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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "686-g l-lake sluice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

685-G PAR Pond and 686-G L-Lake Sluice Gate Conduit Cleanouts/Inspections 685-G PAR Pond and 686-G L-Lake Sluice Gate Conduit Cleanouts/Inspections Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and clear weeds and other debris from the conduits at Par Pond Dam and Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake), in part to facilitate Federal Energy Regulatory Commission inspection requirements. This will be accomplished at Par Pond by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 10 CFS incrementally to a fully open flow of 2000 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully open. The gate will remain fully open for 5 minutes, whereupon the gate will be closed to its normal position and flow of 10 CFS. At Steel Creek Dam, this will be accomplished in the same manner except normal flow is 4.5

2

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

685-G PAR Pond and 686-G L-Lake Sluice Gate Conduit Cleanouts/Inspections 685-G PAR Pond and 686-G L-Lake Sluice Gate Conduit Cleanouts/Inspections Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and clear weeds and other debris from the conduits at Par Pond Dam and Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake), in part to facilitate Federal Energy Regulatory Commission inspection requirements. This will be accomplished at Par Pond by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 10 CFS incrementally to a fully open flow of 2000 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully open. The gate will remain fully open for 5 minutes, whereupon the gate will be closed to its normal position and flow of 10 CFS. At Steel Creek Dam, this will be accomplished in the same manner except normal flow is 4.5

3

CX-010121: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21: Categorical Exclusion Determination 21: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010121: Categorical Exclusion Determination 685-G Par Pond and 686-G L-Lake Sluice Gate Conduit Cleanouts/Inspections CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/21/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and clear weeds and other debris from the conduits at Par Pond Dam and Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake), in part to facilitate Federal Energy Regulatory Commission inspection requirements. This will be accomplished at Par Pond by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 10 CFS incrementally to a fully open flow of 2000 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully

4

CX-002205: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

205: Categorical Exclusion Determination 205: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002205: Categorical Exclusion Determination 686-G Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake) Inspection CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and inspect the operating mechanisms of the gates at Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake). This will be accomplished by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 4.5 cubic feet per second (CFS) incrementally to a fully open flow of 1400 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully open. The gate will remain fully open for 5 minutes, whereupon the gate will be closed to its normal position and

5

W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen buildup in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel.

Bailey, J.W.

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 24 I-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen build up in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel.

Bailey, J.W.

1997-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Aerosol characteristics in the offgas from a pilot-scale sluicing operation  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale study was performed to simulate conditions anticipated during sluicing operations to retrieve waste in single-shell Tank 241-C-106 at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The objective of the study was to identify and characterize the potential aerosol source term at the inlet of the headspace exhaust ventilation system during sluicing operations. The information is needed to support decisions for components to be used in the full-scale operation. A secondary objective was to qualitatively evaluate the visibility during sluicing. Three simulated sluicing tests were performed in the 336 Building`s quarter-scale waste tank facility located at Hanford. Scaling relationships were used to guide modifications to the quarter-scale tank to accommodate tests that simulated tank geometry, sluicing, and ventilation conditions in the full-scale tank. Simulated sluicing fluids were targeted on solid and liquid surfaces during the tests. Test conditions were monitored, and aerosol measurements were made in the offgas ventilation duct. Also during the tests, an in-tank camera was used to monitor visibility.

Ligotke, M.W.; Whyatt, G.A.; Beckette, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115.

Bevins, R.R.

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Review of Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Operations and Data for Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sluicing operations were performed to retrieve high-heat sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 using the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System. This eliminated the high-heat safety issue for C-106 and demonstrated a technology for retrieval of single-shell tank waste. Both AY-102 and C-106 were monitored during the waste transfer operations, providing a clear picture of general trends in each tank. Specific issues addressed were evaluation of the data for evidence of flammable gas accumulation in AY-102 and thermal performance of AY-102 under the increasing heat load.

Cuta, Judith M.; Carothers, Kelly G.; Damschen, Dennis W.; Kuhn, William L.; Lechelt, Jeanne A.; Sathyanarayana, Kurabalakota; Stauffer, Leslie A.

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

LOCKREM, L.L.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method that uses water jets to dissolve the water-soluble waste and mobilize the water-insoluble waste. Retrieval operations will liberate any waste gases trapped in the wetted solid waste matrix, and these gases will be released into the tank headspaces. Because the trapped gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, a concern exists that a flammable mixture could be formed in the tank headspaces. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during modified sluicing waste retrieval operations. Considered here are nine of the 12 tanks from the 241-S tank farm (241-S-107, 241-S-111, and 241-S 112 are not considered) and Tank 241-U-107. This report is intended to support the specification of process controls that ensure flammable conditions do not develop in the tank headspaces. Consequently, the physical scenarios considered, the models developed to estimate retained gas releases and the tank headspace compositions under these scenarios, and the model input data are intended to conservatively assess the potential to reach headspace flammability. The analyses are intended to address worst-case conditions and establish reasonable upper bounds on the achievable flammability of the tank headspaces. Flammable retained gas inventories, for example, are based on the 95th percentile developed by Barker and Hedengren (2003), giving 95% confidence that actual inventories are smaller than those used in the calculations. Gas releases and headspace flammability were evaluated for three general scenarios: a very aggressive dissolution and erosion of saltcake waste by water jets impinging on the waste surface, the drainage of interstitial liquids from saltcake during a shutdown of the retrieval process, and the dissolution of saltcake by unsaturated liquids during a shutdown of the retrieval process. The simple model of waste retrieval using the modified sluicing approach indicated that the flammable gas headspace concentrations can rapidly approach the action level of 25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL) when the tank is passively ventilated. While it is not necessary to use the portable exhauster to maintain the headspace hydrogen concentration below this action level, retrieval rates would probably be limited by the slow removal of flammable gases by passive ventilation. It was determined that using a portable exhauster anywhere in the assumed operating range of 270 to 475 cfm would prevent the headspaces from reaching the 25% of LFL action level even if the water jets are very effective at eroding the saltcake. Specific guidelines are developed to ensure that, in the event of a catastrophic loss of the retrieval pump and portable exhauster, headspace flammability will not reach the LFL. This report is Revision 1 of PNNL-14271. This revision expands the analysis of interstitial liquid drainage-induced gas releases to address a general retrieval scenario (the previous version of this report assumed a center-out retrieval approach and conditions). Tank waste conditions (waste volumes, interstitial liquid levels, temperatures, retained gas void fractions, etc.) have also been updated from the previous version.

Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method. Retrieval operations will hydraulically erode and dissolve the saltcake waste, and the resulting brine will then be pumped to a double-shell tank (DST). Waste gases residing in the solid waste matrix will be released into the tank headspace when the matrix is eroded or dissolved. These retained waste gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, and there is a concern that these flammable gases could produce a flammable mixture in the tank headspaces during the retrieval operations. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during waste retrieval operations. The SSTs considered here are ten of the twelve 241-S farm tanks (tanks 241-S-107 and 241-S-111 are excluded from consideration here) and tank 241-U-107 (U-107).

Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and inspect the operating mechanisms of the gates at Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake). This will be purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and inspect the operating mechanisms of the gates at Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake). This will be accomplished by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 4.5 CFS incrementally to a fully open flow of 1400 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully open. The gate will remain fully open for 5 minutes, whereupon the gate will be closed to its normal position and flow of 4.5 CFS. After fully open flow for 5 minutes, the gate will be returned to its normal position, reestablishing the 4.5 CFS flow. During the periods of increased flow, water samples will be collected to monitor sediment transport. Any ecological impacts to the receiving stream is expected to be minimal and temporary.

17

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and inspect the operating mechanisms of the gates at Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake). This will be The purpose of this activity is to perform gate checks and inspect the operating mechanisms of the gates at Steel Creek Dam (L-Lake). This will be accomplished by opening the sluice gate and increasing the flow from the normal 4.5 CFS incrementally to a fully open flow of 1400 CFS. Flow will be increased by opening the sluice gate in stages of 50% per hour until the gate is fully open. The gate will remain fully open for 5 minutes, whereupon the gate will be closed to its normal position and flow of 4.5 CFS. After fully open flow for 5 minutes, the gate will be returned to its normal position, reestablishing the 4.5 CFS flow. During the periods of increased flow, water samples will be collected to monitor sediment transport. Any ecological

18

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the structural analysis of the Pipe Supports designed for Slurry and Supernate transfer pipe lines in order to meet the requirements of applicable ASME codes. The pipe support design loads are obtained from the piping stress calculations W320-27-I-4 and W320-27-I-5. These loads are the total summation of the gravity, pressure, thermal and seismic loads. Since standard typical designs are used for each type of pipe support such as Y-Stop, Guide and Anchors, each type of support is evaluated for the maximum loads to which this type of supports are subjected. These loads are obtained from the AutoPipe analysis and used to check the structural adequacy of these supports.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following calculations: Exhaust airflow sizing for Tank 241-C-106; Equipment sizing and selection recirculation fan; Sizing high efficiency mist eliminator; Sizing electric heating coil; Equipment sizing and selection of recirculation condenser; Chiller skid system sizing and selection; High efficiency metal filter shielding input and flushing frequency; and Exhaust skid stack sizing and fan sizing.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing civil/structural calculations, Volume 7  

SciTech Connect

The structural skid supporting the Process Building and equipment is designed based on the criteria, codes and standards, referenced in the calculation. The final members and the associated elements satisfy the design requirements of the structure. Revision 1 incorporates vendor data for the weight of the individual equipment components. The updated information does not affect the original conclusion of the calculation, since the overall effect is a reduction in the total weight of the equipment and a nominal relocation of the center of gravity for the skid assembly.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "686-g l-lake sluice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan establishes the organization, plans, and systems for management of Project W-320 as defined in DOE Order 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987).

Phillips, D.R.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development and Deployment of the Extended Reach Sluicing System (ERSS) for Retrieval of Hanford Single Shell Tank Waste - 14206 (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

A history of the evolution and the design development of Extended Reach Sluicer System (ERSS) is presented. Several challenges are described that had to be overcome to create a machine that went beyond the capabilities of prior generation sluicers to mobilize waste in Single Shell Tanks for pumping into Double Shell Tank receiver tanks. Off-the-shelf technology and traditional hydraulic fluid power systems were combined with the custom-engineered components to create the additional functionality of the ERSS, while still enabling it to fit within very tight entry envelope into the SST. Problems and challenges inevitably were encountered and overcome in ways that enhance the state of the art of fluid power applications in such constrained environments. Future enhancements to the ERSS design are explored for retrieval of tanks with different dimensions and internal obstacles.

Bauer, Roger E.; Figley, Reed R.; Innes, A. G.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Natural Fluctuation of Water Level in Par Pond and Reduced Water Flow in Steel Creek below L Lake at the Savannah River Site http:energy.govnepadownloads...

25

Project W-320 ALARA Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

Harty, W.M.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hanford Retrieval Technology Development Ruben Mendoza  

Hydro-trans R-5 R-6 R-7 Diversion Box Vacuum Exhaust EXH-1001-HIH air water waste ... influence, attack angles, and energy of the sluice stream on the waste

27

Safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, Project W-320: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the C-106 sluicing operation are: (1) to stabilize the tank by reducing the heat load in the tank to less than 42 MJ/hr (40,000 Btu/hour), and (2) to initiate demonstration of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval technology. The purpose of this supporting document (SD) is as follows: (1) to provide safety classifications for items (systems, structures, equipment, components, or parts) for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), and (2) to document and methodology used to develop safety classifications. Appropriate references are made with regard to use of existing systems, structures, equipments, components, and parts for C-106 single-shell transfer tank located in the C Tank Farm, and 241-AY-102 (AY-102) double shell receiver tanks (DST) located in the Aging Waste Facility (AWF). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System consists of two transfer lines that would connect the two tanks, one to carry the sluiced waste slurry to AY-102, and the other to return the supernatant liquid to C-106. The supernatant, or alternate fluid, will be used to mobilize waste in C-106 for the sluicing process. The equipment necessary for the WRSS include pumps in each tank, sluicers to direct the supernatant stream in C-106, a slurry distributor in AY-102, HVAC for C-106, instrumentation and control devices, and other existing components as required.

Conner, J.C.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This revision (Rev. 1) updates the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. Ongoing and planned future activities include: cold testing of the sluicing and pumping system; readiness assessment; equipment relocation and assembly; isotopic dilution of fissile radionuclides; sluicing and transfer of the tanks contents; and preparation of the Removal Action Completion Report. The most significant change is that the sluicing and pumping system has been configured by and will be operated by CDM Federal Programs Corporation. In addition, a new technical lead and a new project analyst have been designated within Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. The schedule for tanks contents removal has been accelerated, with transfer of the final batch of tank slurry now scheduled for March 31, 1998 (instead of November 10, 1998). The OHF sluicing and pumping project is proceeding as a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The purpose of the project is to remove the contents from five inactive underground storage tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9. The tanks contain an estimated 52,700 gal of liquid and sludge, together comprising a radioactive inventory of approximately 30,000 Ci.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Sludge mobilization with submerged nozzles in horizontal cylindrical tanks  

SciTech Connect

The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and the evaporator service tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are used for the collection and storage of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). Wastes collected in these tanks are typically acidic when generated and are neutralized with sodium hydroxide to protect the tanks from corrosion; however, the high pH of the solution causes the formation of insoluble compounds that precipitate. These precipitates formed a sludge layer approximately 0.6 to 1.2 m (2 to 4 ft) deep in the bottom of the tanks. The sludge in the MVSTs and the evaporator service tanks will eventually need to be removed from the tanks and treated for final disposal or transferred to another storage facility. The primary options for removing the sludge include single-point sluicing, use of a floating pump, robotic sluicing, and submerged-nozzle sluicing. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of submerged-nozzle sluicing in horizontal cylindrical tanks and (2) obtain experimental data to validate the TEMPEST (time-dependent, energy, momentun, pressure, equation solution in three dimensions) computer code.

Hylton, T.D.; Cummins, R.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Perona, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Application of support vector machines in scour prediction on grade-control structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into the problem of predicting the maximum depth of scour on grade-control structures like sluice gates, weirs and check dams, etc., has been mainly of an experimental nature and several investigators have proposed a number of empirical relations ... Keywords: Back propagation neural network, Grade-control structures, Modeling, Scour, Support vector machines

Arun Goel; Mahesh Pal

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EA-1070: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact 70: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1070: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact Natural Fluctuation of Water Level in Par Pond and Reduced Water Flow in Steel Creek below L Lake at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the proposed natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond, and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L Lake at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action was not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Revised Finding of No Significant Impact for the Natural Fluctuation of Water Level in Par Pond and Reduced Water Flow in Steel Creek below L Lake

34

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 6720 of 28,905 results. 11 - 6720 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005773: Categorical Exclusion Determination Paint Removal/Disturbance Involved Work in K-Area Complex Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005773-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005775: Categorical Exclusion Determination Synthesis of Inorganic Materials Using Microwave Reactor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/07/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005775-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005777: Categorical Exclusion Determination Excavate and Replace Drain Pipe at 686-G Steel Creek Dam

35

Waste compatibility assessments to support project W-320  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this internal memo is to provide a recommendation for the transfer of tank 241-C-106 waste, Attachment 2, to tank 241-AY-102. This internal memo also identifies additional requirements which have been deemed necessary for safely receiving and storing the waste documented in Attachment 2 from tank 241-C-106 in tank 241-AY-102. This waste transfer is planned in support of tank 241-C-106 solids sluicing activities. Approximately 200,000 gallons of waste and flush water are expected to be pumped from tank 241-C-106 into tank 241-AY-102. Several transfers will be necessary to complete the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 solids. To assure ourselves that this waste transfer will not create any compatibility concerns, a waste compatibility assessment adhering to current waste compatibility requirements has been performed.

BLAAK, T.M.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

Conner, J.C.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Management of Process Wastewater at Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of drivers is causing utilities to consider closing ash ponds and converting to dry ash handling. These drivers include wastewater discharge regulations on salinity, chlorides, nutrients, and metals, as well as solid waste regulations resulting from concerns with pond safety. Because ash ponds at many sites receive a variety of wastewaters, even if a plant converts to dry ash handling and thereby reduces or eliminates ash sluice water, other wastewater streams will still require treatment. E...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

High volume tidal or current flow harnessing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus permitting the utilization of large volumes of water in the harnessing and extracting of a portion of the power generated by the rise and fall of ocean tides, ocean currents, or flowing rivers includes the provision of a dam, and a specialized single cavity chamber of limited size as compared with the water head enclosed by the dam, and an extremely high volume gating system in which all or nearly all of the water between the high and low levels on either side of the dam is cyclically gated through the single chamber from one side of the dam to the other so as to alternately provide positive air pressure and a partial vacuum within the single chamber. In one embodiment, the specialized chamber has a barrier at the bottom which divides the bottom of the chamber in half, large ports at the bottom of the chamber to permit inflow and outflow of high volumes of water, and ganged structures having a higher total area than that of corresponding ports, in which the structures form sluice gates to selectively seal off and open different sets of ports. In another embodiment, a single chamber is used without a barrier. In this embodiment, vertical sluice gates are used which may be activated automatically by pressures acting on the sluice gates as a result of ingested and expelled water.

Gorlov, A.M.

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE MAY 2009 [VISIT US AT WWW.WRPSTOC.COM OR WWW.HANFORD.GOV/ORP/ FOR MORE INFORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Retrieval of waste from single-shell tank C-110 resumed in January making it the first waste retrieval operation for WRPS since taking over Hanford's Tank Operations Contract last October. Now, with approximately 90 percent of the waste removed, WRPS believes that modified sluicing has reached the limits of the technology to remove any further waste and is preparing documentation for use in decision making about any future retrieval actions. Tank C-110 is located in C Fann near the center of the Hanford Site. It is a 530,000 gallon tank, built in 1946, and held approximately 126,000 gallons of sludge and other radioactive and chemical waste materials when retrieval resumed. Modified sluicing technology uses liquid waste from a nearby double-shell tank to break up, dissolve and mobilize the solid material so it can be pumped. Because of the variety of waste fon11S, sluicing is often not able to remove all of the waste. The remaining waste will next be sampled for analysis, and results will be used to guide decisions regarding future actions. Work is moving rapidly in preparation to retrieve waste from a second single-shell tank this summer and transfer it to safer double-shell tank storage. Construction activities necessary to retrieve waste from Tank C-104, a 530,000 gallon tank built in 1943, are approximately 60 percent complete as WRPS maintains its focus on reducing the risk posed by Hanford's aging single-shell waste tanks. C-104 is one of Hanford's oldest radioactive and chemical waste storage tanks, containing approximately 263,000 gallons of wet sludge with a top layer that is dry and powdery. This will be the largest sludge volume retrieval ever attempted using modified sluicing technology. Modified sluicing uses high pressure water or liquid radioactive waste sprayed from nozzles above the waste. The liquid dissolves and/or mobilizes the waste so it can be pumped. In addition to other challenges, tank C-104 contains a significant amount of plutonium and uranium. It also contains a host of contaminated legacy equipment so the entire process is being managed carefully to protect workers and the environment.

HOLLOWAY JN

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "686-g l-lake sluice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water reuse and recycle in the US steam-electric-generating industry - an assessment of current practice and potential for future applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study assesses the current and future potential for wastewater reuse and recycle by the steam-electric-generating industry in the United States. Fifty-three power plants employing one or more of the following reuse/recycle measures were identified by a literature search and interviews with reuse/recycle experts--cascading higher-quality wastewaters to lower-quality uses, recirculating ash sluice water, using cooling tower makeup or sidestream softening, treating and reclaiming wastewaters, using dry-cooling systems, and using municipal effluents as plant-intake water. Detailed case studies were performed on eight of the 53 plants surveyed.

Breitstein, L.; Tucker, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Engineering study for ISSTRS design concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., is pleased to transmit the attached Conceptual Design Package for the Initial Single Shell Tank Retrieval System (ISSTRS), 90% Conceptual Design Review. The package includes the following: (1) ISSTRS Trade Studies: (a) Retrieval Facility Cooling Requirements; (b) Equipment Re-usability between Project W-320 and Tanks 241-C-103 and 241-C-1 05; (c) Sluice Line Options; and (d) Options for the Location of Tanks AX-103 and A-1 02 HVAC Equipment; (2) Drawings; (3) Risk Management Plan; (4) 0850 Interface Control Document; (5) Requirements Traceability Report; and (6) Project Design Specification.

Hertzel, J.S.

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Project W-320 Tank 106-C waste retrieval study analysis session report  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document has been prepared to make the Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company Project W-320 Tank 106-C Waste Retrieval Study Analysis Session Report readily retrievable. This facilitated session was requested by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to review the characterization data and select the best alternatives for a double-shell receiver tank and for a sluicing medium for Tank 106-C waste retrieval. The team was composed of WHC and Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company (KEH) personnel knowledgeable about tank farm operations, tank 106-C requirements, tank waste characterization and analysis, and chemical processing. This team was assembled to perform a structured decision analysis evaluation and recommend the best alternative-destination double-shell tank between tanks 101-AY and 102-AY, and the best alternative sluicing medium among dilute complexant (DC), dilute noncomplexant (DNC), and water. The session was facilitated by Richard Harrington and Steve Bork of KEH and was conducted at the Bookwalter Winery in Richland from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. from July 27 through July 29, 1993. Attachment 1 (Scope Statement Sheet) identifies the team members, scope, objectives, and deliverables for the session.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Simulation of Hanford Tank 241-C-106 Waste Release into Tank 241-Y-102  

SciTech Connect

Waste stored in Hdord single-shell Tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced with a supernatant liquid from doubIe-shell Tank 241 -AY- 102 (AY-1 02) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Har@ord Site in Eastern Washington. The resulting slurry, containing up to 30 wtYo solids, will then be transferred to Tank AY-102. During the sluicing process, it is important to know the mass of the solids being transferred into AY- 102. One of the primary instruments used to measure solids transfer is an E+ densitometer located near the periphery of the tank at riser 15S. This study was undert.dcen to assess how well a densitometer measurement could represent the total mass of soiids transferred if a uniform lateral distribution was assumed. The study evaluated the C-1 06 slurry mixing and accumulation in Tank AY- 102 for the following five cases: Case 1: 3 wt'%0 slurry in 6.4-m AY-102 waste Case 2: 3 w-t% slurry in 4.3-m AY-102 waste Case 3: 30 wtYo slurry in 6.4-m AY-102 waste Case 4: 30 wt% slurry in 4.3-m AY-102 waste Case 5: 30 wt% slurry in 5. O-m AY-102 waste. The tirne-dependent, three-dimensional, TEMPEST computer code was used to simulate solid deposition and accumulation during the injection of the C-106 slurry into AY-102 through four injection nozzles. The TEMPEST computer code was applied previously to other Hanford tanks, AP-102, SY-102, AZ-101, SY-101, AY-102, and C-106, to model tank waste mixing with rotating pump jets, gas rollover events, waste transfer from one tank to another, and pump-out retrieval of the sluiced waste. The model results indicate that the solid depth accumulated at the densitometer is within 5% of the average depth accumulation. Thus the reading of the densitometer is expected to represent the total mass of the transferred solids reasonably well.

KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

1999-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C C - - Farm Farm Retrieval Retrieval Update Update Leela Sasaki Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange May 19, 2009 Tank Operations Contract 2 Agenda * Retrieval Criteria * Retrieval Summary * Modified Sluicing * Tank Updates - Tank C-108 - Tank C-109 - Tank C-110 - Tank C-104 * Other Retrieval Technologies * Q&A Tank Operations Contract 3 Retrieval Criteria * Milestone M-45-00 of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) sets retrieval criteria - Volume not to exceed: * 360 ft 3 (2,693 gal) for 100 Series tanks (75-ft diameter tanks) * 30 ft 3 (224 gal) for 200 Series tanks (20-ft diameter tanks) - Retrieve waste to the limit of waste retrieval technology capability Tank Operations Contract 4 Pre- and Post-Retrieval Volumes * About 30% of the waste in C-Farm has been retrieved

52

Free-surface flow simulations for discharge-based operation of hydraulic structure gates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine non-hydrostatic flow simulations of the free surface with a discharge model based on elementary gate flow equations for decision support in operation of hydraulic structure gates. A water level-based gate control used in most of today's general practice does not take into account the fact that gate operation scenarios producing similar total discharged volumes and similar water levels may have different local flow characteristics. Accurate and timely prediction of local flow conditions around hydraulic gates is important for several aspects of structure management: ecology, scour, flow-induced gate vibrations and waterway navigation. The modelling approach is described and tested for a multi-gate sluice structure regulating discharge from a river to the sea. The number of opened gates is varied and the discharge is stabilized with automated control by varying gate openings. The free-surface model was validated for discharge showing a correlation coefficient of 0.994 compared to experimental data. A...

Erdbrink, C D; Sloot, P M A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tank waste consolidation analysis for transfer of ORNL RH-TRU tank sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate the schedule and technical issues associated with consolidation of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). This work supports the DOE Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program plans for private sector treatment of all ORNL TRU sludges for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Transfer of these sludges must be completed in FY 2000 to meet the required schedule for beginning shipment of treated sludges to the WIPP by 2002. This study was performed to (1) evaluate the sludge transfer schedule, (2) evaluate the ability of existing tank systems to contain and manage the sludges and liquids generated during the transfers, and (3) evaluate the costs and schedules of different solid/liquid separation and solids-monitoring methods used during sludge transfer for management of sluice waters.

Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Potential for criticality in Hanford tanks resulting from retrieval of tank waste  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential during retrieval operations for segregation and concentration of fissile material to result in a criticality. The sluicing retrieval of C-106 sludge to AY-102 and the operation of mixer pumps in SY-102 are examined in some detail. These two tanks (C-106, SY-102) were selected because of the near term plans for retrieval of these tanks and their high plutonium inventories relative to other tanks. Although all underground storage tanks are subcritical by a wide margin if assumed to be uniform in composition, the possibility retrieval operations could preferentially segregate the plutonium and locally concentrate it sufficiently to result in criticality was a concern. This report examines the potential for this segregation to occur.

Whyatt, G.A.; Sterne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Baseline estimate of the retained gas volume in Tank 241-C-106  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of the retained gas volume in Hanford Tank 241-C-106 (C-106) using the barometric pressure effect method. This estimate is required to establish the baseline conditions for sluicing the waste from C-106 into AY-102, scheduled to begin in the fall of 1998. The barometric pressure effect model is described, and the data reduction and detrending techniques are detailed. Based on the response of the waste level to the larger barometric pressure swings that occurred between October 27, 1997, and March 4, 1998, the best estimate and conservative (99% confidence) retained gas volumes in C-106 are 24 scm (840 scf) and 50 scm (1,770 scf), respectively. This is equivalent to average void fractions of 0.025 and 0.053, respectively.

Stewart, C.W.; Chen, G.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caustic Caustic Caustic Caustic Cleaning Cleaning for Waste for Waste Heel Heel Removal Removal WB Barton Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange May 19, 2009 Tank Operations Contract 2 I would like to acknowledge the work of Dan Herting, Heinz Huber, and the staff at the 222-S Laboratory. Without their work, this process would just be a glimmer of an idea. Tank Operations Contract 3 Contents * Background * Chemistry * History * Observations * Process * Next Steps Tank Operations Contract 4 Background * Only 1 of 5 C farm tanks has met the TPA goal for waste retrieval when they reached the "limit of the technology." * On average about 10 % of the starting volume is not retrievable with current sluicing technology. * Waste heels have similar appearance, light tan sand and

58

Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste  

SciTech Connect

A byproduct of the Purex process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste, is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant on the Hanford Site. Rheological and transport properties of NCAW slurry were evaluated. First, researchers conducted lab rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The NCAW in the tank will either be retrieved as is, i.e., no change in the concentration presently in the tank, or will be slightly concentrated before retrieval. Sluicing may be required to retrieve the solids. Three concentrations of simulated NCAW were evaluated that would simulate the different retrieval options: NCAW in the concentration that is presently in the tank; a slightly concentrated NCAW, called NCAW5.5; and equal parts of NCAW settled solids and water (simulating the sluicing stage), called NCAW1:1. The physical and rheological properties of three samples of each concentration at 25 and 100/sup 0/C were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCAW and NCAW5.5 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. NCAW1:1 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C displayed properties of a yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The classical non-Newtonian models for pseudoplastic and yield-pseudoplastic fluids were used with the laboratory data to predict the full-scale pump-pipe network parameters.

Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Outfall Site and Type Selection for a New Surface Flow Outlet to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site near the downstream tip of Cascades Island with a mid-level chute outfall type was selected for the high flow (> 28.3 m3/s) outfall of the new surface flow outlet for juvenile salmonids at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse (B2). The new passage route and outfall are a result of modifications to the original ice and trash sluice chute to increase discharge capacity and improve passage conditions, including a new outfall type and site. Technical guidelines on high flow outfall location and design were established concurrently with the outfall development process. Critical design parameters for the new B2 outfall included discharge of 150 m3/s, jet entry velocities approaching 15.2 m/s, and a tailwater elevation range of 6.1 m. For outfall siting, the selection process began with identification of nine initial alternatives. Screening, evaluation, and selection stages narrowed the list to two outfall sites – “Range D” 122 m directly downstream from the existing sluice chute outfall and “Range F” 760 m downstream near the end of Cascades Island. For outfall type, the selection process was initiated with conceptualization of 13 alternatives. Following successive screening, evaluation, consolidation, and selection stages, two outfall types became finalists – “Adjustable Cantilever” and “Mid-Level Cantilever.” The four combinations of outfall site/type were evaluated in 1:30 and 1:100 scale physical hydraulic models and a Mid-Level Cantilever at the tip of Cascades Island in Range F was selected. During further engineering after our study, the cantilever was replaced with a monolith structure to reduce construction costs, resulting in a mid-level chute outfall that was installed in 2004. Post-construction evaluations indicated survival rates around 100% through the B2CC were the highest of all passage routes at Bonneville Dam. The B2CC surface flow outlet with its high flow outfall provided a major improvement to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Kuhn, Karen; Lee, Randall T.; Plump, John H.; Stensby, David A.; Sweeney, Charles E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "686-g l-lake sluice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Calculation note: project W-320 primary ventilation air flowrequirements for mitigation of steady state flammable gasconcentrations in the headspaces of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This calculation note analyzes headspace concentrations of hydrogen dependent upon assumed ventilation flow rates provided for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The analyses are based on measured or estimated steady state hydrogen release rates. Tank 241-C-106 is analyzed prior to sluicing; tank 241-AY-102 is analyzed both prior to and after completion of sluicing. Specific analyses, using both best estimated and bounding hydrogen generation rates, include the minimum primary ventilation flow rates required in the tanks to ensure that the steady state hydrogen concentration in the respective tank headspace does not exceed 25% and 100% of the LFL. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of time as well as the time required to reach 25% and 100% of LFL upon complete loss of active ventilation, starting from the steady state hydrogen concentration based on a 200 CFM minimum flow rate in tank 241-C-106 and a 100 CFM minimum flow rate in tank241-AY-102. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of thee following partial loss of active ventilation (i.e., step changes to l60, l20, 80, and 40 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-C-106, staffing from a 200 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 200 CFM flow rate. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of the following partial loss of active ventilation i.e., step changes to 80, 60, 40, and 20 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-AY-102, starting from a 100 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 100 CFM flow rate.

Estey, S.D.

1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

CONNER, J.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tank Waste Retrieval Lessons Learned at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60 percent of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring this waste to the DST system. Retrieval of SST salt-cake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. Regulatory requirements for SST waste retrieval and tank farm closure are established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), better known as the Tri- Party Agreement, or TPA. The HFFACO was signed by the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and requires retrieval of as much waste as technically possible, with waste residues not to exceed 360 ft{sup 3} in 530,000 gallon or larger tanks; 30 ft{sup 3} in 55,000 gallon or smaller tanks; or the limit of waste retrieval technology, whichever is less. If residual waste volume requirements cannot be achieved, then HFFACO Appendix H provisions can be invoked to request Ecology and EPA approval of an exception to the waste retrieval criteria for a specific tank. Tank waste retrieval has been conducted at the Hanford Site over the last few decades using a method referred to as Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing. Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing employs large volumes of DST supernatant and water to dislodge, dissolve, mobilize, and retrieve tank waste. Concern over the leak integrity of SSTs resulted in the need for tank waste retrieval methods capable of using smaller volumes of liquid in a more controlled manner. Retrieval of SST waste in accordance with HFFACO requirements was initiated at the Hanford Site in April 2003. New and innovative tank waste retrieval methods that minimize and control the use of liquids are being implemented for the first time. These tank waste retrieval methods replace Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing and employ modified sluicing, vacuum retrieval, and in-tank vehicle techniques. Waste retrieval has been completed in seven Hanford Site SSTs (C-106, C-103, C-201, C-202, C-203, C-204, and S-112) in accordance with HFFACO requirements. Three additional tanks are currently in the process of being retrieved (C-108, C-109 and S-102) Preparation for retrieval of two additional SSTs (C-104 and C-110) is ongoing with retrieval operations forecasted to start in calendar year 2008. Tank C-106 was retrieved to a residual waste volume of 470 ft{sup 3} using oxalic acid dissolution and modified sluicing. An Appendix H exception request for Tank C-106 is undergoing review. Tank C-103 was retrieved to a residual volume of 351 ft{sup 3} using a modified sluicing technology. This approach was successful at reaching the TPA limits for this tank of less than 360 ft{sup 3}and the limits of the technology. Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204 are smaller (55,000 gallon) tanks and waste removal was completed in accordance with HFFACO requirements using a vacuum retrieval system. Residual waste volumes in each of these four tanks were less than 25 ft{sup 3}. Tank S-112 retrieval was completed February 28, 2007, meeting the TPA Limits of less than

Dodd, R.A. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., Richland, Washington (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Gunite and Associated Tanks Waste Conditioning System: Description and Operational Summary  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe and document the function, operational performance, problems encountered, lessons-learned, and overall assessment of the performance of the waste conditioning system (WCS) in the Gunite{trademark} and Associated Tanks (GAAT) remediation project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The GAAT are located in the main plant area of ORNL in the North and South Tank Farms. These tanks were constructed in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. Each tank in the South Tank Farm (STF) has a 50-ft inside diameter and a capacity of {approx}170,000 gal. Each Gunite tank in the North Tank Farm (NTF) has a 25-ft inside diameter with a capacity of {approx}44,000 gal. The GAAT were designed to receive radioactive and chemical wastes from ORNL processes. The tanks were constructed of Gunite, which is created by pneumatically spraying concrete over a wire mesh. Following construction, the site was backfilled so the domes of the tanks were covered with {approx}6 ft of earth. The STF tanks (W-5, -6, -7, -8, -9, and -10) are set in a 2 x 3 array with an east-west axis. The two GAAT in the NTF are on the north side of Central Avenue, and the STF is across the street. One additional Gunite tank, TH-4, is located {approx}300 ft east of the STF. TH-4 is a smaller, 20-ft inside diameter tank with a capacity of {approx}14,000 gal. Approximately 90% of the sludge inventory was removed from the STF tanks during a sluicing campaign in 1982-84 (Autry et al., 1990). Over 95% of the residual from the original sluicing was removed during the GAAT Remediation Project of 1997-2000. The NTF and STF tanks, as well as tank TH-4 were remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) with regulatory oversight by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

Emison, JA

2002-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

MHK Technologies/Severn Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Severn Barrage Severn Barrage < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Severn Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Severn Barrage is a proposed tidal power station to be built across the Bristol Channel Severn Estuary Along the length of the Severn Barrage open sluice gates would allow the tide to flow in These gates would then be closed at high tide trapping enormous quantities of water behind the barrage A total of 214 40MW turbines would be built into the barrage through which the trapped water would return at high pressure when the tide turns generating electricity In order to permit shipping to pass through the barrage an enormous set of shipping locks would be constructed The tidal turbines along the barrage would generate the same amount of electricity as three of the latest nuclear power stations 8 6 GW during flow and 2 GW on average This would be sufficient to provide 5 6 of the current electricity usage of England and Wales equivalent to 8 large coal fired power stations

66

Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

Bowman, T.J.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many ({approximately}25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval.

Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EIS-0268-Figures-1997.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOFJ'EIS-0268 DOFJ'EIS-0268 - PKw.2F Figure 4-L L-Lake and environs. 4-3 -- =----- 90 --m--- -m- EAST o (C.nti""ed O"figure 4.4b) AA 320 1 300 1 Fourmile Indian Grave Upland Pen Branch Brench Formation Branch 280 ~ 280 240 : E -220 ~ L 200 180 I 160 140 1 I I 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Legend: _ _ Inferredcontact Note:TO converito kilometersmultiply by 1.609 to convetito metersmultiply by0.304e Figure 4-4a. Generalized geologic cross section from Fourmile Branch to L DO~IS-0268 I t" 1 I I t 4-8 DOE/EIS-0268 I 4-60 I t t i I I DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,. 4-61 DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,,.':, .. ,.. , 4-62 I 1 I I I DOE/EIS-0268 4-63 DOEI'EIS-0268 ., . . 4-64 I I 1 B I I I m 1 I I I I 1 I I I m I DOE~IS-0268 4-65 DO~IS-0268 Radon in homes: 200 millirem per year Notes me major contributor to the annual average individual dose in the United StaIeS, [ncluti"g residents of the Central Savannah River Area, is naturally occuning radiation

70

Bald and Golden Eagles of the SRP. (Annual report, 1986)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both Bald and Golden Eagles have a prior history of occurrence on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Sightings of Bald Eagles have been uncommon but persistent, while Golden Eagle sightings have been rare. A one-year survey was conducted to assess the use of the SRP by these two species. Thirty-six Bald Eagles were seen during the study period. No Golden Eagles were observed. Over 90% of the Bald Eagle sightings were on Par Pond; three out of four of these birds were adults. Thirteen percent of the sightings were of paired birds, and the remainder were of solitary individuals. Bald Eagles were observed during every month of the survey. The majority were seen between November and May. Sightings were evenly divided between morning and afternoon hours. Two marked Bald Eagles were observed. Since the conclusion of this study, twenty-two Bald Eagles have been reported. Six were new locality records for the SRP. Four of these sightings were on L-Lake. Bald Eagle use of the SRP is higher than was previously thought; Golden Eagle use remains rare.

Mayer, J.J.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kennamer, R.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Soil processes and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum (PG) is an acidic by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry, and is produced in large quantities by the wet phosphoric acid process. Most PG is sluiced out to repositories, forming large stockpiles. Phosphogypsum is composed mainly of gypsum (Ca-SO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O), but contains impurities of environmental concern such as F{sup -}, acids, trace elements, and naturally occurring radionuclides, which originate from the phosphate rock used in processing. Possible movement of these impurities into groundwater is an issue. {sup 226}Radium is the major source of radioactivity in PG produced from sedimentary phosphate rock. Few studies have addressed the leachability of {sup 226}Ra because solid solutions of Ra, Ba, and Sr are very insoluble. The objective of this study was to investigate the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, Ba and Sr in leachate generated from PG produced from Togo phosphate rock. Phosphogypsum was extracted 30 times with deionized distilled (d.d.) H{sub 2}O over 30 d. Extractable {sup 226}Ra was maximal (0.55 Bq L{sup -1}) and Day 30 Minimum extractable {sup 226}RA (0.23 Bq L{sup -1}) occurred on the Day 30 extraction but still exceeded the current U.S. drinking water standard. Solid phase {sup 226}Ra increased between Day 0 (850 Bq kg{sup -1}) and DAy 30 (1120 Bq kg{sup -1}). The {sup 226}Ra/Ba ratios in the solid phase and in the extractable liquid phase very nearly equal over the last half of the extraction period. If this relationship holds for other PGs, then solution {sup 226}Ra activities can be estimated if solid-phase {sup 226}Ra/Ba ratios are known and Ba solution concentrations are known or estimated. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Rutherford, P.M.; Dudas, M.J.; Arocena, J.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2  

SciTech Connect

The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

Lewis, BE

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Outfall Site and Type Selection for a New Surface Flow Outlet to Pass Juvenile Fish at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site near the downstream tip of Cascades Island and a mid-level cantilever outfall type were selected for the high flow outfall of the new surface flow juvenile fish bypass at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse. The new bypass will be a modification of the existing ice and trash sluice chute, which discharges into the tailrace with jet impact on the bottom near a shoreline that predators inhabit. Thus, a new site and type are necessary for this high flow (> 28.3 m3/s) outfall. Technical guidelines on high flow outfall location and design were established and applied during the outfall development process. Critical design parameters included discharge at 150 m3/s, entry velocities approaching 15.2 m/s, and tailwater elevation range of 6.1 m. For outfall siting, the selection process began with identification of nine initial alternatives. Screening, evaluation, and selection stages narrowed the list to two sites – “Range D” 121.9 m straight downstream from the existing outfall and “Range F” 760 m downstream near the tip of Cascades Island. For outfall type, the selection process was initiated with conceptualization of 13 alternatives. During successive screening, evaluation, consolidation, and selection stages, professional judgment and quantitative comparisons were used to select two finalists – “Adjustable Cantilever” and “Mid-Level Cantilever.” The four combinations of outfall site/type were evaluated in 1:30 and 1:100 scale physical hydraulic models. The process resulted in selection of a mid-level cantilever with plunge pool at the tip of Cascades Island. The system is scheduled for completion in March 2004.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ebberts, Blaine; Giorgi, Albert E.; Kuhn, Karen; Lee, Randy; Plump, John H.; Stensby, David A.; Sweeney, Charles E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Synthesis of Juvenile Salmonid Passage Studies at The Dalles Dam, Volume II, 2001-05  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines – with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. Since the review by Ploskey et al. (2001a) of research during 1982-2000 at The Dalles Dam, the Corps funded over $20M of research in at least 39 studies during 2001-2006. The purpose of the current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2006. The data we synthesize comes from numerous research techniques employed to address particular study objectives at The Dalles Dam. The suite of techniques includes acoustic and radio telemetry, acoustic cameras, acoustic Doppler current profilers, balloon tags, computational fluid dynamics models, drogues, fixed and mobile hydroacoustics, fyke nets, physical scale models, PIT-tags, sensor fish, sonar trackers, and underwater video. Hydraulic data involves flow patterns and water velocities. Biological data involve forebay approach paths and residence times, horizontal and diel distributions, passage efficiencies and effectiveness, fish behaviors, tailrace egress and predation rates, and route-specific and total project survival rates. Data for 2001-2006 are synthesized in this report to provide, in conjunction with Ploskey et al. (2001a), resources for engineers, biologists, and dam operators to use when making decisions about fish protection measures for juvenile salmonids at The Dalles Dam. This review covers the major fish passage research efforts during 2001-2006 and includes sections on the Environmental Setting, Forebay and Project Passage Studies, Spill Studies, Sluiceway Studies, Turbine Studies, Smolt Survival Studies, and a Discussion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Beeman, John W.; Duran, Ian; Puls, Andrew

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2  

SciTech Connect

The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435,000 below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

Lewis, BE

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characterization engineering status report october 1998 - december 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Characterization Engineering (CE) continues to make progress in support of the project goal of characterizing the Hanford high-level waste tanks. Two core sampling systems were operational during this reporting period-push mode core sampling system No. 1 and rotary mode core sampling system No. 4. The availability average for core sampling systems No. 1 , No. 3 and No. 4, combined, was 45 percent, down from 79percent for the previous quarter and 58 percent for FY 1998. System No. 2 did not have scope during the quarter, and availability was not hacked. System No. 3 was out of service the entire quarter for corrective maintenance. Two tanks were core sampled during the reporting period, and 24 samples were retrieved. Core sample recovery increased slightly during the quarter. System No. 1 average sample recovery increased from 80percent to 81 percent, The rotary mode core sampling average recovery increased to 62 percent from 55 percent for the previous quarter. sampling six tanks, one more than scheduled. Vapor Sampling was utilized in support of the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 and for emissions monitoring of three exhaust stacks. Increased support was provided for Vapor Sampling the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. The sampling was necessary due to freezing problems with the field-installed systems. Preparations are continuing for the Light-Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) deployment with configuration and minor hardware upgrades. The LDUA Operational Readiness Review continues. The oversight of the Nested, Fixed-Depth Sampler system development has started to increase in order to ensure that a usable system is received when the project is completed. To improve configuration control, 92 drawing sheet revisions were completed along with the generation of nine new drawing sheets. The number of outstanding Engineering Change Notices increased slightly because of the addition of more drawings into the project. continues to develop. Organizational responsibilities are being identified and documented as well as the scope and deliverables. Finishing Plant was completed, and the final reviews to authorize starting work have begun. Significant progress was made in other areas as well. Grab Sampling completed The stewardship of the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal equipment The engineering and work planning for opening tank 241-2361 at the Plutonium.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, both insoluble (principally hydrogen) and soluble (principally ammonia), posing a number of safety concerns (Peurrung et al. 1997; Meader 1996).

J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "686-g l-lake sluice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-104  

SciTech Connect

This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste contained in underground storage tank 241-BY-104. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09. Tank 241-BY-104 is one of 12 single-shell tanks located in the BY-Tank Farm in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Tank 241-BY-104 entered service in the first quarter of 1950 with a transfer of metal waste from an unknown source. Through cascading, the tank was full of metal waste by the second quarter of 1951. The waste was sluiced in the second quarter of 1954. Uranium recovery (tributyl phosphate) waste was sent from tank 241-BY-107 during the second quarter of 1955 and from tank 241-BY-110 during the third quarter of 1955. Most of this waste was sent to a crib during the fourth quarter of 1955. During the third and fourth quarters of 1956 and the second and third quarters of 1957, the tank received waste from the in-plant ferrocyanide scavenging process (PFeCN2) from tanks 241-BY-106, -107, -108, and -110. This waste type is predicted to compose the bottom layer of waste currently in the tank. The tank received PUREX cladding waste (CWP) periodically from 1961 to 1968. Ion-exchange waste from cesium recovery operations was received from tank 241-BX-104 during the second and third quarters of 1968. Tank 241-BY-104 received evaporator bottoms waste from the in-tank solidification process that was conducted in the BY-Tank Farm 0247from tanks 241 -BY- 109 and 241 -BY- 1 12 from 1970 to 1974. The upper portion of tank waste is predicted to be composed of BY saltcake. Tank 241-BY-104 was declared inactive in 1977. Waste was saltwell pumped from the tank during the third quarter of 1982 and the fourth quarter of 1985. Table ES-1 and Figure ES-1 describe tank 241-BY-104 and its status. The tank has an operating capacity of 2,869 kL and presently contains an estimated 1,234 kL of noncomplexed waste. Of this total volume, 568 kL are estimated to be sludge and 666 kL are estimated to be saltcake. The Hanlon values are not used because they are inconsistent with waste surface level measurements, and they will not be updated until the tank level stabilizes and the new surface photos are taken. This report summarizes the collection and analysis of two rotary-mode core samples obtained in October and November 1995 and reported in the Final Report for Tank 241-BY-104, Rotary Mode Cores 116 and 117. Cores 116 and 117 were obtained from risers 5 and IIA, respectively. The sampling event was performed to satisfy the requirements listed in the following documents: Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective , Data Requirements for the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue Developed through the Data Quality Objective Process, Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Fuel Rich Tank Safety Issue, Test Plan for Samples from Hanford Waste Tanks 241-BY-103, BY-104, BY-105, BY-106, BY-108, BY-110, YY-103, U-105, U-107, U-108, and U-109.

Benar, C.J.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) had an outstanding year. The most significant accomplishments that occurred throughout fiscal year (FY) 2000 include the following: On April 24,2000, DOE ORP received BNFL Inc. B-1 deliverables and CHG completed Phase 1 Part B-2 Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP), to demonstrate the ability to provide waste feed to be treated/stored in a long-term disposal facility. The RTP consisted of key enabling assumptions, critical risks, waste handling actions, financial and schedule risk analysis, staffing plans, a project execution plan, and a resource loaded schedule. The Department determined that the BNFL Inc. proposal was unacceptable in many areas and essentially shifted the financial risk from BNFL Inc. back to the Federal government; thus a key benefit of privatization was lost. On May 8,2000, the Secretary announced that the privatization contract be terminated. In the interim, the Department directed the onsite Tank Farm Contractor, CHG, to continue the design work scope for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant until a new waste treatment contract is awarded. DOE ORP released its request for proposals (RFP) for a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization contractor on August 31,2000 and is on schedule to meet award of the contract by January 15,2000. CHG successfully reached 1,000,000 safe work hours without a lost workday injury or illness on Wednesday, September 23,2000. The record was initiated on May 23,2000 and took 114 days to achieve. All Tri-Party Agreement and Consent Decree milestones scheduled for the fiscal year were completed. Along with meeting all enforceable agreement milestones, nineteen out of twenty Performance Incentives (PIS) were successfully completed. The 20 PIS comprised of 114 specific deliverables, of which 107 were met. In addition to the 20 scheduled PIS, six accelerated activities were completed. Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen generation was successfully mitigated this fiscal year, including a series of transfers and back-dilutions that remediated the flammable gas hazards and closed the surface level growth Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) associated with the tank. CHG transitioned from the Basis for Interim Operation to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) in October 1999. The High Heat Safety Issue on tank 241-C-106 was resolved, including the removal of the tank from the watch list. Several cross-site waste transfers were completed to support saltwell pumping efforts. In addition, Evaporator Campaign 00-1 began in April 2000, resulting in an estimated waste volume reduction of 600,000 gallons. Final sluicing operations of tank 241-C-106 were completed on October 6, 1999. The sludge recovery goal of 95 percent was exceeded. The total sludge transfer from tank 241-C-106 to 241-AY-102 was 67.8 inches (186,500 gallons). The successful test of the AZ-101 mixer pump was completed, proving that CHG has the technology necessary to retrieve tank waste for treatment. Approval of the Notice of Construction (NOC) for the AN Farm tank retrieval system was received from the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency on July 21,2000. This is a significant step forward for Project W-211, ''Initial Tank Retrieval Systems'' in preparing waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant.

WAGNILD, K.J.

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

WRPS MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is the Hanford tank operations contractor, charged with managing one of the most challenging environmental cleanup projects in the nation. The U.S. Department of Energy hired WRPS to manage 56 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The waste is the legacy of 45 years of plutonium production for the U. S. nuclear arsenal. WRPS mission is three-fold: safely manage the waste until it can be processed and immobilized; develop the tools and techniques to retrieve the waste from the tanks, and build the infrastructure needed to deliver the waste to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) when it begins operating. WTP will 'vitrify' the waste by mixing it with silica and other materials and heating it in an electric melter. Vitrification turns the waste into a sturdy glass that will isolate the radioactivity from the environment. It will take more than 20 years to process all the tank waste. The tank waste is a complex highly radioactive mixture of liquid, sludge and solids. The radioactivity, chemical composition of the waste and the limited access to the underground storage tanks makes retrieval a challenge. Waste is being retrieved from aging single-shell tanks and transferred to newer, safer double-shell tanks. WRPS is using a new technology known as enhanced-reach sluicing to remove waste. A high-pressure stream of liquid is sprayed at 100 gallons per minute through a telescoping arm onto a hard waste layer several inches thick covering the waste. The waste is broken up, moved to a central pump suction and removed from the tank. The innovative Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) is also being used to retrieve waste. MARS is a remotely operated, telescoping arm installed on a mast in the center of the tank. It uses multiple technologies to scrape, scour and rake the waste toward a pump for removal. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) provided nearly $326 million over two-and-a-half years to modernize the infrastructure in Hanford's tank farms. WRPS issued 850 subcontracts totaling more than $152 million with nearly 76 percent of that total awarded to small businesses. WRPS used the funding to upgrade tank farm infrastructure, develop technologies to retrieve and consolidate tank waste and extend the life of two critical operating facilities needed to feed waste to the WTP. The 222-S Laboratory analyzes waste to support waste retrievals and transfers. The laboratory was upgraded to support future WTP operations with a new computer system, new analytical equipment, a new office building and a new climate-controlled warehouse. The 242-A Evaporator was upgraded with a control-room simulator for operator training and several upgrades to aging equipment. The facility is used to remove liquid from the tank waste, creating additional storage space, necessary for continued waste retrievals and WTP operation. The One System Integrated Project Team is ajoint effort ofWRPS and Bechtel National to identify and resolve common issues associated with commissioning, feeding and operating the Waste Treatment Plant. Two new facilities are being designed to support WTP hot commlsslomng. The Interim Hanford Storage project is planned to store canisters of immobilized high-level radioactive waste glass produced by the vitrification plant. The facility will use open racks to store the 15-foot long, two-foot diameter canisters of waste, which require remote handling. The Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Project is a major upgrade to the existing Effluent Treatment Facility at Hanford so it can treat about 10 million gallons of liquid radioactive and hazardous effluent a year from the vitrification plant. The One System approach brings the staff of both companies together to identify and resolve WTP safety issues. A questioning attitude is encouraged and an open forum is maintained for employees to raise issues. WRPS is completing its mission safely with record-setting safety performance. Since WRPS took over the Hanford Tank Operations Contract in October 2

BRITTON JC

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z