Sample records for 686-g l-lake sluice

  1. The limnology of L Lake: Results of the L-Lake monitoring program, 1986--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    L Lake was constructed in 1985 on the upper regions of Steel Creek, SRS to mitigate the heated effluents from L Reactor. In addition to the NPDES permit specifications (Outfall L-007) for the L-Reactor outfall, DOE-SR executed an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that thermal effluents from L-Reactor will not substantially alter ecosystem components in the approximate lower half of L Lake. This region should be inhabited by Balanced (Indigenous) Biological Communities (BBCs) in accordance with Section 316(a) of the Pollution Control (Clean Water) Act (Public Law 92-500). In response to this requirement the Environmental Sciences Section/Ecology Group initiated a comprehensive biomonitoring program which documented the development of BBCs in L Lake from January 1986 through December 1989. This report summarizes the principal results of the program with regards to BBC compliance issues and community succession in L Lake. The results are divided into six sections: water quality, macronutrients, and phytoplankton, aquatic macrophytes, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, and community succession. One of the prime goals of the program was to detect potential reactor impacts on L Lake.

  2. Sharav Sluices Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformationSharav Sluices Ltd Jump

  3. Advanced sluicing system test report for single shell tank waste retrieval integrated testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the testing performed by ARD Environmental, Inc., and Los Alamos Technical Associates of the LATA/ARD Advanced Sluicing System, in support of ACTR Phase 1 activities. Testing was to measure the impact force and pressures of sluicing streams at three different distances, as measured by the Government supplied load cell. Simulated sluicing of large simulated salt cake and hard pan waste coupons was also performed. Due to operational difficulties experienced with the Government supplied load cell, no meaningful results with respect to sluice stream impact pressure distribution or stream coherence were obtained. Sluice testing using 3000 psi salt cake simulants measured waste retrieval rates of approximately 12 Ml/day (17.6 ft{sup 3}/hr). Rates as high as 314 m{sup 3}/day (463 ft{sup 3}/hr) were measured against the lower strength salt cake simulants.

  4. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank (SST) modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis (documented safety analysis [DSA]) and to determine if additional controls may be required. This safety evaluation also supports the requirement to perform a generic safety basis amendment for the retrieval of any additional SSTs (other than 241-S-112, and 241-U-107) by modified sluicing from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP) Safety Evaluation Report (SER) 03-TED-066, ''Safety Evaluation Report (SER) for Approval of Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) for Tank Farms Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval/Closure Modified Sluicing''.

  5. Project management plan for project W-320, tank 241-C-106 sluicing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leliefeld, K.W.

    1996-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Project Management Plan establishes the organization, plans, and systems for management of Project W-320 as defined in DOE Order 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987). The sluicing is for retrieving high-heat waste from single shell tank 241-C-106.

  6. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the SST modified sluicing system with DST supernatant for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  7. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  8. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  9. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and hounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  10. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  11. Chemical and chemically-related considerations associated with sluicing tank C-106 waste to tank AY-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    New data on tank 241-C-106 were obtained from grab sampling and from compatibility testing of tank C-106 and tank AY-102 wastes. All chemistry-associated and other compatibility Information compiled in this report strongly suggests that the sluicing of the contents of tank C-106, in accord with appropriate controls, will pose no unacceptable risk to workers, public safety, or the environment. In addition, it is expected that the sluicing operation will successfully resolve the High-Heat Safety Issue for tank C-106.

  12. Using historical aerial photography and softcopy photogrammetry for waste unit mapping in L Lake.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christel, L.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L Lake was developed as a cooling water reservoir for the L Reactor at the Savannah River Site. The construction of the lake, which began in the fall of 1984, altered the structure and function of Steel Creek. Completed in the fall of 1985, L Lake has a capacity of 31 million cubic meters and a normal pool of 58 meters. When L Reactor operations ceased in 1988, the water level in the lake still had to be maintained. Site managers are currently trying to determine the feasibility of draining or drawing down the lake in order to save tax dollars. In order to understand the full repercussions of such an undertaking, it was necessary to compile a comprehensive inventory of what the lake bottom looked like prior to filling. Aerial photographs, acquired nine days before the filling of the lake began, were scanned and used for softcopy photogrammetry processing. A one-meter digital elevation model was generated and a digital orthophoto mosaic was created as the base map for the project. Seven categories of features, including the large waste units used to contain the contaminated soil removed from the dam site, were screen digitized and used to generate accurate maps. Other map features include vegetation waste piles, where contaminated vegetation from the flood plain was contained, and ash piles, which are sites where vegetation debris was burned and then covered with clean soil. For all seven categories, the area of disturbance totaled just over 63 hectares. When the screen digitizing was completed, the elevation at the centroid of each disturbance was determined. When the information is used in the Savannah River Site Geographical Information System, it can be used to visualize the various L Lake draw-down scenarios suggested by site managers and hopefully, to support evaluations of the cost effectiveness for each proposed activity.

  13. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document.

  14. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  15. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Comparison of Nozzle and Flow Straighteners for Tank Waste Sluicing Applications Letter Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, O Dennis; Jackson, David R.

    2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nozzles and flow straighteners were compared to assess the relative quality of the water streams for sluicing waste from underground storage tankes. The criteria for comparison were 1) the impact force produced by the streams over a range of distance from the nozzle impinging on target plates, and 2) the coherence of the streams as manifest by the variation of force on targets of two different sizes. It was determined that 1) the standard Hanford flow straightener is measurable less effective than a commercial firefighting flow straightener at producing a coherent stream when used with the standard Hanford nozzle, and 2) a lighter and more compact firefighting deluge nozzle will deliver a stream of equal quality to that from the Hanford nozzle when either nozzle is used with the commercial flow straightener.

  17. Origins of volatile organic compounds emerging from tank 241-C-106 during sluicing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAUFFER, L.A.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were released from the ventilation stack of tank 241-C-106 during sluicing operations on November 18, 1998. Workers experienced serious discomfort. They reported an obnoxious acrid odor and the 450 ppm VOC in ventilation stack 296-C-006 exceeded the level approved in the air discharge permit. Consequently, the operation was terminated. Subsequent analyses of samples collected opportunistically from the stack indicated many organic compounds including heptenes, heptanones, and normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH) and their remnants were present. Subsequently, a process test designed to avoid unnecessary worker exposure and enable collection of analytical samples from the stack, the breathing area, and the receiver tank was conducted on December 16, 1998. The samples obtained during that operation, in which the maximum VOC content of the stack was approximately 35 ppm, have been analyzed by teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Special Analytic Services (SAS). This report examines the results of these investigations. Future revisions of the report will examine the analytical results obtained for samples collected during sluicing operations in March. This report contains the available evidence about the source term for these emissions. Chapter 2 covers characterization work, including historical information about the layers of waste in the tank, the location of organic compounds in these layers, the total organic carbon (TOC) content and the speciation of organic compounds. Chapter 3 covers the data for the samples from the ventilation stack, which has the highest concentrations of organic compounds. Chapter 4 contains an interpretation of the information connecting the composition of the organic emissions with the composition of the original source term. Chapter 5 summarizes the characterization work, the sample data, and the interpretation of the results.

  18. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  19. Quality control summary report for the RFI/RI assessment of the submerged sediment core samples taken at Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. II

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the sediment characterization performed under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s (WSRC) Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) in support of Par Pond, Pond C, and L- Lake. This characterization will be a screening study and will enable the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) to develop a defensible contaminants of concern list for more extensive characterization of the Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake.

  20. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  1. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site`s river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site`s river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft).

  2. Single shell tank sluicing history and failure frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTZEL, J.S.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses the potential for failure of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) that are presumably sound and helps to establish the retrieval priorities for these and the assumed leakers. Furthermore, this report examines probabilities of SST failure as a function of age and operational history, and provides a simple statistical summary of historical leak volumes, leak rates, and corrosion factor.

  3. Hazardous waste dislodging and conveyance: The confined sluicing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.A.; Fossey, R.D.; Mann, M.D.; Blaine, J.G. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). High Pressure Waterjet Lab.; Rinker, M.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an investigation of a means for dislodging and conveying waste currently stored in underground storage tanks. A series of experiments have been carried out to evaluate the potential of a medium pressure, medium flow rate cutting system as a means of dislodging the waste. It has been found that waterjets at a pressure of 10,000 psi can effectively cut the material which has been chosen to simulate the hardened saltcake within the storage tanks. Based on a parameterization test it has thus been calculated that an inlet flow volume of approximately 30 gallons per minute will be sufficient to excavate 30 gallons per minute of waste from a tank. In order to transport the resulting slurry from the tank, a modified jet pump has been developed and has demonstrated its capability of conveying fluid and waste particles, up to one inch in diameter, to a height of more than 60 feet. Experiments were conducted to examine different configurations to achieve the production levels required for waste removal and to clean the walls of residual material. It was found more effective to clean the walls using an inclined angle of impact rather than a perpendicular angle of impact in order to provide a safeguard against driving the water through any cracks in the containment. It was demonstrated that excavation can take place with almost total immediate extraction of the water and debris from the cutting process. The results have qualitatively shown the potential of a medium pressure waterjet system for achieving the required results for underground storage tank waste retrieval.

  4. Ungrammatical Double-Island Sluicing as a Diagnostic of Left-Branch Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantor, Sara

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a. *I don’t remember which Balkan language they want to hireto hire someone who speaks a Balkan language, but I don’thired someone who speaks a Balkan language, but I don’t re-

  5. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following design calculations: Cooling load in pump pit 241-AY-102; Pressure relief seal loop design; Process building piping stress analysis; Exhaust skid maximum allowable leakage criteria; and Recirculation heat, N509 duct requirements.

  6. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the structural analysis of the Pipe Supports designed for Slurry and Supernate transfer pipe lines in order to meet the requirements of applicable ASME codes. The pipe support design loads are obtained from the piping stress calculations W320-27-I-4 and W320-27-I-5. These loads are the total summation of the gravity, pressure, thermal and seismic loads. Since standard typical designs are used for each type of pipe support such as Y-Stop, Guide and Anchors, each type of support is evaluated for the maximum loads to which this type of supports are subjected. These loads are obtained from the AutoPipe analysis and used to check the structural adequacy of these supports.

  7. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing piping calculations, Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this report is to calculate the hydraulic forces imposed at the sluicer nozzle. This is required by Project W-320 waste retrieval for tank 241-C-106. The method of analysis used is Bernoulli`s momentum equation for stead flow.

  8. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Civil/structural calculations. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable.

  9. Project W-320, tank 241-C-106 sluicing acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify the Project W-320 Chiller Documentation required to be turned over from the Projects Organization to Tank Farm Operations as part of the acceptance of the new equipment for beneficial use.

  10. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Civil/structural calculations. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW civil/structural calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The Equipment Removal System (ERS) has been identified by WHC as not having any safety class 1 items present in the tank pits during equipment removal activities, Documentation of this finding is provided in Letter of Instruction 3/1 Analysis Requirements for Project W-320 Equipment Removal System (REF: LOI KGS-94-013). Based on this specific direction from WHC, 3/1 analysis for any component of the Project W-320 ERS is required. No further documentation of non-safety impacting safety items is required per DOE-RL Audit finding No.90-02, and filing of this memorandum in the W-320 project files satisfies the intent of the referenced DOE observation.

  11. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Civil/structural calculations. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW civil/structural calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable.

  12. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing electrical calculations, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. These calculations are required: To determine the power requirements needed to power electrical heat tracing segments contained within three manufactured insulated tubing assemblies; To verify thermal adequacy of tubing assembly selection by others; To size the heat tracing feeder and branch circuit conductors and conduits; To size protective circuit breaker and fuses; and To accomplish thermal design for two electrical heat tracing segments: One at C-106 tank riser 7 (CCTV) and one at the exhaust hatchway (condensate drain). Contents include: C-Farm electrical heat tracing; Cable ampacity, lighting, conduit fill and voltage drop; and Control circuit sizing and voltage drop analysis for the seismic shutdown system.

  13. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing electrical calculations, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable.

  14. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Civil/structural calculations. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The purpose of this calculation is to conservatively estimate the weight of equipment and structures being added over Tank 241-C-106 as a result of Project W-320 and combine these weights with the estimated weights of existing structures and equipment as calculated in Attachment 1. The combined weights will be compared to the allowable live load limit to provide a preliminary assessment of loading conditions above Tank 241-C-106.

  15. Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Huckaby; B. E. Wells

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or Battelle Memorial Institute. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

  16. Development and Deployment of the Extended Reach Sluicing System (ERSS) for Retrieval of Hanford Single Shell Tank Waste. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Roger E. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Figley, Reed R. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Innes, A. G. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A history of the evolution and the design development of Extended Reach Sluicer System (ERSS) is presented. Several challenges are described that had to be overcome to create a machine that went beyond the capabilities of prior generation sluicers to mobilize waste in Single Shell Tanks for pumping into Double Shell Tank receiver tanks. Off-the-shelf technology and traditional hydraulic fluid power systems were combined with the custom-engineered components to create the additional functionality of the ERSS, while still enabling it to fit within very tight entry envelope into the SST. Problems and challenges inevitably were encountered and overcome in ways that enhance the state of the art of fluid power applications in such constrained environments. Future enhancements to the ERSS design are explored for retrieval of tanks with different dimensions and internal obstacles.

  17. EA-1070: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural Fluctuation of Water Level in Par Pond and Reduced Water Flow in Steel Creek below L Lake at the Savannah River Site

  18. Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

  19. Castor: Secure Code Updates using Symmetric Cryptosystems Donnie H. Kim Rajeev Gandhi Priya Narasimhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    . We describe an implementation of Castor that hard- ens the TinyOS-based update protocol, Deluge with those of Deluge and with those of a contemporary secure update protocol, Sluice, that uses asymmetric as compared to Deluge, and lower resource usage as well as lower end-to-end update latency as compared

  20. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  1. Radiological and toxicological calculations for AY-102 and C-106HEPA filters and pre-filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, T.R.; Van Vleet, R.J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high heat content solids in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W-320. Once sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from `unagitated` to `agitated`. This means that the partition fraction which described the aerosol content of the head space will increase from 1 X 10{sup - 20} to 1 X 10{sup -1}. This head space will become much more loaded with suspended material. The nature of this suspended material may change significantly, sluicing may inadvertently bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is an enabling assumption that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition. It is an enabling assumption that the sluicing line; the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters in Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition.

  2. Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

  3. Rio Grande project partnerships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for supporting hydrologic analysis and modeling. The information will help develop bi-national cooperation between Mexico and the United States concerning water in the Rio Grande Basin. It will also provide accurate and reli- able data necessary for analysis... municipal demands. With the population expected to double in the next 50 years, the urban water demands will increase proportionately. Story by Danielle Supercinski At the Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 in San Benito, sluice gates inside...

  4. Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.C.

    1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

  5. Proposed strategy for leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation during Hanford single-shell tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to propose a strategy for addressing applicable LDMM-related criteria in order to determine an allowable leakage volume for SSTs targeted for waste retrieval using sluicing. A strategy is required to work through the individual ALV criterion (and related issues) in a prioritized,orderly, and efficient manner. All components of the strategy are based upon LDMM-related issues, functions and requirements,and technology alternatives.

  6. Computational Engineering and Science Program at the University of Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Computational Engineering and Science Program at the University of Utah Carleton DeTar , Aaron L Lake City, Utah 84112. Computational Engineering and Science Program The grand computational challenges use of modern computers in scientific and engineering research and development over the last three

  7. EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

  8. HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE MAY 2009 [VISIT US AT WWW.WRPSTOC.COM OR WWW.HANFORD.GOV/ORP/ FOR MORE INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLLOWAY JN

    2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrieval of waste from single-shell tank C-110 resumed in January making it the first waste retrieval operation for WRPS since taking over Hanford's Tank Operations Contract last October. Now, with approximately 90 percent of the waste removed, WRPS believes that modified sluicing has reached the limits of the technology to remove any further waste and is preparing documentation for use in decision making about any future retrieval actions. Tank C-110 is located in C Fann near the center of the Hanford Site. It is a 530,000 gallon tank, built in 1946, and held approximately 126,000 gallons of sludge and other radioactive and chemical waste materials when retrieval resumed. Modified sluicing technology uses liquid waste from a nearby double-shell tank to break up, dissolve and mobilize the solid material so it can be pumped. Because of the variety of waste fon11S, sluicing is often not able to remove all of the waste. The remaining waste will next be sampled for analysis, and results will be used to guide decisions regarding future actions. Work is moving rapidly in preparation to retrieve waste from a second single-shell tank this summer and transfer it to safer double-shell tank storage. Construction activities necessary to retrieve waste from Tank C-104, a 530,000 gallon tank built in 1943, are approximately 60 percent complete as WRPS maintains its focus on reducing the risk posed by Hanford's aging single-shell waste tanks. C-104 is one of Hanford's oldest radioactive and chemical waste storage tanks, containing approximately 263,000 gallons of wet sludge with a top layer that is dry and powdery. This will be the largest sludge volume retrieval ever attempted using modified sluicing technology. Modified sluicing uses high pressure water or liquid radioactive waste sprayed from nozzles above the waste. The liquid dissolves and/or mobilizes the waste so it can be pumped. In addition to other challenges, tank C-104 contains a significant amount of plutonium and uranium. It also contains a host of contaminated legacy equipment so the entire process is being managed carefully to protect workers and the environment.

  9. Development of a waste dislodging and retrieval system for use in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory gunite tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, J.D.; Lloyd, P.D.; Burks, B.L. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Gunite And Associated Tanks (GAAT) Treatability Study the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a tank waste retrieval system capable of removing wastes varying from liquids to thick sludges. This system is also capable of scarifying concrete walls and floors. The GAAT Treatability Study is being conducted by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration Program. Much of the technology developed for this project was cosponsored by the DOE Office of Science and Technology through the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) and the Robotics Technology Development Program. The waste dislodging and conveyance (WD&C) system was developed jointly by ORNL and participants from the TFA. The WD&C system is comprised of a four degree-of-freedom arm with back driveable motorized joints. a cutting and dislodging tool, a jet pump and hose management system for conveyance of wastes, confined sluicing end-effector, and a control system, and must be used in conjunction with a robotic arm or vehicle. Other papers have been submitted to this conference describing the development and operation of the arm and vehicle positioning systems. This paper will describe the development of the WD&C system and its application for dislodging and conveyance of ORNL sludges from the GAAT tanks. The confined sluicing end-effector relies on medium pressure water jets to dislodge waste that is then pumped by the jet pump through the conveyance system out of the tank. This paper will describe the results of cold testing of the integrated system. At the conference presentation there will also be results from the field deployment. ORNL has completed fabrication of the WD&C system for waste removal and is full-scale testing, including testing of the confined sluicing end-effector.

  10. Tank 241-CX-70 waste removal and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuVon, D.K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-CX-70, located on the Hanford Site in Washington State, is a 30,000 gal single-shell storage tank built in 1952 to hold high-level process waste from pilot tests of the reduction-oxidation process. In 1979 decommissioning operations were begun by pumping liquid waste from the tank to the double-shell tank (DST) 101-AY. Not all the waste was removed at that time. Approximately 10,300 gal of sludge remained. On September 25, 1987, operations were resumed to remove the remaining waste using a sluicing and pumping method. This report documents the final removal of waste from Tank 241-CX-70.

  11. Tank 241-CX-70 waste removal and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuVon, D.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-CX-70, located on the Hanford Site in Washington State, is a 30,000 gal single-shell storage tank built in 1952 to hold high-level process waste from pilot tests of the reduction-oxidation process. In 1979 decommissioning operations were begun by pumping liquid waste from the tank to the double-shell tank (DST) 101-AY. Not all the waste was removed at that time. Approximately 10,300 gal of sludge remained. On September 25, 1987, operations were resumed to remove the remaining waste using a sluicing and pumping method. This report documents the final removal of waste from Tank 241-CX-70.

  12. Hanford Tanks Initiative fiscal year 1997 retrieval technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tanks Initiative was established in 1996 to address a range of retrieval and closure issues associated with radioactive and hazardous waste stored in Hanford`s single shell tanks (SSTs). One of HTI`s retrieval goals is to ``Successfully demonstrate technology(s) that provide expanded capabilities beyond past practice sluicing and are extensible to retrieve waste from other SSTS.`` Specifically, HTI is to address ``Alternative technologies to past practice sluicing`` ... that can ... ``successfully remove the hard heel from a sluiced tank or to remove waste from a leaking SST`` (HTI Mission Analysis). During fiscal year 1997, the project contracted with seven commercial vendor teams to demonstrate retrieval technologies using waste simulants. These tests were conducted in two series: three integrated tests (IT) were completed in January 1997, and four more comprehensive Alternative Technology Retrieval Demonstrations (ARTD) were completed in July 1997. The goal of this testing was to address issues to minimize the risk, uncertainties, and ultimately the overall cost of removing waste from the SSTS. Retrieval technologies can be separated into three tracks based on how the tools would be deployed in the tank: globally (e.g., sluicing) or using vehicles or robotic manipulators. Accordingly, the HTI tests included an advanced sluicer (Track 1: global systems), two different vehicles (Track 2: vehicle based systems), and three unique manipulators (Track 3: arm-based systems), each deploying a wide range of dislodging tools and conveyance systems. Each industry team produced a system description as envisioned for actual retrieval and a list of issues that could prevent using the described system; defined the tests to resolve the issues; performed the test; and reported the results, lessons learned, and state of issue resolution. These test reports are cited in this document, listed in the reference section, and summarized in the appendices. This report analyzes the retrieval testing issues and describes what has been learned and issues that need further resolution. As such, it can serve as a guide to additional testing that must be performed before the systems are used in-tank. The major issues discussed are tank access, deployment, mining strategy, waste retrieval, liquid scavenging (liquid usage), maneuverability, positioning, static and dynamic performance, remote operations, reliability, availability, maintenance, tank safety, and cost.

  13. W-320 Department of Health documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to gather information required to show that Project W-320 is in compliance with Washington State Department of Health requirements as specified in Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, DOE/RL-95-45. Specifically, that W-320 is in compliance with ASME N509-1989 (Nuclear Power Plant Air-Cleaning Units and Components) and ASME N5 10-1989 (Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems) for the 296-C-006 exhaust system.

  14. Engineering study for ISSTRS design concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., is pleased to transmit the attached Conceptual Design Package for the Initial Single Shell Tank Retrieval System (ISSTRS), 90% Conceptual Design Review. The package includes the following: (1) ISSTRS Trade Studies: (a) Retrieval Facility Cooling Requirements; (b) Equipment Re-usability between Project W-320 and Tanks 241-C-103 and 241-C-1 05; (c) Sluice Line Options; and (d) Options for the Location of Tanks AX-103 and A-1 02 HVAC Equipment; (2) Drawings; (3) Risk Management Plan; (4) 0850 Interface Control Document; (5) Requirements Traceability Report; and (6) Project Design Specification.

  15. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, D.A.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated filter loadings and would lead to an unfiltered pathway from the radioactively contaminated and toxic aerosols in the head space (vapor space) of the tank into the outside environment. The initiator for the unfiltered (continuous) release scenario is wetting of the HEPA filters with an accompanying filter breach or failure of the seals surrounding the filter in the enclosure. No releases from the filters themselves are assumed in this scenario. In the absence of controls, the exhaust system would continue to expel the contaminated head space air into the outside environment in all three of these scenarios.

  16. Sharp Amenity System Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformationSharav Sluices Ltd

  17. Sharp Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformationSharav Sluices LtdSharp

  18. Sharp Enel JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformationSharav Sluices

  19. Sharyland Utilities LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformationSharav SluicesSharyland

  20. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  1. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

  2. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam 2008-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2008 and early spring 2009, respectively. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). Operating the sluiceway reduces the potential for hydropower production. However, this surface flow outlet may be the optimal non-turbine route for fallbacks in late fall after the sluiceway is typically closed for juvenile fish passage and for overwintering summer steelhead and kelt passage in the early spring before the start of the voluntary spill season. The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines, and their movements in front of the sluiceway at TDA to inform fisheries managers’ and engineers’ decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study periods were from November 1 to December 15, 2008 (45 days) and from March 1 to April 9, 2009 (40 days). The study objectives were to 1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA during the two study periods, respectively, and 2) assess the behavior of these fish in front of sluice entrances. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics and fish behavior data using acoustic imaging. For the overwintering summer steelhead, fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. We estimated that a total of 1790 ± 250 (95% confidence interval) summer steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices during November 1 to December 15, 2008. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, without the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of steelhead may have fallen back through turbines. Run timing peaked in late November, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for overwintering steelhead fallbacks was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. Therefore, sluiceway operations should not be based on diel distribution. For the early spring study, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 40-day study period. A total of 1766 ± 277 (95% confidence interval) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, as with steelhead fallback, not having the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of overwintering steelhead and kelts may use the turbines for downstream passage before the start of the spill season. Run timing peaked in late March; however, relatively large numbers of kelt-sized targets passed the dam on March 2 and March 6 (162 and 188 fish, respectively). Horizontal distribution indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Again, no clear pattern was seen for diel distribution of overwintering steelhead and early out-migrating kelt passage.

  3. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

  4. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  5. Preventing Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Hanford Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the predictive methods used to ensure that waste transfer operations in Hanford waste tanks do not create waste configurations that lead to unsafe gas release events. The gas release behavior of the waste in existing double-shell tanks has been well characterized, and the flammable gas safety issues associated with safe storage of waste in the current configuration are being formally resolved. However, waste is also being transferred between double-shell tanks and from single-shell tanks into double-shell tanks by saltwell pumping and sluicing that create new wastes and waste configurations that have not been studied as well. Additionally, planning is underway for various waste transfer scenarios to support waste feed delivery to the proposed vitrification plant. It is critical that such waste transfers do not create waste conditions with the potential for dangerous gas release events.

  6. Free-surface flow simulations for discharge-based operation of hydraulic structure gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdbrink, C D; Sloot, P M A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine non-hydrostatic flow simulations of the free surface with a discharge model based on elementary gate flow equations for decision support in operation of hydraulic structure gates. A water level-based gate control used in most of today's general practice does not take into account the fact that gate operation scenarios producing similar total discharged volumes and similar water levels may have different local flow characteristics. Accurate and timely prediction of local flow conditions around hydraulic gates is important for several aspects of structure management: ecology, scour, flow-induced gate vibrations and waterway navigation. The modelling approach is described and tested for a multi-gate sluice structure regulating discharge from a river to the sea. The number of opened gates is varied and the discharge is stabilized with automated control by varying gate openings. The free-surface model was validated for discharge showing a correlation coefficient of 0.994 compared to experimental data. A...

  7. Potential for criticality in Hanford tanks resulting from retrieval of tank waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whyatt, G.A.; Sterne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the potential during retrieval operations for segregation and concentration of fissile material to result in a criticality. The sluicing retrieval of C-106 sludge to AY-102 and the operation of mixer pumps in SY-102 are examined in some detail. These two tanks (C-106, SY-102) were selected because of the near term plans for retrieval of these tanks and their high plutonium inventories relative to other tanks. Although all underground storage tanks are subcritical by a wide margin if assumed to be uniform in composition, the possibility retrieval operations could preferentially segregate the plutonium and locally concentrate it sufficiently to result in criticality was a concern. This report examines the potential for this segregation to occur.

  8. Treatability Study Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support future decision making of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU) remedy selection, the Department of Energy (DOE) is performing a Treatability Study (TS), consistent with the EPA guidance for Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability studies. The study will inform stakeholders about various waste removal technologies and the cost of potential remediation approaches, particularly the cost associated with sluicing and the reduction in risk to human health and the environment from tank content removal. As part of the GAAT OU remedy, a series of studies and technology tests will be preformed. These may address one or more of the following areas, characterization, removal, treatment, and transfer of wastes stored in the GAAT OU.

  9. EA-1999: Proposal to Permit 750 Acres at the Savannah River Site for Use by the State of South Carolina Military Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts from a proposal by South Carolina Military Department (SCMD) to permit the use of 750 acres at SRS for military training exercises and permanent facilities to support training. This proposal, if implemented, would further the purposes of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of the Army and DOE concerning the Use of SRS Lands for Military Training Activities, signed in 2007. SCMD has requested permitting two tracts of land, one near B-Area and one west of L-Lake and north of South Carolina Route 125, to establish facilities for military training purposes. SCMD does not propose to conduct live-fire training or to use tracked vehicles at SRS.

  10. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam, 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2009 through early spring 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines for fisheries managers and engineers to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study was from November 1, 2009 to April 10, 2010. The study was divided into three study periods: Period 1, November 1 - December 15, 2009 for a fall/winter sluiceway and turbine study; Period 2, December 16, 2009 - February 28, 2010 for a turbine only study; Period 3, March 1 - April 10, 2010 for a spring sluiceway and turbine study. Sluiceway operations were scheduled to begin on March 1 for this study; however, because of an oil spill cleanup near the sluice outfall, sluiceway operations were delayed until March 8, 2010, therefore the spring study period did not commence until March 8. The study objectives were to (1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA between November 1 and December 15, 2009 and March 1 and April 10, 2010, and (2) estimate the numbers and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units between December 16, 2009 and February 28, 2010. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics. For Period 1, overwintering summer steelhead fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. A total of 879 {+-} 165 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse and sluiceway during November 1 to December 15, 2009. Ninety two percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in early December, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. For Period 2, adult steelhead passage occurred on January 14 and 31 and February 2, 22, and 24. A total of 62 {+-} 40 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes during December 16, 2009 to March 7, 2010. Horizontal distribution data indicated turbine unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred during morning periods. Passage did not occur during afternoon or nighttime. For Period 3, the early spring study period, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 34-day study period. A total of 1,985 {+-} 234 (95% CI) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse sluiceway. Ninety-nine percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in late March and again in early April. Horizontal distribution indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. The results of this study strongly suggest that operating the TDA sluiceway for steelhead passage (fallbacks and kelts) during the late fall, winter, and early spring months will provide an optimal, non-turbine route for these fishes to pass the dam.

  11. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L. [and others] [and others

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  12. Initial ACTR retrieval technology evaluation test material recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, M.R.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millions of gallons of radiaoctive waste are contained in underground storage tanks at Hanford (SE Washington). Techniques for retrieving much of this waste from the storage tanks have been developed. Current baseline approach is to use sluice jets for single-shell tanks and mixer pumps for double-shell tanks. The Acquire Commercial Technology for Retrieval (ACTR) effort was initiated to identify potential improvements in or alternatives to the baseline waste retrieval methods. Communications with a variety of vendors are underway to identify improved methods that can be implemented at Hanford with little or no additional development. Commercially available retrieval methods will be evaluated by a combination of testing and system-level cost estimation. Current progress toward developing waste simulants for testing ACTR candidate methods is reported; the simulants are designed to model 4 different types of tank waste. Simulant recipes are given for wet sludge, hardpan/dried sludge,hard saltcake, and soft saltcake. Comparisons of the waste and simulant properties are documented in this report.

  13. Coal ash utilization in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, S.R.; Brendel, G.F.; Gray, R.E. [GAI Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methods of coal combustion product (CCP) management successfully employed in the US and considers their potential application in India. India produces about 66 million tons per year (mty) of coal ash from the combustion of 220 mty of domestically produced coal, the average ash content being about 30--40 percent as opposed to an average ash content of less than 10 percent in the US In other words, India produces coal ash at about triple the rate of the US. Currently, 95 percent of this ash is sluiced into slurry ponds, many located near urban centers and consuming vast areas of premium land. Indian coal-fired generating capacity is expected to triple in the next ten years, which will dramatically increase ash production. Advanced coal cleaning technology may help reduce this amount, but not significantly. Currently India utilizes two percent of the CCP`s produced with the remainder being disposed of primarily in large impoundments. The US utilizes about 25 percent of its coal ash with the remainder primarily being disposed of in nearly equal amounts between dry landfills and impoundments. There is an urgent need for India to improve its ash management practice and to develop efficient and environmentally sound disposal procedures as well as high volume ash uses in ash haulback to the coalfields. In addition, utilization should include: reclamation, structural fill, flowable backfill and road base.

  14. Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, T.J.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

  15. Used powdex resin for liquid waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, C.J.; Bramblett, J.W.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdex resin has traditionally been used on the Secondary side for condensate polishing. The resins on these polishers are backwashed periodically based on chemical breakthrough or high differential pressure. Upon the backwash, the ion exchange capacity on the powdex resin is not completely exhausted. In the past, this partially used powdex resin was sluiced to a liner and treated as waste for disposal. In an effort to reduce radioactivity being released from segregated, high chemical concentration wastes, the idea of trying used powdex resin was initiated. In 1992, Duke Power Company began processing problem liquid waste streams with used Secondary powdex and subsequent decanting of the waste water for release. the results have shown significant reductions in the activity of this water. This paper will detail the history, method, and the results of using Secondary powdex for liquid radwaste processing. It will also describe the benefits, such as: (1) Processing waste streams not suitable for bead resin demineralizers. (2) Ability to process large volumes of waste water in a short period of time. (3) Recycling media thought to be useless. (4) > 80% Reduction in activity of water processed. (5) Overall curies reduction. (6) Improved bead demineralizer performance.

  16. Regulatory issues associated with closure of the Hanford AX Tank Farm ancillary equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid mixed, high-level radioactive waste has been stored in underground single-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. After retrieval of the waste from the single-shell tanks, the DOE will proceed with closure of the tank farm. The 241-AX Tank Farm includes four one-million gallon single-shell tanks in addition to sluice lines, transfer lines, ventilation headers, risers, pits, cribs, catch tanks, buildings, well and associated buried piping. This equipment is classified as ancillary equipment. This document addresses the requirements for regulatory close of the ancillary equipment in the Hanford Site 241-AX Tank Farm. The options identified for physical closure of the ancillary equipment include disposal in place, disposal in place after treatment, excavation and disposal on site in an empty single-shell tank, and excavation and disposal outside the AX Tank Farm. The document addresses the background of the Hanford Site and ancillary equipment in the AX Tank Farm, regulations for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively contaminated equipment, requirements for the cleanup and disposal of radioactive wastes, cleanup and disposal requirements governing hazardous and mixed waste, and regulatory requirements and issues associated with each of the four physical closure options. This investigation was conducted by the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during Fiscal Year 1998 for the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project.

  17. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  20. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  1. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

  2. Corrosion Control during Closure Activities at the Savannah River Site - 13514

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, Bruce J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Subramanian, Karthik H.; Martin, Keisha B. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site (SRS) separation process are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during normal service and design basis events (e.g., earthquake conditions). A corrosion control program is in place to ensure that degradation of the steel does not impact the structural and leak integrity functions of these waste tanks. The SRS is currently retrieving waste from older waste tanks and processing the waste through the vitrification for long term stabilization. The retrieval processes prepare the tanks for ultimate closure (i.e., grouting) by removing sludge by mechanical and/or sluicing methods, dissolving salt cake by adding water, and chemical cleaning of the residual sludge with oxalic acid. Each of these retrieval methods will result in waste chemistry that does not meet the requirements of the current corrosion control program. Given the short-term exposure and limited remaining service life for the tanks in which retrievals are being performed, an assessment of the need for corrosion controls in these tanks was performed. The assessment reviewed the corrosion rates in the more aggressive environments and the postulated loads on the structure during the closure activities. The assessment concluded that the current corrosion control program may be suspended for a short period of time while final retrieval of the waste is performed. (authors)

  3. Development and Deployment of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Christopher A.; Landon, Matthew R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Hanson, Carl E. [AREVA Federal Services, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012. (authors)

  4. W-320 Project thermal modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Waste Remediation Using the Borehole-Miner Extendible-Nozzle Sluicer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Boris, G.F.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole-miner extendible-nozzle sluicing system was designed, constructed, and deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to remediate five horizontal underground storage tanks containing sludge and supernate at the ORNL Old Hydrofracture Facility site. The tanks were remediated in fiscal year 1998 to remove {approx}98% of the waste, {approx}3% greater than the target removal of >95% of the waste. The tanks contained up to 18 in. of sludge covered by supernate. The 42,000 gal of low level liquid waste were estimated to contain 30,000 Ci, with 97% of this total located in the sludge. The retrieval was successful. At the completion of the remediation, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation agreed that the tanks were cleaned to the maximum extent practicable using pumping technology. This deployment was the first radioactive demonstration of the borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting system. The extendible nozzle is based on existing bore hole-miner technology used to fracture and dislodge ore deposits in mines. Typically borehole-miner technology includes both dislodging and retrieval capabilities. Both dislodging, using the extendible-nozzle water-jetting system, and retrieval, using a jet pump located at the base of the mast, are deployed as an integrated system through one borehole or riser. Note that the extendible-nozzle system for Oak Ridge remediation only incorporated the dislodging capability; the retrieval pump was deployed through a separate riser. The borehole-miner development and deployment is part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements project under the direction of the US Department of Energy's EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. This development and deployment was conducted as a partnership between RPD and E and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's US DOE EM040 Old Hydrofracture Facility remediation project team.

  6. Engineering development of a lightweight high-pressure scarifier for tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, B.K.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements Program (RPD&E) is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area to investigate existing and emerging retrieval processes suitable for the retrieval of high-level radioactive waste inside underground storage tanks. This program, represented by industry, national laboratories, and academia, seeks to provide a technical and cost basis to support site-remediation decisions. Part of this program has involved the development of a high-pressure waterjet dislodging system and pneumatic conveyance integrated as a scarifier. Industry has used high-pressure waterjet technology for many years to mine, cut, clean, and scarify materials with a broad range of properties. The scarifier was developed as an alternate means of retrieving waste inside Hanford single-shell tanks, particularly hard, stubborn waste. Testing of the scarifier has verified its ability to retrieve a wide range of tank waste ranging from extremely hard waste that is resistant to other dislodging means to soft sludge and even supernatant fluid. Since the scarifier expends water at a low rate and recovers most of the water as it is used, the scarifier is well suited for retrieval of tanks that leak and cannot be safely sluiced or applications where significant waste dilution is not acceptable. Although the original scarifier was effective, it became evident that a lighter, more compact version that would be compatible with light weight deployment systems under development, such as the Light Duty Utility Arm, was needed. At the end of FY 95, the Light Weight Scarifier (LWS) was designed to incorporate the features of the original scarifier in a smaller, lighter end effector. During FY 96, the detailed design of the LWS was completed and two prototypes were fabricated.

  7. Integration of geographic information systems and logistic multiple regression for aquatic macrophyte modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumalani, S. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geography; Jensen, J.R.; Althausen, J.D.; Burkhalter, S. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geography; Mackey, H.E. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since aquatic macrophytes have an important influence on the physical and chemical processes of an ecosystem while simultaneously affecting human activity, it is imperative that they be inventoried and managed wisely. However, mapping wetlands can be a major challenge because they are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, to shrub or scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrian environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically from season to season, especially when nonpersistent species are present. This research, focuses on developing a model for predicting the future growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This model will use a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze some of the biophysical variables that affect aquatic macrophyte growth and distribution. The data will provide scientists information on the future spatial growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This study focuses on the Savannah River Site Par Pond (1,000 ha) and L Lake (400 ha) these are two cooling ponds that have received thermal effluent from nuclear reactor operations. Par Pond was constructed in 1958, and natural invasion of wetland has occurred over its 35-year history, with much of the shoreline having developed extensive beds of persistent and non-persistent aquatic macrophytes.

  8. Dismantling Structures and Equipment of the MR Reactor and its Loop Facilities at the National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' - 12051

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov, V.G.; Danilovich, A.S.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Muzrukova, V.D.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Fadin, S.Yu.; Shisha, A.D.; Chesnokov, A.V. [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 a design of decommissioning of research reactors MR and RFT has been developed in the National research Center 'Kurchatov institute'. The design has been approved by Russian State Authority in July 2009 year and has received the positive conclusion of ecological expertise. In 2009-2010 a preparation for decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT was spent. Within the frames of a preparation a characterization, sorting and removal of radioactive objects, including the irradiated fuel, from reactor storage facilities and pool have been executed. During carrying out of a preparation on removal of radioactive objects from reactor sluice pool water treating has been spent. For these purposes modular installation for clearing and processing of a liquid radioactive waste 'Aqua - Express' was used. As a result of works it was possible to lower volume activity of water on three orders in magnitude that has allowed improving essentially of radiating conditions in a reactor hall. Auxiliary systems of ventilation, energy and heat supplies, monitoring systems of radiating conditions of premises of the reactor and its loop-back installations are reconstructed. In 2011 the license for a decommissioning of the specified reactors has been received and there are begun dismantling works. Within the frames of works under the design the armature and pipelines are dismantled in a under floor space of a reactor hall where a moving and taking away pipelines of loop facilities and the first contour of the MR reactor were replaced. A dismantle of the main equipment of loop facility with the gas coolant has been spent. Technologies which were used on dismantle of the radioactive contaminated equipment are presented, the basic works on reconstruction of systems of maintenance of on the decommissioning works are described, the sequence of works on the decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT is shown. Dismantling works were carried out with application of means of a dust suppression that, in aggregate with standard means at such works of individual protection of the personnel and devices of radiating control, has allowed to lower risk of action of radiation on the personnel, the population and environment at the expense of reduction of volume activity of radioactive aerosols in air. (authors)

  9. Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

    1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, both insoluble (principally hydrogen) and soluble (principally ammonia), posing a number of safety concerns (Peurrung et al. 1997; Meader 1996).

  10. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435,000 below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  11. SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEEL SAMPLES FROM TANK 241-C-110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAGE JS; COOKE GA; PESTOVICH JA; HUBER HJ

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During sluicing operations of tank 241-C-110, a significant amount of solids were unable to be retrieved. These solids (often referred to as the tank 'heel') were sampled in 2010 and chemically and mineralogically analyzed in the 222-S Laboratory. Additionally, dissolution tests were performed to identify the amount of undissolvable material after using multiple water contacts. This report covers the solid phase characterization of six samples from these tests using scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The chemical analyses, particle size distribution analysis, and dissolution test results are reported separately. Two of the samples were from composites created from as-received material - Composite A and Composite B. The main phase in these samples was sodium-fluoride-phosphate hydrate (natrophosphate) - in the X-ray diffraction spectra, this phase was the only phase identifiable. Polarized light microscopy showed the presence of minor amounts of gibbsite and other phases. These phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as sodium aluminosilicates, sodium diuranate, and sodium strontium phosphate hydrate (nastrophite) crystals. The natrophosphate crystals in the scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a variety of erosive and dissolution features from perfectly shaped octahedral to well-rounded appearance. Two samples were from water-washed Composites A and B, with no change in mineralogy compared to the as-received samples. This is not surprising, since the water wash had only a short period of water contact with the material as opposed to the water dissolution tests. The last two samples were residual solids from the water dissolution tests. These tests included multiple additions of water at 15 C and 45 C. The samples were sieved to separate a coarser fraction of > 710 {mu}m and a finer fraction of < 710 {mu}m. These two fractions were analyzed separately. The coarser fraction contained mostly gibbsite with minor amounts of sodium aluminosilicates (cancrinite) and bismuth aluminum-rich phases. The finer fraction was mostly composed of gibbsite, the sodium alumino silicate phase, cancrinite, and a poorly crystalline to non-crystalline phase containing varying amounts of iron, bismuth, aluminum, and phosphorus.

  12. FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER MS

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

  13. WRPS MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRITTON JC

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is the Hanford tank operations contractor, charged with managing one of the most challenging environmental cleanup projects in the nation. The U.S. Department of Energy hired WRPS to manage 56 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The waste is the legacy of 45 years of plutonium production for the U. S. nuclear arsenal. WRPS mission is three-fold: safely manage the waste until it can be processed and immobilized; develop the tools and techniques to retrieve the waste from the tanks, and build the infrastructure needed to deliver the waste to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) when it begins operating. WTP will 'vitrify' the waste by mixing it with silica and other materials and heating it in an electric melter. Vitrification turns the waste into a sturdy glass that will isolate the radioactivity from the environment. It will take more than 20 years to process all the tank waste. The tank waste is a complex highly radioactive mixture of liquid, sludge and solids. The radioactivity, chemical composition of the waste and the limited access to the underground storage tanks makes retrieval a challenge. Waste is being retrieved from aging single-shell tanks and transferred to newer, safer double-shell tanks. WRPS is using a new technology known as enhanced-reach sluicing to remove waste. A high-pressure stream of liquid is sprayed at 100 gallons per minute through a telescoping arm onto a hard waste layer several inches thick covering the waste. The waste is broken up, moved to a central pump suction and removed from the tank. The innovative Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) is also being used to retrieve waste. MARS is a remotely operated, telescoping arm installed on a mast in the center of the tank. It uses multiple technologies to scrape, scour and rake the waste toward a pump for removal. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) provided nearly $326 million over two-and-a-half years to modernize the infrastructure in Hanford's tank farms. WRPS issued 850 subcontracts totaling more than $152 million with nearly 76 percent of that total awarded to small businesses. WRPS used the funding to upgrade tank farm infrastructure, develop technologies to retrieve and consolidate tank waste and extend the life of two critical operating facilities needed to feed waste to the WTP. The 222-S Laboratory analyzes waste to support waste retrievals and transfers. The laboratory was upgraded to support future WTP operations with a new computer system, new analytical equipment, a new office building and a new climate-controlled warehouse. The 242-A Evaporator was upgraded with a control-room simulator for operator training and several upgrades to aging equipment. The facility is used to remove liquid from the tank waste, creating additional storage space, necessary for continued waste retrievals and WTP operation. The One System Integrated Project Team is ajoint effort ofWRPS and Bechtel National to identify and resolve common issues associated with commissioning, feeding and operating the Waste Treatment Plant. Two new facilities are being designed to support WTP hot commlsslomng. The Interim Hanford Storage project is planned to store canisters of immobilized high-level radioactive waste glass produced by the vitrification plant. The facility will use open racks to store the 15-foot long, two-foot diameter canisters of waste, which require remote handling. The Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Project is a major upgrade to the existing Effluent Treatment Facility at Hanford so it can treat about 10 million gallons of liquid radioactive and hazardous effluent a year from the vitrification plant. The One System approach brings the staff of both companies together to identify and resolve WTP safety issues. A questioning attitude is encouraged and an open forum is maintained for employees to raise issues. WRPS is completing its mission safely with record-setting safety performance. Since WRPS took over the Hanford Tank Operations Contract in October 2