National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 4b slab floors

  1. Modelling heated composite floor slabs with reference to the Cardington experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillie, Martin; Usmani, Asif; Rotter, J Michael

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a method of modelling composite floor slabs in fire conditions using a stress-resultant approach. The FEAST suite, which consists of two main computer programs is described. The first, SRAS, is designed ...

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  3. Residential Slab-On-Grade Heat Transfer in Hot Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E.; Ascolese, M.; Collins, W.

    1989-01-01

    Heat transfer through an uninsulated slab on grade is calculated using a simple method developed by Kusuda. The seasonal and annual slab loads are graphed as a function of annual average soil temperature, Tm, for a variety of floor system...

  4. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  5. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Whitehall, PA); DeZubay, Egon A. (Mt. Lebanon, PA); Murray, Alexander P. (Murrysville, PA); Vidt, Edward J. (Churchill, PA)

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  6. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Whitehall, PA); DeZubay, Egon A. (Mt. Lebanon, PA); Murray, Alexander P. (Murrysville, PA); Vidt, Edward J. (Churchill, PA)

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  7. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  8. 4B Drawings - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4B Drawings 4B Chamber 4B Mounting

  9. First Floor1 Second Floor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Resource Center Financial Counseling & Infusion Center Scheduling Lactation Room Meditation Garden Infusion Center Clinical Lab Waiting Playground Registration Infusion Center Waiting Second Floor Research Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Conference Room 2250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Financial Counseling & Infusion

  10. Microalloy Precipitation in Hot Charged Slabs , J.G. Speer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    Microalloy Precipitation in Hot Charged Slabs M.S. Dyer1 , J.G. Speer1 , D. K. Matlock1 , A. J. Shutts2 , S. Jansto3 , K. Xu4 , B.G. Thomas4 1 Myra S. Dyer, John G. Speer, David K. Matlock The George S

  11. NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-4B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Letter: NAP-4B Date: June 30,2008 TITLE: Corporate Performance Evaluation Process for M&O Contractors I. OBJECTIVE: To establish and implement a uniform, corporate process...

  12. LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level 2 Lower building Rm.2350 1393 WESTERN ROAD N6G -1G9 UPDATE DRAWN #12;LEVEL 02 FLOOR LEVEL 2 / SECOND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY

  13. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST): In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents a set of idealized in-depth diagnostic test cases for use in validating ground-coupled floor slab heat transfer models. These test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST.

  14. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D.; Giltrud, M.E.; Luk, V.K.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  15. Development of a Leave-in-Place Slab Edge Insulating Form System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Hoeschele; Eric Lee

    2009-08-31

    Concrete slabs represent the primary foundation type in residential buildings in the fast-growing markets throughout the southern and southwestern United States. Nearly 75% of the 2005 U.S. population growth occurred in these southern tier states. Virtually all of these homes have uninsulated slab perimeters that transfer a small, but steady, flow of heat from conditioned space to outdoors during the heating season. It is estimated that new home foundations constructed each year add 0.016 quads annually to U.S. national energy consumption; we project that roughly one quarter of this amount can be attributed to heat loss through the slab edge and the remaining three quarters to deep ground transfers, depending upon climate. With rising concern over national energy use and the impact of greenhouse gas emissions, it is becoming increasingly imperative that all cost-effective efforts to improve building energy efficiency be implemented. Unlike other building envelope components that have experienced efficiency improvements over the years, slab edge heat loss has largely been overlooked. From our vantage point, a marketable slab edge insulation system would offer significant benefits to homeowners, builders, and the society as a whole. Conventional slab forming involves the process of digging foundation trenches and setting forms prior to the concrete pour. Conventional wood form boards (usually 2 x 10's) are supported by vertical stakes on the outer form board surface, and by supporting 'kickers' driven diagonally from the top of the form board into soil outside the trench. Typically, 2 x 10's can be used only twice before they become waste material, contributing to an additional 400 pounds of construction waste per house. Removal of the form boards and stakes also requires a follow-up trip to the jobsite by the concrete subcontractor and handling (storage/disposal) of the used boards. In the rare cases where the slab is insulated (typically custom homes with radiant floor heating), the most practical insulation strategy is to secure rigid foam insulation, such as Dow Styrofoam{trademark}, to the inside of the wooden slab edge forms. An alternative is to clad insulation to the perimeter of the slab after the slab has been poured and cured. In either case, the foam must have a 'termite strip' that prevents termites from creating hidden tunnels through or behind the foam on their way to the wall framing above. Frequently this termite strip is a piece of sheet metal that must be fabricated for each project. The above-grade portion of the insulation also needs to be coated for appearance and to prevent damage from construction and UV degradation. All these steps add time, complexity, and expense to the insulating process.

  16. Fracture of solid state laser slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    Fracture due to thermal stress limits the power output potential of modern, high average power slab lasers. Here the criteria for slab fracture and the nature of the surface flaws which constitute the strength-controlling defects are reviewed. Specific fracture data for gadolinium scandium gallium garnet and LHG-5 phosphate glass with different surface finishes are evaluated in the context of assigning appropriate slab operating parameters using Wiebull statistics. These examples illustrate both the danger of design using brittle components without adequate fracture testing, and the inadequacy of design methods which use a fixed safety factor, for this class of materials. Further consideration reveals that operation of slab lasers in contact with an aqueous coolant may lead to strength degradation with time. Finally, the evolution of the failure process in which a characteristic midplane crack forms is outlined, and the pertinent parameters for avoiding slab fracture are identified.

  17. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce (Beverly Hills, MI); Blessing, Leonard J. (Rochester, MI)

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  18. MCNP4B modeling of pebble-bed reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebenhaft, Julian R. (Julian Robert), 1954-

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B to the neutronic modeling of pebblebed reactors was investigated. A modeling methodology was developed based on an analysis of critical experiments carried out at the ...

  19. MCNP4B Modeling of Pebble-Bed Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebenhaft, Julian Robert

    2001-10-15

    The applicability of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B to the neutronic modeling of pebble-bed reactors was investigated. A modeling methodology was developed based on an analysis of critical experiments carried out at the ...

  20. NON-DESTRUCTIVE DETERMINATION OF SERVICEABILITY AND LOAD BEARING CAPACITY OF FLOOR SLABS USING DYNAMIC METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , output-only modal analysis, Frequency Domain Decomposition, system identification, model updating in this case is the verification of the serviceability and the load bearing capacity towards the certification particularly powerful. The big advantage is that the exciting forces need not to be measured. As a consequence

  1. Casimir pressure on a thin metal slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin-Slobodan Tomas; Zdravko Lenac

    2008-12-08

    We consider the vacuum-field pressure on boundaries of a metal slab in the middle of a cavity with perfectly reflecting mirrors adopting the plasma model for the metal and paying special attention to the surface plasmon polariton contribution to the pressure. We demonstrate that, with increasing cavity length, the pressure on a thin (dmetal whereas in the second case it is entirely due to the (nonretarded) surface plasmon modes supported by the free-standing thin slab. In either case the pressure decreases with the slab thickness. These considerations indicate that the vacuum-field pressure on a thin metal layer (and its modal structure) can be in a symmetric cavity significantly influenced when changing the cavity length.

  2. Technical evaluation of a solar heating system having conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    A simple innovative solar heating design (Solar Option One) using conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab was constructed. An objective of hybrid solar design is to combine the relative advantages of active and passive design approaches while minimizing their respective disadvantages. A test house using the Solar Option One heating system was experimentally monitored to determine its energy based performance during the 1982-83 heating season. The test residence is located in Lyndonville, Vermont, an area which has a characteristically cold and cloudy climate. The two story residence has a floor area of about 1400 square feet and is constructed on a 720 square foot 5.5 inch thick floor slab. A 24 inch packed gravel bed is located beneath the slab and the slab-gravel bed is insulated by two inches of polystyrene insulation. The test building is of frame construction and uses insulation levels which have become commonplace throughout the country. The structure would not fall into the superinsulated category but was tightly constructed so as to have a low infiltration level. The building is sun-tempered in that windows were concentrated somewhat on the South side and all but avoided on the North. A solar greenhouse on the South side of the building was closed off from the structure permanently throughout the testing so as to better observe the solar heating invention without confounding variables. The monitoring equipment generated an internal gain of about 17,000 BTUs per day, roughly the equivalent of occupancy by two persons. A full description of the experimental testing program is given. System efficiency and performance are reported.

  3. Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    INSULATED FLOORS E. Al-Sayed Omar Associate Research Scientist Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat, Kuwait F. Alghimlas * Research Associate Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat..., Kuwait * fghimlas@kisr.edu.kw ABSTRACT Presently in Kuwait the code of practice for energy conservation in the air conditioned buildings implemented by the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) which has been in effect since 1983 has...

  4. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA); Carrano, Anthony V. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  5. RAMONA-4B development for SBWR safety studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Aronson, A.L.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is a revolutionary design of a boiling-water reactor. The reactor is based on passive safety systems such as natural circulation, gravity flow, pressurized gas, and condensation. SBWR has no active systems, and the flow in the vessel is by natural circulation. There is a large chimney section above the core to provide a buoyancy head for natural circulation. The reactor can be shut down by either of four systems; namely, scram, Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI), and Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS). The safety injection is by gravity drain from the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Suppression Pool (SP). The heat sink is through two types of heat exchangers submerged in the tank of water. These heat exchangers are the Isolation Condenser (IC) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The RAMONA-4B code has been developed to simulate the normal operation, reactivity transients, and to address the instability issues for SBWR. The code has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics coupled to multiple parallel-channel thermal-hydraulics. The two-phase thermal hydraulics is based on a nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium drift-flux formulation. It employs an explicit integration to solve all state equations (except for neutron kinetics) in order to predict the instability without numerical damping. The objective of this project is to develop a Sun SPARC and IBM RISC 6000 based RAMONA-4B code for applications to SBWR safety analyses, in particular for stability and ATWS studies.

  6. "Order Module--DOE O 470.4B, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY PROGRAM...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    "Order Module--DOE O 470.4B, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY PROGRAM, DOE O 471.6, INFORMATION SECURITY, DOE O 473.3 "Order Module--DOE O 470.4B, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY PROGRAM, DOE O...

  7. Modeling thermal comfort with radiant floors and ceilings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    literatures related to floor heating environment in Japan.of performance of radiant floor-heating systems and a wallB.W. 2002. Radiant floor heating in theory and practice.

  8. Optimization Online - Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Goetschalckx

    2007-02-28

    Feb 28, 2007 ... ... of the facility layout problem with practical applications when the price ... provided the floor projections on the ground floor are nested starting ...

  9. Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Laila Margarita

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) ...

  10. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  11. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  12. Microchannel Cooled Edge Cladding to Establish an Adiabatic Boundary Condition in a Slab Laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Beach, Raymond J.; Solarz, Richard W.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides an edge cladding for a slab laser, the edge cladding comprising a cooling channel system therein.

  13. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    to the discovery that floor heating had been inadvertentlyDec 15-17 Chair T2-F Floor heating failed Jan 12- 16 Chairpoints for 306 3 rd floor total heating load and temperature

  14. BIOENERGY/BIOFUELS/BIOCHEMICALS Chromatographic determination of 1, 4-b-xylooligosaccharides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    BIOENERGY/BIOFUELS/BIOCHEMICALS Chromatographic determination of 1, 4-b For the majority of lignocellulosic feedstocks for produc- tion of bioethanol and other biofuels, heteroxylans activity [22] or further hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars as platform molecules for biofuels [23

  15. Slab plume interaction beneath the Pacific Northwest Mathias Obrebski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    the Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) and second, that the subducting Juan de Fuca (JdF) slab is fragmented- canic outpouring that occurred 17 Ma. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) hosts a bimodal volcanic volcanic provinces. The Columbia River Basalts (CRB, Figure 1) is the product of a phase of massive vol

  16. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of Water-Reflected Uranium Oxyfluoride Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    A series of twelve experiments were conducted in the mid 1950's at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine the critical conditions of a semi-infinite water-reflected slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). A different slab thickness was used for each experiment. Results from the twelve experiment recorded in the laboratory notebook were published in Reference 1. Seven of the twelve experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments for the inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This evaluation will not only be available to handbook users for the validation of computer codes and integral cross-section data, but also for the reevaluation of experimental data used in the ANSI/ANS-8.1 standard. This evaluation is important as part of the technical basis of the subcritical slab limits in ANSI/ANS-8.1. The original publication of the experimental results was used for the determination of bias and bias uncertainties for subcritical slab limits, as documented by Hugh Clark's paper 'Subcritical Limits for Uranium-235 Systems'.

  17. Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Dongwoo

    Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating Changjun Liu equation (HTE) is presented in this paper, and the temperature variation in a ceramic slab during microwave heating is obtained. The temperature variation in the ceramic slab during microwave heat- ing is simulated

  18. HRC floors are found in residence centers located

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robeson, Scott M.

    to sign up for housing. No matter the weather, living in an HRC means always having a warm, welcoming home friends on the HRC floors, and end up living with friends from their HRC floor when they move off campus are members of the Hutton Honors Col- lege and many live on HRC floors, but HRC res- idents know how to man

  19. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  20. The Modified Weighted Slab Technique: Models and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank C. Jones; Andrew Lukasiak; Vladimir Ptuskin; William Webber

    2000-07-19

    In an attempt to understand the source and propagation of galactic cosmic rays we have employed the Modified Weighted Slab technique along with recent values of the relevant cross sections to compute primary to secondary ratios including B/C and Sub-Fe/Fe for different galactic propagation models. The models that we have considered are the disk-halo diffusion model, the dynamical halo wind model, the turbulent diffusion model and a model with minimal reacceleration. The modified weighted slab technique will be briefly discussed and a more detailed description of the models will be given. We will also discuss the impact that the various models have on the problem of anisotropy at high energy and discuss what properties of a particular model bear on this issue.

  1. Laplace-Fourier analysis and instabilities of a gainy slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hågenvik, Hans Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The idealization of monochromatic plane waves leads to considerable simplifications in the analysis of electromagnetic systems. However, for active systems this idealization may be dangerous due to the presence of growing waves. Here we consider a gainy slab, and use a realistic incident beam, which is both causal and has finite width. This clarifies some apparent paradoxes arising from earlier analyses of this setup. In general it turns out to be necessary to involve complex frequencies $\\omega$ and/or complex transversal wavenumbers $k_x$. Simultaneously real $\\omega$ and $k_x$ cannot describe amplified waves in a slab which is infinite in the transversal direction. We also show that the only possibility to have an absolute instability for a finite width beam, is if a normally incident plane wave would experience an instability.

  2. Optical modes in slab waveguides with magnetoelectric effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talebi, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Optical modes in anisotropic slab waveguides with topological and chiral magnetoelectric effects are investigated analytically, by deriving the closed-form characteristic equations of the modes and hence computing the dispersion-diagrams. In order to compute the characteristic equations, a vector-potential approach is introduced by incorporating a generalized Lorentz gauge, and the corresponding Helmholtz equations are derived correspondingly. It will be shown that the formation of the complex modes and hybridization of the optical modes in such slab waveguides is inevitable. Moreover, when the tensorial form of the permittivity in the waveguide allows for a hyperbolic dispersion, complex transition from the photonic kinds of modes to the plasmonic modes is expected.

  3. Nonlocal microscopic theory of quantum friction between parallel metallic slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despoja, Vito

    2011-05-15

    We present a new derivation of the friction force between two metallic slabs moving with constant relative parallel velocity, based on T=0 quantum-field theory formalism. By including a fully nonlocal description of dynamically screened electron fluctuations in the slab, and avoiding the usual matching-condition procedure, we generalize previous expressions for the friction force, to which our results reduce in the local limit. Analyzing the friction force calculated in the two local models and in the nonlocal theory, we show that for physically relevant velocities local theories using the plasmon and Drude models of dielectric response are inappropriate to describe friction, which is due to excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs, which are properly included in nonlocal theory. We also show that inclusion of dissipation in the nonlocal electronic response has negligible influence on friction.

  4. Water-Moderated and -Reflected Slabs of Uranium Oxyfluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Clinton Gross

    2010-09-01

    A series of ten experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in December 1955, and January 1956, in an attempt to determine critical conditions for a slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). These experiments were recorded in an Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Logbook and results were published in a journal of the American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Science and Engineering, by J. K. Fox, L. W. Gilley, and J. H. Marable (Reference 1). The purpose of these experiments was to obtain the minimum critical thickness of an effectively infinite slab of UO2F2 solution by extrapolation of experimental data. To do this the slab thickness was varied and critical solution and water-reflector heights were measured using two different fuel solutions. Of the ten conducted experiments eight of the experiments reached critical conditions but the results of only six of the experiments were published in Reference 1. All ten experiments were evaluated from which five critical configurations were judged as acceptable criticality safety benchmarks. The total uncertainty in the acceptable benchmarks is between 0.25 and 0.33 % ?k/keff. UO2F2 fuel is also evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-043, HEU-SOL-THERM-011, and HEU-SOL-THERM-012, but these those evaluation reports are for large reflected and unreflected spheres. Aluminum cylinders of UO2F2 are evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-050.

  5. Ionospheric slab thickness in middle and low latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, K.; Liu, X.M. (NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The equivalent slab thickness of the ionosphere at 15 stations in middle and low latitudes was studied to determine its dependence on solar cycle and location. The data were grouped by season. The following are the major conclusions. There appears to be little or no geographical, or geomagnetic, dependence. The slab thickness varies approximately linearly with the 12-month smoothed values of the 10.7-cm solar radio flux. In middle latitudes the winter midnight thickness is essentially independent of the flux, whereas in summer and equinox the midnight thickness increases with increase of solar flux. The noon thickness increases with increase of solar flux in all seasons. The zero-order Fourier coeffficients for the diurnal curves at all 15 stations were expressed as linear functions of the 10.7-cm flux. The higher harmonic coefficients showed no appreciable dependence on solar flux. The pronounced predawn increase in slab thickness is caused by low values of the maximum electron density, not by increase of total electron content. 10 refs.

  6. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  7. Analysis of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor using the code Ramona-4B 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuevas Vivas, Gabriel Francisco

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBVVR) is carried out through the use of the reactor analysis code RAMONA-4B in a scenario of an operational transient, a turbine trip with failure of all the bypass valves. This study is divided...

  8. CUL4B-mediatedERdegradationcontributes to dioxin's action as an endocrine disruptor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    CUL4B-mediatedERdegradationcontributes to dioxin's action as an endocrine disruptor. Ohtakeetal.alsoexaminedtheabundanceof ERandARinthereproductivetissuesofhor- mone-depleted mice lacking AhR and treated with dioxins and/or steroid hormones. In the absenceofAhR,highlevelsofARandERwere insensitive to dioxins, and Ah

  9. Building Area Location Grant 3rd Floor Hallway Outside of S304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Building Area Location Grant 3rd Floor Hallway Outside of S304 Grant 2nd Floor Room S274 Grant 2nd Floor Mailroom A246 (Next to S299) Alway 3rd Floor End of Hallway (By Recycling Bins) Lane Library 1st Beckman Center 3rd Floor Mail / Recycling Area Beckman Center 4th Floor Room B432 Hagey PSRL 1st Floor

  10. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Where to insulate. Adding insulation in the areas shown here may be...

  11. Construction and Preliminary HVS Tests of Pre-Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohler, Erwin R.; du Plessis, Louw; Theyse, Hechter

    2008-01-01

    and Scheffy, C. (2003). “Construction and Test Results fromand Ali, A. (2006). “Construction and Test Results on Dowelthe completed CTB prior to construction of the Super-Slab ®

  12. The circular loop antenna over a lossy dielectric slab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overly, Michael Robert

    1984-01-01

    antenna above a lossy dielectric slab has applicat1ons in undergraound communications/direction find1ng and in the hyperthermic treatment of cancer tumors. Integral equations are derived through the enforcement of boundary conditions at the material... tumor's temperature: lavaersion in a heated liqu1d, irradiation with ultrason1c waves, and the use of perspiration-prevent1ng garments. It is a fact [6]-[9] that the environment inside a tumor enhances its susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects...

  13. Second-harmonic generation from hyperbolic plasmonic nanorod metamaterial slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, Giuseppe; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ginzburg, Pavel; Olivier, Nicolas; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic plasmonic metamaterials provide numerous opportunities for designing unusual linear and nonlinear optical properties. We show that the modal overlap of fundamental and second-harmonic light in an anisotropic plasmonic metamaterial slab results in the broadband enhancement of radiated second-harmonic intensity by up to 2 and 11 orders of magnitudes for TM- and TE-polarized fundamental light, respectively, compared to a smooth Au film under TM-polarised illumination. The results open up possibilities to design tuneable frequency-doubling metamaterial with the goal to overcome limitations associated with classical phase matching conditions in thick nonlinear crystals.

  14. An analysis of periodic heat flow through a plane slab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Daniel Morgan

    1958-01-01

    = heat ener;;y ter perature temperature at end o" time interval w8 nor~el distance from the surface in contact t. ~ith the fluid mhose te", . perature va~ies time prefix, a finite increment densit~J of the slab Sbs '* the fluid. v... INT. HiICH GLIC"' Zigure 2 The al. ;, ebra'c e-lressions for calculating7 the amount of ener'-y er terin;. = an7 interior slice through eaca of its l&oundaries during a finite time interval nQ and. the con- sequent change in energy content...

  15. UCSF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EAP Floor Warden Duties Pamela Roskowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    followed Retrieve emergency bag and put on Floor Warden ID vest and hard hat Observe any hazardous or Emergency Responders with status report of condition of assigned floor. Include the last known locations of any injuries, deaths, trapped or missing persons, fires, hazardous materials spills, utility failures

  16. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    into helical magnetic islands. Such islands de- grade plasma confinement because heat and particles are ableTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity R Phys. Plasmas 12, 122308 (2005); 10.1063/1.2141928 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry

  17. Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

  18. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Bauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor

  19. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    7] B. Borresen, Floor heating and cooling of an atrium, in:thermal performance of floor heating systems, Solar Energy,discussed this issue for floor heating, but not cooling.

  20. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, in, 2012. [15] F.Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design. Proceedings ofof radiant floor cooling systems and their associated air

  1. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  2. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01) (NotAdvanced70.4B Chg 1 1 2-15-2013

  3. The flow in an under-floor plenum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jun Myoung

    2009-01-01

    forced convection dominant flow. REFERENCES Bauman F. , HuiOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO The Flow in an Under-Floor Plenum A10 3 THE EFFECT OF FLOW RATE AND PLENUM DEPTH…………………15

  4. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franek, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, The School of Business Administration in Karvina, Univerzitni nam. 1934, Karvina (Czech Republic); Kavicka, Frantisek; Stetina, Josef [Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); Masarik, Milos [EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel, a.s. (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  5. Calculations of modal characteristics of dielectric slab waveguides by a hybrid method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Eddie Tze-Chung

    1985-01-01

    ) To transform Eq. (3 9) into a, variationa1 problem, the variation of g~(x), 6g~(z), is multiplied to Eq. (3. 9) and then integrated across the ent, ire thickness of the slab waveguide to obtain f OO d2 6g (z)( ? g (z)l ~ 6g?(x)~k ? k Ig (z)dz dzz rd d2... waveguide. 6. Arrangement of triangular basis functions 7. Field distribution in the guide region of a slab waveguide. 8. A slab waveguide (a) with graded index profile (b). 9. Approximation of an index profile by a series of step functions. 10. A...

  6. Generation of terahertz radiation from a low-density plasma slab irradiated by a laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-15

    The generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation when a laser pulse propagates through a low-density plasma slab is considered. It is shown that terahertz waves are excited because of the growth of a weakly damped, antisymmetric leaking mode of the plasma slab. The spectral, angular, and energy parameters of the terahertz radiation are investigated, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of the emitted waves. It is demonstrated that terahertz electromagnetic wave fields are generated most efficiently when the pulse length is comparable to the slab thickness.

  7. Infinite slabs and other weird plane symmetric space-times with constant positive density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo E. Gamboa Saravi

    2007-09-20

    We present the exact solution of Einstein's equation corresponding to a static and plane symmetric distribution of matter with constant positive density located below $z=0$. This solution depends essentially on two constants: the density $\\rho$ and a parameter $\\kappa$. We show that this space-time finishes down below at an inner singularity at finite depth. We match this solution to the vacuum one and compute the external gravitational field in terms of slab's parameters. Depending on the value of $\\kappa$, these slabs can be attractive, repulsive or neutral. In the first case, the space-time also finishes up above at another singularity. In the other cases, they turn out to be semi-infinite and asymptotically flat when $z\\to\\infty$. We also find solutions consisting of joining an attractive slab and a repulsive one, and two neutral ones. We also discuss how to assemble a "gravitational capacitor" by inserting a slice of vacuum between two such slabs.

  8. The assessment of mixing/solid suspension in a slab tank due to vibratory agitation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Christopher Joseph

    1988-01-01

    THE ASSESSMENT OF MIXING/SOLID SUSPENSION IN A SLAB TANK DUE TO VIBRATORY AGITATION A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH RAMSEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE ASSESSMENT OF MIXING/SOLID SUSPENSION IN A SLAB TANK DUE TO VIBRATORY AGITATION A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH RAMSEY Approved as to style and content by: Gar B. Tatterson...

  9. SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

  10. INPP4B-mediated tumor resistance is associated with modulation of glucose metabolism via hexokinase 2 regulation in laryngeal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Joong Won; Kim, Kwang Il; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Noh, Woo Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Oh, Jeong Su; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •HIF-1?-regulated INPP4B enhances glycolysis. •INPP4B regulates aerobic glycolysis by inducing HK2 via Akt-mTOR pathway. •Blockage of INPP4B and HK2 sensitizes radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to radiation and anticancer drug. •INPP4B is associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was recently identified as a tumor resistance factor in laryngeal cancer cells. Herein, we show that INPP4B-mediated resistance is associated with increased glycolytic phenotype. INPP4B expression was induced by hypoxia and irradiation. Intriguingly, overexpression of INPP4B enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Of the glycolysis-regulatory genes, hexokinase 2 (HK2) was mainly regulated by INPP4B and this regulation was mediated through the Akt-mTOR pathway. Notably, codepletion of INPP4B and HK2 markedly sensitized radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to irradiation or anticancer drug. Moreover, INPP4B was significantly associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. Therefore, these results suggest that INPP4B modulates aerobic glycolysis via HK2 regulation in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells.

  11. Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,FloorAreaShops Jump

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,FloorAreaShops

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal Jump to:

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaWarehouses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal

  15. INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7) B.5108 Santa Susana, ETEC Bldg 462 (6th Floor, and 1st Floor (pp. 19) B.5450 Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) B.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 7) B.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 13) B

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 033825 (2015) Parity-time symmetry from stacking purely dielectric and magnetic slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    and magnetic slabs James Gear,1 Fu Liu,1 S. T. Chu,2 Stefan Rotter,3 and Jensen Li1,* 1 School of Physics

  17. Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORKSHOP Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor 1 IEEE@astm.org 610-832-9720 www.astm.org May 30, 2015 #12;· To solicit researchers and industry input for the development of consensus standards within ASTM International Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Industrial

  18. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  19. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but ...

  20. Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention...

  1. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Floor and Ceiling Plenum Energy Model Parameters, American Society of Heating,heating and cooling systems were not modelled because the simulation aim was to investigate the influence of the raised floor

  2. Modeling, Simulation, and Practice of Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Floor control, Ubiquitous collaboration, Synchronous collaboration, Mobile devices, Human-computer dispersed virtual place. Mobile computing paradigm [34] made ubiquitous access possible with the integration1 Modeling, Simulation, and Practice of Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration

  3. Beam Collimation Using an Anisotropic Metamaterial Slab without Any Nanometer-sized Aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shou; Cui, Yanxia; Zhang, Feng; He, Sailing; Hao, Yuying; Zhu, Furong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic beam collimation effect has been thoroughly investigated based on the well-known nanometer-scale bull's eye structure formed by complex and high-cost fabrication processes. In this work, we report our effort for attaining beam collimation using an anisotropic metamaterial (AMM) slab that consists of a stack of alternating metal/dielectric layers and an integrated top metal grating. The results show that AMM slab allows creating the beam collimation effect similar to that of the bull's eye structure, an enabling technology for practical application due to its simple architecture and cost benefits. The excitation of surface plasmons at the AMM/air interface is derived. The structure of the AMM slab and its impact on beaming performance were analyzed using the effective medium theory and Finite Element Method.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation from a plasma slab during the development of Weibel instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vagin, K. Yu.; Romanov, A. Yu.; Uryupin, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    Electromagnetic radiation from an anisotropic plasma slab formed by ionization of matter in the field of a high-power femtosecond pulse is studied. It is shown that the growth of initial field perturbations in the course of Weibel instability is accompanied by the generation of nonmonochromatic radiation with a characteristic frequency on the order of the instability growth rate. It is found that perturbations with characteristic scale lengths less than or on the order of the ratio of the speed of light to the Langmuir frequency are excited and radiated most efficiently, provided that the slab is thicker than this ratio.

  5. BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    1ST FLOOR ENTRANCE ELEVATOR WASHROOMS BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH MCINTYRE MEDICAL SCIENCES BUILDING 3655 SIR WILLIAM OSLER PINE AVENUE PROMENADESIRWILLIAMOSLER ACCESSIBLE BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND SOUTH ENTRANCE (1ST FLOOR) ALL

  6. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls or resonant magnetic perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys. Plasmas 12

  7. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick and Franois L. Waelbroeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick.1063/1.4863498 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys

  8. Effect of drift-acoustic waves on magnetic island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F. L. Waelbroeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travel radially from one side of an islandEffect of drift-acoustic waves on magnetic island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F. L. Waelbroeck Department of Physics, Institute

  9. Continuous wave near-infrared atomic Xe laser excited by a radio frequency discharge in a slab geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    Continuous wave near-infrared atomic Xe laser excited by a radio frequency discharge in a slab excited by a radio frequency rf discharge in a slab geometry. A maximum continuous wave cw output power­7 Until now the research in this wave- length region was concentrated mainly on the improvement of solid

  10. Deep-slab fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moyer, Craig

    Deep-slab fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean, M. J., S. C. Komor, P. Fryer, and C. L. Moyer, Deep-slab fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea.5, made up overwhelmingly of Archaea, is oxidizing methane from the ascending fluid to carbonate ion

  11. Low--frequency tremors, intraslab and interplate earthquakes in Southwest Japan--from a viewpoint of slab dehydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Philippine Sea slab. However, there are some places without such LFT; they are N. Izu-Kanto, E. Shikoku above the 35­45 km depth surface of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PHS). In this article, we, in terms of dehydration of the PHS slab. 2. Low­­Frequency Tremor and Bathymetry of the Philippine Sea [5

  12. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Jump

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search

  16. Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices

  17. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.

  18. Assimilating lithosphere and slab history in 4-D Earth models Dan J. Bower a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Dan J.

    past (e.g., seismology, residual topography, stratigraphy). Using global models with paleogeographical subduction beneath North America, (2) enhanced correlation of model slabs and fast anomalies in seismic by earthquake locations and high seismic velocity anomalies by seismic tomogra- phy (e.g., Grand, 2002

  19. Fossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    .tecto.2006.06.003 #12;basin and mechanisms of basin formation, and interpret the Illinois basinFossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee August 2006 Abstract The Illinois basin is one of several well-studied intracratonic sedimentary basins

  20. IMPACT OF DIAPHRAGMS ON SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF EXISTING SLAB-ON-GIRDER STEEL BRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    of seismic ductile detailing provisions for steel bridges in all bridge design codes to date partly explains literature on the seismic evaluation and/or design of bridges (e.g. Seismic 1981; Ontario 1991; American 1994IMPACT OF DIAPHRAGMS ON SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF EXISTING SLAB-ON-GIRDER STEEL BRIDGES by Seyed Mehdi

  1. International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble Chamonix Mont-Blanc -2013 Weather preceding persistent deep slab avalanches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble ­ Chamonix Mont-Blanc - 2013 Weather preceding rapid mass loading via precipitation or wind transported snow or from snowpack warming by air. INTRODUCTION Weather is one of the most important factors in snow slab avalanche formation, as it creates

  2. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal The Bridge from D&D to Redevelopment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conger, M Malinda; Schneider, Ken R

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D&D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. , DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL s 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 10,000 cubic yards (CY) of concrete, 2,500 CY of debris, and 500 CY of contaminated soil. The completion of this work will allow the site to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL.

  3. FLEXURAL BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE SLABS REINFORCED WITH BASALT FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER (BFRP) BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , leigh, NC, USA.Ra ABSTRACT This paper represents the results of an experimental study conducted bars were tested in four- point bending. Dimensions of all slabs were 6 in. × 24 in. × 12 ft (150 mm the typical limit specified by ACI for all tested flexural specimens due to the low elastic modulus

  4. Observation of the spread of slow deformation in Greece following the breakup of the slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Observation of the spread of slow deformation in Greece following the breakup of the slab Virginie Engineering, ITSAK, Thessaloniki, Greece, 4 Université de Savoie, ISTerre, Le Bourget du Lac, France, 5 analyze here a "storm" of earthquakes in Greece and show that their interaction provides remarkable

  5. Sunda-Java trench kinematics, slab window formation and overriding plate deformation since the Cretaceous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Sunda-Java trench kinematics, slab window formation and overriding plate deformation since along the 3200 km long Sunda-Java trench, one of the largest subduction systems on Earth. Combining window underlying the Java­South Sumatra region, and we propose that decreased mantle wedge viscosities

  6. DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR BRIDGE DECK SLABS REINFORCED by CFRP and GFRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan 1, Amr Abdelrahman 2, Gamil Tadros 3, and Sami Rizkalla 4 Summary The use of carbon and glass the service life of bridge deck slabs. The linear properties of FRPs up to failure and their relatively low elastic modulus and strain at ultimate have raised concerns regarding their use as reinforcements

  7. DESIGN OF CONCRETE DECK SLABS Sami Rizkalla 1 and Tarek Hassan 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ISIS Canada), University ofManitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3T 5V6 The use of carbon and glass the service life of bridge deck slabs. The linear properties of FRPs up to failure and their relatively low elastic modulus and strain at ultimate have raised concerns regarding their use as reinforcements

  8. Slab waveguide photobioreactors for microalgae based biofuel production{{ Erica Eunjung Jung,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Slab waveguide photobioreactors for microalgae based biofuel production{{ Erica Eunjung Jung are a promising feedstock for sustainable biofuel production. At present, however, there are a number to substantial interest in increasing biofuel production. Biofuels can be produced from a number of different

  9. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todorov, Kamen O.

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 ?m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are ...

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  11. An intelligent floor field cellular automata model for pedestrian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekaterina Kirik; Tat'yana Yurgel'yan; Dmitriy Krouglov

    2009-06-15

    A stochastic cellular automata (CA) model for pedestrian dynamics is presented. Our goal is to simulate different types of pedestrian movement, from regular to panic. But here we emphasize regular situations which imply that pedestrians analyze environment and choose their route more carefully. And transition probabilities have to depict such effect. The potentials of floor fields and environment analysis are combined in the model obtained. People patience is included in the model. This makes simulation of pedestrians movement more realistic. Some simulation results are presented and comparison with basic FF-model is made.

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFTAreaFloorAreaGroceryShops

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This

  16. Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had that dress when you di-yi-yi-yi-yine Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had it to me Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had something you wore #12;

  17. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittereder, Nick; Poerschke, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season.

  18. Laser beat wave excitation of terahertz radiation in a plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, Jetendra

    2014-10-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generation by nonlinear mixing of lasers, obliquely incident on a plasma slab is investigated. Two cases are considered: (i) electron density profile is parabolic but density peak is below the critical density corresponding to the beat frequency, (ii) plasma boundaries are sharp and density is uniform. In both cases, nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force that gives rise to electron drift at the beat frequency. In the case of inhomogeneous plasma, non zero curl of the nonlinear current density gives rise to electromagnetic THz generation. In case of uniform plasma, the sharp density variation at the plasma boundaries leads to radiation generation. In a slab width of less than a terahertz wavelength, plasma density one fourth of terahertz critical density, laser intensities ?10{sup 17?}W/cm{sup 2} at 1??m, one obtains the THz intensity ?1?GW/cm{sup 2} at 3 THz radiation frequency.

  19. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO? emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  20. Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Goetschalckx and Takashi Irohara

    2007-02-22

    Feb 22, 2007 ... problem with practical applications when the price of land is high or when a ... may have different dimensions provided the floor projections on.

  1. Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

    2009-05-15

    ............................................................................. 34 3.3 Weather-Soil Interaction Models ................................................... 37 viii CHAPTER Page 3.4 Soil-Structure Interaction Models .................................................. 40 3.5 Comparison of Beam Depths... for Stiffened Slabs on Shrink-Swell Soils Using WRI, PTI 2004 and AS 2870...................................... 42 3.6 Influence of the 2002 Texas Section of ASCE Recommended Practice on the Beam Depths for Stiffened Slabs on Shrink-Swell Soils...

  2. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  3. Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  4. AREA FACTOR DETERMINATIONS FOR AN INDUSTRIAL WORKER EXPOSED TO A CONCRETE SLAB END-STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; Patricia Lee, P; Eduardo Farfan, E; Jesse Roach, J

    2007-02-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) is decommissioning many of its excess facilities through removal of the facility structures leaving only the concrete-slab foundations in place. Site-specific, risk-based derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for radionuclides have been determined for a future industrial worker potentially exposed to residual contamination on these concrete slabs as described in Jannik [1]. These risk-based DCGLs were estimated for an exposure area of 100 m{sup 2}. During deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) operations at SRS, the need for area factors for larger and smaller contaminated areas arose. This paper compares the area factors determined for an industrial worker exposed to a concrete slab end-state for several radionuclides of concern at SRS with (1) the illustrative area factors provided in MARSSIM [2], (2) the area correction factors provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance [3], and (3) the hot spot criterion for field application provided in the RESRAD User's Manual [4].

  5. Deuterated water in the solar-type protostars NGC 1333 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutens, A; Cabrit, S; Codella, C; Kristensen, L E; Ceccarelli, C; van Dishoeck, E F; Boogert, A C A; Bottinelli, S; Castets, A; Caux, E; Comito, C; Demyk, K; Herpin, F; Lefloch, B; McCoey, C; Mottram, J C; Parise, B; Taquet, V; van der Tak, F F S; Visser, R; Yildiz, U A

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this paper is to study deuterated water in the solar-type protostars NGC1333 IRAS4A and IRAS4B, compare their HDO abundance distribution with other star-forming regions and constrain their HDO/H2O ratios. Methods. Using the Herschel/HIFI instrument as well as ground-based telescopes, we observed several HDO lines covering a large excitation range (Eup/k=22-168 K) towards these protostars and an outflow position. Non-LTE radiative transfer codes were then used to determine the HDO abundance profiles in these sources. Results. The HDO fundamental line profiles show a very broad component, tracing the molecular outflows, in addition to a narrower emission component as well as a narrow absorbing component. In the protostellar envelope of NGC1333 IRAS4A, the HDO inner (T>100 K) and outer (T<100 K) abundances with respect to H2 are estimated at 7.5x10^{-9} and 1.2x10^{-11} respectively, whereas, in NGC1333 IRAS4B, they are 1.0x10^{-8} and 1.2x10^{-10} respectively. Similarly to the low-mass prot...

  6. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  7. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal - The Bridge from D and D to Redevelopment - 12342

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travaglini, Mike; Halsey, Pat; Conger, Malinda; Schneider, Ken

    2012-07-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D and D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers and sub-grade structures, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL's 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 7,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of concrete, 2,000 m{sup 3} of debris, and 400 m{sup 3} of contaminated soil. Immediately adjacent to the 2000 Area is the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park and the modernized ORNL western campus. The Science and Technology Park is the only private sector business and technology park located within the footprint of a national laboratory. The completion of this work will not only greatly reduce the risk to the ORNL campus occupants but also allow this much sought after space to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL. Demolition of aging facilities enabled by injection of ARRA funding has significantly altered the landscape at ORNL while reducing risk to laboratory personnel and operations and providing valuable central campus land parcels for redevelopment to expand and enhance the science mission of the Laboratory. D and D of these infrastructure legacies that were once eyesores that harbored risk in the ORNL Central Campus have been transformed to green spaces and extremely valuable candidate sites for future buildings. The 2000 Area slabs and soils removal marks the first step in creating the bridge between the modernized east and west campus and acts as the cornerstone in the redevelopment of the ORNL Central Campus area which will be a key contributor to ORNL meeting its vision of the future. (authors)

  8. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  9. Data:9f33a9f9-21ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  10. Houses for early weaned piglets : influence of rearing on the floor or in batteries,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Houses for early weaned piglets : influence of rearing on the floor or in batteries, temperature-deck batteries on wire floor divided into 2 compartments : one at I8.!0 y- i°C, relative humidity 61+ io p. roo and in batteries were the following : 148 and z36 (period I), !2S and 495 (period 11), i. e. differences in favour

  11. UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1970 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building 1966-2005; Pierce Hall of Physical Sciences ­ chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics ­ W. Conway Pierce, Chairman #12;Hart Schmidt of Geology bld; 1954-66 ­ Plus 2nd floor addition; 1959-66 ­ Pierce Hall; 1966-2005 · Instruments and support

  12. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot...

  13. Vitality and chemistry of roots of red spruce in forest floors of stands with a gradient of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Vitality and chemistry of roots of red spruce in forest floors of stands with a gradient of soil Al) dominated by red spruce and with a gradient of forest floor exchangeable Al/Ca ratios. Root vitality

  14. TRAC analysis of the system pressure effects tests in the Slab Core Test Facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis, using the TRAC computer code, of three system pressure effects reflood tests performed during 1981 at the Slab Core Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokai, Japan. Comparisons of the calculated results with the experimental data were very good, particularly for rod temperature histories, core differential pressures, mass inventories, liquid carryover, and fluid velocities in the loops. These comparisons indicate that the TRAC code can predict reasonably well the effects of pressure variations in test conditions. This and similar calculations demonstrate that TRAC is a useful tool for the design of nuclear reactor systems and the analysis of system response during postulated accident sequences.

  15. Design of flexible ultrahigh-Q microcavities in diamond-based photonic crystal slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snjezana Tomljenovic-Hanic; Andrew D. Greentree; C. Martijn de Sterke; Steven Prawer

    2008-12-10

    We design extremely flexible ultrahigh-Q diamond-based double-heterostructure photonic crystal slab cavities by modifying the refractive index of the diamond. The refractive index changes needed for ultrahigh-Q cavities with $Q ~ 10^7$, are well within what can be achieved ($\\Delta n \\sim 0.02$). The cavity modes have relatively small volumes $Vdesign is flexible because the range of parameters, cavity length and the index changes, that enables an ultrahigh-Q is quite broad. Furthermore as the index modification is post-processed, an efficient technique to generate cavities around defect centres is achievable, improving prospects for defect-tolerant quantum architectures.

  16. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate; Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    This document provides content for three areas of the Building America Solution Center. First, "Insulating Closed Crawlspace Walls and Band Joist Area" describes how to install rigid foam insulation on the interior perimeter walls and band joist area in closed crawlspace foundations of homes. Second, "Removing Construction Debris from Flexible Ducts" describes how to clean flexible ducts after construction or major renovation of a home to remove debris resulting from building materials, particularly airborne dust and particulates. Third, images, CAD drawings, and a case study illustrate right and wrong ways to apply polyethylene sheeting over aggregate. Similarly, a CAD drawing is included that illustrates the use of a concrete slab over polyethylene.

  17. Slab edge insulating form system and methods (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System in the CERN SPS(Journal Article) | SciTechPatent: Slab

  18. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO? emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore »feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  19. Histone deacetylase 3 represses p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription by interacting with Sp1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Weifeng [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Tan Dapeng [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Wang Xiuli [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Han Songyan [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Tan Jiang [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Zhao Yanmei [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Lu Jun [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)]. E-mail: ycsuo@nenu.edu.cn; Huang Baiqu [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2006-01-06

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) has been implicated to play roles in governing cell proliferation. Here we demonstrated that the overexpression of HDAC3 repressed transcription of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} genes in 293T cells, and that the recruitment of HDAC3 to the promoter regions of these genes was critical to this repression. We also showed that HDAC3 repressed GAL4-Sp1 transcriptional activity, and that Sp1 was co-immunoprecipitated with FLAG-tagged HDAC3. We conclude that HDAC3 can repress p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription by interacting with Sp1. Furthermore, knockdown of HDAC3 by RNAi up-regulated the transcriptional expression of p15{sup INK4b}, but not that of p21{sup WAF1/cip1}, implicating the different roles of HDAC3 in repression of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription. Data from this study indicate that the inhibition of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} may be one of the mechanisms by which HDAC3 participates in cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis.

  20. Experimental study of slab solar collection on the hydronic system of road

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qing; Huang, Yong; Li, Ming; Liu, Yan [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Yan, Y.Y. [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    This paper studied the slab solar collection (SSC) process, which is one of the essential compositions of road hydronic ice-snow melting (HISM) system that stores solar energy in summer to melt ice and snow on the road in winter. Its aim is to find out the heat transfer characteristic of the SSC and heat collecting efficiency and the influence of pipe spacing and flow rate by experiment. As shown in experimental results, the average heat collecting capacity is about 150-250 W/m{sup 2} in natural summer condition, while the solar radiation intensity is about 300-1000 W/m{sup 2}. It is shown that the increment of fluid flow results in the increment of heat collection efficiency, while the increment of pipe spacing results in the decrement of the efficiency in experiment modes. The results show that the road slab can obtain about 30% solar heat in summertime, and the solar collection can lower the pavement temperature and reduce the insolation weathering. (author)

  1. Modeling a fluid to solid phase transition in snow weak-layers. Application to slab avalanche release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francois Louchet

    2015-04-07

    Snow slab avalanche release usually results from failure of weak layers made of loose ice crystals. In previous field experiments, we evidenced for the first time an interesting stress-driven transition in the weak layer between a granular fluid and a solid phase. We propose here an original model involving the kinetics of ice grains bonds failure and reconstruction. The model evidences a sudden transition between two drastically different types of weak layer behaviors. It accounts for the characteristics of both the studied fluid-solid transition and for slab avalanche release observations. It may possibly apply to a number of other granular materials.

  2. Phase control of group velocity in a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, D. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahrai, M. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Motavalli, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atomic systems is discussed. It is shown that the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can be switched from subluminal to superluminal light propagation by the thickness of the slab or the intensity of the coupling field. Furthermore, it is found that, in the presence of quantum interference, the reflected and transmitted pulses are completely phase dependent. So, the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can only be switched from subluminal to superluminal by adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields.

  3. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., Vol. 10, 1977. Printed in Great Britain. 01977 The effect of anisotropic scattering on the critical slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    scattering on the critical slab problem in neutron transport theory using a synthetic kernel CE Siewert and M scattering laws on the critical thickness of a multiplying slab in one-speed neutron transport theory is studied using a scattering kemel which consists of a linear combination of backward, forward and isotropic

  4. Comment on "The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle" by W.P. Schellart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Schellart's criticism is based on three primary interpretations such as i) the subduction hinge migrates deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle" by W.P. Schellart Carlo Doglioni Dipartimento di Scienze on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle. Tectonophysics, 445, 363­372.] paper uses

  5. Frequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs: A Computational Approach for Arbitrary Geometries and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between patterned (photonic-crystal) slabs at designable frequencies and separations, exploiting a general numerical approach for computing heat transfer in arbitrary geometries

  6. Jane Gray Research Greenhouse and IB Sixth Floor Greenhouse Department of Integrative Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Gray Research Greenhouse and IB Sixth Floor Greenhouse Department of Integrative Biology UC Berkeley - 200 Centennial Dr. Greenhouse Space Request Form Date of Request____________ Expected time frame_____________________E-mail______________________________________ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Greenhouse Environmental Specifications Watering instructions

  7. The effectiveness of floor mats as an intervention for standing fatigue of light fabrication workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael Shannon

    1996-01-01

    A field study was conducted in a light fabrication plant to determine the effectiveness of floor mats on reducing the symptoms of standing fatigue. Specific physiological variables measured include skin temperature of the ...

  8. Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, William

    1993-01-01

    The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

  9. Instability due to a two recirculation pump trip in a BWR using RAMONA-4B computer code with 3D neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.S.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1993-06-01

    An investigation was made of the potential for thermal-hydraulic instabilities coupled to neutronic feedback in a BWR due to a two recirculation pump trip event using the RAMONA-4B computer code with 3D neutron kinetics. It is concluded that a high-power (100%) and low-flow (75%) initial condition would most likely lead to in-phase density wave oscillations after the tripping of both recirculation pumps, and that RAMONA-4B is capable of predicting such thermal-hydraulic instabilities coupled to neutronic feedback in BWR and in SBWR.

  10. Ground Floor (Basement) B10 -B10A --IT Service Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    -- Living Room 130 -- Buskuhl Gallery B50 ­ Arch 1st Year Studio B60 ­ ID 1st Year Studio B60 East ­ ID 2nd;Second Floor 205 -- Arch 2nd Year Studio (Access by First or Third Floor) 230 -- CNS Classroom 240 -- CNS Year Studio B80 ­ ID 3rd Year Studio B90 ­ ID 4th Year 150, 155, 160 -- Shared Classrooms 165

  11. Radiant cooling research scoping study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy; Bauman, Fred; Huizenga, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    B W. 2002. Radiant Floor Heating in Theory and Practice.the inverse of the radiant floor heating systems that haveresidential radiant floor slab heating systems are often

  12. 378 IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 40, NO. 4, APRIL 2004 Slab Delivery of Incoherent Pump Light to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

    Pump Light to Double-Clad Fiber Amplifiers: An Analytic Approach Dmitrii Kouznetsov and Jerome V. Moloney Abstract--Delivery of incoherent diode bar pump power via a tapered slab into a double-clad fiber the multimode pump power of diode bars or stacks into single-mode signals [1]­[4]. Impressive power scaling

  13. Plasmon excitation in metal slab by fast point charge: The role of additional boundary conditions in quantum hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; An, Sheng-Bai; Song, Yuan-Hong Wang, You-Nian; Kang, Naijing; Miškovi?, Z. L.

    2014-10-15

    We study the wake effect in the induced potential and the stopping power due to plasmon excitation in a metal slab by a point charge moving inside the slab. Nonlocal effects in the response of the electron gas in the metal are described by a quantum hydrodynamic model, where the equation of electronic motion contains both a quantum pressure term and a gradient correction from the Bohm quantum potential, resulting in a fourth-order differential equation for the perturbed electron density. Thus, besides using the condition that the normal component of the electron velocity should vanish at the impenetrable boundary of the metal, a consistent inclusion of the gradient correction is shown to introduce two possibilities for an additional boundary condition for the perturbed electron density. We show that using two different sets of boundary conditions only gives rise to differences in the wake potential at large distances behind the charged particle. On the other hand, the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model is seen to cause a reduction in the depth of the potential well closest to the particle, and a reduction of its stopping power. Even for a particle moving in the center of the slab, we observe nonlocal effects in the induced potential and the stopping power due to reduction of the slab thickness, which arise from the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model.

  14. Influence of the surface termination to the point imaging by a photonic crystal slab with negative refraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanshui Xiao; Min Qiu; Zhichao Ruan; Sailing He

    2005-09-01

    Point imaging by a photonic crystal slab due to the negative refraction is studied theoretically. By investigating the transfer function of the imaging system, the influence of the surface termination to the imaging quality is analyzed. It is shown that an appropriate surface termination is important for obtaining an image of good quality.

  15. Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan derived from shear wave splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan generated by shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in the subducting Philippine Sea are further divided into PHS1 and PHS2 (upper and lower planes of the double seismic zone in the Philippine

  16. Parity-time symmetry from stacking purely dielectric and magnetic slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gear, James; Chu, S T; Rotter, Stefan; Li, Jensen

    2015-01-01

    We show that Parity-time symmetry in matching electric permittivity to magnetic permeability can be established by considering an effective Parity operator involving both mirror symmetry and coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This approach extends the discussion of Parity-time symmetry to the situation with more than one material potential. We show that the band structure of a one-dimensional photonic crystal with alternating purely dielectric and purely magnetic slabs can undergo a phase transition between propagation modes and evanescent modes when the balanced gain/loss parameter is varied. The cross-matching between different material potentials also allows exceptional points of the constitutive matrix to appear in the long wavelength limit where they can be used to construct ultrathin metamaterials with unidirectional reflection.

  17. Air-bridged photonic crystal slabs at visible and near-infrared wavelengths K. B. Crozier,1 Virginie Lousse,2,3 Onur Kilic,3 Sora Kim,3 Shanhui Fan,3 and Olav Solgaard3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air-bridged photonic crystal slabs at visible and near-infrared wavelengths K. B. Crozier,1 manuscript received 15 February 2006; published 30 March 2006 Air-bridged photonic crystal slabs of the transmission spectra of air-bridged photonic crystal slabs with free space illumination using collimated

  18. Data:0c7149ef-adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  19. Data:Caa5cce6-c6c8-4b7a-ac01-eb6abdf87c9b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caa5cce6-c6c8-4b7a-ac01-eb6abdf87c9b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  20. Data:759abfab-3871-4b1c-95f6-528e8c64d151 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    abfab-3871-4b1c-95f6-528e8c64d151 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1....

  1. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan H. Davis

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

  2. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  3. Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal Jump

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  5. The period ratio for standing kink and sausage modes in solar structures with siphon flow. I. magnetized slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo; Chen, Yanjun

    2013-01-01

    In the applications of solar magneto-seismology(SMS), employing the ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to twice the one of its first overtone, $P_1/2P_2$, plays an important role. We examine how field-aligned flows affect the dispersion properties, and hence the period ratios, of standing modes supported by magnetic slabs in the solar atmosphere. We numerically solve the dispersion relations and devise a graphic means to construct standing modes. For coronal slabs, we find that the flow effects are significant, for the fast kink and sausage modes alike. For the kink ones, they may reduce $P_1/2P_2$ by up to 23% compared with the static case, and the minimum allowed $P_1/2P_2$ can fall below the lower limit analytically derived for static slabs. For the sausage modes, while introducing the flow reduces $P_1/2P_2$ by typically $\\lesssim 5$ % relative to the static case, it significantly increases the threshold aspect ratio only above which standing sausage modes can be supported, meaning that their det...

  6. CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX A CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) A.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 8) A.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 19) A.5455 Los

  7. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

  8. COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR TOPOGRAPHY (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell) Introduction This lecture is the development of the lithospheric cooling problem. For researchers in the areas important thermal boundary layer which is at the core-mantle boundary. As the lithosphere cools it becomes

  9. Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

  10. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor Office/or for the past 12 months. 4. Evidence you are a registered voter in North Carolina. 5. Evidence of motor vehicle ownership - registration card in North Carolina. 6. Copy of North Carolina Driver's License. 7. Evidence

  11. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor Office (Domiciliary) of North Carolina for Tuition Purposes. 1. Documents of residence for the past 12 months (i are a registered voter in North Carolina. 5. Evidence of motor vehicle ownership - registration card in North

  12. Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and extend access to Ecology. http://www.jstor.org #12;Late Spring 1968 CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION RATES 471. Germination behavior of some halc- phytes. Bull. Res. Council Israel (D) 6: 187-188. CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION

  13. Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor Long Beach, CA 90802 in this self-insured program. The Office of Risk Management in the Chancellor's Office administers the general liability, workers' compensation, property, and professional liability programs. The State Office of Risk

  14. Influence of floor plenum on energy performance of buildings with1 UFAD systems2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    . Thermal29 buoyancy causes temperature stratification in the occupied zone, and the air temperature in the31 to use less energy for cooling [1,2]. In addition, the thermal stratification in a room the occupied zone and the floor plenum also be considered, so do the43 thermal stratification in the occupied

  15. Beyond Kanban: Creating and analyzing lean shop floor control policies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley B.

    Beyond Kanban: Creating and analyzing lean shop floor control policies 1 Asbjoern M. Bonvik ffl Stanley B. Gershwin Operations Research Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 Laboratory for Manufacturing policies for repetitive manufacturing, including kanban, basestock, and CONWIP control. This view focuses

  16. The Floor Strategy: Wayfinding Cognition in a Multi-Level Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Floor Strategy: Wayfinding Cognition in a Multi-Level Building Christoph Hölscher1 , Georg and cognitive processes of wayfinding in public buildings. We conducted an empirical study in a complex multi-level building, comparing performance measures of experienced and inexperienced participants in different

  17. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

  18. Tender Notice for Renovation of Toilets (Gents & Ladies) on Ground and Second Floor in the Academic Block of ISI Bangalore Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Block of ISI Bangalore Centre Sealed tender applications are hereby invited from the contractors (Gents & Ladies) on ground floor and second floor in the Academic block building of ISI, Bangalore Centre

  19. Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University, Dept. Civ. & Env. Eng.;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University in the design of steel and concrete floor systems to control vibrations suggests that a floor system's vibration-term collaborative research program between Tufts University and LeMessurier Consultants to investigate the vibration

  20. Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and N. M. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners. http://www.jstor.org #12;497 ENERGY AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS OF FOREST FLOORS IN THREE MINNESOTA FORESTS and subsequent utilization by heterotrophs is a major pathway of energy flow. Forest floors can also

  1. RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - models and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.; Neymotin, L.Y.

    1998-03-01

    This document describes the major modifications and improvements made to the modeling of the RAMONA-3B/MOD0 code since 1981, when the code description and assessment report was completed. The new version of the code is RAMONA-4B. RAMONA-4B is a systems transient code for application to different versions of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) such as the current BWR, the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This code uses a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, non-equilibrium, drift-flux, two-phase flow formulation of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients and instability issues. Chapter 1 is an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 discusses the neutron kinetics modeling and the implementation of reactivity edits. Chapter 3 is an overview of the heat conduction calculations. Chapter 4 presents modifications to the thermal-hydraulics model of the vessel, recirculation loop, steam separators, boron transport, and SBWR specific components. Chapter 5 describes modeling of the plant control and safety systems. Chapter 6 presents and modeling of Balance of Plant (BOP). Chapter 7 describes the mechanistic containment model in the code. The content of this report is complementary to the RAMONA-3B code description and assessment document. 53 refs., 81 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 thermal-hydraulic predictions of JAERI Slab Core Test Facility gravity-feed tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, J.S.; Lin, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRAC-PF1/MOD1, was used to analyze the Slab Core Test Facility gravity-feed tests (Runs 604, 605, 611, and 613) performed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The objectives of the TRAC analysis are to compare the TRAC predictions with the test results and to assess the TRAC capability for simulating the core thermal-hydraulic behavior during the reflood phase of a large loss-of-coolant accident. In general, the TRAC-calculated results agree well with the data.

  3. Innovative residential floor construction: Structural evaluation of steel joists with pre-formed web openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elhajj, N.R.

    1999-03-01

    Since 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development has sponsored numerous studies to identify, evaluate, and implement innovative structural materials, such as cold-formed steel (CFS), in the residential market. The use of CFS is still very limited, partly because steel is not being effectively integrated into conventional home construction. One of the major barriers to the use of CFS floor joists is the impact it has on placement of large waste drains and ductwork installed in floor systems. This report provides an overview of tests conducted by the NAHB to integrate these systems with CFS. A brief literature review of relevant work followed by a detailed overview of the experimental and analytical approach are also provided. The report recommends adoption of the research findings in residential and commercial applications.

  4. Second Floor N314 N313 N312 N311 N310 N309N308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST CORRIDOR N304 N307 N306 Centre for Doctoral Research N305 LIFT First Floor NORTHWEST CORRIDOR N203207 S207A S206S206A S205 S204 S203 S202 MAIN NORTH CORRIDOR M F LINKCORRIDOR LIFT 301 F M D Lift LIFT Lecture Theatre 1 (N111) Seminar Room 1 Tea & Cofee Station Seminar Room 2 Programme Office Office

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:

  7. Wheelchair access to this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Lift. Page 10. Stairs. Page 10. Toilets. Page 11. Room Directory. Page 12. Floor Plans, Page 13 at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre. The nearest bus stops

  8. Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

    2004-01-01

    Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time...

  9. Fatigue analysis of stringer to floor beam connections in through plate girder and through truss railroad bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Leslie Virginia

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to determine fatigue stresses in the stringer to floor beam connections of through plate girder (TPG) and through truss (TT) bridges in order to predict failure. Field observations by the Association of American...

  10. Floor Polisher 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    When steam transfers its heat in a manufacturing process or heat exchanger, it may revert to a liquid phase called condensate. This paper presents a method to help certain manufacturing and petro-chemical companies to save energy costs by returning their...

  11. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  12. Verification of criticality accident alarm system detector locations for the X-326 process cell floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.; Lee, B.L. Jr.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors on the cell floor of the X-326 process building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) are located at a height of 5 m above the cell floor. It has been suggested that this height be lowered to I m to alleviate accelerated system failures caused by the elevated temperatures at 5 m and to reduce the frequency of injury to maintenance personnel lifting the approximately 90-lb units into position. Work has been performed which analyzed the effect of relocating the CAAS detectors on the process floors of the X-333 and X-330 buildings from their current height to a height of 1 m{sup 1}. This earlier work was based on criticality accidents occurring in low enriched material (5% {sup 235}U) and was limited to the X-333 and X-330 buildings and the low enriched areas of X-326. It did not consider the residual higher enriched material in the X-326 building. This report analyzes the effect on criticality alarm coverage of lowering the CAAS detectors. This analysis is based on criticality accidents resulting from higher enriched material which may be present as ``hold-up`` in the process equipment within the X-326 building. The criticality accident alarm detectors at the PORTS facility are set to alarm at a neutron absorbed dose rate of 5 mrad/hr. The calculated absorbed dose rates presented in this report show that the detectors examined that produce an alarm for the given criticality event at their current height will also produce an alarm if located at a height of 1 meter. Therefore, lowering the detectors will not result in a loss of coverage within the building.

  13. Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

    2006-01-01

    accordin g to heat quantity compared charge according to area. 2.3 Government Encouraging Use of New and Re producible Energy In order to save energy in architecture field, government and MINISRY OF CONSTRUCTIO N P.R. CHINA issue a series of laws... has longer life and its life is up to fifty years. 6) Divided calculation heat is easily carried out i n floor radiant heating system. It is helpful to so lve charge question. According to statistic, it can save energy about 20~30% that charge...

  14. Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Douglas E. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Jump to:

  16. Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs David L. C. Chan, Marin Soljaci, and J. D. Joannopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs Received 8 May 2006; published 18 September 2006 We perform direct thermal emission calculations for three, implemented via a finite-difference time- domain algorithm. We demonstrate that emissivity and absorptivity

  17. Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C. Chan, Marin Soljaci, and J. D. Joannopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C phenomena that drive thermal emission in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystals, emphasizing of how the emissive properties of these systems can be tailored to our needs. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.74

  18. Sanders, J. E.; Merguerian, Charles; and Okulewicz, S. C., 1995b, Recumbent fold in displaced slab of Upper Cretaceous sediments, Princes Bay, Staten Island, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    of Upper Cretaceous sediments, Princes Bay, Staten Island, New York: further evidence that ice flowing Program with Abstracts, 135 p. RECUMBENT FOLD IN DISPLACED SLAB OF UPPER CRETACEOUS SEDIMENTS, PRINCES BAY the navigation tower along the shores of Princes Bay, Staten Island, [UTM grid coordinates 566.70E, 4484.20N

  19. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Micca, P.L.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1986-03-11

    A stable boronated (/sup 10/B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/, at a dose of about 200 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight. The infusion is preformed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of /sup 10/B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of /sup 10/B in the tumor. 1 tab.

  20. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  1. L. Bocher1,4*, B. Masenelli2, D. Hapiuk3 , M. Kociak4 and K Masenelli-Varlot1 1 INSA-Lyon, MATEIS UMR 5510, 7 avenue J. Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bocher1,4*, B. Masenelli2, D. Hapiuk3 , M. Kociak4 and K Masenelli-Varlot1 1 INSA-Lyon, MATEIS UMR 5510, 7 avenue J. Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex 2 Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, UMR et Nanostructures, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon - France 4 Laboratoire de Physique des

  2. SEIK WENG NG 183 C14A--SIA---CI5A 103.8 (!) CI4B--S1B----C15B 103.4 (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    SEIK WENG NG 183 C14A--SIA---CI5A 103.8 (!) CI4B--S1B----C15B 103.4 (1) CI4A--S3A---4218A 101.8 (1. (1955). Nature (London), 176, 308-310. Ng, S. W. (1992). J. Crystallogr. Spectrosc. Res. 22, 615-618. Ng

  3. Optical Spectrum Analyzer with Quantum-Limited Noise Floor M. Bishof, X. Zhang, M. J. Martin, and Jun Ye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical Spectrum Analyzer with Quantum-Limited Noise Floor M. Bishof, X. Zhang, M. J. Martin with state-of-the-art stability. We demonstrate a technique that precisely measures the noise spectrum determine the laser noise spectrum from near dc to 100 Hz via the measured fluctuations in atomic excitation

  4. PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

  5. A model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    ; improved thermal comfort; improved ventilation efficiency and indoor air quality; reduced energy useA model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb a Energy gains that occur above the occupied zone are isolated from the calculation of the required space supply

  6. Job Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    , Neuromatters is at the forefront of neurotechnologies, EEG signal processing and decoding. The successfulJob Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com Founded by recognized neuroengineering experts from Columbia University and the City College of New York

  7. SICS. A Sensor-Based In-Line Control System for the Surfaces of Continuously Cast Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh [OG Technologies, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-09-23

    The Phase II project has been carried out in accordance to the proposed tasks and budget, based on the original and extended schedule. The R&D team designed and implemented the test unit for the full width coverage, installed the unit in a caster. The development work further included enhanced image processing, in-depth defect study and process control models. The function, operation, and maintenance of the SICS was thoroughly studied during the Phase II research. The experience indicates additional hardware and procedures are required to make the SICS a commercially ready product in operation and maintenance aspect. Such developments have been finished and the team is contacting potential customers for the first commercial installation of SICS. Additionally, OGT is exploring the possibility to team up with a US company that specializes in surface cleaning for slabs/blooms/billets such that the in-line surface inspection can be integrated with in-line surface clean up for the maximum benefit to the steel industry.

  8. TRAC analysis of the effect of increased ECC subcooling on the reflood transient in the Slab Core Test Facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    A blind posttest calculation of Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Run 510, the high-subcooling test, was completed with TRAC-PD2/MOD1 using initial conditions provided by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), but without knowledge of the actual test results. There is good comparison between the calculation and the data for rod temperatures, turnaround times, core differential pressures, and mass inventories, and reasonable comparison for absolute pressures, upper plenum pool formation, and fluid temperatures and mass accumulation in the steam-water separator. Comparison of this calculation with the calculation of the base case test (Run 507) shows that the qualitative behavior during reflood is calculated correctly for both cases. In addition, from this comparison the following conclusions can be drawn: for the high-subcooling case, the peak rod temperture was lower, calculated quench times were earlier, there was more entrainment and liquid carryover from the core to the upper plenum, and the liquid mass accumulation in both the core and the upper plenum was greater.

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  10. Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 363374 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2002-01-01

    Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand K variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content within a Douglas fir

  11. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  12. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  13. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  14. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  15. Summary Report: Control Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam; Lee, Yoonsu

    2007-01-01

    GSHP; Radiant floor and passive solar heating; decentralizedSlab heating and/or cooling UFAD Forced Air Under Floor Airheating and cooling, conditioned air is delivered through an under floor

  16. A Sea Floor Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Zumberge

    2005-12-31

    In the North Sea natural gas production field at Sleipner, CO{sub 2} is being separated from natural gas and injected into an underground saline aquifer, known as the Utsira formation, for environmental purposes. In this study, gravity measurements were made over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site in 2002 and again in 2005 on top of 30 concrete benchmarks on the seafloor to study the behavior and physical properties of the injected CO{sub 2}. As the gas is injected, pore space water is replaced by gas, altering the bulk density of the formation. This results in a change in gravitational acceleration observed on the overlying sea floor. Our gravity measurements show a repeatability of 4.3 {micro}Gal for 2003 and 3.5 {micro}Gal for 2005. Forward models of the gravity change are calculated based on both 3-D seismic data and reservoir simulation models from other studies. These forward models indicate that the magnitude of maximum gravity change is primarily related to CO{sub 2} density rather than flow geometry. The time-lapse gravity observations best fit a high temperature forward model based on the seismically determined CO{sub 2} geometry, suggesting that the 3-D reflection seismics are imaging the geometry of the injected CO{sub 2}, and that the in situ CO{sub 2} density is around 530 kg/m{sup 3}. Uncertainty in determining the average density using this technique is estimated to be {+-}65 kg/m{sup 3} (95% confidence), however, additional seismic surveys are needed before final conclusions can be drawn. Future gravity measurements will put better constraints on the CO{sub 2} density and continue to map out the CO{sub 2} flow.

  17. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  18. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  19. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  20. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  1. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  2. Synthesis of 3-amino-4-hydroxylaminothiazolidine-2-thiones and 2,3-dimethyl-4. cap alpha. ,5-dihydro-7-thioxothiazolo(3,4-b)-1,2,4-triazines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epshtein, S.P.; Orlova, T.I.; Rukasov, A.F.; Tashchi, V.P.; Putsykin, Yu. G.

    1987-10-01

    The reaction of dimeric nitroso chlorides of olefins with potassium dithiocarbazate was used to synthesize 3-amino-4-hydroxylaminothiazolidine-2-thiones, which undergo rearrangement to 2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazines on heating and react with butane-2,3-dione to give 2,3-dimethyl-4..cap alpha..,5-dihydro-7-thioxothiazolo(3,4-b)-1,2,4-triazine 4-oxides. The latter are reduced by sodium borohydride to the corresponding 3,4,4..cap alpha..,5-tetrahydro-7-thioxo derivatives. The IR spectra of KBr pellets of the compounds were recorded with a Perkin-Elmer spectrometer. The UV spectra of solutions in ethanol were obtained with a Specord UV spectrophotometer. The PMR spectra of solutions of the compounds in d/sub 6/-DMSO were obtained with a Varian FT-80A spectrometer with tetramethylsilane (TMS) as the internal standard.

  3. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ICF-insulated foundation slab edge with R-20 rigid foam under the slab; an air-to-water heat pump plus radiant floor heat; 100% LED lighting; filtered-fan-powered fresh air...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED. DOE Zero...

  6. Building America Update - October 9, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slab. A single ductless heat pump heats and cools the home, which also gets passive solar heating from south-facing triple-pane windows that heat a concrete slab floor plus a...

  7. W4B Bristol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village of Wellington,FL LLC JumpOscillationA.C. 463-43 JumpB

  8. Sweetwater 4b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEuropeEnergySustainability CenterSvayaSweco Jumpa Jump to:b

  9. Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3BClimate

  10. NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-4B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal of Honor recipients honoredGenerationSecurityAchievementPolicy

  11. Underhill Parking Facility is the closest University Lot that is available to the public. Meter machines located on each floor take exact change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Parking: Underhill Parking Facility is the closest University Lot that is available to the public. Parking spots fill quickly. Comprehensive map of at UC Berkeley's public parking lots (http://pt.berkeley.edu/parking. Meter machines located on each floor take exact change or credit card. Parking along College Ave. Longer

  12. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  13. Psychology Student Affairs -1st Floor Mandler Hall -858.534.3001 -psycadvising@ucsd.edu h#p://psychology.ucsd.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    Psychology Student Affairs - 1st Floor Mandler Hall - 858.534.3001 - psycadvising@ucsd.edu h#p://psychology.ucsd.edu · At least 4 of the Upper Division Psychology Courses MINOR REQUIREMENTS 5 Upper Division 2 Lower Division 6 Upper

  14. Center for Space Research, Conference Room 2.806, WPR Building, 2nd Floor, 3925 W. Braker Lane, Suite 200, Austin, Texas 78759

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Center for Space Research, Conference Room 2.806, WPR Building, 2nd Floor, 3925 W. Braker Lane 10 -- 8:30 AM Thermospheric Density Variations, Solar EUV and Geomag. Storm Modeling Bruce R. Bowman, Senior Scientist with Space Environment Technologies Abstract: Discussion of density variations and how

  15. Rigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial based alignment--feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the authors [1], advances in 3D sonographical imaging as well as in data acquisition techniques allowRigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial with enhanced informative content. In this paper, we present an overlay technique of magnetic resonance (MR

  16. Sl.No. ITEM UNIT QTY RATE AMOUNT A EARTHWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    .00 Ground floor i) Column Shaft Cft 150.00 ii) For roof beams Cft 130.00 iii) For roof slab Cft 370.00 First floor i) Column Shaft Cft 108.00 ii) For lintels beams Cft 75.00 iii) For Chejjas and cill slabs Sft 136.50 iv) For roof beams Cft 130.00 v) For roof slab Cft 370.00 Second floor i) Column Shaft Cft 108.00 ii

  17. TRAC analyses for CCTF and SCTF tests and UPTF design/operation. [Cylindrical Core Test Facility; Slab Core Test Facility; Upper Plenum Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Cappiello, M.W.; Dotson, P.J.; Gilbert, J.S; Martinez, V.; Stumpf, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical support in 1985 for Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) tests involves the posttest analysis of 16 tests that have already been run in the CCTF and the SCTF and the pretest analysis of 3 tests to be performed in the UPTF. Posttest analysis is used to provide insight into the detailed thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood tests performed in CCTF and SCTF. Pretest analysis is used to ensure that the test facility is operated in a manner consistent with the expected behavior of an operating full-scale plant during an accident. To obtain expected behavior of a plant during an accident, two plant loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) calculations were performed: a 200% cold-leg-break LOCA calculation for a 2772 MW(t) Babcock and Wilcox plant and a 200% cold-leg-break LOCA calculation for a 3315 MW(t) Westinghouse plant. Detailed results are presented for several CCTF UPI tests and the Westinghouse plant analysis.

  18. Cooling load calculations for radiant systems: are they the same traditional methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    B. 2008. “Radiant floor cooling systems. ” ASHRAE Journal 4.embedded radiant heating and cooling. Geneva: InternationalM. Deru. 2010. “Radiant slab cooling for retail. ” ASHRAE

  19. B. B. Turner J. E. Lawvcr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ex'lraction unit at Bonnie (now CF) Both sites have a11 equipment and building structures removed. Floor slabs rerain. No unusual radioactivity noticed. Radioactivity over...

  20. Radiant Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a steady cooling effect. Homes built on concrete slabs are prime candidates for radiant heating systems, and radiant floor cooling takes advantage of the same principle using...

  1. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor. Here we propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source ...

  2. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the cables or tubing in a solid floor and are the oldest form of modern radiant floor systems. The tubing or cable can be embedded in a thick concrete foundation slab (commonly...

  3. Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01

    radiative heat transfer, since radiation was neglectedradiation striking the floor makes up the majority of the total heat transferheat transfer processes: conduction through the slab and floor panels and into the supply plenum via convection; radiation

  4. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

  5. 5/9/2015 Texas A&M research project in pursuit of elusive particles The Battalion: Science & Technology http://www.thebatt.com/sciencetechnology/texasamresearchprojectinpursuitofelusiveparticles/article_0b7b2142f21a11e4b80897343f9d6593.html?mod... 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toback, David

    5/9/2015 Texas A&M research project in pursuit of elusive particles The Battalion: Science://www.thebatt.com/sciencetechnology/texasamresearchprojectinpursuitofelusiveparticles/article_0b7b2142f21a11e4b80897343f9d6593.html?mod... 1/2 Texas A&M research project in pursuit of elusive under development at Texas A&M. The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, or SCDMS, will be one

  6. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  7. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  8. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  9. Comparison of effectiveness of sub-slab ventilation systems for indoor radon mitigation: A numerical study; Comparaison a l`aide d`un outil numerique de l`efficacite des systemes de ventilation active du sol limitant la penetration du radon dans l`habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnefous, Y.C. [Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l`Etat, 69 - Vaulx en Velin (France). Lab. Sciences de l`Habitat]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Gadgil, A.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Allard, F. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1992-04-01

    The functioning of an active sub-slab ventilation system (SVS) has been studied successfully with the help of a previously evaluated numerical model. The parameters explored are the permeability of the sub-slab and the gravel placed beneath it, the amplitude of applied pressure at the installation point of the system and the functioning method: depressurization or pressurization. The mechanisms contributing to the success of the two systems are identified. This numerical study shows that the presence of a layer of gravel beneath the sub-slab considerably improves the performance of the SVS. Considered separately from the extremely permeable sub-slabs, the depressurization systems perform better than the pressurization systems. 17 refs. [Francais] Le fonctionnement des Systemes de Ventilation active du Sol (SVS) a ete etudie a l`aide d`un outil numerique precedemment evalue avec succes. Les parametres explores sont les permeabilites du sol et du gravier place sous plancher bas, l`amplitude de la pression appliquee au point d`installation du systeme, et le mode de fonctionnement: Depressurisation ou Pressurisation. Les mecanismes contribuant au succes des deux systemes sont identifies. Cette etude numerique montre que la presence d`une couche de gravier sous plancher bas ameliore de facon considerable les performances des SVS. Mis a part le cas des sols extremement permeables, les systemes de Depressurisation ont de meilleures performances que les systemes de Pressurisation. 17 refs.

  10. EnergyPlus vs DOE-2: The Effect of Ground Coupling on Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption of a Slab-On-Grade Code House in a Cold Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-PA-10-08-03.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 34856 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-PA-10-08-03.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ENERGYPLUS VS DOE-2... extends the previous comparative work by comparing EnergyPlus and DOE-2.1e results for GCHT based on a slab-on- grade code house in a cold climate. Three GCHT models were used in the study. These models were Winkelmann?s (2002) model in DOE-2.1e...

  11. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  12. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Program in Logistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is currently working on MIT Auto corporate logistics and operations management positions. He has a Bachelors of Science in food technology massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  13. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    management for the last six years. He was Product Manager at Optimum Logistics, Director of Global Logistics a Master of Engineering in Logistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in Solid massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  14. Student Accounting Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor P.O. Box 843036 Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 Fax (804) 828-5463 www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Student Accounting · Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center · 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor · P.O. Box 843036 · Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 · Fax (804) 828-5463 · www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting excess financial aid (not in excess of $200) to any prior academic year charges on my account. 3. I

  15. Student Accounting Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor P.O. Box 843036 Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 Fax (804) 828-5463 www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Student Accounting · Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center · 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor · P.O. Box 843036 · Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 · Fax (804) 828-5463 · www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting-digit routing transit number and your account number. I hereby authorize and request Virginia Commonwealth

  16. Office +27 (0) 21 424 5351 Fax +27 (0) 21 423 4819 Email attorneys@fidfund.co.za Website www.fidfund.co.za Physical 5th Floor, Waalburg Building, 28 Wale Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    .fidfund.co.za Physical 5th Floor, Waalburg Building, 28 Wale Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa Postal P O Box 3062, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa Docex Docex 154, Cape Town B M Molefe (Chief Executive Officer), A M oorr ee--mmaaiilleedd aapppplliiccaattiioonn ffoorrmmss.. Yours faithfully MR S. AFRICA BURSARY CO

  17. Application of the theory of Linear Singular Integral Equations and Contour Integration to Riemann Hilbert Problems for determination of new decoupled expressions of Chandrasekhar's X- and Y- functions for slab geometry in Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabindra Nath Das

    2007-02-22

    In Radiative transfer, the intensities of radiation from the bounding faces of finite slab are obtained in terms of X- and Y- functions of Chandrasekhar . Those are non linear non homogeneous coupled integral equations . Those non linear integral equations are meromorphically extended to the complex plane to get linear non homogeneous coupled integral equations. Those linear integral equations are converted to linear singular integral equations with. linear constraints . Those singular integral equations are then transformed to non homogeneous Riemann Hilbert Problems. Solutions of those Riemann Hilbert Problems are obtained using the theory of linear singular integral equations to decouple those X- and Y- functions. New forms of linear non homogeneous decoupled integral equations are derived for X- and Y- function separately with new linear constraints. Those new decoupled integral equations are transformed into linear singular integral equations to get two new separate non homogeneous Riemann Hilbert problems and to find solutions in terms of one known N- function and five new unknown functions in complex plane . All five functions are represented in terms of N-functions using the theory of contour integration >. Those X- and Y- functions are finally expressed in terms of that N - function and also in terms of H- functions of Chandrasekhar and of integrals in Cauchy principal value sense in the complex plane and real plane. both for conservative and non conservative cases . The H - functions for semi infinite atmosphere are derived as a limiting case from the expression of X- function of finite atmosphere.

  18. Front-end Back-end (b)-4 (b)-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    and research fields. Biopotentials span a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies making the system design

  19. baepgfb-mac4b | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Four Rivers Energy Modernization Project (June 1994) -- Not...

  20. GIZ Sourcebook Module 4b: Inspection and Maintenance and Roadworthiness |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEOGHD Inc| Open

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4B Mark Phifer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to Apply forNavalReginald Agunwah Water(DOE) Office ofLiners andOn

  2. AP-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1AGGIEAL2007-04.pdfALFSummitserved through the

  3. baepgfb-mac4b | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifiesValidation ofUV-RSSSummary WorldConstrained35

  4. VA-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedofDepartment ofDeploymentDepartmentService2 1 24-B

  5. First Floor Records Office, Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Post O ce Bureau of Internal Revenue FTC Archives Building Federal Bureau of Investigation US Court of Transport. Post O ce Government Printing O ce Lafayette Square Renwick Gallery L'Enfant Plaza FAA NASA

  6. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California, consuming an average of 5 billion kWhyr, more than 25 percent of the total electricity consumption for the entire state of New Mexico. 6 It's not just surface water...

  7. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17 Projects forgray vanGuidelines

  8. How the Library is Organized Floor 1 Floor 2 Floor 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    AND to combine terms; use " " around phrases For information on classroom management in middle school "classroom management" and (elementary or middle) For information on inclusive teaching in Grade 4: inclusi

  9. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  10. A structural analysis of the first Cardington test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillie, Martin; Usmani, Asif; Rotter, J Michael

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis of the first Cardington test using shell elements to model the concrete floor slab. The behaviour of these elements is defined using FEAST, a program that allows the behaviour ...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Constructio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    double-stud walls, a vaulted roof with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100%...

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Constructio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100% LED lights. Ferguson Design &...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Coupeville...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has a SIP roof and walls, R-20 rigid foam under slab, triple-pane windows, ground source heat pump for radiant floor heat, and a unique balanced ventilation system using separate...

  14. Delivered by ICEVirtualLibrary.com to: IP: 86.163.247.163

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symons, Digby

    and the concrete. Timber­concrete composite floors can be attractive for both refurbishment and new-build projects. In refurbishment projects the installation of shear connectors followed by the in situ casting of a concrete slab

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat. BAZeroEnergyReadyPreferredBuilders062414.pdf...

  16. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Devoted Builders, LLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Devoted Builders meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the cold climate with R-25 ICF walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  17. The Gravitational Field of a Plane Slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo E. Gamboa Saravi

    2009-05-07

    We discuss the exact solution of Einstein's equation corresponding to a static and plane symmetric distribution of matter with constant positive density located below $z=0$ matched to vacuum solutions.

  18. Numerical treatment of disorder in PHC slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkov, Momchil

    2015-01-01

    This work concentrates on numerical simulations of Photonic Crystal structures using basis-expansion methods, with a main focus on simulating disorder. The plane-wave and guided-mode expansions are outlined as tools to compute the Bloch modes of a structure, on the basis of which the Bloch-mode expansion formalism is outlined - the latter allowing for simulations of large structures in presence of disorder. As a first illustration of the method, we apply it to three gentle-confinement cavities, to obtain results for their quality factors similar to the theoretically predicted in the literature. Furthermore, we compute that random disorder can drive those factors down to the experimentally measured values. As a second application, we study the effect of irregular hole shapes in a PHC waveguide, and find that the correlation length of the irregularity (i.e. the typical scale of the roughness of the features) matters: for higher correlation lengths, the computed modes show both higher band broadening and higher ...

  19. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brain E. (Corral de Tierra, CA); Barsun, Stephan K. (Davis, CA); Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Hoeschele, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Springer, David A. (Winters, CA)

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  20. Product List Substructure -Foundations -Slab on Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Slag Cement Generic 35% Slag Cement Generic 50Cem Slag Cement (35%) Lafarge NewCem Slag Cement (50%) Generic 35% Fly Ash Cement Lafarge Portland Type I Ash Cement Generic 20% Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Slag Cement Generic 35% Slag Cement #12;Generic 50

  1. Plancher solaire direct mixte \\`a double r\\'eseau en habitat bioclimatique - Conception et bilan thermique r\\'eel. Double direct solar floor heating in boclimatic habitation - Design and real energetical balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Larochelambert, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a new direct solar floor heating technique with double heating network wich allows simultaneous use of solar and supply energy. Its main purpose is to store and to diffuse the whole available solar energy while regulating supply energy by physical means without using computer controlled technology. This solar system has been tested in real user conditions inside a bioclimatic house to study the interaction of non-inertial and passive walls on the solar productivity. Daily, monthly and annual energy balances were drawn up over three years and completed by real-time measurements of several physical on-site parameters. As a result the expected properties of this technique were improved. The use of per-hour solar productivity, saved primary energy and corrected solar covering ratio is recommended to analyze the performances of this plant and to allow more refined comparisons with other solar systems

  2. Comparison of DOE-2.1E with Energyplus and TRNSYS for Ground Coupled Residential Buildings in Hot anf Humid Climates Stage 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01

    of the topic. The second section is a comparative analysis between DOE-2, EnergyPlus and TRNSYS programs for slab-on-grade heat transfer in empty sealed boxes in four U.S. climates. 2. INTRODUCTION Ground coupled heat transfer (GCHT) through concrete floor...Plus and DOE-2 slab-on-grade heat transfer based on the results obtained from IECC4 [19] compliant residential buildings in four climates of the U.S. In these comparisons, the TRNSYS slab-on-grade model is used as the truth standard for slab-on-grade heat...

  3. Connection of modular steel beam precast slab units with cast-in-place closure pour slabs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Natalie Camille

    2005-02-17

    -field formwork and lengthy traffic closures. The Texas Department of Transportation proposes a new method of constructing jointless bridges using prefabricated girder-and-deck units connected on-site with cast-in-place closure pours. This new system will expedite...

  4. Elev. Elev. 1st Floor, Building 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    undergrad, 1st year master's and 1st ~ 2nd year doctroal students University Clinic Nishi-Waseda Office 4th year undergrad, 2nd year master's and 3rd year doctoral students Automatic Certificate-Issuing Macine Next to the Stairs Mon.~Sat.: 9:00~21:00 Locations Issuing Medical Certificates 1st ~ 3rd year

  5. PITTSBURGH AIRPORT MARRIOTT HOTEL FLOOR PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10:45 - 12:00 p.m Intermediate Temperature Electrogenerative Cells for Flexible Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel Greg Tao, Materials & Systems Research, Inc. Liquid Fuels...

  6. Johannesburg First Floor, 17 Baker Street,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    and Installation of Rotary UPS, MV Indoor Switchgear and Power Transformers at the MeerKAT site near Carnarvon

  7. Berit Floor Lund Rigorous simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    ingeniør Norwegian University of Science and Technology Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering Department of Engineering Cybernetics #12;Norwegian University of Science and Technology Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering Department

  8. Floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

  9. Formaldehyde Laminate Flooring Clinician Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the eyes, nose, and throat Skin rashes Cough Shortness of breath Bronchospasm and wheezing, especially

  10. CXD 4600, 9103 Second Floor Refurbishment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods POCTBT |CUD-55 /Allen

  11. COMET TA Floor Plan 100225.vc6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013, 4:15pmEnergyNovember 12, 2015,and Night |

  12. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRLFloor

  13. DOE ZERH Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5” SIP walls and 10.25” SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes — Cedarwood, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This house was the Grand Winner in the Affordable Builder category of the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, and has 6-inch SIP walls, a 10-inch structural insulated panel roof, and insulating concrete forms foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab.A single ductless heat pump heats and cools the home, which also gets passive solar heating from south-facing triple-pane windows that heat a concrete slab floor plus a connected greenhouse.

  15. DOE ZERH Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  16. The Jesup W. Scott High School, Toledo, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Harry Clifford

    1914-01-01

    ^" centers for the main reinforcement and 3/8" at 12" centers for shrinkage. Unless otherwise marked (plate#6) all panels, except End floor ceilings slab, were of this kind. Panels of different thickness or of different steel section were so marked... iron and all cast Iron 25 pipe is extra heavy. Drinking fountains and toilets are located on each floor and special toilets are provided for the public and employees. Toilet fixtures, drinking fountains, laboratories and slop sinks are of solid...

  17. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits theSunShot Prize: Race to 7-DayEnergyofWork ||

  18. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex FuelsEnergyInc| Open Energy Information

  19. Part B: Project Summary ITR: A Scalable Enabling IT Infrastructure for Developing Regions (ICT4B)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    , low-power devices, 2) a new approach to low-cost networking based on intermittent connectivity (rather for social science research. The expected 10-100 times reduction in device cost stems from the co times reduction in infrastructure cost comes largely from 1) the focus on intermittent networking, which

  20. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivery and Energy Reliability, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Legacy Management. Responsible for management and implementation of S&S programs administered by the...

  1. Materials Data on Zn4B6SeO12 (SG:217) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  3. Materials Data on Ho4(B2O5)3 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. 10102003 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 26, No. 4B, p. 10101031 August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Oceanography of the U.S. Pacific Northwest Coastal Ocean and Estuaries with Application to Coastal Ecology, Washington 98195 ABSTRACT: Ocean processes are generally large scale on the U.S. Pacific Northwest coast the intensity of upwelling-favorable wind forcing increases south- ward while primary production and chlorophyll

  5. 4B.1 IMPACTS OF HUMIDITY-CORRECTED SONDE DATA ON TOGA COARE ANALYSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junhong

    occurred over the entire depth of sounding profile, but were largest at low levels. Based on extensive humidity sensor. This error affects the entire sounding profile, increases with the age of the sonde at several key sites generally reported hu- midities too dry. In contrast, the sounding systems around 10 N

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuscola, Illinois June 8, 2011 FutureGen Alliance International Non-Profit Consortia 2 Project Description Project Concept 3 Project Description Project Goals * Demonstrate an...

  7. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThreeFebruaryMuseumEffect of photodiodeNoticeTravel-

  8. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4b. Value of Production by Selected Industries,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul1998, and 2002 b Pageand 20021998

  9. Microsoft Word - A-4_B-5BroadcastEmail110911.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E09Grand9/9/11 Total

  10. CP&L-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNGFact S heet:between theCarolina

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms to Speed

  12. Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 0 0EffectiveEffective

  13. Deflection of Concrete Slabs Reinforced with Advanced Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigated as an alternative to overcome the corrosion problem in bridge decks, parking garages, water and wastewater treatment facilities, marine structures and chemical plants. In addition to their excellent non rod produced by Mitsubishi Kasei, Japan. The CFRP rods are fabricated using continuous coal tar pitch

  14. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Géologie de Lyon, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université de Lyon-1, CNRS, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07, France

  15. Experimental observations and analysis of macrosegregation in rolling slab ingots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagstaff, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The increased demand for aluminum as a primary structural metal stems from a quest in automotive, aerospace, and marine industries to be more energy efficient and sustainable. This unprecedented demand drives aluminum ...

  16. X-ray reflection spectra from ionized slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. R. Ross; A. C. Fabian; A. J. Young

    1999-02-23

    X-ray reflection spectra are an important component in the X-ray spectra of many active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole candidates. It is likely that reflection takes place from highly ionized surfaces of the accretion disc in some cases. This can lead to strong Comptonization of the emergent iron, and other, absorption and emission features. We present such reflection spectra here, computed in a self-consistent manner with the method described by Ross and Fabian. In particular we emphasise the range where the ionization parameter (the flux to density ratio) \\xi is around and above 10^4. Such spectra may be relevant to the observed spectral features found in black hole candidates such as Cygnus X-1 in the low/hard state.

  17. Tunable structures comprising two photonic crystal slabs optical study in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter, Yves-Alain

    Department, Ecole Polytechnique de Montr´eal, Montr´eal (QC) H3C 3A7, Canada yves peak. Finally, we investigate the electromagnetic energy distributions at the wavelength

  18. Hybrid heat capacity-moving slab solid-state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-03-01

    Laser material is pumped and its stored energy is extracted in a heat capacity laser mode at a high duty factor. When the laser material reaches a maximum temperature, it is removed from the lasing region and a subsequent volume of laser material is positioned into the lasing region to repeat the lasing process. The heated laser material is cooled passively or actively outside the lasing region.

  19. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotora, J. Jr.; Groh, E.F.; Kann, W.J.; Burelbach, J.P.

    1984-04-10

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprises many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  20. Field Study and Numerical Simulation of Sub Slab Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnefous, Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    1: project report. Bonneville Power Administration Report;Laboratory by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through

  1. Radiative transfer model for contaminated slabs : experimental validations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrieu, François; Schmitt, Bernard; Douté, Sylvain; Brissaud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a set of spectro-goniometric measurements of different water ice samples and the comparison with an approximated radiative transfer model. The experiments were done using the spectro-radiogoniometer described in Brissaud et al. (2004). The radiative transfer model assumes an isotropization of the flux after the second interface and is fully described in Andrieu et al. (2015). Two kind of experiments were conducted. First, the specular spot was closely investigated, at high angular resolution, at the wavelength of $1.5\\,\\mbox{\\mu m}$, where ice behaves as a very absorbing media. Second, the bidirectional reflectance was sampled at various geometries, including low phase angles on 61 wavelengths ranging from $0.8\\,\\mbox{\\mu m}$ to $2.0\\,\\mbox{\\mu m}$. In order to validate the model, we made a qualitative test to demonstrate the relative isotropization of the flux. We also conducted quantitative assessments by using a bayesian inversion method in order to estimate the parameters (e.g. sampl...

  2. The wet Nicaraguan slab Geoffrey A. Abers and Terry Plank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    University, Boston, MA, USA Bradley R. Hacker Department of Geological Sciences, University of California Seismology: Body wave propagation. Citation: Abers, G. A., T. Plank, and B. R. Hacker, The wet Nicaraguan

  3. NUCLEAR SLAB COLLISION IN A RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Germany, and by the Director, Office of Energy Research,Germany, and by the D i r e c t o r , O f f i c e of Energy

  4. Opportunities exist to name an entire floor in the Natural History Building. 1st Floor: $3 million | 2nd Floor: $5 million | 3rd Floor: $4 million | 4th Floor: $2 million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    and film showings. (7,000 students per year) $500,000 · Sedimentology Research Lab: This will be a large laboratory complex that will be the central focus of research and student training in sedimentology. The area

  5. Experimental Validation of Building Vibration Propagation Using a Four Story Laboratory Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Robert D.

    Experimental Validation of Building Vibration Propagation Using a Four Story Laboratory Model@acentech.com Robert D. White, Assistant Professor, Tufts University, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, R vibration levels at each floor. Mathematical models of column, beam, and slab elements were developed

  6. 22|The Structural Engineer 21 February 2006 paper: persaud/symons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symons, Digby

    22|The Structural Engineer ­ 21 February 2006 paper: persaud/symons Synopsis Timber frame buildings of steel. This paper presents results from testing of a composite system that allows the use of timber in `push- out' shear tests and a three-point bend test of a full-scale floor slab has been completed

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows. DOEZEHCliftonViewHom...

  8. Structural analysis, design and evaluation of mock-up platform, monorail, and tank plate cut-out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hundal, T.S.

    1995-12-19

    Platform - Structural analyses were performed for design seismic, live and dead load combinations for the freestanding platform over the partial DST mock-up section. The platform is to be used for Robotic ultrasonic inspection of the tank wall. It is a free standing structure anchored to floor slab with Hilti Kwik bolts.

  9. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tom Walsh & Co.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Tom Walsh & Company’s homes in an urban infill project in Portland achieved meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the marine climate with R-21 fiberglass batt walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 42 without PV and a -1 with PV. This 3,192 ft2 custom home has 6-inch SIP walls, a 12-inch SIP roof, an R-28 ICF-insulated foundation slab edge with R-20 rigid foam under the slab; an air-to-water heat pump plus radiant floor heat; 100% LED lighting; filtered-fan-powered fresh air intake; triple-pane windows, 9.7 kWh PV for electric car charging station.

  11. Human Resources Office Dalia Bldg. 2nd Floor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of soil conservation and water harvesting interventions. Design and evaluate soil and water conservation.icarda.org Post-doctoral Fellow Soil and Water Conservation Position specification Post-doctoral Fellow Reports to: Director, Integrated Water and Land Management Program (IWLMP) Location: Amman, Jordan. Closing date: 12

  12. 1752 Columbia Rd. NW, Fourth Floor Washington, DC 20009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    money and builders could benefit by increasing their profits according to Power Shift, a non the $8,000-10,000 that installing solar on existing homes costs in part because homebuilders purchase's Buydown and the California Tax Credit the total cost to purchase a two kW system is $5

  13. The Behaviour and Design of Composite Floor Systems in Fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Neil

    Modern composite steel frame structures possess a high degree of redundancy. This allows them to survive extreme fires without collapse as there are many alternative loadpaths which can be used to transfer load away from the fire affected part...

  14. Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

    1958-01-01

    This dissertation examines the performance of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) implemented in a mesoscale model in increasingly realistic contexts from under a perfect model assumption and in the presence of significant ...

  15. First Floor Interim Plan: January,2008 Draft: 28 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Visitor 1207 Bio Off Hinsa 1208 Bio Lab Freezer 1209 Bio Lab Radio- isotopes 1004 Bio Lab Animal Bio Phy Fac Res Case 1035 Phy Lab Optic Laser 1133 Phy Lab Waves 1231 Phy Lab Nuclear 1236 Phy Adv Lab 1133A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1133B Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1231A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1321 Phy Study 1233 Phy

  16. First Floor Interim Plan: Fall,2007 Draft: 13 August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Bio Off Hinsa 1208 Bio Lab Freezer 1209 Bio Lab Radio- isotopes 1004 Bio Lab Animal Bio / Phys Develop 1039 Phy Off Case 1038 Phy Fac Res Case 1035 Phy Lab Optic Laser 1133 Phy Lab Waves 1231 Phy Lab Nuclear 1236 Phy Adv Lab 1133A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1133B Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1231A Phy Lab Mod / Waves

  17. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    insulation Wire fasteners Tape measure Sharp utility knife Caulk and foam sealant Caulk gun Stepladder Straightedge Respirator or dust mask Eye protection Protective clothing,...

  18. Characterizing the muscle architecture in cadaveric female pelvic floor muscles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Olivia Thuy-Minh

    2012-01-01

    A. Ashton-Miller. "Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced byComparison of Levator Ani Muscle Defects and Function inMRI Comparison of Levator Ani Structure, Volume, and

  19. Working Towards 100% Electronic Transactions on the Shop Floor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, M.

    1985-01-01

    ~ will have to deal with to succeed. The three companies are General Motors, General Electric, and IBM, and the three major issues are: 1. Building a comprehensive manufucturing!strat egy, not a piece-meal, approach. 2. Building a corporate manufacturing... to strategy planning technique and not to reality. As a result, we will witness one of the largest re-positioning periods in corporate manufacturing history. PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE IBM, like GM and GE, has moved through a consider able period...

  20. International Flooring Conference 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , China Main sources of information W W W W W W W W W W W W · UNECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market by European Forest Institute · US Foreign Agricultural Statistics · Chinese Customs · State Forestry Agency, China · International Wood Markets Group · European Federation of the Parquet Industry Main sources

  1. Indentation and Recovery Tests of Common Resilient Floor Coverings. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price

    1960-01-01

    Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive ...

  2. Indentation and recovery characteristics of common resilient floor coverings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Billy Ray

    1959-01-01

    ?ate'ties At tbe ' Tesperstnres of 50 p an4 11 p. . . . . . ' hf l . Xg, Typical indentation ebd aeooverp corrie af Robber Tile, Vinyl Tile ead Viayl?' Asbestos Tile ~ ' ~ ' ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ "a' ~ ~ ~ ', ~ do" ' l la;: Tppioe1 xsdestotios . end... . . . Rmhagasnsl ~ "r C . I prefect Qhs pi the genes Agricultural ggperiaent gtstion '-entitled &%'ho Desirability of Wetiridle end Methods of is- ' a?-' stslletioa for tloir Coverings, , Drainboard surfaces, yleor snd gall Piaiehes', ead gall. Co...

  3. ECE Graduate Student Affairs Engineering Building I, 2nd Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    , Applied Additional Courses Electromagnetic Theory - Electromagnetics and Computational Methods Coursework (twenty units) SIO 214 A Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Core Courses SIO 202 A-B Fundamentals for Electromagnetics, Advanced Antenna Design ECE 250 Random Processes Total: 12 Units ECE 251 A-B-C-D1 Digital Signal

  4. ECE Graduate Student Affairs Engineering Building I, 2nd Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -B-C3 Antennas and Their System Applications, Applied Electromagnetic Theory - Electromagnetics and Computational Methods for Electromagnetics ECE 230 A-B-C Solid State Electronics I, II and III ECE 236 A IIIPhotonics, BioElectronics, BioNanotechnology ECE 251 A-B Digital Signal Processing I and II ECE 253 Fundamentals

  5. Entropy "floor" and effervescent heating of intracluster gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roychowdhury, S; Nath, B B; Begelman, M C; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2004-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies have shown that the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM), even at radii as large as half the virial radius, is higher than that expected from gravitational processes alone. This is thought to be the result of nongravitational processes influencing the physical state of the ICM. In this paper, we investigate whether heating by a central AGN can explain the distribution of excess entropy as a function of radius. The AGN is assumed to inject buoyant bubbles into the ICM, which heat the ambient medium by doing pdV work as they rise and expand. Several authors have suggested that this "effervescent heating" mechanism could allow the central regions of clusters to avoid the ``cooling catastrophe''. Here we study the effect of effervescent heating at large radii. Our calculations show that such a heating mechanism is able to solve the entropy problem. The only free parameters of the model are the time-averaged luminosity and the AGN lifetime. The results are main...

  6. Entropy "floor" and effervescent heating of intracluster gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Roychowdhury; M. Ruszkowski; B. B. Nath; Mitchell C. Begelman

    2004-07-08

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies have shown that the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM), even at radii as large as half the virial radius, is higher than that expected from gravitational processes alone. This is thought to be the result of nongravitational processes influencing the physical state of the ICM. In this paper, we investigate whether heating by a central AGN can explain the distribution of excess entropy as a function of radius. The AGN is assumed to inject buoyant bubbles into the ICM, which heat the ambient medium by doing pdV work as they rise and expand. Several authors have suggested that this "effervescent heating" mechanism could allow the central regions of clusters to avoid the ``cooling catastrophe''. Here we study the effect of effervescent heating at large radii. Our calculations show that such a heating mechanism is able to solve the entropy problem. The only free parameters of the model are the time-averaged luminosity and the AGN lifetime. The results are mainly sensitive to the total energy injected into the cluster. Our model predicts that the total energy injected by AGN should be roughly proportional to the cluster mass. The expected correlation is consistent with a linear relation between the mass of the central black hole(s) and the mass of the cluster, which is reminiscent of the Magorrian relation between the black hole and bulge mass.

  7. Second Floor Interim Plan: January,2008 Draft: 28 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2114 Chem Fac Res Marzluff 2113 Chem Fac Res Mobley 2605 Chem Fac Res Off Sharpe 2024 Chem Classroom 2023 Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage

  8. Second Floor Interim Plan: Fall,2007 Draft: 10 August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    .Chem Lab 2331 Chem Intro/Org Lab Instrumentation 2331A Telecom 2213 Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2114 Chem Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage 2133 Organic Chem Lab 2134 Intro

  9. Second Floor Interim Plan: Summer,2007 Draft: 6 April 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Intro.Chem Lab 2331 Chem Intro/Org Lab Instrumentation 2331A Telecom 2213 Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2008 Chem Fac Res Lyons 2806 StckrmOff Campbell then Math Off Visitor 2807 Chem Glassware Storage 2809 Classroom 2023 Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage 2133 Organic Chem Lab 2134

  10. Production system improvement : floor area reduction and visual management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhuling, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis suggests on the development process of a new layout design and visual management tools to improve the efficiency of a production line in a medical device company. Lean production philosophy and common lean ...

  11. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Efficient waste-recovery methods for rare-earth metals are one way to reduce demand for these limited mined resources. The process,...

  12. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the rare-earth metals for reuse. But CMI scientist Ikenna Nlebedim said he and co-inventor Bill McCallum wanted to push further. "We decided to see if there is a possibility of...

  13. Exploring abundance under the sea floor By Alvin Powell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    instruments designed to take measurements there. Girguis and research associate Scott Wankel, who describe

  14. Accessibility Building Name Grid to the ground floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    Cogeneration Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F3 J Busch Dining Hall

  15. Financial Services and Operations 2nd Floor Lakeshore Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or type The number below is: Individual Taxpayer ID No. (ITIN) Social Security No. Federal Employer ID No

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFTArea

  17. Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy

  18. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirementsRecycling

  19. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA TokenCommercialSTEMSarah L.Department of Energy

  20. Probing triple-Higgs productions via $4b2\\gamma$ at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    The quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or ILC at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed MC simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel $HHH\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}\\gamma\\gamma$, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than $1.8\\times 10^4$ ab$^{-1}$. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear ($\\lambda_3$) and quartic ($\\lambda_4$) self-couplings of the Higgs. We find that, through a search in the triple Higgs production, the...

  1. Probing triple-Higgs productions via $4b2?$ at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien-Yi Chen; Qi-Shu Yan; Xiaoran Zhao; Zhijie Zhao; Yi-Ming Zhong

    2015-10-23

    The quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or ILC at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed MC simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel $HHH\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}\\gamma\\gamma$, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than $1.8\\times 10^4$ ab$^{-1}$. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear ($\\lambda_3$) and quartic ($\\lambda_4$) self-couplings of the Higgs. We find that, through a search in the triple Higgs production, the parameters $\\lambda_3$ and $\\lambda_4$ can be restricted to the ranges $[-1, 5]$ and $[-20, 30]$, respectively. We also examine how new physics can change the production rate of triple-Higgs events. For example, in the singlet extension of the Standard Model, we find that the triple-Higgs production rate can be increased by a factor of $\\mathcal{O}(10)$.

  2. A. 4 B. -7/8 0.1/4 D. *8/7 E. _1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The level of air pollution in a certain city is proportional to the square of the ... Use di?erentials to estimate the percentage by which the air-pollution level will ...

  3. 4 B: v .j.. i. AK ' 8 ,7-7 .......... .B~,8 j > V '~ models must therefore accurately repro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jernvall, Jukka

    waves, and their reflections on the eastern and western ocean basin boundaries (8, 15, 32, 33). Eastern/05 (Universite de Paris VI, Paris, 1993). 13. A. E. Gill, J. Phys. Oceanogr. 13, 586 (1983). 14. M. J. Mc. 96, 22135 (1991). 25. C. Maes, thesis, Universitb de Paris VI, Paris (1996). 26. S. K. Esbensen and Y

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b-Mound Reindustrilaization Workshop Parts 1-3-Hanford-Adrian_comp

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V.How DOE and the Tri

  5. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings: The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L. F.; Steigauf, B.

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy/3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  6. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings. The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Steigauf, Brianna

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy / 3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  7. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, Robert C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  8. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  9. Mechanical Air Distribution and Interacting Relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N. A.

    1989-01-01

    housing is much tighter today than in 1965 when this article was written. Early last year several counties in central Florida were put on alert for having high concentrations of radon. Infiltration causes radon gas to enter through cracks... in the floor slab and hollow concrete block walls, etc. This has been cited many times by research papers, TV and the local news papers alerting the public of itsf dagger and need for detection and mitigation . Indoor radon concentration is believed...

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Greenbank, Washington that scored HERS 37 without PV and a -5 with PV. This 1,955 ft2 custom home has 6.5-inch structural insulated panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows.

  11. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Air Volume Term Definition W Watt ZNE Zero-net-energyConditioning in Near Zero-Net- Energy Buildings The goal ofconstruct a building with zero net energy use. The building

  12. Fire Experiments of Thin-Walled CFRP Pretensioned High Strength Concrete Slabs Under Service Load 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrasi, Giovanni; Maluk, Cristian; Bisby, Luke; Hugi, Erich; Kanik, Birol

    2012-06-14

    deteriorates at elevated temperature and that high strength concrete tends to an explosive spalling failure mode when subjected to a fire. The bond strength reductions in fire, their impacts on the load-bearing capacity of prestressed concrete structures...

  13. Electromagnetic vacuum energy for two parallel slabs in terms of surface, wave guide and photonic modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bordag

    2012-01-05

    The formulation of the Lifshitz formula in terms of real frequencies is reconsidered for half spaces described by the plasma model. It is shown that besides the surface modes (for the TM polarization), and the photonic modes, also waveguide modes must be considered.

  14. FULL SCALE TESTING OF A BRIDGE DECK SLAB REINFORCED WITH CFRP K. Charieson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Canada to incorporate carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement into part ofthe concrete deck reinforced polymer (FRP) which could be carbon, glass or aramid fibres, provides an effective preventative bridges. Fibre reinforced polymer (FRP), offers an effective alternative to the use of conventional steel

  15. / free-slip / free-slip Numerical models of slab deformation in the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    of the plate. Model: Model domain: Results: Effect of decoupling mechanism 410 km 660 km oceánska doska nadlozná doska Results: Effect of boundary condition Effect of yield stress Plate velocity Kinematic, crust.s 1020 Pa.s 1021 Pa.s Free-slip, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 108 Pa Kinematic, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 109 Pa

  16. Application of the Grillage Methodology to Determine Load Distribution Factors for Spread Slab Beam Bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen-Gauthier, Joel

    2013-08-09

    Transverse load distribution behavior amongst bridge girders is influenced by many parameters including girder material properties, spacing, skew, deck design, and stiffening element interactions. In order to simply and ...

  17. Plumesubduction interaction in southern Central America: Mantle upwelling and slab melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the different models that explain this OIB signature in an arc setting. We report a migration of back-arc alkaline volcanism towards the northwest, consistent with arc-parallel mantle flow models, and a migration primary magmas increased from close to ambient mantle (~1380­1410 °C) in the Pliocene to ~1450 °C

  18. -vyuzit fyzikln-chemickch vlastnost sloucenin (povrchov aktivita, slab interakce, rozpustnost plyn)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    látka známá látka #12;RF (OH)n RF RF O ++ X = F, H CX2 CX RF (OH)n (OH)n CH2 CC CH3 O O Síovadla pro.; Boutevin, B. J. Fluorine Chem. 1995, 75, 87-92. #12;RF (OH)n RF RF O ++ X = F, H CX2 CX RF (OH)n (OH)n CH2

  19. Slab dehydration in the Earth's mantle transition zone Guillaume Richard , David Bercovici, Shun-Ichiro Karato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dependent solubility. The self-adjustment entails the concentration of water reaching a local maximum below the top of the high water solubility in wadsleyite and ringwoodite, the mantle transition zone is possibly a large water reservoir. The potentially high water content of the Earth's mantle transition zone is a key

  20. Guided-mode resonance photonic crystal slab sensors based on bead monolayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Polytechnique de Montr´eal, Montr´eal (QC) H3C 3A7, Canada lina.shi@polymtl.ca Abstract: Using finite wavelength as electro-magnetic energy distribution in some guided-mode resonances can be strongly localized

  1. Seismic fragility and retrofitting for a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Jong-Wha

    2004-09-30

    .....................................67 Table 4.10. 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years ground motions for St. Louis, Missouri (from Wen and Wu 2000) ............................................................70 Table 4.11. 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years ground... motions for St. Louis, Missouri (from Wen and Wu 2000) ............................................................71 Table 4.12. 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years ground motions for Memphis, Tennessee (from Wen and Wu 2000...

  2. Toroidal Mantle Flow Through the Western U.S. Slab Window1 and E. Humphreys2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    River Plain (Schutt et al., 1998), portions of the Colorado Plateau (Gok et al., 2003) and near the48 of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, where lithosphere is imaged to depths of ~200 km35 (Dueker et al directions46 are commonly oriented close to the direction of absolute plate motion (e.g., across the Snake47

  3. Life Cycle Modeling of Concrete Bridge Design: Comparison of Engineered Cementitious Composite Link Slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepech, Michael D.

    performance: 40% less life cycle energy consumption, 50% less solid waste generation, and 38% less raw of the national highway and road system. While United States consumption is significant, glo- bal construction: Concrete infrastructure represents an enormous investment of materials, energy, and capital, and results

  4. An analysis of the flow of heat from tubes buried in a concrete slab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdredge, Ernest C

    1951-01-01

    , thc curves become atraiCht lines whoa plot "0!! Qn 1GC paper ae shown on PiCure 3 ~ It is now possible to write a sep-rate ec~uation for each value of. , To writs a sinple d equaLlo!E or aII values of it is necessary to find expressions for a C, b...

  5. Performance analysis of an integrated UFAD and radiant hydronic slab system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Paul; Ho Lee, Kwang; Webster, Tom; Bauman, Fred

    2011-01-01

    validation of the EnergyPlus low-temperature radiantbuilding>. [19] US DOE. EnergyPlus: building technologiesenergy.gov/buildings/energyplus/>. [20] Henninger RH, Witte

  6. Analysis of a hybrid UFAD and radiant hydronic slab HVAC system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Paul; Lee, Kwang Ho; Webster, Thomas; Bauman, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Validation of the EnergyPlus Low-Temperature Radiantviewsede/ DOE, “EnergyPlus: Building Technologies Program,”apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus/ DOE, “EnergyPlus

  7. Two-dimensional design of post-tensioned concrete flat slab bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Suchitra Bahadur

    1993-01-01

    for more than two years. The analysis takes into account losses due to creep, shrinkage, relaxation, friction, and cracking. Fringe plots of deflections and stresses show the graphical capabilities of the microcomputer software package used for this study....

  8. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    1.4-20: Heating water valve position and air and water1.4-22: Heating water valve position and air and water1.4-20: Heating water valve position and air and water

  9. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency Renewableof transporting thermal energy with water vs. air (about 7chilled water system, thereby saving energy. When outside

  10. ENSO diversity as a result of the recharge oscillator interacting with the slab ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    of Mathematical Sciences Monash University, VIC 3800 Australia yanshan.yu@monash.edu Abstract1 El Nino of El Nino­Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (Wyrtki 1975; Wyrtki 1985;21 Jin 1997). It is a zero order fast, the diversity in the patterns29 of ENSO events, with more El Nino events occurring in the central Pacific (CP El

  11. Controlling circular polarization of light emitted by quantum dots using chiral photonic crystal slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobanov, S V; Gippius, N A; Maksimov, A A; Filatov, E V; Tartakovskii, I I; Kulakovskii, V D; Weiss, T; Schneider, C; Geßler, J; Kamp, M; Höfling, S

    2015-01-01

    Polarization properties of the emission have been investigated for quantum dots embedded in chiral photonic crystal structures made of achiral planar GaAs waveguides. A modification of the electromagnetic mode structure due to the chiral grating fabricated by partial etching of the waveguide layer has been shown to result in a high circular polarization degree $\\rho_c$ of the quantum dot emission in the absence of external magnetic field. The physical nature of the phenomenon can be understood in terms of the reciprocity principle taking into account the structural symmetry. At the resonance wavelength, the magnitude of $|\\rho_c|$ is predicted to exceed 98%. The experimentally achieved value of $|\\rho_c|=81$% is smaller, which is due to the contribution of unpolarized light scattered by grating defects, thus breaking its periodicity. The achieved polarization degree estimated removing the unpolarized nonresonant background from the emission spectra can be estimated to be as high as 96%, close to the theoretic...

  12. Subduction factory 2. Are intermediate-depth earthquakes in subducting slabs linked to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    dehydration reactions? Bradley R. Hacker,1 Simon M. Peacock,2 Geoffrey A. Abers,3 and Stephen D. Holloway2 Citation: Hacker, B. R., S. M. Peacock, G. A. Abers, and S. D. Holloway, Subduction factory, 2 is not sufficient for generating an earthquake. The companion paper by Hacker et al. [2003] outlines

  13. Subduction factory: 4. Depthdependent flux of H2O from subducting slabs worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Keken,1 Bradley R. Hacker,2 Ellen M. Syracuse,3 and Geoff A. Abers4 Received 9 August 2010; revised 19. Hacker, E. M. Syracuse, and G. A. Abers (2011), Subduction factory: 4. Depthdependent flux of H2O from

  14. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    exchange, thermal energy storage tanks, heat recovery wheel,exchange, thermal energy storage tanks, heat recovery wheel,

  15. Theory of Pulsed Four-Wave-Mixing in One-dimensional Silicon Photonic Crystal Slab Waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavdas, Spyros

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical analysis and computational study of four-wave mixing (FWM) of optical pulses co-propagating in one-dimensional silicon photonic crystal waveguides (Si-PhCWGs). Our theoretical analysis describes a very general set-up of the interacting optical pulses, namely we consider nondegenerate FWM in a configuration in which at each frequency there exists a superposition of guiding modes. We incorporate in our theoretical model all relevant linear optical effects, including waveguide loss, free-carrier (FC) dispersion and FC absorption, nonlinear optical effects such as self- and cross-phase modulation (SPM, XPM), two-photon absorption (TPA), and cross-absorption modulation (XAM), as well as the coupled dynamics of FCs and optical field. In particular, our theoretical analysis based on the coupled-mode theory provides rigorously derived formulae for linear dispersion coefficients of the guiding modes, linear coupling coefficients between these modes, as well as the nonlinear waveg...

  16. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-On-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes covers two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  17. Live load effects in diaphragms of concrete slab-on-steel girder highway bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saindon, Kenneth Carl

    1994-01-01

    of diaphragm member forces under vehicle live load for both the strength and fatigue limit states. These forces are shown to vary significantly among bridges with different diaphragm-deck stiffness ratios and 0 values, where 8 is a property based upon bridge...

  18. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    CIEE State Partnership for Energy Efficient DemonstrationsAir Volume Term Definition W Watt ZNE Zero-net-energyASHRAE. CPUC. 2011. CA Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan:

  19. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    thermal mass, advanced window blinds that redirect solar energythermal mass, advanced window blinds that redirect solar energy

  20. Slab edge insulating form system and methods (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System in the CERN SPS(Journal Article) | SciTechPatent:

  1. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  2. Data:C6bdf72a-ed0a-4b57-b925-933e6f205d63 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bba-b1e5-536338a1d458 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  5. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Volume 2, Session 3A--Session 4B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  6. BTu4B.6.pdf Biomedical Optics and 3D Imaging OSA 2012 Dynamic imaging of in vitro human airway epithelium using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Amy

    , the mucus layer must transport the pathogenic materials from the lungs via mucociliary transport or cough

  7. such structure is depicted in the upper panel of Fig. 4b. It compares very well qualitatively with the model result shown in the lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    aspects of these self-assembly mechanisms have previously been rationalized on the basis of seemingly of its energetics and dynamical rules, the degree of local order and anisotropy out of equilibrium. Bray, A. J. Theory of phase-ordering kinetics. Adv. Phys. 43, 357­459 (1994). 2. Tanaka, H

  8. ,"Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9" ,"Released:3a. January Monthly Peak HourB

  9. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  10. Controlling Mold Growth after the Storm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2005-09-30

    . If possible, use air conditioning or heat with fans and dehumidifiers. If you have no power and can get access to a generator, run a dehumidifier indoors to help remove moisture from the air. New mold colonies can form in as little as 3 days if materials..., but they do not prevent regrowth. 6. Do all you can to speed the drying of subfloors, slabs and wall framing before replacing insulation, wallboard and flooring. Use air conditioning, heaters, fans or, better yet, a dehumidifier. Contractors who...

  11. Second Floor N314 N313 N312 N311 N310 N309N308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecture Theatre 1 (N111) Seminar Room 1 Tea & Cofee Station Seminar Room 2 Programme Office Office Clonskeagh Donnyrook Ballsbridge Ranelagh St Stephens Green Sandymount Dundrum Herbert Park Location Map

  12. Directions to U-M Occupational Health Services (3rd floor, Med Inn Building)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    at the Cardiovascular Center underground7. parking. East Hospital Drive ends at the Med Inn parking lot.8. Choose at the Cardiovascular Center underground6. parking. East Hospital Drive ends at the Med Inn parking lot.7. Choose parking lot.11. Choose a space designated for Occupational Health parking. MED INN PARKING FROM NORTH

  13. Long-term Neurological Outcomes in Adults with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Admitted to ICU versus Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    low-risk patients as age less than 65 years, isolated headLow-risk defined as admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, isolated head

  14. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    longer-run management of greenhouse gas emis- sions; thatthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severinthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severin

  15. Low-floor Bus Design Preferences of Walking Aid Users during Simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Applied Ergonomics, 10.1016/j.apergo.2012.07.011. A Visual Haptic System for Children with Learning- fessor this August. She is the director of the Ergonomics and Bio- mechanics Lab. Dr. Cavuoto's work and muscle fatigue. The results of this work were recently published in Applied Ergonomics. The outcomes

  16. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  17. Geometric, topological & semantic analysis of multi-building floor plan data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Emily J

    2006-01-01

    Generating a comprehensive model of a university campus or other large urban space is a challenging undertaking due to the size, geometric complexity, and levels of rich semantic information contained in inhabited environments. ...

  18. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    economic slowdown cuts oil demand. At the intersection ofoil price, the expected retail gasoline price and consumption quantities are shown using a short-run demand

  19. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Ola Eiken

    2004-11-29

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 3/18/04 to 9/19/04. During this time, we participated in several CO{sub 2} sequestration-related meetings and conferences. On March 29, 2004, we participated in the 2004 Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting for the Department of Energy in Pittsburgh, PA. During the week of May 2, 2004, we attended and presented at the Third Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in Alexandria, VA. Finally, during the week of August 8, 2004, we took part in the U.S.-Norway, CO{sub 2} Summer School in Santa Fe, NM. Additional modeling was also completed, examining the seismic velocity pushdown estimates from the gravity models and the expected deformation of the seafloor due to the injected CO{sub 2}.

  20. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2004-05-19

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/03 to 3/18/04. During this time, significant advancement in the 3-D gravity forward modeling code was made. Testing of the numerical accuracy of the code was undertaken using both a sheet of mass and a frustum of a cone for test cases. These were chosen because of our ability to do an analytic calculation of gravity for comparison. Tests were also done to determine the feasibility of using point mass approximations rather than cuboids for the forward modeling code. After determining that the point mass approximation is sufficient (and over six times faster computationally), several CO{sub 2} models were constructed and the time-lapse gravity signal was calculated from each. From these models, we expect to see a gravity change ranging from 3-16 {micro}Gal/year, depending on reservoir conditions and CO{sub 2} geometry. While more detailed modeling needs to be completed, these initial results show that we may be able to learn a great deal about the state of the CO{sub 2} from the time-lapse gravity results. Also, in December of 2003, we presented at the annual AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  1. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zuberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2003-11-17

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A three-week trip to Statoil Research Centre in Trondheim, Norway, was made in the summer of 2003. This visit consisted of gathering data and collaborating with scientists working on the Sleipner project. The trip ended with a presentation of the seafloor gravity results to date at a SACS2 (Saline Aquifer CO{sub 2} Storage 2) meeting. This meeting provided the perfect opportunity to meet and gather information from the world's experts on the Sleipner project.

  2. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner

    2005-07-11

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/04 to 3/18/05. During this time, gravity and pressure modeling were completed and work graduate student Scott Nooner began writing his Ph.D. dissertation, of which this work is a the major part. Improvements to the gravimeters are also underway that will hopefully increase the measurement precision.

  3. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  4. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  5. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    May 2004. Espey, M. “Gasoline Demand Revisited: AnRun Price Elasticity of Gasoline Demand,” Energy Journal,114. Poterba, J. “Is the Gasoline Tax Regressive? ,” in D.

  6. Monitored Performance of an Office Building with an Under-floor Air Distribution System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, C.; Norford, L.

    2005-01-01

    of the building. The mechanical room is located on the roof above the atrium. The façade is nearly 100% glazing, with fixed shading devices installed to reduce solar heat and glare. On the south and west façades, photovoltaics are integrated into the shading... of the photovoltaics, integrated with the exterior shading devices on the southern and the western façades, to the energy consumption of the building could be determined from the detailed sub- metering data. The monthly contribution of the photovoltaics ranged from...

  7. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    diesel and jet fuels. It would target a certain oil pricediesel and jet fuel. That quantity would vary, of course, both with the price

  8. Swing: From Time to Torque (Dance Floor Democracy at the Hollywood Canteen)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Sherrie

    2013-10-08

    childhood growing up in a small segregated Texas town, a career as an actor spent moving through predomi- nantly white crowds in a racially marked body, basic training with other black recruits under white of½cers at Montford Point, a furlough spent trying... of segregated and unequal condi- tions for black Marines. Montford Point also had a pool, he tells me, but black Marines couldn’t use it, only the white of½cers.28 The proximity and restrictions from swimming pools and movie stars at Mont- ford Point mirror his...

  9. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    load and capacity; solar heat gain; Radiant design standardssignificance of solar radiation in the design process andthe magnitude of solar impacts under various design/control

  10. Innovative accessible sunken floor systems for multi-story steel buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Henry K

    1987-01-01

    With the demands of telecommunications and computer equipment, building owners and designers are facing an increasingly difficult problem for wire management in today's electronic workplace. This thesis is to investigate ...

  11. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a fa

  12. An evaluation of floor surfaces on the basis of skin temperature during constrained standing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monford, Leo Gabriel

    1995-01-01

    Determining compound levels in fruits and vegetables is necessary in the food industry for appropriate management and processing of these products. A fast, nondestructive and reliable method of measuring compounds is ...

  13. Dance Floor Reverberations: Affect and Experience in Contemporary Electronic Dance Music 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher

    2015-08-10

    In recent years, electronic dance music (EDM) and dance music culture have gained immense popularity. This thesis looks at EDM’s contemporary cultural landscape and what changes this popularity has brought about. While ...

  14. RYCKMAN LECTURE SERIES AND EARTH DAY CELEBRATION Lunch reception to follow, Second Floor, Brauer Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    used to counter the threat posed by Naegleria fowleri in water distribu- tion systems. The Chlorine Revolution: The Importance of Chlorination, 1908 (Typhoid Fever) to 2014 (Naegleria fowleri) EECE Department

  15. Chemistry of burning the forest floor during the FROSTFIRE experimental burn, interior Alaska, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    in interior Alaska, and were analyzed for bulk density, major and trace elements, and organic compounds. Concentrations of carbon, nutrients, and several major and trace elements were significantly altered by the burn: Biogeochemical processes (4805); 1030 Geochemistry: Geochemical cycles (0330); KEYWORDS: combustion, experimental

  16. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    for Standardization, Brussels, Belgium, 2006. EnergyPlus.2009. EnergyPlus Input Output Reference.The Encyclopedic Reference to EnergyPlus Input and output.

  17. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    a direct comparison of EnergyPlus simulated radiation heatStandards, 1983. [19] DOE, EnergyPlus Engineering Reference,as the ratio of the EnergyPlus simulated radiant cooling

  18. Detecting Floor Anomalies Michael R. M. Jenkin1 and Allan Jepson2;z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jepson, Allan D.

    is to determine where an robot can go by identifying oor regions for which the planar oor assumption can be veri and forklifts moving about; oil and water spills on the oor; oor drains which can be uncovered; hoses, tools regions of the oor can be expected to contain structure which violates the planarity assumption

  19. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    oil price, the expected retail gasoline price and consumption quantities are shown using a short-run demand elasticity assumption

  20. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    and jet fuels. It would target a certain oil price andjet fuel. That quantity would vary, of course, both with the price

  1. Spring 2009 Assistant professor Laura Valdiviezo takes to the floor during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to support new tenure- track faculty in the School of Education to become successful scholars and teachers faculty on the "nuts and bolts" of academic life. It grew in 2008, when a meeting assessing the needs groups to support each other in their scholarly work. "I appreciated the supportive atmosphere

  2. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Menguc, Thermal radiation heat transfer, CRC Press, 2011.convection and radiation heat transfer are compared to theused for this study. Radiation Heat Transfer In the ASHRAE

  3. Support Vector Networks for Prediction of Floor Pressures in Shallow Cavity Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    known fact that skin friction on air vehicles reduces the maneuverability and agility while increasing development side of the above mentioned ultimate goal. Feedback control performance on aerodynamic flow sys author, and he is with TOBB Economics and Technology University, Department of Electrical and Electronics

  4. An evaluation of standing-induced lower leg edema as a function of floor surace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiSalvi, Lawrence Roberts

    1995-01-01

    of the surfaces. The surfaces used included: two brands of anti-fatigue mat, three types of industrial grating, and concrete. Using water volume displacement, edema of three segments of the right leg (ankle-and-below, calf-and-below, and knee...

  5. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Wade, Dale D.

    2006-08-01

    Abstract—Dead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

  6. Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Fabio

    velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

  7. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    as a function of crude oil prices with and without the FPSP.NYMEX front-month crude oil price that is generally referrederence between the price of crude oil and the target price.

  8. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave energy, wave energy converter, WEC, electrical energy, alternative energy, hydrokinetic energy on the coasts of the United States the harvesting ocean wave energy is ideal. It is projected that wave energy

  9. 970 East 58th Street 3rd floor Chicago, IL 60637 773-702-8000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    with the University; and to ensure the University's compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards merchant standards and/or industry standards for the processing of credit cards or automated clearing house of a proposed application with PCIDSS and industry best practices for conducting electronic payment transactions

  10. Valley floor climate observations from the McMurdo dry valleys, Antarctica, 19862000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    : Pressure, density, and temperature; 1610 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); 1650 Global Change: Solar with proximity to the polar plateau. Site- to-site variation in mean annual solar flux and PAR is due to exposure.992) of increasing potential temperature with distance from the coast (0.09°C kmÀ1 ). In contrast to mean annual

  11. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    M. Filippi, B.W. Olesen, Solar radiation and cooling loadY. Chen, The effect of solar radiation on dynamic thermaldependant upon solar radiation, ASHRAE Transactions, (2006)

  12. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    the exposure to direct solar radiation, and the presence ofthe influence of direct solar radiation, and the presence ofdue to the incident solar radiation. Figure 3 Box-plot for

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology

  14. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReportReport

  15. 1st-Order Current-Induced Textural Transition of He-3-a in a Thin Slab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Ren.

    1979-01-01

    . ' M. C. Cross and P. W. Anderson, in Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Lo~ Temperature Physics, Otaniemi, Finland, 1975, edited by M. Krusius and M. Vurio {North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1975), Vol. I, p. 29. ~4J. C. Wheatley...

  16. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The rangemore »of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  17. Slab retreat and active shortening along the central-northern The interpretation of CROP seismic profiles, integrated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    linea sismica a riflessione CROP M-15 e la rielaborazione dei dati geologici e geofi- sici disponibili

  18. Spring 2005 Test #1 1. Steady state heat conduction in a slab with heat generation. (40 points)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCready, Mark J.

    conductivity is a function of x, k = k0 + k1 x. #12;2. Transpirational cooling in a cylindrical geometry (35 to the surroundings is given by a heat transfer coefficient and Newton's law of cooling q(R) = h (T(R) -T0). a. Write

  19. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-01

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  20. Room temperature spontaneous emission enhancement from quantum dots in photonic crystal slab cavities in the telecommunications C-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hostein, Richard; Larqué, Matthieu; Lee, Ko-Hsin; Talneau, Anne; Gratiet, Luc Le; Robert-Philip, Isabelle; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beveratos, Alexios; 10.1063/1.3104855

    2009-01-01

    We report on the control of the spontaneous emission dynamics from InAsP self-assembled quantum dots emitting in the telecommunications C-band and weakly coupled to the mode of a double heterostructure cavity etched on a suspended InP membrane at room temperature. The quality factor of the cavity mode is 44x10^3 with an ultra-low modal volume of the order of 1.2 lambda/n)^3, inducing an enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of up a factor of 2.8 at 300 K.

  1. Room temperature spontaneous emission enhancement from quantum dots in photonic crystal slab cavities in the telecommunications C-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Hostein; Rémy Braive; Matthieu Larqué; Ko-Hsin Lee; Anne Talneau; Luc Le Gratiet; Isabelle Robert-Philip; Isabelle Sagnes; Alexios Beveratos

    2009-03-25

    We report on the control of the spontaneous emission dynamics from InAsP self-assembled quantum dots emitting in the telecommunications C-band and weakly coupled to the mode of a double heterostructure cavity etched on a suspended InP membrane at room temperature. The quality factor of the cavity mode is 44x10^3 with an ultra-low modal volume of the order of 1.2 lambda/n)^3, inducing an enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of up a factor of 2.8 at 300 K.

  2. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Composites Containing MQ (II-VI) Slabs: A New Class of Nanostructures with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    , for example, periodic arrays of quantum dots (QDs), are necessary to achieve a sharp line width and strong intensity for practical applications in optoelec- tronic devices.1 Quantum dots grown by colloidal meth- ods properties of the semiconductor bulk materials.2a For example, the InP dots with size ranging 2-6 nm

  3. Demonstration of high waveguide bending efficiency (>90%) in a photonic-crystal slab at 1.5m wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -crystal waveguide bend. In this paper, we reported the first quantitative experimental study of bending efficiency in a photonic crystal waveguide bend at =1.5µm. The paper is structured as follows. In the first part. In the second part of paper, we report the quantitative analysis of bending efficiency in a photonic- crystal

  4. Early-age concrete temperature and moisture relative to curing effectiveness and projected effects on selected aspects of slab behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Dan

    2009-05-15

    of TMAC2 program. The concrete pavement was cast at the FAA National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) near Atlantic City, New Jersey. In this study, the concrete set maturity was 6 determined and the relationship between shrinkage................................................................................... 144 Fig. V-10. Vibrating Wire Gage EM-5........................................................................ 144 Fig. V-11. Free Shrinkage Test Setup.......................................................................... 145 Fig. V-12...

  5. Slab interactions in the Taiwan region based on the P-and S-velocity distributions in the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    and the Ryukyu arc, separated with a transform fault. The NW movement of the Philippine Sea Plate led to first located in a contact zone between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the tectonic processes the Philippine Sea plate underneath the Luzon Island. The Taiwan Island is located at the junction between

  6. Consequences of the Fermat's anisotropic uniaxial principle on the reflexion and transmission factors for one-dimensional uniaxial crystal slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeDez, Vital

    2010-01-01

    A coherent definition of the reflection and transmission factors at a plane interface separating two uniaxial crystals is proposed, from the photons impulsion-energy 4-vectors conservation. This definition, different from the classical electromagnetic one, is compatible with the completely resolved extended Fermat's principle of the geometric optics for extraordinary luminous rays inside uniaxial media, and allows the exact calculation of the transmission factors at the plane interface for any practical configuration, combining all possible optical axes and anisotropy factors variations. Furthermore, this particular technique points out the existence of quasi-particles strongly associated to the photons, whose behaviour is highly correlated to the photons transmission/reflection possibilities.

  7. Quantization of surface plasmon polariton on the metal slab by Green's tensor method in amplifying and attenuating media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Allameh; R. Roknizadeh; R. Masoudi

    2015-07-15

    A quantized form of Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) modes propagating on the metal thin film is provided, which is based on the Green's tensor method. Since the media will be considered lossy and dispersive, the amplification and attenuation of the SPP modes in various dielectric media, by applying different field frequencies, can be studied. We will also illustrate the difference between behavior of coherent and squeezed SPP modes in the amplifying media.

  8. Arc Basalt Simulator version 2, a simulation for slab dehydration and fluid-fluxed mantle melting for arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    @jamstec.go.jp) Bradley R. Hacker Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9630, USA (hacker@geol.ucsb.edu) Peter E. van Keken Department of Geological Sciences, University. Hacker, P. E. van Keken, H. Kawabata, T. Yoshida, and R. J. Stern (2009), Arc Basalt Simulator version 2

  9. AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, D.T.

    2011-01-01

    frame construction. floor furnace heating. m floor windows,Gas forced air heating system. 100 m floor area, 230 msolar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 m floor

  10. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    NMBE Floor Cooling Floor Heating AHU Fan Energy Conclusions.consumption (for floor cooling and heating models) Tablesimulated energy consumption (for floor cooling and heating

  11. The real consequences of an ocean floor collapse A collapse of the ocean floor in the Gulf of Mexico is in our near future but all depends on how such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    on European and Asian trade for 50% of their annual revenue. The environmental impact is hard to measure of Mexico is in our near future but all depends on how such will occur. Two possible scenarios have been and will be far less destructive. Nevertheless, the impact on the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama

  12. Self-organized mode-locking effect in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrids J. Van de Vondel,1 A. V. Silhanek,1 V. Metlushko,2 P. Vavassori,3,4 B. Ilic,5 and V. V. Moshchalkov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    between a vortex line and a finite-size permanent magnet is given by3 Up R = - dot m · Bv R - r d3 r, 1 of the vortex line, m is the magnetic moment of the ferromagnetic dot and Bv is the field generated and Magnetism Group, INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B

  13. Data:225b952f-75c8-44c8-9e4b-2e63f6a9a928 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  14. Studies of Protein Interactions and Knowledge-Based Drug Design: (A) The Electrostatic Nature of Recognition Between HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loop and Coreceptors CCR5/CXCR4, (B) Complement System Inhibition by Compstatin Family Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López de Victoria Suárez, Aliana

    2012-01-01

    RMSF plots reveal that the GPG region, a highly conservedgreen denotes the conserved GPG motif at the tip of the

  15. First-principle investigations of K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type double perovskite oxides La{sub 4}B?B?O{sub 8} (B?B??=?Fe, Co, Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Hejie; Wei, Yingfen; Gui, Hong; Li, Xin; Zhao, Zhenjie Xie, Wenhui

    2014-06-07

    The K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type structure La{sub 4}CoNiO{sub 8} (LCNO), La{sub 4}FeCoO{sub 8} (LFCO), and La{sub 4}FeNiO{sub 8} (LFNO) are studied by using the first-principle electronic structure calculations. Our results indicate that the ground state of LCNO is a ferrimagnetism (FiM) with a large energy gap about 1.9?eV, LFCO and LFNO are antiferromagnetism with energy gaps about 1.3 and 1.4?eV, respectively. Their orthorhombic distortions, out-of-plane elongation, and tilting of octahedron are discussed. It is indicated that LFCO and LFNO have stronger crystal distortion than LCNO. Our calculations indicate that the in-plane magnetic exchange interaction of LCNO is much stronger than LFCO and LFNO, thus LCNO should have much higher magnetic ordering temperature than LFCO and LFNO.

  16. From an armada of ocean buoys moored to the sea floor, to orbiting satellites, to advance computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the most infrequent, but they pose a major threat to coastal populations, particularly in the seismically tsunami forecasts and warnings 4 The DART (Deep- ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoy tsunami in decisions about the need for evacuations and other safety measures 4 The National Weather Service's Tsunami

  17. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    J.M, 1977, Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of clasticvia integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andand Interpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic

  18. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    facies, pp.165-184 of Seismic Stratigraphy - applications toon sediment delivery, seismic stratigraphy, and changes inSeismic Stratigraphy ..

  19. Wheelchair access to and within this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    6. Parking. Page 7. Outside Access. Page 8. Internal Access, Page 10. Reception. Page 10. Lift. Page of a mile of the main student residences at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station

  20. Wheelchair access to and within this building is unsuitable without assistance and is limited to part of the second floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Parking. Page 7. Outside Access. Page 8. Internal Access. Page 11. Reception. Page 12. Lift. Page 12 student residences at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre

  1. Wheelchair access to and within this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    6. Parking, Page 7. Outside Access, Page 8. Internal Access, Page 10. Reception, Page 10. Lift, Page at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre. The nearest bus stops

  2. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    A study based on exploration 3D seismic data. Marine andSeismic Stratigraphy - applications to hydrocarbon exploration,In: 3D Seismic Technology: Application to the Exploration of

  3. Predictions of VRF on a Langmuir Probe under the RF Heating Spiral on the Divertor Floor on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosea, J C [PPPL; Perkins, R J [PPPL; Jaworski, M A [PPPL; Kramer, G J [PPPL; Ahn, J-W [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    RF heating deposition spirals are observed on the divertor plates on NSTX as shown in for a NB plus RF heating case. It has been shown that the RF spiral is tracked quite well by the spiral mapping of the strike points on the divertor plate of magnetic field lines passing in front of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX. Indeed, both current instrumented tiles and Langmuir probes respond to the spiral when it is positioned over them. In particular, a positive increment in tile current (collection of electrons) is obtained when the spiral is over the tile. This current can be due to RF rectification and/or RF heating of the scrape off layer (SOL) plasma along the magnetic field lines passing in front of the the HHFW antenna. It is important to determine quantitatively the relative contributions of these processes. Here we explore the properties of the characteristics of probes on the lower divertor plate to determine the likelyhood that the primary cause of the RF heat deposition is RF rectification.

  4. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

  5. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    via integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andInterpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic2.4 RESULTS AND INTERPRETATIONS 2.4.1 Seismic Stratigraphy

  6. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid

  7. he chain of calamity now known as Japan's Triple Disaster began with a massive rupture in the ocean floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Donald M.

    . At the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, commissioned in 1971 on the coast 140 miles north of Tokyo, reaching heights up to 49 feet. minuTes LaTer In Fukushima, the Dai-ichi nuclear plant withstood shaking nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986. Without their cooling systems, three of the plant's six re

  8. Submit complete applications to the Administrative Assistant of the Department of Psychology, Room 10-Floor East, UNBC Teaching & Learning Building.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Submit complete applications to the Administrative Assistant of the Department of Psychology, Room program is competitive. The following conditions must be met: a) you must have completed 60 credit hours completed at the time of application. c) a faculty member in psychology must be willing to supervise your

  9. USC Career Center 6 floor, H. William Close (BA) Bldg. (P) 803.777.7280 (F) 803.777.7556

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    .777.1946 Email: career@sc.edu Website: www.sc.edu/career JobMate Full Access Form Resume Approval (Please print Search Integrity Statement The initial tenet of the Carolinian Creed, referencing students' obligation integrity." When conducting a job search and interviewing with employers, your display of ethical behavior

  10. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    Bouma, A.H. , 1962, Sedimentology of some flysch deposits: aGulf of California: sedimentology, mass physical properties

  11. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    drilling results found extensive evidence of sill-driven fluid-Drilling results confirmed (Kastner, 1982) that vertical discharge hydrothermal fluids

  12. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  13. UHS Health Promotion Office, UHS Building, 2nd floor, 273-5775 The Monthly InSTALLSTALLSTALLSTALLment AAAAuuuugggguuuusssstttt 2222000000009999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    . 2. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing and sneezing. Throw your tissue away. 3 is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick! Wash your hands after you cough, sneeze or use District Health Unit Please... Whenever you cough or

  14. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    seismic reflection profiles as seismically blank or chaotic near-verticalProfile shows three pockmarks and acoustic blanking below that linkup with near vertical zones of seismicvertical zones of seismic disturbance interpreted as pipe-like fluid-flow conduits. Above: Analog 3.5 kHz profile

  15. Severe soil frost reduces losses of carbon and nitrogen from the forest floor during simulated snowmelt: A laboratory experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    Greenhouse gas Snowmelt Leachate Winter climate change a b s t r a c t Considerable progress has been made and DON in leachate were up to 19 and 18 mg N kgÀ1 soil greater in the no soil frost and mild soil frost of this study show that total fluxes of N in leachate, as well as total cumulative C and N fluxes (gases þ

  16. TopoPlan: a topological path planner for real time human navigation under floor and ceiling constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of virtual humans. 1 Introduction One of the goal of behavioral animation is to automate the process of populating a virtual environment with au- tonomous virtual humans. Models used to describe hu- manoid meshes modeled by designers (architects, graphics de- signers...). In order to endow a virtual human

  17. Floor-Plan Priors for Monocular Layout Estimation Chenxi Liu1, Alexander Schwing2, Kaustav Kundu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Brualla et al., 2014 Indoor localization (video, depth sensors) Project Tango SLAM work Lee et al., 2010 Xiao & Furukawa, 2012 Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Liu, Schwing, Kundu & Furukawa, 2012 3D indoor reconstruction from large photo collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014

  18. Measure Guideline: Implementing a Plenum Truss for a Compact Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    This Measure Guideline presents the steps to implement a compact duct system inside an attic bulkhead (plenum truss) of a one-story, slab-on-grade (SOG) home. In a compact duct design, ductwork runs are reduced in length to yield a smaller and more compact duct system. Less energy will be lost through ductwork if the ducts are contained within the thermal enclosure of the house. These measures are intended for the production builder working to meet the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requirements and keep the ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house. This measure of bringing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house is appropriate for the builder wishing to avoid cathedralizing the insulation in the attic space (i.e., locating it at the underside of the roof deck rather than along the attic floor) or adding dropped soffits.

  19. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  20. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House - Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian® Homes®), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft² slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols, while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic to conditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing of individual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.