912 25,233 26,611 1977-2014 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,377 2,154 1,660 1,360 1,198 1,148 1990-2014 Pacific (California) 37 28 31 22 21 20 1977-2014 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 1,886 1,717 1,311 1,061 941 882 1981-2014 Gulf of Mexico (Texas) 454 409 318 277 236 246 1981-2014 Alaska 358 317 327 299 285 304 1977-2014 Lower 48 States 21,236 21,922 23,228 24,613 24,948 26,307 1977-2014 Alabama 254 223 218 214 175 176 1977-2014 Arkansas 698 951 1,079 1,151 1,140 1,142

  7. ESTIMATING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Moore, E.

    2013-07-17

    The United States holds at least 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the National Nuclear Security Administration and the DOE Office of Environmental Management. Many of the items that require disposition are only partially characterized, and SRNL uses a variety of techniques to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that are important for processing through the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility and alternative disposition paths. Recent advances in laboratory tools, including Prompt Gamma Analysis and Peroxide Fusion treatment, provide data on the existing inventories that will enable disposition without additional, costly sampling and destructive analysis.

  8. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This December 2015 report, the sixth in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recent installations, policies, funding, and deployments around the country.

  9. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtin, Sandra; Jennifer, Gangi

    2015-12-17

    This December 2015 report, the sixth in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recent installations, policies, funding, and deployments around the country.

  10. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2013

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This October 2013 report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, continues to build on the April 2010 State of the States rep

  11. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2015

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This December 2015 report, the sixth in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recen

  12. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, continues to build on the April 2010 State of the States report that pro

  13. State Energy Alternatives: Alternative Energy Resources by State

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This U.S. map provides state by state information on incentives and laws related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. Discover what's available in each state for innovation grants, infrastructure grants, and production grants and who to contact. Find out how many alternative refueling stations are available in each state and where they are. Tennessee, for example, in 2009, has 114 alternative refueling stations: 36 biodiesel, 1 electrical, 29 ethanol, 4 natural gas, and 44 propane. There are also 5 Truck Stop Electrification (TSE) sites in Tennessee. Users can also find out from this map interface the contacts for Clean Cities in a state, information about renewable energy projects and activities in each state, fuel prices across a state, and biomass potential resources and current production in each state.

  14. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2014 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies Institute (BTI) and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, continues to build on the April 2010 State of the States report...

  15. Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State ...

  16. New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic Preservation Offices PROTOTYPE ...

  17. California State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement California State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State ...

  18. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of 2. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  19. NREL Study Shows Renewable Energy Potential in Every State - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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