National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 7-year histogram 1985-1991

  1. Histograms Scatterplots Displaying Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    representing frequencies or percents by area. 3 / 16 #12;Histograms Scatterplots Histogams Interpret histogram in R is accomplished as follows. > age51,49,64,50,48,65,52,56,46,54,49,51,47,55, 55,54,42,51,56,55,51,54,51,60,61,43,55,56,61,52,69,64,46,54,47) > hist(age, main = c

  2. Self-tuning Histograms: Building Histograms Without Looking at Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboulnaga, Ashraf

    Self-tuning Histograms: Building Histograms Without Looking at Data Ashraf Aboulnaga Computer at query optimization time, the cost of building them and maintaining or rebuilding them when the data histograms. Building a histogram involves scanning or sampling the data, and sorting the data

  3. Lab 3a: Distribution functions Histogram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 3a: Distribution functions Outline · Histogram · Basic concepts · Gaussian (normal) distribution ­Limiting distribution · Poisson distribution ­Counting measurements #12;Histogram and bin A histogram is a graphical representation of the distribution of data. It is a representation of tabulated

  4. Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million CubicChanges in

  5. A non parametric approach for histogram segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desolneux, Agnès

    considers a rigorous definition of an admissible segmentation, avoiding over and under-segmentation problems of Gaussians, for example, luminance histograms of natural images, as we shall see in the experimental section segments by minimizing some energy criterion (variance, entropy, etc...). In all cases, the number of modes

  6. Improved Histogram Equalization Methods for Robust Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Histogram Equalization Methods for Robust Speech Recognition Hsin-Ju Hsieh1, 2 , Jeih-weih Hung2 , Berlin Chen1 1 2 hsinju@ntnu.edu.tw, berlin@ntnu.edu.tw, jwhung@ncnu.edu.tw (Histogram% Keywords: automatic speech recognition, noise robustness, histogram equalization, feature contextual

  7. Snippet Based Trajectory Statistics Histograms for Assistive Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and infusion pump usage. Snippet Based Trajectory Statistics Histograms encodes the motion and position focus on assistive systems on home medical device usage, more specifically, infusion pump and inhaler usage. Infusion pumps are used to deliver fluid and medication into a patient's body, and inhaler

  8. A HISTOGRAM DENSITY MODELING APPROACH TO MUSIC EMOTION RECOGNITION Ju-Chiang Wang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsin-Min

    A HISTOGRAM DENSITY MODELING APPROACH TO MUSIC EMOTION RECOGNITION Ju-Chiang Wang1,2 , Hsin with developing pre- dictive models that comprehend the affective content of musi- cal signals. Recently histogram den- sity modeling approach that models the emotion distribution by a 2-D histogram over

  9. Accelerated weight histogram method for exploring free energy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindahl, Viveca; Hess, Berk

    2014-01-01

    Calculating free energies is an important and notoriously difficult task for molecular simulations. The rapid increase in computational power has made it possible to probe increasingly complex systems, yet extracting accurate free energies from these simulations remains a major challenge. Fully exploring the free energy landscape of, say, a biological macromolecule typically requires sampling large conformational changes and slow transitions. Often, the only feasible way to study such a system is to simulate it using an enhanced sampling method. The accelerated weight histogram (AWH) method is a new, efficient extended ensemble sampling technique which adaptively biases the simulation to promote exploration of the free energy landscape. The AWH method uses a probability weight histogram which allows for efficient free energy updates and results in an easy discretization procedure. A major advantage of the method is its general formulation, making it a powerful platform for developing further extensions and an...

  10. Calculation of free energy landscapes: A Histogram Reweighted Metadynamics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Smiatek; Andreas Heuer

    2011-03-02

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of free energy landscapes. Our approach involves a history dependent bias potential which is evaluated on a grid. The corresponding free energy landscape is constructed via a histogram reweighting procedure a posteriori. Due to the presence of the bias potential, it can be also used to accelerate rare events. In addition, the calculated free energy landscape is not restricted to the actual choice of collective variables and can in principle be extended to auxiliary variables of interest without further numerical effort. The applicability is shown for several examples. We present numerical results for the alanine dipeptide and the Met-Enkephalin in explicit solution to illustrate our approach. Furthermore we derive an empirical formula that allows the prediction of the computational cost for the ordinary metadynamics variant in comparison to our approach which is validated by a dimensionless representation.

  11. Shot-Noise Limited Single-Molecule FRET Histograms: Comparison between Theory and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    Shot-Noise Limited Single-Molecule FRET Histograms: Comparison between Theory and Experiments Eyal the best fit shot-noise limited proximity ratio histogram (PRH) in single-molecule fluorescence resonant potential artifacts affecting the calculation of the best fit shot-noise limited PRH. This algorithm

  12. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative 2011) ABSTRACT This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms integrated cloud feedbacks computed in this manner agree remarkably well with the adjusted change in cloud

  13. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references.

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS 1 Fast Local Histogram Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS 1 Fast Local Histogram are with the School of Computer Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China (e-mail: h.d.liew@gmail.com; m.yang@njnu.edu.cn). Yang Gao is with the State Key Laboratory for Novel Software Technology

  15. Flow Classification by Histograms or How to Go on Safari in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilion, Richard

    Flow Classification by Histograms or How to Go on Safari in the Internet Augustin Soule , Kavé aggregated Internet traffic flows efficiently, we need to be able to categorize flows into distinct classes method for Internet flow classification. We show that our method is powerful in that it is capable

  16. Changes in energy intensity in the manufacturing sector 1985--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-15

    In this report, energy intensity is defined as the ratio of energy consumption per unit of output. Output is measured as the constant dollar of value of shipments and receipts, and two measures of energy consumption are presented in British thermal units (Btu): Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy. A decrease in energy intensity from one period to another suggests an increase in energy efficiency, and vice versa. Energy efficiency can be defined and measured in various ways. Certain concepts of energy efficiency, especially those limited to equipment efficiencies, cannot be measured over time using changes in energy-intensity ratios. While improved energy efficiency will tend to reduce energy intensity, it is also true that a change in energy intensity can be due to factors unrelated to energy efficiency. For this report, energy intensity is used as a surrogate measure for energy efficiency, based on industry knowledge and current methodological analyses.

  17. Reverse mapping of normal tissue complication probabilities onto dose volume histogram space: The problem of randomness of the dose volume histogram sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markov, Krassimir; Schinkel, Colleen; Stavreva, Nadia; Stavrev, Pavel; Weldon, Michael; Fallone, B. Gino [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, and Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, and Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada); Departments of Physics and Oncology, University of Alberta, and Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G1Z2 (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    A very important issue in contemporary inverse treatment radiotherapy planning is the specification of proper dose-volume constraints limiting the treatment planning algorithm from delivering high doses to the normal tissue surrounding the tumor. Recently we have proposed a method called reverse mapping of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) onto dose-volume histogram (DVH) space, which allows the calculation of appropriate biologically based dose-volume constraints to be used in the inverse treatment planning. The method of reverse mapping requires random sampling from the functional space of all monotonically decreasing functions in the unit square. We develop, in this paper, a random function generator for the purpose of the reverse mapping. Since the proposed generator is based on the theory of random walk, it is therefore designated in this work, as a random walk DVH generator. It is theoretically determined that the distribution of the number of monotonically decreasing functions passing through a point in the dose volume histogram space follows the hypergeometric distribution. The proposed random walk DVH generator thus simulates, in a random fashion, trajectories of monotonically decreasing functions (finite series) that are situated in the unit square [0,1]x[1,0] using the hypergeometric distribution. The DVH generator is an important tool in the study of reverse NTCP mapping for the calculation of biologically based dose-volume constraints for inverse treatment planning.

  18. The Confined-Deconfined Interface Tension in Quenched QCD using the Histogram Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Grossmann; M. L. Laursen

    1993-01-28

    We present results for the confinement-deconfinement interface tension $\\sigma_{cd}$ of quenched QCD. They were obtained by applying Binder's histogram method to lattices of size $L^2\\times L_z\\times L_t$ for $L_t=2$ and $L=8,10,12\\mbox{ and }14$ and various $L_z\\in [L,\\, 4\\, L]$. The use of a multicanonical algorithm and rectangular geometries have turned out to be crucial for the numerical studies. We also give an estimate for $\\sigma_{cd}$ at $L_t=4$ using published data.

  19. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth MARK D. ZELINKA Department of Atmospheric Sciences received 12 May 2011, in final form 15 November 2011) ABSTRACT Cloud radiative kernels and histograms

  20. Year 1 Year 2 Anne 3 Anne 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Languages, Sport EP Third Year: - First 2 trimesters of courses (specialization) - Third trimester: researchYear 1 Year 2 Année 3 Année 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 «« INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN »» MASTERMASTER PhDPhD Two to three years of undergraduate studies Education

  1. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basire, M.; Soudan, J.-M.; Angelié, C., E-mail: christian.angelie@cea.fr [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CNRS-URA 2453, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/LIDyL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-09-14

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the ?-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, g{sub p}(E{sub p}) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called “corrected EAM” (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients S{sub ij} are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature T{sub m} is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number N{sub at}. The standard N{sub at}{sup ?1/3} linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for N{sub at} >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For N{sub at} <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  2. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohri, Nisha; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Keam, Jennifer; Ballangrud, Ase; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N.; Ho, Alice Y.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

  3. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Sherman, 1984; Klaassen and Peltier, 1985, 1991; Caulfield and Peltier, 1994, 2000; Smyth and Moum, 2001

  4. Use of benchmark dose-volume histograms for selection of the optimal technique between three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Chunhui [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yang, Claus Chunli [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Narayan, Samir [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stern, Robin L. [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Perks, Julian [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Goldberg, Zelanna [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Purdy, James A. [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)]. E-mail: Srinivasan.Vijayakumar@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate our own benchmark dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum for both conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate quantitatively the benefits of using IMRT vs. 3D-CRT in treating localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer, our policy was to plan each patient with both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This study included 31 patients with T1b to T2c localized prostate cancer, for whom we completed double-planning using both 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. The target volumes included prostate, either with or without proximal seminal vesicles. Bladder and rectum DVH data were summarized to obtain an average DVH for each technique and then compared using two-tailed paired t test analysis. Results: For 3D-CRT our bladder doses were as follows: mean 28.8 Gy, v60 16.4%, v70 10.9%; rectal doses were: mean 39.3 Gy, v60 21.8%, v70 13.6%. IMRT plans resulted in similar mean dose values: bladder 26.4 Gy, rectum 34.9 Gy, but lower values of v70 for the bladder (7.8%) and rectum (9.3%). These benchmark DVHs have resulted in a critical evaluation of our 3D-CRT techniques over time. Conclusion: Our institution has developed benchmark DVHs for bladder and rectum based on our clinical experience with 3D-CRT and IMRT. We use these standards as well as differences in individual cases to make decisions on whether patients may benefit from IMRT treatment rather than 3D-CRT.

  5. Histograms detect imbalances Variable sizes capture variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    Laboratory, North Carolina State University, Renaissance Computing Institute This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52, Profiler, Child Nodes Data Output: to Parent Node, Tool Communication paths OPS Attr.1 Attr.2 Attr

  6. Microsoft Word - CFAC 7-Year PSA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reimbursable costs incurred to replace the curtailed schedule. 11.2.3.3 In the event power cannot be scheduled from a BPA Scheduling Point of Receipt (other than a...

  7. Microsoft Word - CFAC 7-Year PSA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal March 3, 2015 -Far-redCarlsbad Draft is

  8. Pitch Histograms in Audio and Symbolic Music Information Retrieval Pitch Histograms in Audio and Symbolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    classification. Given the rapidly increasing importance of digital music distribution, as well as the fact of computer users. Up to now, genre classification for digitally stored music has been performed manually musical genre classification. A multiple-pitch detection algorithm for polyphonic signals is used

  9. Pitch Histograms in Audio and Symbolic Music Information Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    , genre classification for digitally stored music has been performed manually and therefore automatic and audio form. This representation is evaluated in the context of automatic musical genre classification-pitch detection, automatic musical genre classification results from symbolic and audio data are compared

  10. TRANSFORM CODING OF RGB-HISTOGRAMS Reiner Lenz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenz, Reiner

    (Comaniciu et al., 2003) to cite a few. In the following we will first argue that a rele- vant transformation

  11. Automated Insect Identification through Concatenated Histograms of Local Appearance Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by thermal pollution, eutrophica- tion, sedimentation, and chemical pollution. In addition to its practical

  12. Efficiently Matching Sets of Features with Random Histograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarychev, Konstantin

    advanced search systems for audio [23], video [29] and sensor data also use sets of unordered high-dimensional feature vec- tors as their metadata representations, thus it is important to develop a flexible, effective

  13. AUDIO CONTEXT RECOGNITION USING AUDIO EVENT HISTOGRAMS Toni Heittola1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virtanen, Tuomas

    Eronen2 , Tuomas Virtanen1 1Department of Signal Processing Tampere University of Technology Korkeakoulunkatu 1, 33720, Tampere, Finland email: toni.heittola@tut.fi, annamaria.mesaros@tut.fi, tuomas.virtanen@tut.fi 2Nokia Research Center P.O.Box 100, FIN-33721, Tampere, Finland email: antti

  14. OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, Greg T

    2013-01-01

    finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

  15. Relationships among magnitude representation, counting and memory in 4- to 7-year-old children: A developmental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soltesz, Fruzsina; Szucs, Denes; Szucs, Livia

    2010-02-18

    when the perceptual information was in con- flict with numerical information. Susceptibility to irrele- vant perceptual features weakened with age, and the congruency effect was mainly driven by 4-year-olds. This developmental trend is in agreement...

  16. Audience Design in Children: Evidence of listener-specific conceptual reference at 6-7 years old 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid Milligan, Simon D.

    Speakers tend to design their utterances specifically for respective audiences (AD). The knowledge that a referential concept is shared with a particular listener allows the speaker to make, otherwise ambiguous, abbreviated and definite reference...

  17. Author's personal copy Multifractal analysis of three-dimensional histogram from color images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    can be helpful to var- ious tasks of digital image processing, as for instance modeling, classification, indexing. Ó 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Natural images, especially relevant structures or clusters for segmentation, classification, indexing, or other purposes

  18. A flat histogram method for inference with probabilistic and deterministic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrun, Sebastian

    probabilistic and deterministic dependencies are present at the same time is a challenging task with many real-world for an appropri- ate energy function, where the density of states is defined as a function that for each energy level E gives the number of configurations with that energy. We propose a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo

  19. Correlated histogram representation of Monte Carlo derived medical accelerator photon-output phase space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided to represent the calculated phase space of photons emanating from medical accelerators used in photon teletherapy. The method reproduces the energy distributions and trajectories of the photons originating in the bremsstrahlung target and of photons scattered by components within the accelerator head. The method reproduces the energy and directional information from sources up to several centimeters in radial extent, so it is expected to generalize well to accelerators made by different manufacturers. The method is computationally both fast and efficient overall sampling efficiency of 80% or higher for most field sizes. The computational cost is independent of the number of beams used in the treatment plan.

  20. Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following commentsMethods for Estimating Short-Term Extremeposter,MISR,

  1. Burrowing Owls in the Pacific Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    #12;10/12/2014 7 Conservation Outlook Issues · Lack of data · Conflicting interests · Nest mostly, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA. Breeding Bird Survey data, 1985-1991. Scale represents (NatureServe) Breeding distribution of the burrowing owl in the US & Canada (Breeding Bird Survey) Why

  2. Summary We studied the effect of scion donor-tree age on the physiology and growth of 6-to 7-year-old grafted Scots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    in age from 36 to 269 years at the time of grafting. Hydraulic conductance was measured gravimetrically conductance per unit leaf area did not vary with crown size. However, leaf specific hydraulic conduc- tance measurements included photosynthethetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration, whole plant hydrau- lic

  3. Thin-Ideal Internalization, Self-Objectification, and Body Dissatisfaction in the Prevention of Eating Disorders in 5 to 7 Year Old Girls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley Michelle

    2015-06-01

    as a major risk factor in the development eating disorder symptoms in both women and men (Cash & Deagle, 1997; Fairburn, Peveler, Jones, Hope, & Doll, 1993; Fairburn, Stice et al., 1993; Hrabosky & Grilo, 2007; Killen et al., 1996; Polivy & Herman...

  4. Discovery of the 5.7-year Douglass cycle: A pioneer’s quest for solar cycles in tree-ring records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, W H

    2010-01-01

    11.0 and 11.6) as potential solar witnesses. The first isby a solar cycle of 11.2. To answer potential criticism that

  5. Figure 1: Basin specific histograms for alternative tilting angle. Histograms of 2 tilting angle for subbasins A, B and C. For subbasin A the average angle is 26 with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    : Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics June 4, 2012 #12;Figure S1: Cut-based free energy profiles for apo of holo PDZ3 consists of a single free energy basin. The lack of barriers for holo PDZ3 hinders the optimization of RC. For apo PDZ3, the cut-based free energy profile projected onto the optimized RC is shown

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy employing divalent europium-doped alkaline earth halides and digital readout for accurate histogramming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Drury, Owen B; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2014-11-11

    A scintillator radiation detector system according to one embodiment includes a scintillator; and a processing device for processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from the scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A scintillator radiation detector system according to another embodiment includes a processing device for fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. A method according to yet another embodiment includes processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from a scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A method in a further embodiment includes fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times; and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  7. El sistema teatral uruguayo de la última década: ¿Un cambio de paradigma?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Roger

    1992-04-01

    aparición de nuevas publicaciones periódicas con ligeros matices opositores, semanarios como La Semana ya desde 1979, seguidos de Opinar, El Correo de los Viernes, y La Democracia, al año siguiente, el plebiscito que dijo "no" a los intentos de... la post dictadura hasta hoy, 1985-1991, donde las transformaciones del sistema político-social que produce el retorno a la democracia incidirán de múltiples modos en el sistema teatral: regreso del grupo El Galpón exiliado en México y recuperación...

  8. h0: Printing Images and Their Histograms 1. Print four 512512 images: mandrill, scene, texture, fingerprint with size 3.2 by 3.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    cos 16 cos3 16 cos5 16 cos7 16 cos9 16 cos11 16 cos13 16 cos15 16 cos2 16 cos6 16 cos10 16 cos14 16 cos18 16 cos22 16 cos26 16 cos30 16 cos3 16 cos9 16 cos15 16 cos21 16 cos27 16 cos33 16 cos39 16 cos45 16 cos4 16 cos12 16 cos20 16 cos28 16 cos36 16 cos44 16 cos52 16 cos60 16 cos5 16 cos15 16 cos25 16

  9. h1: Printing Images and Their Histograms 1. Print four 512512 images: mandrill, scene, texture, fingerprint with size 3.2 by 3.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    cos 16 cos3 16 cos5 16 cos7 16 cos9 16 cos11 16 cos13 16 cos15 16 cos2 16 cos6 16 cos10 16 cos14 16 cos18 16 cos22 16 cos26 16 cos30 16 cos3 16 cos9 16 cos15 16 cos21 16 cos27 16 cos33 16 cos39 16 cos45 16 cos4 16 cos12 16 cos20 16 cos28 16 cos36 16 cos44 16 cos52 16 cos60 16 cos5 16 cos15 16 cos25 16

  10. Proton radiotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical outcome and a dosimetric comparison with photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yock, Torunn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: tyock@partners.org; Schneider, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Friedmann, Alison [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Fullerton, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tarbell, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Background: Over 85% of pediatric orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are cured with combined chemotherapy and radiation. However, the late effects of photon radiation compromise function and cosmetic outcome. Proton radiation can provide excellent tumor dose distributions while sparing normal tissues better than photon irradiation. Methods and Materials: Conformal 3D photon and proton radiotherapy plans were generated for children treated with proton irradiation for orbital RMS at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dose-volume histograms (90%, 50%, 10%) were generated and compared for important orbital and central nervous system structures. Average percentages of total dose prescribed were calculated based on the 3 dose-volume histogram levels for normal orbital structures for both the proton and photon plans. The percent of normal tissue spared by using protons was calculated. Results: Seven children were treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma with proton irradiation and standard chemotherapy. The median follow-up is 6.3 years (range, 3.5-9.7 years). Local and distant controls compare favorably to those in other published accounts. There was an advantage in limiting the dose to the brain, pituitary, hypothalamus, temporal lobes, and ipsilateral and contralateral orbital structures. Tumor size and location affect the degree of sparing of normal structures. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy is superior to 3D conformal photon radiation in the treatment of orbital RMS. Proton therapy maintains excellent tumor coverage while reducing the radiation dose to adjacent normal structures. Proton radiation therapy minimizes long-term side effects.

  11. Accumulated dose to the rectum, measured using dose-volume histograms and dose-surface maps, is different from planned dose in all patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaife, Jessica E.; Thomas, Simon J.; Harrison, Karl; Romanchikova, Marina; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.; Forman, Julia; Bates, Amy M.; Jena, Raj; Parker, M. Andrew; Burnet, Neil G.

    2015-07-24

    ve tha t f ro m the DVHs. To facilita te visua l comp a riso n of the DSMs, we deve lop e d a syste m to sta n da rdize the ir sup e rior - inf e rio r len gth s. The med ian MV rad iu s durin g trea tm e nt was calcula te d for each participa... PR OO FS BJ R UN CO RR EC TE D 15 p rost a te can c e r. Inte rna tio na l jou rna l of rad iation onco logy, biolo gy, physics. 2008 ;7 0 (4 ):1 12 4 - 9 . 13. Jan i AB, Su A, Corre a D, Gratzle J. Compa riso n of late gastro inte stin a l...

  12. Fast Beam Investigations of Two- and Three-Body Photodissociation by Time- and Position-Coincidence Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crider, Paul

    2010-01-01

    dynamic and kinematic information about the decay mechanismkinematic histograms that can elucidate the mechanism of

  13. Introduction We will analyze data that are given as an n d matrix of real numbers. The number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemelä, Jussi

    function graphs to analyze physical data, and Playfair (1786, 1801) invented the histogram, the pie chart

  14. An Investigation into the Benefits of Tactile Feedback for Laparoscopic, Robotic, and Remote Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wottawa, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Mutter, D. (2002). Transcontinental robot-assisted remote100. Histogram of the one-way transcontinental internet103 Estimating Transcontinental

  15. Applicator-guided volumetric-modulated arc therapy for low-risk...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    included in this analysis; for each patient, plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, homogeneity index, and conformity indexes. All techniques met the...

  16. Is There A Grand Challenge or X-Prize for Data Mining? Gregory Piatetsky-Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    from simple features (e.g. color histogram for images, energy estimates for audio signal, texture, speaker emotion recognition in audio, automatic summarization of TV programs, extracting relationships

  17. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    40 Figure E1. NOx Emissions (lb/MWh) for ICEs, Californa Air53 Figure E2. NOx Emission Histogram for SimulatedNOx emissions.

  18. Bacterial motility on abiotic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibiansky, Maxsim

    2013-01-01

    3.20 Histogram of angular velocity for a representativeWT bacterium; positive angular velocity indicates clockwisebac- terium b at time i. Angular velocity. We calculate the

  19. Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly - 2july09 - FINAL...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    analytic studies and radiochemistry. Figure 7. Histogram of measured (red) and actual (green) density using 150 micron x 150 micron material cross-sections Figure 6. Fractional...

  20. SOCR Analyses: Implementation and Demonstration of a New Graphical Statistics Educational Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Annie; Cui, Jenny; Dinov, Ivo D

    2009-01-01

    e.g. , box plots, pie charts, time plots, etc. Histogramgraphically with bar charts, pie charts or histograms, wedemonstration. Bottom left: pie chart demonstration. Bottom

  1. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1993-12-01

    The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

  2. Action and Event Recognition with Fisher Vectors on a Compact Feature Set Dan Oneata Jakob Verbeek Cordelia Schmid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    in a video is repre- sented by means of bag-of-visual-word (BoV) histograms. Possibly, to capture spatio several space-time cells overlaid on the video [17]. The BoV histograms are then fed into SVM classifiers

  3. Interactive Poster: Using CoMIRVA for Visualizing Similarities Between Music Artists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    of music. This information can be gained basically from the audio signal or from metadata (e.g. ID3-tags-Dimensional Smoothed Data Histograms (3D-SDH) Based on the "Smoothed Data Histogram" (SDH) introduced in [2], we

  4. Employing linear prediction coding in feature time sequences for robust speech recognition in noisy environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adaptation) (cepstral mean and variance normalization, CMVN)[1](cepstral histogram normalization, CHN)[2. Hilger and H. Ney, "Quantile based histogram equalization for noise robust large vocabulary speech recognition," IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech and Language Processing, 14(3), pp. 845­854, 2006. [3] C. P

  5. ON THE APPROXIMATE W-DISJOINT ORTHOGONALITY OF SPEECH Scott Rickard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz, Ozgur

    is with the Audio and Signal Processing Group, Siemens Corporate Research and the Program in Applied- dimensional histogram constructed from the ratio of the time-fre- quency representations of the mixtures which-disjoint orthogonality the histogram can be used to determine the mixing parameters and separate sources. Example

  6. The MIT Libraries seek an experienced, customer-oriented manager of services, staff and technology to lead the Information Delivery & Library Access (ID&LA) Department. This is an exciting opportunity to provide leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    QUALIFICATIONS: MLS/MLIS or equivalent combination of an advanced degree and experience Minimum of 7 years

  7. Impact of Dose to the Bladder Trigone on Long-Term Urinary Function After High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Oh, Jung Hun; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential association between genitourinary (GU) toxicity and planning dose–volume parameters for GU pelvic structures after high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 268 patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy to a prescribed dose of 86.4 Gy in 48 fractions during June 2004-December 2008 were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Dose–volume histograms of the whole bladder, bladder wall, urethra, and bladder trigone were analyzed. The primary endpoint for GU toxicity was an IPSS sum increase ?10 points over baseline. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 3-7.7 years). Thirty-nine patients experienced an IPSS sum increase ?10 during follow-up; 84% remained event free at 5 years. After univariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.006), the V90 of the trigone (P=.006), and the maximal dose to the trigone (P=.003) were significantly associated with an IPSS sum increase ?10. After multivariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.009) and increased maximal dose to the trigone (P=.005) remained significantly associated. Seventy-two patients had both a lower baseline IPSS sum and a higher maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as high risk, and 68 patients had both a higher baseline IPSS sum and a lower maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as low risk for development of an IPSS sum increase ?10. Twenty-one of 72 high-risk patients (29%) and 5 of 68 low-risk patients (7%) experienced an IPSS sum increase ?10 (P=.001; odds ratio 5.19). Conclusions: The application of hot spots to the bladder trigone was significantly associated with relevant changes in IPSS during follow-up. Reduction of radiation dose to the lower bladder and specifically the bladder trigone seems to be associated with a reduction in late GU toxicity.

  8. Reliability as a measure of transportation system performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dena Delise

    2000-01-01

    Comparison Results for Station ES-614D - Northbound Speed Comparison Results for Station ES-614D - Southbound Speed Comparison Results for Station ES-619D - Northbound Speed Comparison Results for Station ES-628D - Southbound Relative Frequency Histogram...

  9. A Stored Picture Hacking Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowitz, Sidney

    A short description of LISP functions that have been written for use with the stored picture facility. These functions allow one to display an image of a stored scene on the 340 scope, and produce graphs and histograms of ...

  10. Quantum chaos in the heavy quarkonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. U. Matrasulov; F. C. Khanna; U. R. Salomov

    2003-06-23

    The binding energy spectra of the heavy quarkonia are calculated by solving the Schr\\"odinger equations with Coulomb plus confining potentials. Statistical properties of the obtained spectra are studied by plotting nearest level spacing distribution histograms.

  11. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    , the procedure generates a histogram of heat-flow values determined from existing measurements obtained from are strongly non-Gaussian, but are well approximated by the log-logistic distribution which is completely

  12. Energy-Efficient HOG-based Object Detection at 1080HD 60 fps with Multi-Scale Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suleiman, Amr AbdulZahir

    In this paper, we present a real-time and energy-efficient multi-scale object detector using Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification. Parallel detectors with balanced ...

  13. Image use in the characterization of field parameters: incorporation of remote sensing with hydrologic simulation modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Garey Alton

    2000-01-01

    procedure (histogram matching) in terms of matching the theoretically expected growth of vegetation away from image soil lines. Estimates of organic matter (OM) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) were derived from soil lines of bare soil images. Leaf area...

  14. Integrating co-occurrence and spatial contexts on patch-based scene segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use is the bag-of-visterms (BOV), i.e., a histogram of discretized regional descriptors. On one hand, despite the loss of "strong" spatial contextual infor- mation, BOVs have been successfully used

  15. Image retrieval, classification and object recognition using local invariant features in high resolution remote sensing imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    computing the intersection between histograms. Given BOV W1 and BOV W 2 corresponding to two images, thekernel is computed as: M min BOV W 1 (m), BOV W 2 (m) . K

  16. Operational profiling and statistical analysis of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Travis J. (Travis John)

    2013-01-01

    Ship operational profiles are a valuable tool for ship designers and engineers when analyzing potential designs and ship system selections. The most common is the speed-time profile, normally depicted as a histogram showing ...

  17. Fast Human Detection With Cascaded Ensembles On The GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilgic, Berkin

    We investigate a fast pedestrian localization framework that integrates the cascade-of-rejectors approach with the Histograms of Oriented Gradients (HoG) features on a data parallel architecture. The salient features of ...

  18. FINDING KBO FLYBY TARGETS FOR NEW HORIZONS JOHN SPENCER and MARC BUIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Leslie A.

    FINDING KBO FLYBY TARGETS FOR NEW HORIZONS JOHN SPENCER and MARC BUIE Lowell Observatory LESLIE maintained by Marc Buie at http://www.lowell.edu/buie/kbo/kbofollowup.html (histogram, right axis). The good

  19. WATERMARKING 3D SHAPES USING LOCAL MOMENTS Adrian G. Bors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bors, Adrian

    of the research on watermarking has concentrated on audio signals, images, or video sequences [1, 2]. Only by a copyright protection watermarking algorithm employ- ing modifications in histograms of surface normals were

  20. Harmonium Models for Semantic Video Representation and Classication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Eric P.

    contain multi- ple data types including image frames, transcript text, speech, audio signal, each bearing the transcript keywords and color-histogram features, and performs classication using these latent topics under

  1. The Effectiveness of Concept Based Search for Video Retrieval Claudia Hauff and Robin Aly and Djoerd Hiemstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    understood extraction methods of low level features from media files (e.g. color histograms or audio signals to return. Thus the expression does not cover concepts which are only represented in the audio content

  2. Math 163 Objective by Chapter Displaying Distributions, Chapter 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    in which each quantitative variable is measured. 3. Recognize when a pie chart can and cannot be used. 4 quantities. 5. Interpret pie charts and bar graphs. 6. Make a histogram of the distribution of a quantitative

  3. Math 1530: Applied Statistics Review for Test 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    ; percentile; z-score; probability 2. Plots: bar chart; Pareto (pie) chart; histogram; stemplot; time plot. Computations: section degree of pie chart (f n · 360o ); mean (X = X n , µ = X N , X = f·Xk n ); me- dian

  4. Common binding by redundant group B Sox proteins is evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl, Sarah H.; Russell, Steven

    2015-04-13

    Three-way comparison of Dichaete binding. (A) Pie chart showin present in one species (47%), two species (23%) or all three species (30%). in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. yakuba clustered by binding affinity key and histogram shows...

  5. The transputer based GA. SP data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, D.; Avano, B.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G. ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the new data acquisition for the GA.SP detector is presented. It is a distributed system based on a network of 40 T800 and T222 transputers linked to a VME system used for histogram storage. A 100 MBit/s FDDI ring connects the system to UNIX workstations used for the experiment control, histogram display and second level data analysis.

  6. Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhibo

    2009-05-15

    MODIS ( ! v IS ) cirrus optical thickness retrieval, along with a linear fit (blue line) of ! c POLDER by 0.6827! v MIS . Note that the logarithm scale is used in both axes............................................................................................... 100 x FIGURE Page 4.10 The histograms of the ratio ! c POLDER / c MIS . ........................................ 101 4.11 A schematic of the ?plane-parallel albedo bias?................................ 103 4.12 Histogram of the cloud...

  7. Audit Report: Department of Energy's Controls over Recovery Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management (EM) oversees two major contracts for cleaning up the legacy contamination at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The 7 year, 2.9 billion contract with...

  8. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Well efficiency Pump maintenance 4-7 years 20 nOI; probablyenergy savings for pump maintenance. to formulate moreEfficiency Pump Efficiency & Maintenance. & Maintenance. -v-

  9. Intelligent Building Energy Information and Control Systems for Low-Energy Operations and Optimal Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Open  Automated  Demand  Response  Communications from  7 Years of Automated Demand Response in Commercial Management and Demand Response in Commercial  Buildings. , 

  10. Probability density functions for the variable solar wind near the solar cycle minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vörös,; Leitner, M; Narita, Y; Consolini, G; Kovács, P; Tóth, A; Lichtenberger, J

    2015-01-01

    Unconditional and conditional statistics is used for studying the histograms of magnetic field multi-scale fluctuations in the solar wind near the solar cycle minimum in 2008. The unconditional statistics involves the magnetic data during the whole year 2008. The conditional statistics involves the magnetic field time series splitted into concatenated subsets of data according to a threshold in dynamic pressure. The threshold separates fast stream leading edge compressional and trailing edge uncompressional fluctuations. The histograms obtained from these data sets are associated with both large-scale (B) and small-scale ({\\delta}B) magnetic fluctuations, the latter corresponding to time-delayed differences. It is shown here that, by keeping flexibility but avoiding the unnecessary redundancy in modeling, the histograms can be effectively described by a limited set of theoretical probability distribution functions (PDFs), such as the normal, log-normal, kappa and logkappa functions. In a statistical sense the...

  11. Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcell, Wesley Tyler

    2011-02-22

    classical SyS arises from fact that SyS induces within-level (h) and between-level components of variance and that the between-level component is unmeasured (Cochran, 1977). The SRS-based estimator (2) is unbiased if the order of units... squared error is depicted differently in the graphics of Appendix E. On each page the panels are histograms of MSE for all h = 1, ? , k and i= 1, 2? , n possibilities, each 29 panel representing one of our eight estimators. The SRS histogram...

  12. Interface Tensions and Perfect Wetting in the Two-Dimensional Seven-State Potts Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Grossmann; Sourendu Gupta

    1993-10-25

    We present a numerical determination of the order-disorder interface tension, \\sod, for the two-dimensional seven-state Potts model. We find $\\sod=0.0114\\pm0.0012$, in good agreement with expectations based on the conjecture of perfect wetting. We take into account systematic effects on the technique of our choice: the histogram method. Our measurements are performed on rectangular lattices, so that the histograms contain identifiable plateaus. The lattice sizes are chosen to be large compared to the physical correlation length. Capillary wave corrections are applied to our measurements on finite systems.

  13. Nonparametric Regression for Geographic Visualization and Analysis of Environmental Policy Gerald Whittaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David W.

    Nonparametric Regression for Geographic Visualization and Analysis of Environmental Policy Gerald August 9-13, 1998. The views expressed are the author's, and do not necessarily represent policies; averaged shifted histogram; environmental economics The U.S. Department of Agriculture administers

  14. Differential gene expression Anja von Heydebreck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    on ANOVA/linear models r continuous response variable: linear models; censored survival times: e.g. Cox proportional hazards models #12;Example Golub data, 27 ALL vs. 11 AML samples, 3,051 genes. Histogram). The FDR (Benjamini & Hochberg 1995) is the expected proportion of Type I errors among the rejected

  15. A Fingerprint Classification Technique Using Directional Images Meltem Ballan and F. Ayhan Sakarya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Brian L.

    A Fingerprint Classification Technique Using Directional Images Meltem Ballan and F. Ayhan Sakarya directional histograms. The technique enhances the digitized image using adaptive clipping and image matching classification methods, such as Galton and Henry Classification [2], rely on point patterns in fingerprints which

  16. A Real-Time Face Tracking System Based On A Single PTZ Camera 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seoktae

    2014-12-12

    Figure 24 Evaluation of the zooming feature ........................................................... 49 Figure 25 Performance evaluation of proposed system mimicking a lecture .......... 50 ix LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1.... Then, a classifier containing information regarding the features used for detection is loaded into the process. The image preprocessing step transforms the original image in RGB color to a grey scaled version and continues on to histogram...

  17. Development of a stochastic convection R. J. Keane, R. S. Plant, N. E. Bowler, W. J. Tennant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    ­ p.6/45 #12;Rank Histograms of surface temperature Development of a stochastic convection scheme ­ p of a stochastic convection scheme ­ p.8/45 #12;Climate modelling of heavy pre- cipitation Sun et. al. J. Clim The distribution will be different in reality, but the variability will be similar. Development of a stochastic

  18. Machine Vision and Applications manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    in videos produced by in- frared sensors (due to varying thermal conditions) and vis- ible sensors (e instead of the conventional Bhattacharyya histogram- based distance. Extensive evaluation of the proposed-world surveillance video sequences from multimodal (infrared and visible) ca- meras. Keywords structural similarity

  19. Quick Summary of Covariate Data for Lab 05 Here, we only have 2 covariates so summarizing things is fairly simple. There is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotella, Jay J.

    )) hist(dat$birth_date) abline(v = mean(dat$birth_date), col = "red", lwd = 2) hist(dat$tail_length) abline(v = mean(dat$tail_length), col = "blue", lwd = 2) Histogram of dat$birth_date dat

  20. Testing for Renewal and Detailed Balance Violations in Single-Molecule Blinking Processes James B. Witkoskie and Jianshu Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    Testing for Renewal and Detailed Balance Violations in Single-Molecule Blinking Processes James B one- and two-dimensional histograms for several features including the renewal properties, detailed to determine the lower bound on the number of measurements necessary to differentiate underlying kinetic models

  1. Supplementary Information ISI Data Collection Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igic, Boris

    Supplementary Information ISI Data Collection Appendix We collected reports from which relative a measure along with transparent calculation procedures. We searched the online databases ISI Web explicitly. Negative ISI values were set to zero in the main text analyses. A histogram of unmodified ISI

  2. Pharmaceutical Tablet Inspection Emil Sauer Lynge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implementation. The results thus only reects the explanatory power of the tablets spectral response. A method is proposed for classifying that involves a variation of SVM, a voting system and histograms for evaluating observed to expected responses. #12;ii #12;Summary (Danish) Målet for denne afhandling er at undersøge

  3. AIAA980057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    AIAA­98­0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS: PARAMETRIC STUDY WITH MULTIPLE that is most useful in estimating fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. The histograms of rainflow counted for flapwise loads on three horizontal axis wind tur­ bines(HAWTs). In the case of two of these turbines

  4. AIAA-98-0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    AIAA-98-0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS: PARAMETRIC STUDY WITH MULTIPLE that is most useful in estimating fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. The histograms of rain ow counted for apwise loads on three horizontal axis wind tur- binesHAWTs. In the case of two of these turbines

  5. A 9 Monte Carlo Simulations Michael Bachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachmann, Michael

    generally called "thermal fluctua- tions") or "lose" energy by friction effects (dissipation). The total Reweighting methods 9 3.1 Single-histogram reweighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-ensemble Monte Carlo methods 12 4.1 Replica-exchange Monte Carlo method (parallel tempering

  6. Vortices in brain activity: Their mechanism and significance for perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J III

    2009-01-01

    gamma power is phase-locked to theta oscillations in humanwere gamma Sleep -2.96 human 2. Power-law PSD, null spikes,human, cat and rabbit ECoG. Histograms were calculated of the intervals between events where successive power

  7. TOPCAT Plotting from STILTS API and Command Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Mark

    is now bundled and documented as part of the STILTS package (v3.0) for use outside of TOPCAT. All TOPCAT labels, vectors, sized markers, histogram, spectrogram, colour coding by density or additional The STILTS package provides access to TOPCAT functions from the command line or a Jython front end. New

  8. Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. 4927 September 12, 2006 (DOI: will be inserted by hand later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audard, Marc

    3 Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory, 550 West 120th St, MC 5247, New York, NY 10027, USA 4 cost of evaluating L is smaller than for any of the alternative methods if the forward model: statistical ­ X-rays: general ­ stars: TMC 1. Introduction Energy histograms are often used as spectrum

  9. Thanks to Professor Luc Anselin, Spatial Analysis Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. GEO 580 Lab 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    the Tutorial in Chapter 2 of ESRI's Using ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst manual (on the Digital Earth server, or by choosing a data transformation to check how that affects #12;2 the distribution of the variable · Change the number of bars to 11, and experiment with a log transformation · The Histogram and map are linked. To see

  10. On Bulk Loading TPR-Tree Bin Lin and Jianwen Su

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Jianwen

    a histogram-based bottom up algorithm (HBU) along with a modified top-down greedy split algo- rithm (TGS show that HBU outperforms both TPR and TGS for all kinds of non-uniform datasets, is relatively stable and compare it with the original TPR- tree bulk loading algorithm and a modified top-down greedy split (TGS

  11. WindSat SDR and EDR On Orbit Calibration and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    simulation based on a large ensemble of NDBC buoy data. The ensemble permits globally distributed radiometer CALIBRATION METHOD A 10 year archive of NDBC buoy data covering 1991-2000 was assembled and characterized. In particular, histograms were compiled for every buoy partitioned by month and year. That is, for one buoy

  12. Natural Scene Image Modeling using Color and Texture Visterms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-visterms (BOV) representation (histogram of quantized local descriptors), extracted from both texture and color questions: how can color be integrated in the BOV framework and how much is gained by doing so the BOV image representation. Section 4 de- scribes the experimental setup. Classification results

  13. Improving the Fisher Kernel for Large-Scale Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    classification the FK was shown to extend the popular bag-of-visual-words (BOV) by going beyond count statistics. However, in practice, this enriched representation has not yet shown its superiority over the BOV classification to date has been to describe images with bag-of-visual-words (BOV) histograms and to classify them

  14. A Thousand Words in a Scene Pedro Quelhas, Member, IEEE, Florent Monay, Jean-Marc Odobez, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odobez, Jean-Marc

    -of-visterms (BOV) representation (histogram of quantized local visual features) is suitable for scene (rather than experiments on binary and multiclass scene classification tasks using a 9,500-image data set, that the BOV for accurate classification, and is more robust than the BOV representation when less labeled training data

  15. Determination of the Controls on Permeability and Transport in Shale by Use of Percolation Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Ian

    2012-10-19

    Page 2.1 SEM Image of Kerogen Pores from a Barnett Shale Sample ................................ 2 2.2 TEM Image of Barnett Shale Kerogen .................................................................. 3 2.3 Equivalent Pore Diameter... Histogram for Utica Shale Sample ............................. 4 2.4 Equivalent Pore Diameter for Fayetteville Shale Sample ..................................... 5 2.5 Adsorbed and Total Gas Content with Respect to TOC in Barnett Shale...

  16. Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohls, Ryan Lanier

    2007-09-17

    ........................................................................................... 82 V FLOW CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF REV INFECTION IN CD4 + AND CD8 + T CELLS...................................................................................... 84 Introduction... ................................................................................................ 81 15. Comparison of CD4 + and CD8 + T cell percentages in REV infected and uninfected Attwater’s prairie chickens.................................................................... 90 ix 16. Histograms showing percentage of cells...

  17. Current Biology, Volume 23 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Steven

    ) during the 24h of FA loading. (G) Representative histograms of the cell cycle profile of cells treated Pol Figure S1. Related to Figure 1 (A) Triglycerides measured by enzymatic methods or by flow cytometry with Nile red and BODIPY 493/503 in Non-loaded, Loaded and Loaded cells treated with TriacsinC 10µ

  18. Confounded Expectations: Informedia at TRECVID 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The dimensionality is thus 200 (5*5*8). Audio features We extract audio signal every 20 msecs (512 windows at 44100, audio, text and `semantic' detectors, such as face detection and Video OCR detection. In TRECVID 2004 that representative image. There are 3 different types of image features: color histograms, textures and edges

  19. On Using Nearly-Independent Feature Families for High Precision and Confidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    families and different ways of processing the different signals. For example, YouTube videos contain audio, gradient and motion-related histogram features extracted from the visual signal. Given access to such rich such as text, audio, and video features are available, combining the outputs of base classifiers trained

  20. An Innovative Three-Dimensional User Interface for Exploring Music Collections Enriched with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    in this collection. This is accomplished by automatically extracting features from the audio signal and training, a Smoothed Data Histogram (SDH) is calculated on the SOM and interpreted as a three-dimensional height that is founded in the sounds of one's digital audio collection. Using intelligent audio analysis, the pieces

  1. Harmonium Models for Semantic Video Representation and Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    keywords and color-histogram features, and perform classification using these latent topics under a unified. Video data contain multifari- ous data types including image frames, transcript text, speech, audio signal, each bearing correlated and com- plementary information essential to the analysis and re- trieval

  2. 466 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SPEECH AND AUDIO PROCESSING, VOL. 11, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2003 Noise Spectrum Estimation in Adverse Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Israel

    not perform well in low SNR conditions. Furthermore, the signal segments used for building the histograms466 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SPEECH AND AUDIO PROCESSING, VOL. 11, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2003 Noise Spectrum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The noise estimate is obtained by averaging past spectral power values

  3. 2.4. IMAGE PROCESSING Umesh Rajashekar & Alan C. Bovik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajashekar, Umesh

    - The Signal, Image, and Video Audio-Visualization Gallery Umesh Rajashekar and Alan C. Bovik, The University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3 Java-based Educational Software for Image and Two-Dimensional Signal Processing Lina J. Karam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4.3.1 Binary image processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 4.3.2 Histogram

  4. 36th International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2011) May 22-27, 2011, Prague, Czech Republic DEGENERATE UNMIXING ESTIMATION TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo, Bryan

    36th International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2011) May 22 The Degenerate Unmixing Estimation Technique (DUET) is a Blind Source Separation (BSS) algorithm for stereo audio. DUET depends on an amplitude-phase 2d histogram built from the differences between the two channels

  5. 1482 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 50, NO. 7, JULY 2004 On the Efficient Evaluation of Probabilistic Similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Nuno M.

    , multiple other signal modalities. Examples include multimedia databases containing audio, video, including audio [12], [31] or bio­informatics signals. The design of an architecture for content­based image are currently available only for simple proba­ bilistic models such as the Gaussian or the histogram. We analyze

  6. Local-feature-map Integration Using Convolutional Neural Networks for Music Genre Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    of being manual efforts. Feature extraction from an acoustical music signal is a significant step extracted from a windowed short signal, such as MFCC, STFT, LPC, Filterbank Coefficients and Autore such as histograms, means, variances, etc [4, 5, 6]. These approaches, how- ever, extract the features frame

  7. A toolbox for musical feature extraction from audio By Olivier Lartillot and Petri Toiviainen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiserslautern, Universität

    ()()()() Composes channels into one global signal 10 #12;Example ­ mirframeframeframeframe()()()() Audio have Beats Per Minute (BPM) mirhisto() calculates a histogram 14 #12;a = miraudio(myAudio.waw) fbA toolbox for musical feature extraction from audio 1 By Olivier Lartillot and Petri Toiviainen

  8. THUMBNAILDJ: VISUAL THUMBNAILS OF MUSIC Ya-Xi Chen Ren Klber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    representation. Beat Histogram [11] is a temporal representation of beat strength in audio signals (see Figure 1a thumbnail can be automatically gener- ated for an audio file, including information of tempo, volume, genre an audio file as se- quential stripes. Bright colors correspond to speech or singing, and purple and blue

  9. MULTIDIMENSIONAL DATAFLOW GRAPH MODELING AND MAPPING FOR EFFICIENT GPU IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    of image histogram implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Experimental results from this study for expressing the func- tionality of digital signal processing (DSP) applications, such as those associated with audio and video data stream pro- cessing, digital communications, and image processing (e.g., see [1

  10. TOWARDS AUDIO TO SCORE ALIGNMENT IN THE SYMBOLIC DOMAIN Bernhard Niedermayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    the audio signal on the one hand, and either from a rendering or directly from the score on the other hand to others like Pitch Histograms or MFCC based features in the context of audio matching and alignmentTOWARDS AUDIO TO SCORE ALIGNMENT IN THE SYMBOLIC DOMAIN Bernhard Niedermayer Department

  11. EXPLORING SUPERFRAME CO-OCCURRENCE FOR ACOUSTIC EVENT RECOGNITION Huy Phan1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Institute for Signal Processing, University of L¨ubeck, Germany 2 Graduate School for Computing in Medicine-- Acoustic event recognition, superframe, histogram, co-occurrence 1. INTRODUCTION Detection of acoustic-based presenta- tion of the audio, and individual events are modelled as Hid- den Makov Models (HMMs

  12. A Comparative Study on Content-Based Music Genre Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    and composers have been influenced by music in other genres. However, it has been observed that audio signals classification, DWCHs1 . DWCHs capture the local and global information of music signals simultaneously by computing histograms on their Daubechies wavelet coefficients. Effectiveness of this new feature

  13. AN AUGMENTED MULTI-TIERED CLASSIFIER FOR INSTANTANEOUS MULTI-MODAL VOICE ACTIVITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    (green), and lip (blue) detected mouth cropped lips RGB histogram time-domain audio Fig. 1 starts or stops talking. Problems arise when the acoustic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases and informa- tion carried by an acoustic signal used to detect voice ac- tivity is lost, rapidly degrading

  14. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF NEURAL ENGINEERING J. Neural Eng. 2 (2005) 5263 doi:10.1088/1741-2560/2/2/006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ionides, Edward

    2005-01-01

    sessions in which both the behavioral performance and signal to noise ratio of the peri-event histograms- and multi-unit activities were decoded using a Kalman filter to represent an audio `cursor' (90 ms tone pips. This study demonstrates that subjects can learn to generate neural control signals that are well suited

  15. 820 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. SC-19, NO. 6, DECEMBER 1984 Full-Speed Testing of A/D Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hae-Seung "Harry"

    , FELLOW, IEEE Abstract -- High-precision analog-to-digital converters (ADC'S) are sought for digital audio produces a histogram of the digital output codes of an ADC sampling a known input. The code density can by an ADC under test at sampling times that are asynchronous relative to the input signal. The relative

  16. WATERMARKING 3D MODELS Thomas Harte and Adrian G. Bors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bors, Adrian

    - ing audio data, still images, or video [1, 2, 3]. While audio data consists of one-dimensional time varying signals, images are 2-D mappings of digital data distributed on a rectangular lattice. When. A copyright protection watermarking algorithm employing modifications in the histograms of 3D object surface

  17. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoury, Elie

    or processed directly from the signal, such as spectrum/cepstrum features for an audio signal or color histograms for an image. They are expressed numerically and represented through vectors whose dimensions, we find the "audio turn" segmentation. An "audio turn" denotes a homo- geneous audio segment related

  18. Introduction Lyrics feature sets Experiments Conclusions and future work Combination of Audio &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    to `traditional' bag-of-words · Compare to audio features · Rhythm Patterns (RP) · Rhythm Histograms (RHIntroduction Lyrics feature sets Experiments Conclusions and future work Combination of Audio & Lyrics Features for Genre Classication in Digital Audio Collections Rudolf Mayer, Andreas Rauber Vienna

  19. MIREX 2005: COMBINED FLUCTUATION FEATURES FOR MUSIC GENRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    Histogram) to the MIREX 2005 audio genre classification task. All feature sets are based on fluctuation, which is rank 5. 1 IMPLEMENTATION 1.1 Feature Extraction We extract 3 feature sets from audio data, using algorithms implemented in MATLAB. The algorithms process audio tracks in standard digital PCM

  20. TsuhanChen2005 From Low-Level Features to High-Level Semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    , frequency spectrum Image: color histogram, wavelet coeffs Video: audio feature + image feature, motion Multimedia Signal Processing (MMSP) Technical Committee, 1996~ IEEE MMSP Workshops Princeton 1997, Los Data types: Text database Audio database Image/video database Sketch/ink database 3D object database

  1. Robust Features for Effective Speech and Music Discrimination Zhong-hua Fu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    features need high quality audio signal or refined spectrum detail, and some cause long delay so as not fit: Average Pitch Density (APD), Relative Tonal Power Density (RTPD). Separate histograms are used to prove retrieval and effective coding for telecommunication, audio stream always needs to be diarized or labeled

  2. 1482 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 50, NO. 7, JULY 2004 On the Efficient Evaluation of Probabilistic Similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Nuno M.

    , multiple other signal modalities. Examples include multimedia databases containing audio, video, including audio [12], [31] or bio-informatics signals. The design of an architecture for content-based image are currently available only for simple proba- bilistic models such as the Gaussian or the histogram. We analyze

  3. UWIT: Underwater Image Toolbox for Optical Image Processing and Mosaicking in MATLAB Ryan Eustice, Oscar Pizarro, Hanumant Singh, Jonathan Howland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    adaptive histogram specification (CLAHS) to deal with the inherent nonuniform lighting in underwater-footprint, overlapping images. The propagation of visible light underwater suffers from rapid at- tenuation and scattering, which in combination with a limited camera-to-light separation available on most vehicle

  4. Case studies on lithography-friendly vlsi circuit layout 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Pratik Jitendra

    2009-05-15

    ........................................................................................................ 36 23 CD Variations in histogram format from c432 whole-circuit simulations, SW3 ........................................................................................................ 37 24 Comparison of congestion ratios, c432... ................................................ 45 35 Variation of the cost function with iterations, c5315 ................................ 46 36 Estimated feature variations for ?S0? and ?Sn?, c5315 .............................. 46 x FIGURE...

  5. Approaches To Integrating A HIgh Penertration Of Solar PV and CPV Onto The Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Steven Craig

    2013-01-01

    improvements in cell efficiency Map of the continental US with filled contours indicated annual average direct normal solarsolar PV industry in conjunction with the continued improvement in efficiency of multijunction cellssolar cells . 123  Figure A.14 Efficiency histograms of last 5 generations of terrestrial cells   125  Figure A.15 Planned improvement 

  6. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bytes) of raw data. For example, out of hundreds of millions of collision events in a high-energy added to FastBit to support a number of DOE funded projects. Supporting Conditional Analysis Building on the searching capability, we have recently added functions to compute conditional multivariate histograms

  7. Experimental Study of Free Stream Turbulence Effects on Dynamic Stall of Pitching Airfoil by using Particle Image Velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    of attack histogram of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). By using PIV, the instantaneous vortex, a great deal of attention has been paid to investigate the aerodynamic performance of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) [4-6]. VAWT often operates inside an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer. The purpose

  8. Rule of sample proportions (p. 359) IF: 1. There is a population proportion of interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    10/28/09 1 Rule of sample proportions (p. 359) IF: 1. There is a population proportion of interest proportion is computed every time, the resulting histogram will: 1. be roughly bell-shaped 2. have mean equal to the true population proportion 3. have standard deviation equal to: Sample proportions: Suppose the true

  9. MODELING TEXT WITH GENERALIZABLE GAUSSIAN MIXTURES Lars Kai Hansen, Sigurdur Sigurdsson, Thomas Kolenda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensions 17] choose to apply a biased architecture, the so-called naive Bayes classi er, here we, and Cen- ter for Multimedia. In LSI term occurrence histograms are projected on a or- thogonal set vector k f k kg. The parameters are estimated from a set of examples D = fxnjn = 1 ::: Ng. In the pattern

  10. MODELING TEXT WITH GENERALIZABLE GAUSSIAN MIXTURES Lars Kai Hansen, Sigurdur Sigurdsson, Thomas Kolenda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    dimensions [17] choose to apply a biased architecture, the so­called naive Bayes classifier, here we for Multimedia. In LSI term occurrence histograms are projected on a or­ thogonal set of ``eigen are estimated from a set of examples D = fxn jn = 1; :::; Ng. In the pattern recognition literature mixture

  11. An efficient algorithm for building a distributional thesaurus (and other Sketch Engine developments)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicentowski, Richard

    An efficient algorithm for building a distributional thesaurus (and other Sketch Engine, thesauruses based on large corpora for (at time of writing) seven major world languages. The development histograms to present the distribution in a way that is easy to grasp. 1 Thesaurus creation Over the last ten

  12. Spatio-Temporal Optical Flow Statistics (STOFS) for Activity Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    al's 30-pixel man [5], and Roth and Black's idea [9] of learning optical flow statis- tics to learn flow statis- tics of activities. Specifically, this work concerns itself with learning Spatio-Temporal Optical Flow histogram Statis- tics(STOFS). It should be clarified that some recent work on optical flow

  13. Multiple Pedestrian Tracking using Colour and Motion Models Zhengqiang Jiang, Du Q. Huynh, William Moran, Subhash Challa and Nick Spadaccini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huynh, Du

    Multiple Pedestrian Tracking using Colour and Motion Models Zhengqiang Jiang, Du Q. Huynh, William information to track pedestrians in video sequences captured by a fixed camera. Pedestrians are firstly-based model, we extract a 4-dimensional colour histogram for each detected pedestrian window and compare

  14. CHAPTER 9 SOLUTIONS AND MINI-PROJECT NOTES Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    EXERCISE SOLUTIONS 9.1 a. Pie chart, bar graph or pictogram. b. Stemplot, histogram or boxplot. c. Bar letters, 24 (26%) are words of 4 or 5 letters and 28 (30%) are 6 or more letters. The pie chart should because the total number of words are different for the two writers. e. The pie charts are better

  15. PLOT2K: a graphics interface to System 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creel, L.

    1981-01-01

    PLOT2K is an interactive graphics interface to the System 2000 data base management system. It runs on a CDC 6600 computer with an NOS or NOS/BE operating system. The graphics package used is DISSPLA. PLOT2K will generate bar chart histograms, pie charts, or x-y point plots and will access any System 2000 data base.

  16. MA 111 Review for Exam 6 Exam 6 (given in class on Thursday, December 3) will cover Unit 6: Descriptive Statistics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    of data: ­ frequency table ­ bar graph ­ histogram ­ pictogram ­ pie chart · Remember the differences this type of data, and explain why. 2. Suppose you want to make a pie chart of the age of students in MA111. If 39% of the students are 19 years old, how big would the corresponding slice of the pie be? Calculate

  17. MA 111 Review for Exam 6: Solutions Exam 6 (given in class on Thursday, December 3) will cover Unit 6: Descriptive Statistics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    of data: ­ frequency table ­ bar graph ­ histogram ­ pictogram ­ pie chart · Remember the differences the data in the table. You could make a bar graph or a pie chart. A pictogram might also work, maybe, pie chart, or pictogram is appropriate (c) Name a type of graph that would be inappropriate

  18. ENGI 3423 Descriptive Statistics Page 2-01 Tables & Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Glyn

    3 pie chart 3 to 8 sectors 3 pictogram (or other methods) ­ is the scale by length, area or volume frequency table 5 to 20 classes , (# observations) 3 bar chart 5 to 20 classes 3 histogram 5 to 20 classes 5764 5273 5042 5189 4986 (a) Produce a stem and leaf display of the data. (b) Construct a bar chart

  19. Haar LBP Gabor Jet boosting Gabor Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai, Haizhou

    Boosting 1 boosting Haar LBP Gabor Jet boosting LBP Haar Gabor Jet boosting TP391. Further more, three kinds of local feature, Haar like feature, LBP histogram and Gabor jet are extracted, Haar like feature is more efficient for discriminating young and middle aged people, and Gabor Jet fits

  20. I by a contractor of th~ U. S. Government ,'d.r contract No. W311 Q9-ENG38.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    in an equation. Other commonly used programs generate histograms and do statistical analysis. Setting upI by a contractor of th~ U. S. Government ,'d.r contract No. W·31·1 Q9-ENG·38. l's Manual for elegant Program Version 12.4 Manual Version 1 Advanced Photon Source Michael Borland-6 May

  1. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  2. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  3. Steady State Load Characterization Fact Sheet: 2012 Chevy Volt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Scoffield

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet characterizes the steady state charging behavior of a 2012 Chevy Volt. Both level 1 charging (120 volt) and level 2 charging (208 volts) is investigated. This fact sheet contains plots of efficiency, power factor, and current harmonics as vehicle charging is curtailed. Prominent current harmonics are also displayed in a histogram for various charge rates.

  4. amc technical briefamc technical brief Analytical Methods Committee No. 4. Jan 2001 Royal Society of Chemistry 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    for examples in analytical chemistry. A MINITAB macro for calculating kernel density estimates is availableamc technical briefamc technical brief Analytical Methods Committee No. 4. Jan 2001 © Royal Society of Chemistry 2001 REPRESENTING DATA DISTRIBUTIONS WITH KERNEL DENSITY ESTIMATES Histograms are the usual

  5. Radar Chart: Scanning for Satisfactory QoE in QoS Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    , MOS can be estimated from objective, automated methods like PESQ [3] to avoid the personnel cost, ..., n} as in QoE = f(M1, M2, M3, ..., Mn) if everything including the production level of equipments of line charts, box plots, histograms, scatter graphs, etc. to establish their arguments. It is therefore

  6. Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 4.09 6.22 6.66 W W W W W 2010's...

  7. New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

  8. New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Million Barrels) New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  9. New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adjustments (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  10. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  11. New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  12. New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisitions (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  14. Does implicit causality influence children's sentence comprehension 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Studies investigating adults’ sentence comprehension have found that certain verbs convey implicit information about the causality of the sentence. The present study tested children aged 8; 10 – 11;7 years (M = 10;3) to ...

  15. An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Utility Effects R 2 Without MajorReported to State Public Utility Commissions. Berkeley CA:7 Figure 2. Number of Utilities with SAIDI and SAIFI

  16. Department of Defense led Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    within 5-7 years 5 DoE and DoD-led Institutes * Established Institutes: - America Makes (Additive Manufacturing)-Established Aug 2012 DoD - Next Gen. Power Electronics Manuf....

  17. Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Brazil Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 3,279 8,468 0 0 0...

  18. Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 2,581 8,142 0 2,664...

  19. Alaska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's...

  20. Assessing deployment strategies for ethanol and flex fuel vehicles in the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAulay, Jeffrey L. (Jeffrey Lewis)

    2009-01-01

    Within the next 3-7 years the US light duty fleet and fuel supply will encounter what is commonly referred to as the "blend wall". This phenomenon describes the situation when more ethanol production has been mandated than ...

  1. Size-optimized 32-channel brain arrays for 3 T pediatric imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Boris

    Size-optimized 32-channel receive array coils were developed for five age groups, neonates, 6 months old, 1 year old, 4 years old, and 7 years old, and evaluated for pediatric brain imaging. The array consisted of overlapping ...

  2. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  3. DOE's Superior Energy Performance Program Publishes Early Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with an average payback of 1.7 years. These findings and other results are included in a paper presented at the July 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry hosted by...

  4. Children's use of visual information in action planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordova, Alberto

    2012-02-14

    2s delay affected responses in all age groups, especially the younger age groups (5- and 7-year-olds). As delay increased, children as a group tended to overestimate, while adults underestimated. Experiment 2 investigated how participants used...

  5. Federal Institutions and the Democratic Transition: Lessons From South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinfeld, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    ? = 2050 Rand. Technology and Costs (a e , a m , a u ): Theand a u = 7 (years). Technology and Costs (S): The costs perS = 100,000 Rand. Technology and Costs (m): If the central

  6. Probability distribution functions in the finite density lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ejiri; Y. Nakagawa; S. Aoki; K. Kanaya; H. Saito; T. Hatsuda; H. Ohno; T. Umeda

    2012-12-04

    We study the phase structure of QCD at high temperature and density by lattice QCD simulations adopting a histogram method. We try to solve the problems which arise in the numerical study of the finite density QCD, focusing on the probability distribution function (histogram). As a first step, we investigate the quark mass dependence and the chemical potential dependence of the probability distribution function as a function of the Polyakov loop when all quark masses are sufficiently large, and study the properties of the distribution function. The effect from the complex phase of the quark determinant is estimated explicitly. The shape of the distribution function changes with the quark mass and the chemical potential. Through the shape of the distribution, the critical surface which separates the first order transition and crossover regions in the heavy quark region is determined for the 2+1-flavor case.

  7. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  8. Generalized-Ensemble Algorithms for Protein Folding Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Sugita; Ayori Mitsutake; Yuko Okamoto

    2007-07-23

    Conventional simulations of complex systems in the canonical ensemble suffer from the quasi-ergodicity problem. A simulation in generalized ensemble overcomes this difficulty by performing a random walk in potential energy space and other parameter space. From only one simulation run, one can obtain canonical-ensemble averages of physical quantities as functions of temperature by the single-histogram and/or multiple-histogram reweighting techniques. In this article we review the generalized-ensemble algorithms. Three well-known methods, namely, multicanonical algorithm, simulated tempering, and replica-exchange method, are described first. Both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics versions of the algorithms are given. We then present further extensions of the above three methods.

  9. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-01-23

    A computer implemented method modifies an experimental electron density map. A set of selected known experimental and model electron density maps is provided and standard templates of electron density are created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps by clustering and averaging values of electron density in a spherical region about each point in a grid that defines each selected known experimental and model electron density maps. Histograms are also created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps that relate the value of electron density at the center of each of the spherical regions to a correlation coefficient of a density surrounding each corresponding grid point in each one of the standard templates. The standard templates and the histograms are applied to grid points on the experimental electron density map to form new estimates of electron density at each grid point in the experimental electron density map.

  10. Optimal estimation of free energies and stationary densities from multiple biased simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    When studying high-dimensional dynamical systems such as macromolecules, quantum systems and polymers, a prime concern is the identification of the most probable states and their stationary probabilities or free energies. Often, these systems have metastable regions or phases, prohibiting to estimate the stationary probabilities by direct simulation. Efficient sampling methods such as umbrella sampling, metadynamics and conformational flooding have developed that perform a number of simulations where the system's potential is biased such as to accelerate the rare barrier crossing events. A joint free energy profile or stationary density can then be obtained from these biased simulations with weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM). This approach (a) requires a few essential order parameters to be defined in which the histogram is set up, and (b) assumes that each simulation is in global equilibrium. Both assumptions make the investigation of high-dimensional systems with previously unknown energy landscape ...

  11. Design and Development of Intricate Nanomedical Devices through Compositional, Dimensional and Structural Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yun

    2012-07-16

    -SCK-60nm) ...................................................................................... 67 3.2 Left column: TEM images (drop deposited on carbon-coated copper grids and stained negatively with 1% aqueous uranyl acetate) of A. SCK-60... images (drop-deposited on carbon-coated copper grids and stained negatively with 1% aqueous uranyl acetate) of A. SCK-20nm; C. PTX-SCK-20nm-5%; E. PEG-SCK-20nm; G. PTX-PEG-SCK-20nm-5%. Right column: DLS histograms (determinations were...

  12. The study of synchronous (by local time) changes of the statistical properties of thermal noise and alpha-activity fluctuations of a 239-Pu sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kaminsky; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-05-06

    Experimentally obtained and analyzed fine structure of statistical distributions for two physically independent processes: alpha-decay rate fluctuations of Pu-239 sample in Pushchino (Moscow region, Russia) and equilibrium voltage fluctuations (Johnson noise) from metal-film resistor in Tbilisi (Georgia). Special investigation of histograms shape similarity in these processes demonstrated majority of previously studied effects, called - macroscopic fluctuations. Offered qualitative model of the observed effects.

  13. Maximum likelihood parameter estimation in time series models using sequential Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Sinan

    2013-06-11

    , respectively. This approach is useful to handle the case where the columns of Y are generated sequentially in time, such as in audio signal processing. Usually very large number of columns in Y leads to the necessity of online algorithms to learn the model... .6 (dashed lines). For illustrative purposes, every 1000th estimate is shown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 6.1 Histograms of Monte Carlo estimates of gradients of log p?,?,?? (Y ?,?,?) w.r.t. the parameters of the ?-stable distribution...

  14. Marker-Assisted Verification of Hybrids in Pearl Millet-Napiergrass (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br. x Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Charlie

    2012-02-14

    but towards marginal and abandoned grasslands. In order to reach the goal of producing 36 billion gallons of bioethanol production by 2022 and address the mandatory cap on corn ethanol production that was mandated by the U.S. federal government... Flow Cytometry Hybrid Verification Histograms ..................................... 35 3 PCR Products of PMN Hybrid PEGL09TX04 x PEPU09FL01 showing 10/10 Hybrids in These Progeny...

  15. Gammasphere software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  16. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  17. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  18. A web-based tool for you to monitor nutrition consumption Au-Yeung Yat Hung, Chu Yan Ting Mandy, Lau Chung Yan Johanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunhao

    Ting Mandy, Lau Chung Yan Johanna Advised by Prof. Albert C.S. CHUNG #12;Introduction Hong Kong's new Browser Segmentation extracting lines 0 500 1000 1500 0 500 1000 Vertical Histogram 0 500 1000 1500 -1000 templates Template: 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 50 100 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 0 0.5 1 50

  19. A comparison of material balance calculations based on equilibrium ratios with Schilthuis balance calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clanton, John L

    1956-01-01

    . CALCULATION OF OIL INITIALLY IN PLACE BY SCHILTHUIS MATERIAL BALANCE . . . ZO 6. MATERIAL BALANCE BASED ON EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS 7. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS 8. CONCLUSIONS 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10. REFERENCES 11. BIBLIOGRAPHY , 36 . 38 39 LIST... OF FIGURES AND TABLES FIGURES FOLLOWING PAGE Isovol Map of Scurry Reef Reservoir 22 Histogram of Production, Gas-Oil Ratio, Pressure and Water Injection History. Shrinkage of Scurry Reef Reservoir Oil, Scurry County, Texas. Gas Volumes Liberated from...

  20. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2, 171181, 2002 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/2/171/ Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and Physics The flux of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide between the atmosphere and a spruce forest X. Xu of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured over a spruce for- est in Central Germany The tropospheric abundance ( 500 ppt) and long tropo- spheric lifetime (2­7 years) of carbonyl sulfide (COS) makes

  1. TableHC2.1.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    than 4,000 HDD... 22.8 16.3 13.4 0.3 Q 0.6 1.7 Year of Construction 1939 or Before... 14.7 9.6 8.1 0.8 0.6 Q Q...

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit Buildings",14.4,9.5,2.4,2.2,0.3 "Mobile Homes",1.2,0.3,"Q","Q",0.7 "Year of Construction" "1939 or Before",14.7,7.3,3.3,1.4,2.6 "1940 to 1949",7.4,4.2,1.3,1.1,0.8 "1950 to...

  3. "Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CDD or More and--" "Less than 4,000 HDD",22.8,16.3,13.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,1.7 "Year of Construction" "1939 or Before",14.7,9.6,8.1,0.8,0.6,"Q","Q" "1940 to 1949",7.4,5.3,4.8,0.3,"Q","...

  4. Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 43 53 517 2000's 27,180 80,044 90,769 60,666 63,245 48,647 40,341 33,872 36,594 36,746 2010's...

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497...

  6. Maine Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,525 2,297 2,550 2000's 12,984 10,929 23,672 3,315 16,233 6,500 17,514 21,640 25,628 25,923...

  7. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 30 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 32 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

  11. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico, wind, rain) after 6, 12, 18, 30, and 84 months under specific exposure conditions. Geomembranes of two radiation, humidity, wind, and rain) after 6, 12, 18, 30, and 84 months (0,5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, and 7 years). 2

  12. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The Shaw Industries carpet manufacturing plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, optimized boiler operation and installed waste heat exchangers on two processes in the dye house and an economizer on one boiler, for a payback of 1.7 years. These results prompted plant #4, also located in Dalton, to participate in an assessment.

  13. Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 23,160 26,342 30,479 1970's 31,929 33,934 38,631 36,468 35,525 34,349 32,348 30,533 27,437...

  14. Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's -1,064 -1,092 1970's -5,340 -1,242 -3,243 -2,918 -2,483 99 -3,173 -2,702 -302 -1,927 1980's...

  15. Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.44 2000's 4.03 3.25 4.17 4.63 6.64 5.81 6.15 8.56 5.29 2010's 5.52 W...

  16. Washington Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27,725 40,373 32,639 2000's 74,400 86,184 39,552 57,880 66,068 65,809 58,800 57,294 74,580...

  17. Washington Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 111,159 133,106 124,371 2000's 83,748 75,017 67,717 65,884 67,812 66,874 70,758 73,572 75,748...

  18. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 3,279 11,049 8,142 0 2,664...

  19. Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 342 373 463 2000's 536 532 475 444 446 439 451 502 431 344 2010's 339 362 355 388 401...

  20. Regularizing Unpredictable Variation: The Roles of Adult and Child Learners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makous, Walter

    no effect. In Experiment 2 we taught adults and 5- to 7-year-old chil- dren a similar artificial languageRegularizing Unpredictable Variation: The Roles of Adult and Child Learners in Language Formation or if they change it, making the language more regular as they learn it. In Experi- ment 1 we taught adult

  1. Size-optimized 32-Channel Brain Arrays for 3 T Pediatric Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanwisher, Nancy

    old, 1 year old, 4 years old, and 7 years old, and evaluated for pediatric brain imaging. The array and compared to two coils routinely used for pediatric brain imaging; a commercially available 32-channel adult head coil and a pediatric-sized birdcage coil. Phantom measurements using the neonate, 6-month-old, 1

  2. West Virginia Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0...

  3. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Japan (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 48,346 50,258 53,002 49,779 51,655 48,434 51,289 1980's 44,732 55,929 49,861 52,857 52,840...

  4. Use of Risk-Based End States

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-11-18

    This 7 year old policy was formulated as part of an effort to better define criteria for when the Office of Environmental Management would be completed with cleanup at DOE sites contaminated by nuclear weapons research, development, and production and nuclear energy research. Based on adherence to existing legislation, the Policy is not necessary.

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 17591 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 1759­1 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global ocean simulation Mark R. Petersen,1 Sean J. Williams,1,2 Mathew from a global ocean simulation with one-tenth degree resolution and a duration of 7 years. The census

  6. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-05-01

    This is a presentation about the Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demo, a 7-year project and the largest single FCEV and infrastructure demonstration in the world to date. Information such as its approach, technical accomplishments and progress; collaborations and future work are discussed.

  7. CLINICAL STUDY Control of Lipids at Baseline in the Bypass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    cholesterol and triglyceride values were lower in the United States and Canada. Adjustment for age, sex, edu of death in post-MI patients with diabetes as high as 2-fold or greater.4 The 7-year rate of MI (fatal, as rates increase 2- to 5-fold compared with the general population.2,3 Also of concern is the higher 1

  8. "Globalstar, Iridium and other Satellite-Based Mobile Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relay ­ Direct broadcast, small dishes, competitor to cable #12;5 Puting Them Together: Return? · Investment = $5B, lifetime = 7+ years, market = 5M users · Operating expense $200M/year · 2M users at $1/min contractor · Odyssey was a TRW "we wish we can" · Constellation promoted by Brazil (equator) · Elipsat

  9. A Survey on Cloud Interoperability: Taxonomies, Standards, and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, David Wai-lok

    A Survey on Cloud Interoperability: Taxonomies, Standards, and Practice Zhizhong Zhang, Chuan Wu:{zzzhang,cwu,dcheung}@cs.hku.hk ABSTRACT Cloud computing is a new computing paradigm that allows users with different computing demands, applications and services). Many commercial cloud providers have emerged in the past 6-7 years, and each

  10. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore »of the background distribution.« less

  11. Effective potential for SU(2) Polyakov loops and Wilson loop eigenvalues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Smith; Adrian Dumitru; Robert Pisarski; Lorenz von Smekal

    2013-07-24

    We simulate SU(2) gauge theory at temperatures ranging from slightly below $T_c$ to roughly $2T_c$ for two different values of the gauge coupling. Using a histogram method, we extract the effective potential for the Polyakov loop and for the phases of the eigenvalues of the thermal Wilson loop, in both the fundamental and adjoint representations. We show that the classical potential of the fundamental loop can be parametrized within a simple model which includes a Vandermonde potential and terms linear and quadratic in the Polyakov loop. We discuss how parametrizations for the other cases can be obtained from this model.

  12. A VME multiprocessor system for on-line data analysis of nuclear physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maron, G.; Vedovato, G ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1990-06-01

    A VME based multiprocessor system for on-line data analysis is presented. The system is based on a master CPU board that distributes incoming event buffers to several slave CPUs running the same analysis program. A large shared memory is provided to hold final histograms. A Vaxstation, linked to the system via Ethernet, provides control and graphics management of the analyzed data. A numerical simulation of the system is described and results are compared with real performance obtained using a prototype of the system.

  13. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inverse of the background distribution.

  14. Acoustic emission signals resulting from the drying induced fractures of Phyllostachys Pubescens bamboo, Evidence of scale free phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Villalobos

    2015-03-15

    I have performed experimental measurements of acoustic emission signals resulting from the drying process of Phyllostachys Pubescens bamboo. The emphasis was on identifying individual events, and characterize them according to their time span and energy release. My results show a histogram of experimental squared voltage distributions nicely fit into a power law with exponent of $-1.16$, reminiscent of scale free phenomena. I have also calculated the average signal shape, for different time spans of the system, and found an asymmetrical form. The experimental evidence points to the system having an isolated large crack at the beginning of the simulation.

  15. Isoscalar multipole strength in Cd-110 and Cd-116 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Tokimoto, Y.; Clark, HL; John, B.

    2004-01-01

    multipole strength in 110Cd and 116Cd Y.-W. Lui, D. H. Youngblood, Y. Tokimoto, H. L. Clark, and B. John* Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA (Received 6 October 2003; published 24 March 2004) The giant resonance.... The statistical errors are smaller than the data points. LUI, YOUNGBLOOD, TOKIMOTO, CLARK, AND JOHN PHYSICAL REVIEW C 69, 034611 (2004) 034611-2 FIG. 3. Strength distributions obtained for 110Cd are shown by the histograms. Error bars represent the uncertainty...

  16. Houston LDAR II network: design, operation, and performance analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ely, Brandon Lee

    2008-10-10

    antenna’s minimum detectable signal in dBm. ……………….……... 46 5.9 Example showing the method of integration used to estimate network detection efficiency. ………………………...……………………….. 49 6.1 Histograms of c2 values for 6, 7 & 8 sensor solutions fitted...-to-ground and intracloud) structure of thunderstorms and evolution in time. In addition, the Houston LDAR network’s location opens researchers to the opportunity to study the lightning structure of a wide variety of storm types from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs...

  17. Determination of the paradihlorobenzene and paradibromobenzene solid solutions nanoparticles structure via Raman spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korshunov, M A

    2012-01-01

    We measured the small frequencies Raman spectrum of the paradihlorobenzene and paradihlorobenzene solid solution nanoparticles with the size about 100 nanometers. Values of frequencies of lines decrease. The size of nanoparticles was determined by the electronic microscope. Calculations of nanoparticles structure were done using the method of molecular dynamics and histograms of nanoparticles spectra were calculated via the Dyne's method. The result is that the Raman spectrum is the sum of spectra from the central part of the nanoparticle and superficial structures with smaller concentration of paradihlorobenzene.

  18. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniquesmore »will be shown for comparison.« less

  19. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-17

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10{sup -4} g/cm{sup 3}.

  20. The ecology and conservation of the white-winged nightjar Caprimulgus candicans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pople, Robert Grant

    2003-10-07

    (Madroño Ñieto & Esquivel 1997; pers. obs.). Introduction • 10 0 50 100 150 200 250 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month M ea n ra in fa ll (m m ) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 M ea n te m pe ra tu re (ºC ) Figure 1.3 Mean monthly rainfall (histograms... stream_source_info Pople (2003) The ecology and conservation of the White-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus candicans.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 342868 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Pople (2003) The ecology...

  1. NURE aerial gamma ray and magnetic detail survey of portions of northeast Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The Northeast Washington Survey was performed under the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, which is designed to provide radioelement distribution information to assist in assessing the uraniferous material potential of the United States. The radiometric and ancilliary data were digitally recorded and processed. The results are presented in the form of stacked profiles, contour maps, flight path maps, statistical tables and frequency distribution histograms. These graphical outputs are presented at a scale of 1:62,500 and are contained in the individual Volume 2 reports.

  2. Two-body D+s decays to ??+, ???+, ??+, ???+, and ??+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Davis, Raymond Jr.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Daoudi, M.; Ford, W. T.; Johnson, D. R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J. G.

    1992-06-01

    I I 0) LLJ 5000 for which the branching ratios are 38.9% and 23.6%, re- spectively [2]. The yy invariant-mass distribution for momenta above 1.5 GeV/c is shown as the histogram in Fig. 2(a). We also require that the decay angle cosine be- tween both... of the y's and the yy direction in the labora- tory transformed into the yy rest frame be smaller than 0.8. There is considerable background, mostly from m decays. When we eliminate any photon which, with another photon, makes a mass combination...

  3. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shokouhi, Mahsa; Barnes, Anna; Suckling, John; Moorhead, Thomas WJ; Brennan, David; Job, Dominic; Lymer, Katherine; Dazzan, Paola; Reis Marques, Tiago; MacKay, Clare; McKie, Shane; Williams, Steven CR; Lawrie, Stephen M; Deakin, Bill; Williams, Steve R; Condon, Barrie

    2011-12-21

    -RAGE) sequence [30]. Briefly, our whole dataset consisted of two groups: the first group included thirteen subjects scanned twice at three centres with 1.5 T scan- ners (presented here as A, B, and C) and the second group consisted of eleven subjects scanned... mask of brain was created using the information derived from histogram analysis and by applying mor- phological operations which removed skull and non- brain tissues (Figure 1b). The two hemispheres and the cerebellum were then separated (Figure 1c...

  4. Lee-Yang Zeroes and Logarithmic Corrections in the $?^4_4$ Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kenna; C. B. Lang

    1992-10-13

    The leading mean-field critical behaviour of $\\phi^4_4$-theory is modified by multiplicative logarithmic corrections. We analyse these corrections both analytically and numerically. In particular we present a finite-size scaling theory for the Lee-Yang zeroes and temperature zeroes, both of which exhibit logarithmic corrections. On lattices from size $8^4$ to $24^4$, Monte-Carlo cluster methods and multi-histogram techniques are used to determine the partition function zeroes closest to the critical point. Finite-size scaling behaviour is verified and the logarithmic corrections are found to be in good agreement with our analytical predictions.

  5. Global characterization of seismic noise with broadband seismometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Michael William

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of seismic spectra that were calculated from all broadband channels (BH?) made available through IRIS, NIED F-net and Orfeus servers covering the past five years and beyond. A general characterization of the data is given in terms of spectral histograms and data-availability plots. We show that the spectral information can easily be categorized in time and regions. Spectral histograms indicate that seismic stations exist in Africa, Australia and Antarctica that measure spectra significantly below the global low-noise models above 1 Hz. We investigate world-wide coherence between the seismic spectra and other data sets like proximity to cities, station elevation, earthquake frequency, and wind speeds. Elevation of seismic stations in the US is strongly anti-correlated with seismic noise near 0.2 Hz and again above 1.5 Hz. Urban settlements are shown to produce excess noise above 1 Hz, but correlation curves look very different depending on the region. It is shown that wind...

  6. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  7. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.

    2011-10-06

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R and D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  8. Maine Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1.36 1.46 1.40 1970's 1.44 1.50 1.63 1.70 1.88 2.12 2.65 3.23 3.27 3.61 1980's 5.12 6.13 7.32...

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864...

  10. Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,967 3,571 4,910 1970's 5,247 5,591 6,036 6,027 6,174 5,578 6,111 5,747 5,887 5,587 1980's 555...

  11. Natural Gas Citygate Price in Maine (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4.30 4.46 3.73 3.15 3.00 3.23 1990's 3.06 3.00 3.17 3.69 2.98 3.35 4.30 3.84 3.43 4.61 2000's...

  12. Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5.55 5.13 4.93 2000's 4.10 8.00 8.44 9.74 10.43 13.74 14.39 13.40 14.89 9.12 2010's 11.23 10.89...

  13. Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1.96 2.05 1.97 1970's 1.99 2.05 2.14 2.17 2.38 2.65 2.68 3.62 3.57 4.10 1980's 6.34 7.45 8.63...

  14. Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1.48 1.43 1.36 1970's 1.40 1.43 1.47 1.55 1.77 2.27 2.70 3.12 3.48 3.95 1980's 5.31 6.02 6.87...

  15. Washington Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.16 2.64 2.82 2000's 4.01 5.02 4.81 6.05 7.83 10.26 9.87 9.79 10.55 11.68 2010's 9.37 9.47 8.77...

  16. Washington Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1.15 1.09 1.10 1970's 1.11 1.13 1.16 1.25 1.33 1.82 2.23 2.67 2.85 3.46 1980's 4.83 5.35 6.21...

  17. After seven years, where`s the consensus?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    It has been 7 years since the discovery of copper oxide superconductors, yet there is no consensus on the correct theory for this phenomenon. The theory can be divided into 3 groups: ordinary (phonons), exotic (AF spin fluctuations, nested Fermi liquid, excitons, spin bags, odd frequency pairing), and revolutionary (Luttinger liquid, spin-charge separation, gauge theories, anyons, marginal Fermi liquid). C-axis dispersion, dHvA, and magneto-oscillations are also discussed.

  18. After seven years, where's the consensus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    It has been 7 years since the discovery of copper oxide superconductors, yet there is no consensus on the correct theory for this phenomenon. The theory can be divided into 3 groups: ordinary (phonons), exotic (AF spin fluctuations, nested Fermi liquid, excitons, spin bags, odd frequency pairing), and revolutionary (Luttinger liquid, spin-charge separation, gauge theories, anyons, marginal Fermi liquid). C-axis dispersion, dHvA, and magneto-oscillations are also discussed.

  19. The Sun-like activity of the solar twin 18 Scorpii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey C. Hall; Gregory W. Henry; G. Wesley Lockwood

    2007-03-16

    We present the results of 10 yr of complementary spectroscopic and photometric observations of the solar twin 18 Scorpii. We show that over the course of its ~7 year chromospheric activity cycle, 18 Sco's brightness varies in the same manner as the Sun's and with a likely brightness variation of 0.09%, similar to the 0.1% decadal variation in the total solar irradiance.

  20. Can DNA bases be produced during molecular cloud collapse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonali Chakrabarti; Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2000-01-06

    Using a reasonably large chemical reaction network consisting of 421 species, we show that along with normal chemical evolution of molecular cloud during collapse and star formation, significant amount of adenine, a DNA base, may be produced after an evolution of 10^{6-7} years. This findings may shed light on whether life on earth had to begin from scratch or these molecules could have contaminated the earth from the beginning.

  1. Extended analysis of CMB constraints on non-gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikage, Chiaki [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Takahashi, Tomo, E-mail: hikage@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    We study CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations of general types. Specifically, we study CDM/neutrino isocurvature perturbations which are uncorrelated or totally correlated with adiabatic ones. Using the data from the WMAP 7-year observation at V and W bands, we obtained optimal constraints on the nonlinearity parameters of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. Our result shows that primordial perturbations are consistent with Gaussian ones at around 2? level for above mentioned isocurvature modes.

  2. mc4qcd: Online Analysis Tool for Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Di Pierro; Yaoqian Zhong; Brian Schinazi

    2010-05-19

    mc4qcd is a web based collaboration tool for analysis of Lattice QCD data. Lattice QCD computations consists of a large scale Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Multiple measurements are performed at each MC step. Our system acquires the data by uploading log files, parses them for results of measurements, filters the data, mines for required information by aggregating results, represents the results as plots and histograms, and it further allows refining and interaction by fitting the results. The system computes moving averages and autocorrelations, builds bootstrap samples and bootstrap errors, and allows modeling the data using Bayesian correlated constrained linear and non-linear fits. It can be scripted to allow real time visualization of results form an ongoing computation. The system is modular and it can be adapted to automating the analysis workflow of different types of MC computations.

  3. Single photon emission at 1.55??m from charged and neutral exciton confined in a single quantum dash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusanowski, ?. Syperek, M.; Mrowi?ski, P.; Rudno-Rudzi?ski, W.; Misiewicz, J.; S?k, G.; Somers, A.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate charged and neutral exciton complexes confined in a single self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting at 1.55??m. The emission characteristics have been probed by measuring high-spatial-resolution polarization-resolved photoluminescence and cross-correlations of photon emission statistics at T?=?5?K. The photon auto-correlation histogram of the emission from both the neutral and charged exciton indicates a clear antibunching dip with as-measured g{sup (2)}(0) values of 0.18 and 0.31, respectively. It proves that these exciton complexes confined in single quantum dashes of InP-based material system can act as true single photon emitters being compatible with standard long-distance fiber communication technology.

  4. First passage times in integrate-and-fire neurons with stochastic thresholds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Wilhelm; Thul, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    We consider a leaky integrate--and--fire neuron with deterministic subthreshold dynamics and a firing threshold that evolves as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. The formulation of this minimal model is motivated by the experimentally observed widespread variation of neural firing thresholds. We show numerically that the mean first passage time can depend non-monotonically on the noise amplitude. For sufficiently large values of the correlation time of the stochastic threshold the mean first passage time is maximal for non-vanishing noise. We provide an explanation for this effect by analytically transforming the original model into a first passage time problem for Brownian motion. This transformation also allows for a perturbative calculation of the first passage time histograms. In turn this provides quantitative insights into the mechanisms that lead to the non-monotonic behaviour of the mean first passage time. The perturbation expansion is in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations. The approa...

  5. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post-LEP apples seem to have been from a single batch of material. The pre-LEP apples of the weak strength and the post-LEP apples with even weaker strength could have been made of the same batch of material, and the small strength differential might be due to the difference in the induction heating system. If the pre-LEP apples with the lower strength and the post LEP apples are made from the same batch of material, their combined scatter of strength data would be wider and can be understood as a result of the additional processing steps of stress relief and induction heating as discussed.

  6. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe; Sapelkin, Andrei; King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard; Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  7. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR-brachytherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorissen, Bram L; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2014-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 seconds, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iter...

  8. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  9. A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

    2006-05-23

    A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

  10. Cross-platform validation and analysis environment for particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov; I. Pogrebnyak; D. Wilbern

    2015-10-20

    A multi-platform validation and analysis framework for public Monte Carlo simulation for high-energy particle collisions is discussed. The front-end of this framework uses the Python programming language, while the back-end is written in Java, which provides a multi-platform environment that can be run from a web browser and can easily be deployed at the grid sites. The analysis package includes all major software tools used in high-energy physics, such as Lorentz vectors, jet algorithms, histogram packages, graphic canvases, and tools for providing data access. This multi-platform software suite, designed to minimize OS-specific maintenance and deployment time, is used for online validation of Monte Carlo event samples through a web interface.

  11. FEM: Feature-enhanced map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Sobolev, Oleg V.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Turk, Dusan; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-02-26

    A method is presented that modifies a 2mFobs-DFmodel?A-weighted map such that the resulting map can strengthen a weak signal, if present, and can reduce model bias and noise. The method consists of first randomizing the starting map and filling in missing reflections using multiple methods. This is followed by restricting the map to regions with convincing density and the application of sharpening. The final map is then created by combining a series of histogram-equalized intermediate maps. In the test cases shown, the maps produced in this way are found to have increased interpretability and decreased model bias compared with themore »starting 2mFobs-DFmodel?A-weighted map.« less

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Guillet, V; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    Within ten nearby (d projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, $N_H$. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analyzed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool Histogram of Relative Orientations. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing $N_H$ from preferentially parallel or no preferred orientation to preferentially perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfv\\'enic or sub-Alfv\\'enic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength w...

  13. Separation of particles leading to decay and unlimited growth of energy in a driven stadium-like billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André L. P. Livorati; Matheus S. Palmero; Carl P. Dettmann; Iberê L. Caldas; Edson D. Leonel

    2015-07-01

    A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed giving emphasis in the decay of energy mechanism. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy and a statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration. Also, a transport analysis along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy and making use distributions of histograms of frequency, and we set that the causes of the decay of energy are due to the capture of the orbits by the resonant fixed points.

  14. Characterizing Quantum Microwave Radiation and its Entanglement with Superconducting Qubits using Linear Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Eichler; D. Bozyigit; A. Wallraff

    2012-08-27

    Recent progress in the development of superconducting circuits has enabled the realization of interesting sources of nonclassical radiation at microwave frequencies. Here, we discuss field quadrature detection schemes for the experimental characterization of itinerant microwave photon fields and their entanglement correlations with stationary qubits. In particular, we present joint state tomography methods of a radiation field mode and a two-level system. Including the case of finite quantum detection efficiency, we relate measured photon field statistics to generalized quasi-probability distributions and statistical moments for one-channel and two-channel detection. We also present maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct density matrices from measured field quadrature histograms. Our theoretical investigations are supported by the presentation of experimental data, for which microwave quantum fields beyond the single-photon and Gaussian level have been prepared and reconstructed.

  15. Reversible Image Authentication with Tamper Localization Based on Integer Wavelet Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devi, P Meenakshi; Duraiswamy, K

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new reversible image authentication technique with tamper localization based on watermarking in integer wavelet transform is proposed. If the image authenticity is verified, then the distortion due to embedding the watermark can be completely removed from the watermarked image. If the image is tampered, then the tampering positions can also be localized. Two layers of watermarking are used. The first layer embedded in spatial domain verifies authenticity and the second layer embedded in transform domain provides reversibility. This technique utilizes selective LSB embedding and histogram characteristics of the difference images of the wavelet coefficients and modifies pixel values slightly to embed the watermark. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can detect any modifications of the watermarked image.

  16. Evaluation of mutual information estimators on nonlinear dynamic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Papana; D. Kugiumtzis

    2008-09-12

    Mutual information is a nonlinear measure used in time series analysis in order to measure the linear and non-linear correlations at any lag $\\tau$. The aim of this study is to evaluate some of the most commonly used mutual information estimators, i.e. estimators based on histograms (with fixed or adaptive bin size), $k$-nearest neighbors and kernels. We assess the accuracy of the estimators by Monte-Carlo simulations on time series from nonlinear dynamical systems of varying complexity. As the true mutual information is generally unknown, we investigate the existence and rate of consistency of the estimators (convergence to a stable value with the increase of time series length), and the degree of deviation among the estimators. The results show that the $k$-nearest neighbor estimator is the most stable and less affected by the method-specific parameter.

  17. Energy Landscape of the Finite-Size Mean-field 2-Spin Spherical Model and Topology Trivialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhagash Mehta; Jonathan D. Hauenstein; Matthew Niemerg; Nicholas J. Simm; Daniel A. Stariolo

    2014-09-29

    Motivated by the recently observed phenomenon of topology trivialization of potential energy landscapes (PELs) for several statistical mechanics models, we perform a numerical study of the finite size $2$-spin spherical model using both numerical polynomial homotopy continuation and a reformulation via non-hermitian matrices. The continuation approach computes all of the complex stationary points of this model while the matrix approach computes the real stationary points. Using these methods, we compute the average number of stationary points while changing the topology of the PEL as well as the variance. Histograms of these stationary points are presented along with an analysis regarding the complex stationary points. This work connects topology trivialization to two different branches of mathematics: algebraic geometry and catastrophe theory, which is fertile ground for further interdisciplinary research.

  18. Geostatistical Simulation of Hydrofacies Heterogeneity of the West Thessaly Aquifer Systems in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modis, K. Sideri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Integrating geological properties, such as relative positions and proportions of different hydrofacies, is of highest importance in order to render realistic geological patterns. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and Plurigaussian simulation (PS) are alternative methods for conceptual and deterministic modeling for the characterization of hydrofacies distribution. In this work, we studied the spatial differentiation of hydrofacies in the alluvial aquifer system of West Thessaly basin in Greece. For this, we applied both SIS and PS techniques to an extensive set of borehole data from that basin. Histograms of model versus experimental hydrofacies proportions and indicative cross sections were plotted in order to validate the results. The PS technique was shown to be more effective in reproducing the spatial characteristics of the different hydrofacies and their distribution across the study area. In addition, the permeability differentiations reflected in the PS model are in accordance to known heterogeneities of the aquifer capacity.

  19. Combustion Process in a Spark Ignition Engine: Analysis of Cyclic Maximum Pressure and Peak Pressure Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Litak; T. Kaminski; J. Czarnigowski; A. K. Sen; M. Wendeker

    2006-11-29

    In this paper we analyze the cycle-to-cycle variations of maximum pressure $p_{max}$ and peak pressure angle $\\alpha_{pmax}$ in a four-cylinder spark ignition engine. We examine the experimental time series of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ for three different spark advance angles. Using standard statistical techniques such as return maps and histograms we show that depending on the spark advance angle, there are significant differences in the fluctuations of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$. We also calculate the multiscale entropy of the various time series to estimate the effect of randomness in these fluctuations. Finally, we explain how the information on both $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ can be used to develop optimal strategies for controlling the combustion process and improving engine performance.

  20. Sampling Free Energy Surfaces as Slices by Combining Umbrella Sampling and Metadynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapil, Venkat; Nair, Nisanth N

    2015-01-01

    Metadynamics (MTD) is a very powerful technique to sample high--dimensional free energy landscapes, and due to its self--guiding property, the method has been successful in studying complex reactions and conformational changes.MTD sampling is based on filling the free energy basins by biasing potentials and thus for cases with flat, broad and unbound free energy wells, the computational time to sample them becomes very large.To alleviate this problem, we propose a scheme, named Well--Sliced MTD (WS--MTD), where we combine the standard Umbrella Sampling (US) technique with MTD to sample orthogonal collective variables (CVs) in a simultaneous way. Within this scheme, we construct the equilibrium distribution of CVs from biased distributions obtained from independent MTD simulations with umbrella potentials. Reweighting is carried out by a procedure that combines US reweighting and Tiwary-Parrinello metadynamics reweighting within the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). WS--MTD will be an ideal strategy f...

  1. Ensemble annealing of complex physical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habeck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Algorithms for simulating complex physical systems or solving difficult optimization problems often resort to an annealing process. Rather than simulating the system at the temperature of interest, an annealing algorithm starts at a temperature that is high enough to ensure ergodicity and gradually decreases it until the destination temperature is reached. This idea is used in popular algorithms such as parallel tempering and simulated annealing. A general problem with annealing methods is that they require a temperature schedule. Choosing well-balanced temperature schedules can be tedious and time-consuming. Imbalanced schedules can have a negative impact on the convergence, runtime and success of annealing algorithms. This article outlines a unifying framework, ensemble annealing, that combines ideas from simulated annealing, histogram reweighting and nested sampling with concepts in thermodynamic control. Ensemble annealing simultaneously simulates a physical system and estimates its density of states. The...

  2. Computational analysis of kidney scintigrams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrincianu, D.; Puscasu, E.; Creanga, D. [University Al. I. Cuza, Faculty of Physics, 11 Blvd. Carol I, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Stefanescu, C. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr. T. Popa, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The scintigraphic investigation of normal and pathological kidneys was carried out using specialized gamma-camera device from nuclear medicine hospital department. Technetium 90m isotope with gamma radiation emission, coupled with vector molecules for kidney tissues was introduced into the subject body, its dynamics being recorded as data source for kidney clearance capacity. Two representative data series were investigated, corresponding to healthy and pathological organs respectively. The semi-quantitative tests applied for the comparison of the two distinct medical situations were: the shape of probability distribution histogram, the power spectrum, the auto-correlation function and the Lyapunov exponent. While power spectrum led to similar results in both cases, significant differences were revealed by means of distribution probability, Lyapunov exponent and correlation time, recommending these numerical tests as possible complementary tools in clinical diagnosis.

  3. Study of interdomain boundary in diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Lykov

    2002-11-21

    At low temperatures, in strong magnetic fields, the formation of a non-uniform magnetisation is possible in a single-crystal metal sample whose demagnetising factor along the field is close to unity. Namely, so-called Condon diamagnetic domain structure arises and disappears periodically with magnetic field. In this paper, the diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium single crystalis analysed. Directly, existence of diamagnetic domains in that sample was observed earlier by the muon spin precession (mSR) resonance peak splitting. A method is described that allows to calculate quantitative characteristics of the interdomain boundary using the muon histograms. The technique is based on the Marquardt minimisation procedure that has been modified in order to reduce the influence of noise on iterations convergence. Boundary volume fraction was calculated.

  4. Thermodynamic Free Energy Methods to Investigate Shape Transitions In Bilayer Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, N; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of a system is a fundamental thermodynamic quantity of importance particularly in the study of soft matter and biological systems, in which the entropic contributions play a dominant role. While computational methods to delineate the free energy landscape are routinely used to analyze the relative stability of conformational states, to determine phase boundaries, and to compute ligand-receptor binding energies its use in problems involving the cell membrane is limited. Here, we present an overview of four different free energy methods to study morphological transitions in bilayer membranes, induced either by the action of curvature remodeling proteins or due to the application of external forces. Using a triangulated surface as a model for the cell membrane and using the framework of dynamical triangulation Monte Carlo, we have focused on the methods of Widom insertion, thermodynamic integration, Bennett acceptance scheme, and umbrella sampling and weighted histogram a...

  5. LULU analysis program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, H.J.; Lindstrom, P.J.

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes a housekeeping, sorting, and plotting package that operates on word lists generated by a series of user subroutines called ANALYSERS. The LULU program provides a new approach to real-time data analysis for experiments at the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVALAC. ANALYSERS are grouped together for loading and calling in a subroutine called LUUNA. Gives a detailed description of the data flow through LULU. Points out that LULA enables the formation of 100 scatter plots and 100 histograms simultaneously. Presents a diagram which shows the arrays that are used. From the RAW data array (input array) through the analyser output array, VALS, and through the plot arrays, SCAT, to the final array that is displayed as a graph, XY.

  6. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  7. NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

  8. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  9. Data Processing for the SNS EQ-SANS Diffractometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-01-01

    The scattering data on the Extended Q-Range Small Angle Scattering Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source are stored as neutron events. Each event has two parts: the time of fight of the detected neutron, and an identifier for the neutron's location on the detector. In addition, each event is associated with the source pulse from which the neutron is originated. Due to the high neutron beam intensity at the SNS, the size of the stored data files can easily exceed several Gigabytes. Processing and reducing these data can be very time consuming. The standard way of handling the data at the SNS has been to first transform the data into histograms. On the EQ-SANS, these histograms are further processed into intensity I vs. neutron momentum transfer Q files, I(Q). For a large data, the whole process can take many minutes to hours to complete, which severely limits the turnaround time of an experiment. Experimenters often want to reduce the data quickly and depending on the result, make decisions on the setup of next measurements. They may also need to reduce the data using different inputs and conditions. In this work, we present the implementation of a fast data processing scheme for the EQ-SANS diffractometer. The scattering data are processed directly from neutron event files into I(Q) or other desired formats, greatly reducing the needed computation time. Further speed gains are obtained by the implementation of parallel computing under the Message Passing Interface framework. Most data on the EQ-SANS can now be handled in mere seconds. The process is highly automated. All relevant experimental information that is stored in instrument configuration files are read and processed. In addition, the new implementation is highly flexible. All the data corrections and handlings can be controlled transparently through user inputs. Finally, software implementation enables the slicing of neutron event, which can be used for the study of time dependent phenomena.

  10. Statistical Assessment of Proton Treatment Plans Under Setup and Range Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Peter C.; Cheung, Joey P.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Sahoo, Narayan; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Wei; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Court, Laurence E.; Dong, Lei

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a method for quantifying the effect of setup errors and range uncertainties on dose distribution and dose–volume histogram using statistical parameters; and to assess existing planning practice in selected treatment sites under setup and range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Twenty passively scattered proton lung cancer plans, 10 prostate, and 1 brain cancer scanning-beam proton plan(s) were analyzed. To account for the dose under uncertainties, we performed a comprehensive simulation in which the dose was recalculated 600 times per given plan under the influence of random and systematic setup errors and proton range errors. On the basis of simulation results, we determined the probability of dose variations and calculated the expected values and standard deviations of dose–volume histograms. The uncertainties in dose were spatially visualized on the planning CT as a probability map of failure to target coverage or overdose of critical structures. Results: The expected value of target coverage under the uncertainties was consistently lower than that of the nominal value determined from the clinical target volume coverage without setup error or range uncertainty, with a mean difference of ?1.1% (?0.9% for breath-hold), ?0.3%, and ?2.2% for lung, prostate, and a brain cases, respectively. The organs with most sensitive dose under uncertainties were esophagus and spinal cord for lung, rectum for prostate, and brain stem for brain cancer. Conclusions: A clinically feasible robustness plan analysis tool based on direct dose calculation and statistical simulation has been developed. Both the expectation value and standard deviation are useful to evaluate the impact of uncertainties. The existing proton beam planning method used in this institution seems to be adequate in terms of target coverage. However, structures that are small in volume or located near the target area showed greater sensitivity to uncertainties.

  11. Isotoxic Dose Escalation in the Treatment of Lung Cancer by Means of Heterogeneous Dose Distributions in the Presence of Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Mariwan; Nielsen, Morten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Hansen, Olfred [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jahn, Jonas Westberg [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Korreman, Stine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.brink@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To test, in the presence of intrafractional respiration movement, a margin recipe valid for a homogeneous and conformal dose distribution and to test whether the use of smaller margins combined with heterogeneous dose distributions allows an isotoxic dose escalation when respiratory motion is considered. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography scanning. The gross tumor volume and clinical target volume (CTV) were outlined in the mid-ventilation phase. The CTV-to-planning target volume (PTV) margin was calculated by use of a standard margin recipe and the patient-specific respiration pattern. Standard three-dimensional treatment plans were generated and recalculated on the remaining respiration phases. The planning was repeated for a CTV-to-PTV margin decreased by 2.5 and 5 mm relative to the initial margin in all directions. Time-averaged dose-volume histograms (four-dimensional dose-volume histograms) were calculated to evaluate the CTV-to-PTV margin. Finally, the dose was escalated in the plans with decreased PTV such that the mean lung dose (predictor of radiation-induced pneumonitis) was equal to mean lung dose in the plan by use of the initially calculated margin. Results: A reduction of the standard margin by 2.5 mm compared with the recipe resulted in too low of a minimum dose for some patients. A combination of dose escalation and use of heterogeneous dose distribution was able to increase the minimum dose to the target by approximately 10% and 20% for a CTV-to-PTV margin reduction of 2.5 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The margin recipe is valid for intrafractional respiration-induced tumor motions. It is possible to increase the dose to the target without increased mean lung dose with an inhomogeneous dose distribution.

  12. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  13. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, Sylvain [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)]. E-mail: sylvainn@rrsb.nb.ca; Bouchard, Myriam [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Germain, Isabelle [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Raymond, Paul-Emile [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Frederic [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Roy, Rene [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Gingras, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements.

  14. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-07-15

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dose–volume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ?2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ?3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ?2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (? 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ?68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ?2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)]. E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  16. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  17. Improvement of tap holes at Wakayama No. 5 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamashita, M.; Kashiwada, M.; Shibuta, H. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Steel Works

    1995-12-01

    The service life of blast furnaces, as the result of various improvement measures, has been extended from the conventional 5 to 7 years to 15 to 20 years. Wakayama No. 5 blast furnace adopted SiC bricks. Though SiC brick excelled in strength and durability, it has raised problems such as tap hole inside temperature lowering attributable to its high thermal conductivity, insufficient mud burning and gas blow-out. Nevertheless, various countermeasures described within have been taken against such problems, and as the result it has now become possible to maintain tap holes in stable conditions.

  18. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  19. An Investigation of Using Isochoric Data Points in the Development of Natural Gas Equation of State 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khazndar, Aoubai M

    2014-02-27

    gas consumer and will account for 55 percent of total gas use in 2035. This increase of natural gas consumption can be attributed to the big LNG and GTL projects that exist in this region. Qatar more than doubled its LNG liquefaction capacity over... the last 7-years and more than doubled its fuel use in LNG liquefaction plants. [18, 19] In addition to the two GTL facilities (Oryx and Pearl) that are located in Qatar. The Oryx plant consumes 120 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year and produces...

  20. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzales; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2008-10-14

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission with high confidence. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  1. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gonzales, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission at a level of 11 sigma. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  2. Variation in, inheritance of, and correlations between a number of growth and form traits in three sycamore populations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebgen, Russell James

    1980-01-01

    to evaluate different breeding strategies. Genet1c correlations and the coeff1cient of genetic pred1ction (CGp) prov1de informat1on as to how selection for one train w111 affect other important traits. For example, selection for volume could lower wood...milar results 1n two natural stands at Yucatan and Catfish Point, Mississippi . In a 7-year old sycamore plantation, Sauc1er and Ike (1969) exam1ned specific gravities for the first three rings following dif- ferent fertilizer applications (applied...

  3. Methane emissions from rice fields: The effects of climatic and agricultural factors. Final report, March 1, 1994--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The work reported was performed for the purpose of refining estimates of methane emissions from rice fields. Research performed included methane flux measurements, evaluation of variables affecting emissions, compilation of a data base, and continental background measurements in China. The key findings are briefly described in this report. Total methane emissions, seasonal patterns, and spatial variability were measured for a 7-year periods. Temperature was found to be the most important variable studies affecting methane emissions. The data archives for the research are included in the report. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Endogenous contagion – a panel data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baur, Dirk; Fry, Renee

    2006-01-01

    for in the model through the inclusion of the returns of the MSCI World and the MSCI Emerging Markets Free (EMF) Asia indices, respectively. The indices span a time-period of about 7 years from April 30, 1997 until October 22, 2003, for a total of T = 1690... in the crisis is supported by the results of this paper with the detection of contagion during the October 1997 period. To examine the importance of Hong Kong in explaining contagion, Hong Kong returns are included in the vector of exogenous variables...

  5. COMPTEL skymapping: a new approach using parallel computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Strong; H. Bloemen; R. Diehl; W. Hermsen; V. Schoenfelder

    1998-11-13

    Large-scale skymapping with COMPTEL using the full survey database presents challenging problems on account of the complex response and time-variable background. A new approach which attempts to address some of these problems is described, in which the information about each observation is preserved throughout the analysis. In this method, a maximum-entropy algorithm is used to determine image and background simultaneously. Because of the extreme computing requirements, the method has been implemented on a parallel computer, which brings large gains since the response computation is fully parallelizable. The zero level is left undetermined in this method. Results using data from 7 years of COMPTEL data are presented.

  6. Blastoid studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, R. O.

    1961-10-30

    and taxonomy of these fossils. In 1886, R. ETHERIDGE & P. H. CARPENTER published a compre- hensive study of the blastoids, similar to but much more exhaustive than the earlier work by ROEMER. Their paper, based on 7 years of intensive study of 6 THE UNIVERSITY... published on some Devonian and Mississippian blastoids of North America. Since then, little has been added to our knowledge except details of strati- graphic occurrence, as in the papers by K. JOYSEY (1953-1959). In 1943, R. S. BASSLER & M. W. MOODEY...

  7. Physical activity and dietary behaviour in a population-based sample of British 10-year old children: the SPEEDY study (Sport, Physical activity and Eating behaviour: Environmental Determinants in Young people)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Skidmore, Paula M. L.; Mwanza, Kim; Jones, Andrew P.; Callaghan, Alison M.; Ekelund, Ulf; Harrison, Flo; Harvey, Ian; Panter, Jenna R.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Cassidy, Aedin; Griffin, Simon J.

    2008-11-14

    , Kriska AM, Barton BA, Kronsberg SS, Daniels SR, Crawford PB, Sabry ZI, Liu K: Decline in physical activity in 22. Glynn L, Emmett P, Rogers I: Food and nutrient intakes of a pop- ulation sample of 7-year-old children in the south-west of England in 1999... popula- tion-based study from 4 distinct regions in Europe (the Euro- pean Youth Heart Study). Am J Clin Nutr 2004, 80(3):584-590. 33. Ekelund U, Sjostrom M, Yngve A, Poortvliet E, Nilsson A, Froberg K, Wedderkopp N, Westerterp K: Physical activity...

  8. Indiana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  9. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9

  10. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. New York Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. New York Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8Year Jan

  13. New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. South Dakota Natural Gas Processed in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. South Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. State Heating Oil and Propane Program

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. State Heating Oil and Propane Program Expansion of Propane Data Collection

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Stephen Harvey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Stocks of Crude Oil, Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Summary of AEO2015 Renewable Electricity Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Summary of First AEO2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Summary of First AEO2015 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Summary of Second AEO 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Summary of Second AEO 2015 Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Summary of the MECS 2002 User Needs Questionnaire

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  8. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. T:\ClearanceEMEUConsumption\cbecs\pubuse86\txt\cb86sasfmt&layout.txt

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. T:\ClearanceEMEUConsumption\cbecs\pubuse89\txt\layouts&formats.txt

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. TITLE GOES HERE

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2010-2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Table 1.2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Table 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 15 Administration21.3

  16. Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Table 10.24 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Table 10.25 Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Table 11. Summary of U.S. natural gas exports by point of exit, 2010-2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Table 12. Interstate movements and movements across U.S. borders of natural gas by state, 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2010-2014, and by state and sector, 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  8. Table 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Table 2.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. Table 3. Estimation Results for National and Sub-PAD District Regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light Usage by

  8. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light Usage by6.

  9. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light Usage

  10. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light Usage8.

  11. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light Usage8.9.

  12. Table 4. Estimation Results for PAD District Regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light

  14. Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light3

  15. Table 4.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light3Emission5.1

  17. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555. Light3Emission5.1

  18. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.

  19. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of Fuel

  20. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of

  1. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of5 End

  2. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of5

  3. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of57

  4. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of578

  5. Table 5_EntityEmissions.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses

  6. Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses Average

  7. Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses

  8. Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses Table

  9. Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses Table3

  10. Table 7.4 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses Table34

  11. Table 7.6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses

  12. Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses7

  13. Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses79

  14. Table 9. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2010-2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses796

  15. Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses7968

  16. Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End

  17. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 EndNatural

  18. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3

  19. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3State Shares of

  20. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3State

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3StateCoalbed

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3StateCoalbedCrude

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995

  4. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry Natural Gas Proved

  5. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry Natural Gas

  6. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry Natural

  7. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry NaturalLiquids

  8. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry NaturalLiquidsPlant

  9. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995Dry

  10. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995DryExploration &

  11. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995DryExploration

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountry Definitions

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountry DefinitionsPoint of

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountry DefinitionsPoint

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountry DefinitionsPointImports

  17. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountryResidential and

  18. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountryResidential andCoalbed

  19. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountryResidential

  20. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountryResidentialLease

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,YearCountryResidentialLeaseNatural

  2. Low-cost household paint abatement to reduce children's blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, T.; Kanarek, M.S.; Schultz, B.D.; Murphy, A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of low-cost abatement on children's blood lead levels. Blood lead was analyzed before and after abatement in 37 homes of children under 7 years old with initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL. Ninety-five percent of homes were built before 1950. Abatement methods used were wet-scraping and repainting deteriorated surfaces and wrapping window wells with aluminum or vinyl. A control group was retrospectively selected. Control children were under 7 years old, had initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL and a follow-up level at least 28 days afterward, and did not have abatements performed in their homes between blood lead levels. After abatement, statistically significant declines occurred in the intervention children's blood lead levels. The mean decline was 22%, 1 to 6 months after treatment. After adjustment for seasonality and child's age, the mean decline was 6.0 {micro}g/dL, or 18%. The control children's blood levels did not decline significantly. There was a mean decline of 0.25 {micro}g/dL, or 0.39%. After adjustment for seasonality and age, the mean decline for control children was 1.6 {micro}g/dL, or 1.8%. Low-cost abatement and education are effective short-term interim controls.

  3. Iliac Artery Stent Placement Relieves Claudication in Patients with Iliac and Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of iliac artery stent placement for relief of claudication in patients with both iliac and superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions. Methods. Stent placement for only iliac artery occlusive disease was performed in 94 limbs (74 patients) with both iliac and SFA occlusive disease on the same limb. All procedures were performed because intermittent claudication did not improve after continuation of antiplatelet medication therapy and home-based exercise for 3 months. Rutherford classification was 2 in 20 limbs and 3 in 74 limbs. Patients with critical limb ischemia were excluded. Median duration of follow-up was 40 months. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent, clinical improvement rates, and risk factors for requiring additional SFA procedures were evaluated. Results. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 97, 93, 79, and 79 %, respectively. The initial clinical improvement rate was 87 %. Continued clinical improvement rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 87, 81, 69, and 66 %, respectively. SFA Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D lesion was a significant risk factor for requiring additional SFA procedures. Conclusion. Intermittent claudication was relieved by iliac stent placement in most patients with both iliac and SFA lesions. Thus, the indications for treatment of the SFA intended for claudicants should be evaluated after treatment of the iliac lesion.

  4. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Statistical density modification can make use of local patterns of density found in protein structures to improve crystallographic phases. A method for improving crystallographic phases is presented that is based on the preferential occurrence of certain local patterns of electron density in macromolecular electron-density maps. The method focuses on the relationship between the value of electron density at a point in the map and the pattern of density surrounding this point. Patterns of density that can be superimposed by rotation about the central point are considered equivalent. Standard templates are created from experimental or model electron-density maps by clustering and averaging local patterns of electron density. The clustering is based on correlation coefficients after rotation to maximize the correlation. Experimental or model maps are also used to create histograms relating the value of electron density at the central point to the correlation coefficient of the density surrounding this point with each member of the set of standard patterns. These histograms are then used to estimate the electron density at each point in a new experimental electron-density map using the pattern of electron density at points surrounding that point and the correlation coefficient of this density to each of the set of standard templates, again after rotation to maximize the correlation. The method is strengthened by excluding any information from the point in question from both the templates and the local pattern of density in the calculation. A function based on the origin of the Patterson function is used to remove information about the electron density at the point in question from nearby electron density. This allows an estimation of the electron density at each point in a map, using only information from other points in the process. The resulting estimates of electron density are shown to have errors that are nearly independent of the errors in the original map using model data and templates calculated at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Owing to this independence of errors, information from the new map can be combined in a simple fashion with information from the original map to create an improved map. An iterative phase-improvement process using this approach and other applications of the image-reconstruction method are described and applied to experimental data at resolutions ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 Å.

  5. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Conclusion: ACE inhibitors may decrease the incidence of radiation pneumonitis in patients receiving thoracic radiation for lung cancer. These findings are consistent with preclinical evidence and should be prospectively evaluated.

  6. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  7. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

  8. Anterior Myocardial Territory May Replace the Heart as Organ at Risk in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Wenyong; Liu Dong; Xue Chenbin; Xu Jiaozhen; Li Beihui; Chen Zhengwang; Hu Desheng; Wang Xionghong

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether the heart could be replaced by the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as the organ at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the breast for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with left-sided breast cancer who received postoperative radiation after breast-conserving surgery were studied. For each patient, we generated five IMRT plans including heart (H), left ventricle (LV), AMT, LV+AMT, and H+LV as the primary OARs, respectively, except both lungs and right breast, which corresponded to IMRT(H), IMRT(LV), IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV+AMT), and IMRT(H+LV). For the planning target volumes and OARs, the parameters of dose-volume histograms were compared. Results: The homogeneity index, conformity index, and coverage index were not compromised significantly in IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV) and IMRT(LV+ AMT), respectively, when compared with IMRT(H). The mean dose to the heart, LV, and AMT decreased 5.3-21.5% (p < 0.05), 19.9-29.5% (p < 0.05), and 13.3-24.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Similarly, the low (e.g., V5%), middle (e.g., V20%), and high (e.g., V30%) dose-volume of the heart, LV, and AMT decreased with different levels. The mean dose and V10% of the right lung increased by 9.2% (p < 0.05) and 27.6% (p < 0.05), respectively, in IMRT(LV), and the mean dose and V5% of the right breast decreased significantly in IMRT(AMT) and IMRT(LV+AMT). IMRT(AMT) was the preferred plan and was then compared with IMRT(H+LV); the majority of dose-volume histogram parameters of OARs including the heart, LV, AMT, both lungs, and the right breast were not statistically different. However, the low dose-volume of LV increased and the middle dose-volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IMRT(AMT). Also, those of the right lung (V10%, V15%) and right breast (V5%, V10%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The AMT may replace the heart as the OAR in left-sided breast IMRT after breast-conserving surgery to decrease the radiation dose to the heart.

  9. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date. Our findings indicate that this treatment results in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable toxicity.

  10. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ?{sub P}?? and the damping constant ?{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ?{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for ?{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ?{sub p} and ?{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ?{sub p} and ?{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  11. Incorporating Wind Generation Forecast Uncertainty into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2010-10-19

    In this paper, an approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the "flying-brick" technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through integration with an EMS system illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems from other vendors.

  12. Incorporating Uncertainty of Wind Power Generation Forecast into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Huang, Zhenyu; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2011-06-23

    An approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. An assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty - both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures). A new method called the 'flying-brick' technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through EMS integration illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems in control rooms.

  13. Maximum-likelihood density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    A likelihood-based density modification approach is developed that can incorporate expected electron-density information from a wide variety of sources. A likelihood-based approach to density modification is developed that can be applied to a wide variety of cases where some information about the electron density at various points in the unit cell is available. The key to the approach consists of developing likelihood functions that represent the probability that a particular value of electron density is consistent with prior expectations for the electron density at that point in the unit cell. These likelihood functions are then combined with likelihood functions based on experimental observations and with others containing any prior knowledge about structure factors to form a combined likelihood function for each structure factor. A simple and general approach to maximizing the combined likelihood function is developed. It is found that this likelihood-based approach yields greater phase improvement in model and real test cases than either conventional solvent flattening and histogram matching or a recent reciprocal-space solvent-flattening procedure [Terwilliger (1999 ?), Acta Cryst. D55, 1863–1871].

  14. Maximum-likelihood density modification using pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A likelihood-based density-modification method is extended to include pattern recognition of structural motifs. The likelihood-based approach to density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] is extended to include the recognition of patterns of electron density. Once a region of electron density in a map is recognized as corresponding to a known structural element, the likelihood of the map is reformulated to include a term that reflects how closely the map agrees with the expected density for that structural element. This likelihood is combined with other aspects of the likelihood of the map, including the presence of a flat solvent region and the electron-density distribution in the protein region. This likelihood-based pattern-recognition approach was tested using the recognition of helical segments in a largely helical protein. The pattern-recognition method yields a substantial phase improvement over both conventional and likelihood-based solvent-flattening and histogram-matching methods. The method can potentially be used to recognize any common structural motif and incorporate prior knowledge about that motif into density modification.

  15. Decision-Making in Structure Solution using Bayesian Estimates of Map Quality: The PHENIX AutoSol Wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T. C.; Adams, P. D.; Read, R. J.; McCoy, A. J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R. W.; Afonine, P. V.; Zwart, P. H.; Hung, L.-W.

    2009-03-01

    Estimates of the quality of experimental maps are important in many stages of structure determination of macromolecules. Map quality is defined here as the correlation between a map and the map calculated based on a final refined model. Here we examine 10 different measures of experimental map quality using a set of 1359 maps calculated by reanalysis of 246 solved MAD, SAD, and MIR datasets. A simple Bayesian approach to estimation of map quality from one or more measures is presented. We find that a Bayesian estimator based on the skew of histograms of electron density is the most accurate of the 10 individual Bayesian estimators of map quality examined, with a correlation between estimated and actual map quality of 0.90. A combination of the skew of electron density with the local correlation of rms density gives a further improvement in estimating map quality, with an overall correlation coefficient of 0.92. The PHENIX AutoSol Wizard carries out automated structure solution based on any combination of SAD, MAD, SIR, or MIR datasets. The Wizard is based on tools from the PHENIX package and uses the Bayesian estimates of map quality described here to choose the highest-quality solutions after experimental phasing.

  16. Computer simulation of the phase diagram for a fluid confined in a fractal and disordered porous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. De Grandis; P. Gallo; M. Rovere

    2004-11-14

    We present a grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation study of the phase diagram of a Lennard-Jones fluid adsorbed in a fractal and highly porous aerogel. The gel environment is generated from an off-lattice diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. Simulations have been performed with the multicanonical ensemble sampling technique. The biased sampling function has been obtained by histogram reweighting calculations. Comparing the confined and the bulk system liquid-vapor coexistence curves we observe a decrease of both the critical temperature and density in qualitative agreement with experiments and other Monte Carlo studies on Lennard-Jones fluids confined in random matrices of spheres. At variance with these numerical studies we do not observe upon confinement a peak on the liquid side of the coexistence curve associated with a liquid-liquid phase coexistence. In our case only a shouldering of the coexistence curve appears upon confinement. This shoulder can be associated with high density fluctuations in the liquid phase. The coexisting vapor and liquid phases in our system show a high degree of spatial disorder and inhomogeneity.

  17. Proton radiation therapy for retinoblastoma: Comparison of various intraocular tumor locations and beam arrangements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Hug, Eugen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Adams, Judy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Smith, Alfred R. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Munzenrider, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: jmunzenrider@partners.org

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study the optimization of proton beam arrangements for various intraocular tumor locations; and to correlate isodose distributions with various target and nontarget structures. Methods and materials: We considered posterior-central, nasal, and temporal tumor locations, with straight, intrarotated, or extrarotated eye positions. Doses of 46 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) to gross tumor volume (GTV) and 40 CGE to clinical target volume (CTV) (2 CGE per fraction) were assumed. Using three-dimensional planning, we compared isodose distributions for lateral, anterolateral oblique, and anteromedial oblique beams and dose-volume histograms of CTVs, GTVs, lens, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, and soft tissues. Results: All beam arrangements fully covered GTVs and CTVs with optimal lens sparing. Only 15% of orbital bone received doses {>=}20 CGE with a lateral beam, with 20-26 CGE delivered to two of three growth centers. The anterolateral oblique approach with an intrarotated eye resulted in additional reduction of bony volume and exposure of only one growth center. No appreciable dose was delivered to the contralateral eye, brain tissue, or pituitary gland. Conclusions: Proton therapy achieved homogeneous target coverage with true lens sparing. Doses to orbit structures, including bony growth centers, were minimized with different beam arrangements and eye positions. Proton therapy could reduce the risks of second malignancy and cosmetic and functional sequelae.

  18. Proton Radiotherapy for Childhood Ependymoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes and Dose Comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org; Safai, Sairos; Trofimov, Alexei; Wolfgang, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Fullerton, Barbara [Department of Otology and Laryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Internal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bortfeld, Thomas; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical outcomes for pediatric patients treated with proton beam radiation for intracranial ependymoma and compare the dose distributions of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with photons (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton radiation, and intensity-modulated proton radiation therapy (IMPT) for representative patients. Methods and Materials: All children with intracranial ependymoma confined to the supratentorial or infratentorial brain treated at the Francis H. Burr Proton Facility and Harvard Cyclotron between November 2000 and March 2006 were included in this study. Seventeen patients were treated with protons. Proton, IMRT, and IMPT plans were generated with similar clinical constraints for representative infratentorial and supratentorial ependymoma cases. Tumor and normal tissue dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Results: At a median follow-up of 26 months from the start date of radiation therapy, local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 86%, 80%, and 89%, respectively. Subtotal resection was significantly associated with decreased local control (p = 0.016). Similar tumor volume coverage was achieved with IMPT, proton therapy, and IMRT. Substantial normal tissue sparing was seen with proton therapy compared with IMRT. Use of IMPT will allow for additional sparing of some critical structures. Conclusions: Preliminary disease control with proton therapy compares favorably with the literature. Dosimetric comparisons show the advantage of proton radiation compared with IMRT in the treatment of ependymoma. Further sparing of normal structures appears possible with IMPT. Superior dose distributions were accomplished with fewer beam angles with the use of protons and IMPT.

  19. Effect of an external magnetic field on the nematic-isotropic phase transition in mesogenic systems of uniaxial and biaxial molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nababrata Ghoshal; Kisor Mukhopadhyay; Soumen Kumar Roy

    2012-12-17

    Influence of an external magnetic field on the nematic-isotropic ($N-I$) phase transition in a dispersion model of nematic liquid crystals, where the molecules are either perfectly uniaxial or biaxial (board-like), has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Using multiple histogram reweighting technique and finite size scaling analysis the order of the phase transition, the transition temperature at the thermodynamic limit and the stability limit of the isotropic phase below the transition temperature for different magnetic field strengths have been determined. The magnetic field dependence of the shift in $N-I$ transition temperature is observed to be more rapid than that predicted by the standard Landau-de Gennes and Maier-Saupe mean field theories. We have shown that for a given field strength the shift in the transition temperature is higher for the biaxial molecules in comparison with the uniaxial case. The study shows that the $N-I$ transition for the biaxial molecules is weaker than the well known weak first order $N-I$ transition for the uniaxial molecules and the presence of the external magnetic field (up to a certain critical value) makes the transition much more weaker for both the systems. The estimate of the critical magnetic field ($\\sim 110 T$) for the common nematics is found to be smaller than the earlier estimates.

  20. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  1. Anniversary Paper: Image processing and manipulation through the pages of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Ginneken, Bram van [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Room Q0S.459, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    The language of radiology has gradually evolved from ''the film'' (the foundation of radiology since Wilhelm Roentgen's 1895 discovery of x-rays) to ''the image,'' an electronic manifestation of a radiologic examination that exists within the bits and bytes of a computer. Rather than simply storing and displaying radiologic images in a static manner, the computational power of the computer may be used to enhance a radiologist's ability to visually extract information from the image through image processing and image manipulation algorithms. Image processing tools provide a broad spectrum of opportunities for image enhancement. Gray-level manipulations such as histogram equalization, spatial alterations such as geometric distortion correction, preprocessing operations such as edge enhancement, and enhanced radiography techniques such as temporal subtraction provide powerful methods to improve the diagnostic quality of an image or to enhance structures of interest within an image. Furthermore, these image processing algorithms provide the building blocks of more advanced computer vision methods. The prominent role of medical physicists and the AAPM in the advancement of medical image processing methods, and in the establishment of the ''image'' as the fundamental entity in radiology and radiation oncology, has been captured in 35 volumes of Medical Physics.

  2. Spatial organization and correlation properties quantify structural changes on mesoscale of parenchymatous plant tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valous, N. A.; Delgado, A.; Sun, D.-W., E-mail: dawen.sun@ucd.ie [School of Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland); Drakakis, K. [Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-02-14

    The study of plant tissue parenchyma's intercellular air spaces contributes to the understanding of anatomy and physiology. This is challenging due to difficulty in making direct measurements of the pore space and the complex mosaic of parenchymatous tissue. The architectural complexity of pore space has shown that single geometrical measurements are not sufficient for characterization. The inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on the percentage content of phase, but also on how the phase fills the space. The lacunarity morphometric, as multiscale measure, provides information about the distribution of gaps that correspond to degree of spatial organization in parenchyma. Additionally, modern theories have suggested strategies, where the focus has shifted from the study of averages and histograms to the study of patterns in data fluctuations. Detrended fluctuation analysis provides information on the correlation properties of the parenchyma at different spatial scales. The aim is to quantify (with the aid of the aforementioned metrics), the mesostructural changes—that occur from one cycle of freezing and thawing—in the void phase of pome fruit parenchymatous tissue, acquired with X-ray microcomputed tomography. Complex systems methods provide numerical indices and detailed insights regarding the freezing-induced modifications upon the arrangement of cells and voids. These structural changes have the potential to lead to physiological disorders. The work can further stimulate interest for the analysis of internal plant tissue structures coupled with other physico-chemical processes or phenomena.

  3. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1987. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 70 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for reach of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mrem to a high of 0.009 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year). 2 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

  5. Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

  6. A Monte Carlo simulation study on the wetting behavior of water on graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongce Zhao

    2012-09-20

    This paper is an expanded edition of the rapid communication published several years ago by the author (Phys. Rev. B, v76, 041402(R), 2007) on the simulation of wetting transition of water on graphite, aiming to provide more details on the methodology, parameters, and results of the study which might be of interest to certain readers. We calculate adsorption isotherms of water on graphite using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations combined with multiple histogram reweighting, based on the empirical potentials of SPC/E for water, the 10-4-3 van der Waals model, and a recently developed induction and multipolar potential for water and graphite. Our results show that wetting transition of water on graphite occurs at 475-480 K, and the prewetting critical temperature lies in the range of 505-510 K. The calculated wetting transition temperature agrees quantitatively with a previously predicted value using a simple model. The observation of the coexistence of stable and metastable states at temperatures between the wetting transition temperature and prewetting critical temperature indicates that the transition is first order.

  7. Dosimetric and Biologic Differences in Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Treatment Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Yue; Bassetti, Michael; Du, Kaifang; Saenz, Daniel; Harari, Paul; Paliwal, Bhudatt R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the dosimetric and biologic differences in treatment plans from flattened and flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for three anatomic cancer sites. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans with static intensity-modulated radiotherapy beams and volumetric modulated arc therapy beams were generated for 13 patients for both the flattened beam and the FFF beam of the TrueBeam system. Beam energies of 6 MV and 10 MV were chosen for planning. A total of 104 treatment plans were generated in 13 patients. In order to analyze the biological effectiveness of treatment plans, dose volume histograms (DVH) were utilized. Flattened and FFF beam plans are quantitatively compared. Results: In head and neck cases, for VMAT plans, dose reduction in the FFF beam plans compared to the flattened beam in left cochlea, right submandibular gland and right parotid gland reached up to 2.36 Gy, 1.21 Gy and 1.45 Gy, respectively. Similarly, for static IMRT plans, the dose reduction of the FFF beam plans com...

  8. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon, E-mail: leejh@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/H? and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted H? and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, ? = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/H?) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/H? ? 0.55 and ?0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  9. Few-photon imaging at 1550 nm using a low-timing-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, H; You, L; Chen, S; Zhang, W; Wu, J; Wang, Z; Xie, X

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a laser depth imaging system based on the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, which was incorporated with a low-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), operated at the wavelength of 1550 nm. A sub-picosecond time-bin width was chosen for photon counting, resulting in a discrete noise of less than one/two counts for each time bin under indoor/outdoor daylight conditions, with a collection time of 50 ms. Because of the low-jitter SNSPD, the target signal histogram was significantly distinguishable, even for a fairly low retro-reflected photon flux. The depth information was determined directly by the highest bin counts, instead of using any data fitting combined with complex algorithms. Millimeter resolution depth imaging of a low-signature object was obtained, and more accurate data than that produced by the traditional Gaussian fitting method was generated. Combined with the intensity of the return photons, three-dimensional reconstruction overlaid with re...

  10. Analysis of Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst duration distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Two classes of GRBs, short and long, have been determined without any doubts, and are usually prescribed to different physical scenarios. A third class, intermediate in $T_{90}$ durations, has been reported to be present in the datasets of BATSE, Swift, RHESSI and possibly BeppoSAX. The latest release of $>1500$ GRBs observed by Fermi gives an opportunity to further investigate the duration distribution. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether a third class is present in the $\\log T_{90}$ distribution, or is it described by a bimodal distribution. A standard $\\chi^2$ fitting of a mixture of Gaussians is applied to 25 histograms with different binnings. Different binnings give various values of the fitting parameters, as well as the shape of the fitted curve. Among five statistically significant fits none is trimodal. Locations of the Gaussian components are in agreement with previous works. However, a trimodal distribution, understood in the sense of having three separated peaks, is not found for any ...

  11. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1983. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 52 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 45 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 170 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk.

  12. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1986. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 66 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 31 person-rem to a low of 0.0007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.7 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 110 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup -6} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. 12 refs.

  13. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1984. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 56 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 110 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 5 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 280 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.04 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  14. The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naomi A. Ridge; James Di Francesco; Helen Kirk; Di Li; Alyssa A. Goodman; João F. Alves; Héctor G. Arce; Michelle A. Borkin; Paola Caselli; Jonathan B. Foster; Mark H. Heyer; Doug Johnstone; David A. Kosslyn; Marco Lombardi; Jaime E. Pineda; Scott L. Schnee; Mario Tafalla

    2006-02-24

    We present an overview of data available for the Ophiuchus and Perseus molecular clouds from ``Phase I'' of the COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions. This survey provides a range of data complementary to the Spitzer Legacy Program ``From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks.'' Phase I includes: Extinction maps derived from 2MASS near-infrared data using the NICER algorithm; extinction and temperature maps derived from IRAS 60 and 100um emission; HI maps of atomic gas; 12CO and 13CO maps of molecular gas; and submillimetre continuum images of emission from dust in dense cores. Not unexpectedly, the morphology of the regions appears quite different depending on the column-density tracer which is used, with IRAS tracing mainly warmer dust and CO being biased by chemical, excitation and optical depth effects. Histograms of column-density distribution are presented, showing that extinction as derived from 2MASS/NICER gives the closest match to a log-normal distribution as is predicted by numerical simulations. All the data presented in this paper, and links to more detailed publications on their implications are publically available at the COMPLETE website.

  15. Duration distributions for different softness groups of gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. -P. Qin; A. C. Gupta; J. H. Fan; C. -Y. Su; R. -J. Lu

    2010-10-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes according to their durations. We investigate if the softness of bursts plays a role in the conventional classification of the objects. We employ the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) catalog and analyze the duration distributions of different groups of GRBs associated with distinct softness. Our analysis reveals that the conventional classification of GRBs with the duration of bursts is influenced by the softness of the objects. There exits a bimodality in the duration distribution of GRBs for each group of bursts and the time position of the dip in the bimodality histogram shifts with the softness parameter. Our findings suggest that the conventional classification scheme should be modified by separating the two well-known populations in different softness groups, which would be more reasonable than doing so with a single sample. According to the relation between the dip position and the softness parameter, we get an empirical function that can roughly set apart the short-hard and long-soft bursts: $SP = (0.100 \\pm 0.028) T_{90}^{-(0.85 \\pm 0.18)}$, where $SP$ is the softness parameter adopted in this paper.

  16. Radiotherapy margin design with particular consideration of high curvature CTVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St. Andrews Place, E. Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    In applying 3D conformal radiation therapy to a tumor clinical target volume (CTV), a margin is added around the CTV to account for any sources of error in the application of treatment which may result in misalignment between the CTV and the dose distribution actually delivered. The volume enclosed within the CTV plus the margin is known as the PTV, or planning target volume. The larger the errors are anticipated to be, the wider the margin will need to be to accommodate those errors. Based on the approach of van Herk et al. [''The probability of correct target dosage: Dose-population histograms for deriving treatment margins in radiotherapy,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol., Phys. 47(4), 1121-1135 (2000)] this paper develops the mathematical theory behind the calculation of the margin width required to ensure that the entire CTV receives sufficiently high dose with sufficiently high probability. The margin recipe developed not only considers the magnitude of the errors but also includes a term to adjust for curved CTV surfaces. In doing so, the accuracy of the margin recipe is enhanced yet remains mathematically concise enough to be readily implemented in the clinical setting. The results are particularly relevant for clinical situations in which the uncertainties in treatment are large relative to the size of the CTV.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts from Minijets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv; Arnon Dar

    1994-07-14

    Striking similarities exist between high energy gamma ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). They suggest that GRBs are generated by inverse Compton scattering from highly relativistic electrons in transient jets. Such jets may be produced along the axis of an accretion disk formed around stellar black holes (BH) or neutron stars (NS) in BH-NS and NS-NS mergers and in accretion induced collapse of magnetized white dwarfs (WD) or neutron stars in close binary systems. Such events may produce the cosmological GRBs. Transient jets formed by single old magnetized neutron stars in an extended Galactic halo may produce a local population of GRBs. Here we show that jet production of GRBs by inverse Compton scattering can explain quite simply the striking correlations that exist between various temporal features of GRBs, their duration histogram, the power spectrum of their complex multipeak light curves, their power-law high energy spectra and other features of GRBs. Some additional predictions are made including the expected polarization of gamma-rays in the bursts.

  18. Outcome Modeling Using Clinical DVH Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the ability of correlation and regression analysis to extract the normal lung dose-response function from dose volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods: A local injury model is adopted, in which radiation-induced damage (functional loss) G is the integral of the DVH with function R(D). RP risk is H(G) where H() is the sigmoid cumulative distribution of functional reserve. RP incidence is a Bernoulli function of risk. A homogeneous patient cohort is assumed, allowing non-dose-related factors to be ignored. Clinically realistic DVHs are combined with the injury model to simulate RP data. Results: Correlation analysis is often used to identify predictor variables that are correlated with outcome, for inclusion in a predictive model. In the local injury model, all DVH metrics VD contribute to damage. Correlation analysis therefore has limited value. The subset of VD significantly correlated with incidence varies randomly from trial to trial due to random variations in the DVH set, and does not ne...

  19. Effective Pedestrian Detection Using Center-symmetric Local Binary/Trinary Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yongbin; Hartley, Richard; Huang, Xinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Accurately detecting pedestrians in images plays a critically important role in many computer vision applications. Extraction of effective features is the key to this task. Promising features should be discriminative, robust to various variations and easy to compute. In this work, we present novel features, termed dense center-symmetric local binary patterns (CS-LBP) and pyramid center-symmetric local binary$/$ternary patterns (CS-LBP/LTP), for pedestrian detection. The standard LBP proposed by Ojala et al.~\\cite{c4} mainly captures the texture information. The proposed CS-LBP feature, in contrast, captures the gradient information and some texture information. Moreover, the proposed dense CS-LBP and the pyramid CS-LBP/LTP are easy to implement and computationally efficient, which is desirable for real-time applications. Experiments on the INRIA pedestrian dataset show that the dense CS-LBP feature with linear supporct vector machines (SVMs) is comparable with the histograms of oriented gradients (HOG) featur...

  20. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ?3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Robyn, E-mail: robynbanerjee@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ?3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ?3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ?3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ?3 acute toxicity.

  1. A study of self organized criticality in ion temperature gradient mode driven gyrokinetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavridis, M.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.

    2014-10-15

    An investigation on the characteristics of self organized criticality (Soc) in ITG mode driven turbulence is made, with the use of various statistical tools (histograms, power spectra, Hurst exponents estimated with the rescaled range analysis, and the structure function method). For this purpose, local non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of the cyclone base case scenario are performed with the GENE software package. Although most authors concentrate on global simulations, which seem to be a better choice for such an investigation, we use local simulations in an attempt to study the locally underlying mechanisms of Soc. We also study the structural properties of radially extended structures, with several tools (fractal dimension estimate, cluster analysis, and two dimensional autocorrelation function), in order to explore whether they can be characterized as avalanches. We find that, for large enough driving temperature gradients, the local simulations exhibit most of the features of Soc, with the exception of the probability distribution of observables, which show a tail, yet they are not of power-law form. The radial structures have the same radial extent at all temperature gradients examined; radial motion (transport) though appears only at large temperature gradients, in which case the radial structures can be interpreted as avalanches.

  2. The Spatial Structure of Young Stellar Clusters. II. Total Young Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Michael A; Feigelson, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the intrinsic stellar populations (estimated total numbers of OB and pre-main-sequence stars down to 0.1 Mo) that are present in 17 massive star-forming regions (MSFRs) surveyed by the MYStIX project. The study is based on the catalog of >31,000 MYStIX Probable Complex Members with both disk-bearing and disk-free populations, compensating for extinction, nebulosity, and crowding effects. Correction for observational sensitivities is made using the X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) and the near-infrared Initial Mass Function (IMF)--a correction that is often not made by infrared surveys of young stars. The resulting maps of the projected structure of the young stellar populations, in units of intrinsic stellar surface density, allow direct comparison between different regions. Several regions have multiple dense clumps, similar in size and density to the Orion Nebula Cluster. The highest projected density of ~34,000 stars/pc^2 is found in the core of the RCW38 cluster. Histograms of surface densit...

  3. Influence of Solar Activity on State of Wheat Market in Medieval England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev A. Pustilnik; Gregory Yom Din

    2003-12-09

    The database of Prof. Rogers (1887), which includes wheat prices in England in the Middle Ages, was used to search for a possible influence of solar activity on the wheat market. We present a conceptual model of possible modes for sensitivity of wheat prices to weather conditions, caused by solar cycle variations, and compare expected price fluctuations with price variations recorded in medieval England. We compared statistical properties of the intervals between wheat price bursts during years 1249-1703 with statistical properties of the intervals between minimums of solar cycles during years 1700-2000. We show that statistical properties of these two samples are similar, both for characteristics of the distributions and for histograms of the distributions. We analyze a direct link between wheat prices and solar activity in the 17th Century, for which wheat prices and solar activity data (derived from 10Be isotope) are available. We show that for all 10 time moments of the solar activity minimums the observed prices were higher than prices for the correspondent time moments of maximal solar activity (100% sign correlation, on a significance level solar activity.

  4. Coherent measures of the impact of co-authors in peer review journals and in proceedings publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the coauthor effect in different types of publications, usually not equally respected in measuring research impact. {\\it A priori} unexpected relationships are found between the total coauthor core value, $m_a$, of a leading investigator (LI), and the related values for their publications in either peer review journals ($j$) or in proceedings ($p$). A surprisingly linear relationship is found: $ m_a^{(j)} + 0.4\\;m_a^{(p)} = m_a^{(jp)} $. Furthermore, another relationship is found concerning the measure of the total number of citations, $A_a$, i.e. the surface of the citation size-rank histogram up to $m_a$. Another linear relationship exists : $A_a^{(j)} + 1.36\\; A_a^{(p)} = A_a^{(jp)} $. These empirical findings coefficients (0.4 and 1.36) are supported by considerations based on an empirical power law found between the number of joint publications of an author and the rank of a coauthor. Moreover, a simple power law relationship is found between $m_a$ and the number ($r_M$) of coauthor...

  5. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F.; Siah, N. J.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  6. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  7. SU-E-T-617: A Feasibility Study of Navigation Based Multi Criteria Optimization for Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aims to validate multi-criteria optimization (MCO) against standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for advanced cervical cancer in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden). Methods: 10 advanced cervical cancer patients IMRT plans were randomly selected, these plans were designed with step and shoot optimization, new plans were then designed with MCO based on these plans,while keeping optimization conditions unchanged,comparison was made between both kinds of plans including the dose volume histogram parameters of PTV and OAR,and were analysed by pairing-t test. Results: We normalize the plan so that 95% volume of PTV achieved the prescribed dose(50Gy). The volume of radiation 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy of the rectum were reduced by 14.7%,26.8%,21.1%,10.5% respectively(P?0.05). The mean dose of rectum were reduced by 7.2Gy(P?0.05). There were no significant differences for the dosimetric parameters for the bladder. Conclusion: In comparision with standard IMRT optimization, MCO reduces the dose of organs at risk with the same PTV coverage,but the result needs further clinical evalution.

  8. Conformations of Organophosphine Oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-29

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore »field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. The predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  9. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  10. Evaluation of and Suggested Improvements to the WSM6 Microphysics in WRF- ARW Using Synthetic and Observed GOES-13 Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, Lewis; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Clark, Adam; Bikos, Dan; Dembek, Scott R.

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic satellite imagery can be employed to evaluate simulated cloud fields. Past studies have revealed that the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) WRF Single-Moment 6-class (WSM6) microphysics in WRF-ARW produces less upper level ice clouds within synthetic images compared to observations. Synthetic Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-13 imagery at 10.7 ?m of simulated cloud fields from the 4 km National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF-ARW is compared to observed GOES-13 imagery. Histograms suggest that too few points contain upper level simulated ice clouds. In particular, side-by-side examples are shown of synthetic and observed convective anvils. Such images illustrate the lack of anvil cloud associated with convection produced by the NSSL WRF-ARW. A vertical profile of simulated hydrometeors suggests that too much cloud water mass may be converted into graupel mass, effectively reducing the main source of ice mass in a simulated anvil. Further, excessive accretion of ice by snow removes ice from an anvil by precipitation settling. Idealized sensitivity tests reveal that a 50% reduction of the conversion of cloud water mass to graupel and a 50% reduction of the accretion rate of ice by snow results in a significant increase in anvil ice of a simulated storm. Such results provide guidance as to which conversions could be reformulated, in a more physical manner, to increase simulated ice mass in the upper troposphere.

  11. Development of Bayesian analysis program for extraction of polarisation observables at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Stefanie; Ireland, David; Vanderbauwhede, W.

    2014-06-01

    At the mass scale of a proton, the strong force is not well understood. Various quark models exist, but it is important to determine which quark model(s) are most accurate. Experimentally, finding resonances predicted by some models and not others would give valuable insight into this fundamental interaction. Several labs around the world use photoproduction experiments to find these missing resonances. The aim of this work is to develop a robust Bayesian data analysis program for extracting polarisation observables from pseudoscalar meson photoproduction experiments using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. This method, known as nested sampling, has been compared to traditional methods and has incorporated data parallelisation and GPU programming. It involves an event-by-event likelihood function, which has no associated loss of information from histogram binning, and results can be easily constrained to the physical region. One of the most important advantages of the nested sampling approach is that data from different experiments can be combined and analysed simultaneously. Results on both simulated and previously analysed experimental data for the K{sup +}? channel will be discussed.

  12. Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

  13. Abnormal grain growth in AISI 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2014-11-15

    The microstructural evolution during abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in 304L stainless steel was studied in a wide range of annealing temperatures and times. At relatively low temperatures, the grain growth mode was identified as normal. However, at homologous temperatures between 0.65 (850 °C) and 0.7 (900 °C), the observed transition in grain growth mode from normal to abnormal, which was also evident from the bimodality in grain size distribution histograms, was detected to be caused by the dissolution/coarsening of carbides. The microstructural features such as dispersed carbides were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and microhardness. Continued annealing to a long time led to the completion of secondary recrystallization and the subsequent reappearance of normal growth mode. Another instance of abnormal grain growth was observed at homologous temperatures higher than 0.8, which may be attributed to the grain boundary faceting/defaceting phenomenon. It was also found that when the size of abnormal grains reached a critical value, their size will not change too much and the grain growth behavior becomes practically stagnant. - Highlights: • Abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in AISI 304L stainless steel • Exaggerated grain growth due to dissolution/coarsening of carbides • The enrichment of carbide particles by titanium • Abnormal grain growth due to grain boundary faceting at very high temperatures • The stagnancy of abnormal grain growth by annealing beyond a critical time.

  14. Is the Use of a Surrogate Urethra an Option in Prostate High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Josef Kaelkner, Karl Mikael; Berg, Lars; Levitt, Seymour; Holmberg, Carina; Nilsson, Sten; Lundell, Marie

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and the dosimetric consequences of substituting a surrogate urethra assumed to be at the geometric center of the prostate, in place of the true urethra when using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred prostate cancer patients treated with HDR brachytherapy constituted the study group. A pre-plan was made with the urethra visualized. The true urethra was defined, and a surrogate urethra was placed at the geometric center of the prostate. The distance between the two urethras was measured. The deviation was evaluated at the base, middle, and apex. To evaluate the dosimetric consequences for the true urethra when using a surrogate urethra, two different dose plans were made: one based on the true urethra and one based on the surrogate urethra. The dose-volume histograms for the true urethra were analyzed. Results: The deviation between the true urethra and the surrogate urethra was greatest at the base of the prostate. A statistically significant difference was seen between the dosimetric parameters for the true and the surrogate urethra when the dose plan was made using the surrogate urethra. In this situation the dose to the true urethra was increased above our defined maximum tolerance limit. Conclusions: When using dose plans made according to a surrogate urethra the dose to the true urethra might be too high to be acceptable. If the true urethra is not visualized, severe damage could easily develop in a significant number of patients.

  15. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  16. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  17. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  18. Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-09-01

    The primary project objective is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This non-equilibrium process is a key step in the capture and retention of sulfur released during coal combustion by the interaction with calcium based sorbent particles. By encapsulating the sulfur bearing calcium particles in slag, the need for landfilling of this waste is eliminated. This objective will be implemented through a series of up to 20 one day tests carried out in a 20 MMBtu/hr air cooled, slagging combustor-boiler installation located in Philadelphia, PA. The project will consist of two tasks. Task 1 consists of the experiments conducted in the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor, and task 2 will consist of analysis of this data. All the operating procedures for this effort have been developed in the 7 years of operation of this combustor.

  19. Observational Constraints on Cosmological Models with the Updated Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Wei

    2010-08-16

    In the present work, by the help of the newly released Union2 compilation which consists of 557 Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), we calibrate 109 long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the well-known Amati relation, using the cosmology-independent calibration method proposed by Liang {\\it et al.}. We have obtained 59 calibrated high-redshift GRBs which can be used to constrain cosmological models without the circularity problem (we call them ``Hymnium'' GRBs sample for convenience). Then, we consider the joint constraints on 7 cosmological models from the latest observational data, namely, the combination of 557 Union2 SNIa dataset, 59 calibrated Hymnium GRBs dataset (obtained in this work), the shift parameter $R$ from the WMAP 7-year data, and the distance parameter $A$ of the measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak in the distribution of SDSS luminous red galaxies. We also briefly consider the comparison of these 7 cosmological models.

  20. Testing a DBI model for the unification of dark matter and dark energy with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariadna Montiel; Nora Bretón

    2012-02-14

    We study the range of consistency of a model based on a nonlinear scalar field Dirac-Born-Infeld action for the unification of dark matter and dark energy using Gamma-Ray Bursts at high-redshifts. We use the sample of 59 high-redshift GRBs reported by Wei (2010), calibrated at low redshifts with the Union 2 sample of SNe Ia, thus avoiding the circularity problem. In this analysis, we also include the CMB7-year data and the baryonic acoustic peak BAO. Besides, it is calculated the parameter of the equation of state $w$, the deceleration parameter $q_0$ and the redshift of the transition to the decelerate-accelerated phase $z_t$.

  1. Concentric circles in WMAP data may provide evidence of violent pre-Big-Bang activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Gurzadyan; R. Penrose

    2010-11-16

    Conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC) posits the existence of an aeon preceding our Big Bang 'B', whose conformal infinity 'I' is identified, conformally, with 'B', now regarded as a spacelike 3-surface. Black-hole encounters, within bound galactic clusters in that previous aeon, would have the observable effect, in our CMB sky, of families of concentric circles over which the temperature variance is anomalously low, the centre of each such family representing the point of 'I' at which the cluster converges. These centres appear as fairly randomly distributed fixed points in our CMB sky. The analysis of Wilkinson Microwave Background Probe's (WMAP) cosmic microwave background 7-year maps does indeed reveal such concentric circles, of up to 6{\\sigma} significance. This is confirmed when the same analysis is applied to BOOMERanG98 data, eliminating the possibility of an instrumental cause for the effects. These observational predictions of CCC would not be easily explained within standard inflationary cosmology.

  2. Pierre Auger Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Aaron

    2008-01-14

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrate that there is a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 [1] 1019 eV and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within 75 Mpc. We reject the hypothesis of an isotropic distribution of these cosmic rays at over 99% confidence level from a prescribed a priori test. The correlation we observe is compatible with the hypothesis that the highest energy particles originate from relatively nearby extragalactic sources whose fluxes have therefore not been significantly reduced by interaction with the cosmic background radiation. AGN or objects having a similar spatial distribution are possible sources.

  3. Sensitivity of IceCube-DeepCore to neutralino dark matter in the MSSM-25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamish Silverwood; Pat Scott; Matthias Danninger; Christopher Savage; Joakim Edsjö; Jenni Adams; Anthony M Brown; Klas Hultqvist

    2013-04-17

    We analyse the sensitivity of IceCube-DeepCore to annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the solar core, generated within a 25 parameter version of the minimally supersymmetric standard model (MSSM-25). We explore the 25-dimensional parameter space using scanning methods based on importance sampling and using DarkSUSY 5.0.6 to calculate observables. Our scans produced a database of 6.02 million parameter space points with neutralino dark matter consistent with the relic density implied by WMAP 7-year data, as well as with accelerator searches. We performed a model exclusion analysis upon these points using the expected capabilities of the IceCube-DeepCore Neutrino Telescope. We show that IceCube-DeepCore will be sensitive to a number of models that are not accessible to direct detection experiments such as SIMPLE, COUPP and XENON100, indirect detection using Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, nor to current LHC searches.

  4. Sensitivity of IceCube-DeepCore to neutralino dark matter in the MSSM-25

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverwood, Hamish; Adams, Jenni; Brown, Anthony M; Scott, Pat; Danninger, Matthias; Savage, Christopher; Edsjö, Joakim; Hultqvist, Klas E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: savage@physics.utah.edu E-mail: jenni.adams@canterbury.ac.nz E-mail: klas.hultqvist@fysik.su.se

    2013-03-01

    We analyse the sensitivity of IceCube-DeepCore to annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the solar core, generated within a 25 parameter version of the minimally supersymmetric standard model (MSSM-25). We explore the 25-dimensional parameter space using scanning methods based on importance sampling and using DarkSUSY 5.0.6 to calculate observables. Our scans produced a database of 6.02 million parameter space points with neutralino dark matter consistent with the relic density implied by WMAP 7-year data, as well as with accelerator searches. We performed a model exclusion analysis upon these points using the expected capabilities of the IceCube-DeepCore Neutrino Telescope. We show that IceCube-DeepCore will be sensitive to a number of models that are not accessible to direct detection experiments such as SIMPLE, COUPP and XENON100, indirect detection using Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, nor to current LHC searches.

  5. Recent Electron-Cloud Simulation Results for the Main Damping Rings of the NLC and the TESLA Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivi, Mauro T F

    2003-05-19

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  6. PanDA Beyond ATLAS: Workload Management for Data Intensive Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D

    2013-01-01

    The PanDA Production ANd Distributed Analysis system has been developed by ATLAS to meet the experiment's requirements for a data-driven workload management system for production and distributed analysis processing capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. After 7 years of impressively successful PanDA operation in ATLAS there are also other experiments which can benefit from PanDA in the Big Data challenge, with several at various stages of evaluation and adoption. The new project "Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data" is extending PanDA to meet the needs of other data intensive scientific applications in HEP, astro-particle and astrophysics communities, bio-informatics and other fields as a general solution to large scale workload management. PanDA can utilize dedicated or opportunistic computing resources such as grids, clouds, and High Performance Computing facilities, and is being extended to leverage next generation intelligent networks in automated workflow mana...

  7. Intermediate-term prediction in advance of the Loma Prieta earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keilis-Borok, V.I.; Kossobokov, V.; Rotvain, I. (International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, Moscow (USSR)); Knopoff, L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989 was predicted by the use of two pattern recognition algorithms, CN and M8. The prediction with algorithm CN was that an earthquake with magnitude greater than or equal to 6.4 was expected to occur in a roughly four year interval staring in midsummer 1986 in a polygonal spatial window of approximate average dimensions 600 {times} 450 km, encompassing Northern California and Northern Nevada. The prediction with algorithm M8 was that an earthquake with magnitude greater than or equal to 7.0 was expected to occur within 5 to 7 years after 1985, in a spatial window of approximate average dimensions 800 {times} 560 km. The predictions were communicated in advance of the earthquake. In previous, mainly retrospective applications of these algorithms, successful predictions occurred in about 80% of the cases.

  8. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  9. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Jun, E-mail: jun-lian@med.unc.edu; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Lulin, E-mail: lulin.yuan@duke.edu; Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie, E-mail: jackie.wu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Ge, Yaorong [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)] [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been analyzed and identified. For all the OARs, the discrepancies of dose indices between the model predicted values and the actual plan values were within 2.1%. Similar results were obtained from the modeling of FG-IMRT plans. The parotid gland was spared in a comparable fashion during the treatment planning of two institutions. The model based on FG-IMRT plans was found to predict the median dose of the parotid of Tomotherapy plans quite well, with a mean error of 2.6%. Predictions from the FG-IMRT model suggested the median dose of the larynx, median dose of the brainstem and D2 of the brainstem could be reduced by 10.5%, 12.8%, and 20.4%, respectively, in the Tomo-IMRT plans. This was found to be correlated to the institutional differences in OAR constraint settings. Re-planning of six Tomotherapy patients confirmed the potential of optimization improvement predicted by the FG-IMRT model was correct. Conclusions: The authors established a mathematical model to correlate the anatomical features and dosimetric indexes of OARs of HN patients in Tomotherapy plans. The model can be used for the setup of patient-specific OAR dose sparing goals and quality control of planning results. The institutional clinical experience was incorporated into the model which allows the model from one institution to generate a reference plan for another institution, or another IMRT technique.

  10. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-09-15

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Imad, E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2013-10-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15 MV compared with 6 MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

  12. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 3: Main report -- Part B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 to 7 contain Appendices A to P with supporting information.

  13. Wavelet-Smoothed Interpolation of Masked Scientific Data for JPEG 2000 Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13

    How should we manage scientific data with 'holes'? Some applications, like JPEG 2000, expect logically rectangular data, but some sources, like the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), generate data that isn't defined on certain subsets. We refer to grid points that lack well-defined, scientifically meaningful sample values as 'masked' samples. Wavelet-smoothing is a highly scalable interpolation scheme for regions with complex boundaries on logically rectangular grids. Computation is based on forward/inverse discrete wavelet transforms, so runtime complexity and memory scale linearly with respect to sample count. Efficient state-of-the-art minimal realizations yield small constants (O(10)) for arithmetic complexity scaling, and in-situ implementation techniques make optimal use of memory. Implementation in two dimensions using tensor product filter banks is straighsorward and should generalize routinely to higher dimensions. No hand-tuning required when the interpolation mask changes, making the method aeractive for problems with time-varying masks. Well-suited for interpolating undefined samples prior to JPEG 2000 encoding. The method outperforms global mean interpolation, as judged by both SNR rate-distortion performance and low-rate artifact mitigation, for data distributions whose histograms do not take the form of sharply peaked, symmetric, unimodal probability density functions. These performance advantages can hold even for data whose distribution differs only moderately from the peaked unimodal case, as demonstrated by POP salinity data. The interpolation method is very general and is not tied to any particular class of applications, could be used for more generic smooth interpolation.

  14. Orientational Ordering, Buckling, and Dynamic Transitions for Vortices Interacting with a Periodic Quasi-One Dimensional Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Le Thien; D. McDermott; C. J. Olson Reichhardt; C. Reichhardt

    2015-08-21

    We examine the statics and dynamics of vortices in the presence of a periodic quasi-one dimensional substrate, focusing on the limit where the vortex lattice constant is smaller than the substrate lattice period. As a function of the substrate strength and filling factor, within the pinned state we observe a series of order-disorder transitions associated with buckling phenomena in which the number of vortex rows that fit between neighboring substrate maxima increases. These transitions coincide with steps in the depinning threshold, jumps in the density of topological defects, and changes in the structure factor. At the buckling transition the vortices are disordered, while between the buckling transitions the vortices form a variety of crystalline and partially ordered states. In the weak substrate limit, the buckling transitions are absent and the vortices form an ordered hexagonal lattice that undergoes changes in its orientation with respect to the substrate as a function of vortex density. At intermediate substrate strengths, certain ordered states appear that are correlated with peaks in the depinning force. Under an applied drive the system exhibits a rich variety of distinct dynamical phases, including plastic flow, a density-modulated moving crystal, and moving floating solid phases. We also find a dynamic smectic-to-smectic transition in which the smectic ordering changes from being aligned with the substrate to being aligned with the external drive. The different dynamical phases can be characterized using velocity histograms and the structure factor. We discuss how these results are related to recent experiments on vortex ordering on quasi-one-dimensional periodic modulated substrates. Our results should also be relevant for other types of systems such as ions, colloids, or Wigner crystals interacting with periodic quasi-one-dimensional substrates.

  15. Implications of Intercellular Signaling for Radiation Therapy: A Theoretical Dose-Planning Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Recent in vitro results have shown significant contributions to cell killing from signaling effects at doses that are typically used in radiation therapy. This study investigates whether these in vitro observations can be reconciled with in vivo knowledge and how signaling may have an impact on future developments in radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer treatment plans were generated for a series of 10 patients using 3-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. These plans were evaluated using mathematical models of survival following modulated radiation exposures that were developed from in vitro observations and incorporate the effects of intercellular signaling. The impact on dose–volume histograms and mean doses were evaluated by converting these survival levels into “signaling-adjusted doses” for comparison. Results: Inclusion of intercellular communication leads to significant differences between the signalling-adjusted and physical doses across a large volume. Organs in low-dose regions near target volumes see the largest increases, with mean signaling-adjusted bladder doses increasing from 23 to 33 Gy in IMRT plans. By contrast, in high-dose regions, there is a small decrease in signaling-adjusted dose due to reduced contributions from neighboring cells, with planning target volume mean doses falling from 74 to 71 Gy in IMRT. Overall, however, the dose distributions remain broadly similar, and comparisons between the treatment modalities are largely unchanged whether physical or signaling-adjusted dose is compared. Conclusions: Although incorporating cellular signaling significantly affects cell killing in low-dose regions and suggests a different interpretation for many phenomena, their effect in high-dose regions for typical planning techniques is comparatively small. This indicates that the significant signaling effects observed in vitro are not contradicted by comparison with clinical observations. Future investigations are needed to validate these effects in vivo and to quantify their ranges and potential impact on more advanced radiation therapy techniques.

  16. SU-E-T-616: Comparison of Plan Dose Accuracy for Anterior Vs. Lateral Fields in Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moteabbed, M; Trofimov, A; Testa, M; Sharp, G; Wang, Y; Paganetti, H; Zietman, A; Efstathiou, J; Lu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the anticipated introduction of in vivo range verification methods, the use of anterior fields for proton therapy of prostate cancer may become an attractive treatment option, and improve upon the dose distributions achievable with conventional lateral-opposed fields. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the planned dose accuracy for lateral versus anterior oblique field arrangements. Methods: Four patients with low/intermediate risk prostate cancer, participating in a clinical trial at our institution, were selected for this study. All patients were treated using lateral-opposed fields (LAT). The clinical target volume (CTV) received a total dose of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Anterior oblique research plans (ANT) were created using the clinical planning system, and featured beams with ±35-degree gantry angle, 1.2 cm aperture margins, 3-mm range compensator smearing and no range uncertainty margins. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for both beam arrangements using TOPAS. Dose volume histograms were analyzed and compared for planned and MC dose distributions. Differences between MC and planned DVH parameters were computed as a percentage of the total prescribed dose. Results: For all patients, CTV dose was systematically lower (?2–2.5%) for MC than the plan. This discrepancy was slightly larger (?0.5%) for LAT compared to ANT plans for all cases. Although the dose differences for bladder and anterior rectal wall remained within 0.7% for all LAT cases, they were slightly larger for ANT plans, especially for case 3 due to larger patient size and MC-plan range difference. The EUD difference for femoral heads was within 0.6% for both LAT and ANT cases. Conclusion: The dose calculated by the treatment planning system using pencil beam algorithm agrees with MC to within 2.5% and is comparable for lateral and anterior scenarios. The dose agreement in the anterior rectal wall is range- and hence, patient-dependent for ANT treatments.

  17. Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

    2011-11-18

    We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion science; however, it is applicable to many other science domains.

  18. SU-E-T-39: Analyses of Plan Quality Using Different Gantry Rotation Time On Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, Z; Li, R; Qiu, R; Cao, Y; Han, C [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare plan quality of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using different gantry rotation times. Methods: In ten rectal carcinoma patients, plans with different gantry rotation times were designed by Oncentra4.3 planning system, each of them was optimized by experienced planners using almost similar parameters and dose constraints except the different gantry rotation time. The gantry rotation time was increased from 30s to 150s by step of 30(30s, 60s, 90s, 120s, and 150s). Plans (VMAT30s, VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s) were normalized so that at least 95% of PTV would receive the prescription dose 50 Gray in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were evaluated. Conformity indices (CI), homogeneous indices (HI), monitor units (MUs), delivery time were also compared. Results: As the increasing of gantry rotation time, VMAT150s provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT30s. In the normal tissue such as bladder and femurs, the VMAT plans show almost the same V30 and Dmean for them compared with IMRT plans, meanwhile the conformity indices (CI) was better than IMRT plans(p=0.021). However, there was no significant different among the VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s (p=0.054). VMAT150s increased delivery time and monitor units in plans without improving plan quality compared to VMAT60s, VMAT90s and VMAT120s. Conclusion: VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s achieved comparable treatment plans in rectal carcinoma. Slower gantry movement in VMAT150s only improves slight improvement than the others.

  19. SU-E-T-06: A Comparison of IMRT Treatment of Esophageal Carcinoma in Elekta-Precise and Varian23EX Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, W; Fan, X; Qiu, R; Qiao, X; Zhang, R [Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the characteristics of static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans designed on Elekta and Varian Linac in different esophageal cancer(EC), exploring advantages and disadvantages of different vendor Linac, thus can be better serve for clinical. Methods: Twenty-four patients with EC were selected, including 6 cases located in the cervical, upper, middle and the lower thorax, respectively. Two IMRT plans were generated with the Oncentra planning system: in Elekta and Varian Linac, prescription dose of 60Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs, spinal cord and heart, and additional Monitor units(MU), treatment time, Homogeneity index(HI), Conformity index(CI) and Gamma index comparisons were performed. Results: All plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations. The doses to PTV, HI and OAR in Elekta plans were not statistically different in comparison with Varian plans, with the following exceptions: in cervical, upper and lower thoracic EC the PTV's CI, and in middle thorax EC PTV's D2, D50, V105 and PTV-average were better in Elekta plans than in Varian plans. In the cervical, upper and the middle thorax EC, treatment time were significantly decreased in Varian plans as against Elekta plans, while in the lower thoracic EC treatment time were no striking difference. MUs and gamma index were similar between the two Linac plans. Conclusion: For the the middle thorax EC Varian plans is better than Elekta plans, not only in treatment time but in the PTV dose; while for the lower thorax EC Elekta plans is the first choice for better CI; for the other part of the EC usually Elekta plans can increase the CI, while Varian plans can reduce treatment time, can be selected according to the actual situation of the patient treatment.

  20. SU-E-T-580: Comparison of Cervical Carcinoma IMRT Plans From Four Commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y; Li, R; Chi, Z; Zhu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different treatment planning systems (TPS) use different treatment optimization and leaf sequencing algorithms. This work compares cervical carcinoma IMRT plans optimized with four commercial TPSs to investigate the plan quality in terms of target conformity and delivery efficiency. Methods: Five cervical carcinoma cases were planned with the Corvus, Monaco, Pinnacle and Xio TPSs by experienced planners using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. Plans were normalized for at least 95% of PTV to receive the prescription dose (Dp). Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were compared. Other quantities such as Dmin(the minimum dose received by 99% of GTV/PTV), Dmax(the maximum dose received by 1% of GTV/PTV), D100, D95, D90, V110%, V105%, V100% (the volume of GTV/PTV receiving 110%, 105%, 100% of Dp), conformity index(CI), homogeneity index (HI), the volume of receiving 40Gy and 50 Gy to rectum (V40,V50) ; the volume of receiving 30Gy and 50 Gy to bladder (V30,V50) were evaluated. Total segments and MUs were also compared. Results: While all plans meet target dose specifications and normal tissue constraints, the maximum GTVCI of Pinnacle plans was up to 0.74 and the minimum of Corvus plans was only 0.21, these four TPSs PTVCI had significant difference. The GTVHI and PTVHI of Pinnacle plans are all very low and show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans require significantly less segments and MUs to deliver than the other plans. Conclusion: To deliver on a Varian linear-accelerator, the Pinnacle plans show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans have faster beam delivery.