National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 4b slab floors

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  2. Slab Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to insulate slab-on-grade floors and control moisture, air leakage, termites, and radon.

  3. Two-dimensional model of direct solar slab-on-grade heating floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youcef, L. )

    1991-01-01

    The altering direction implicit (ADI) method is used to solve the two-dimensional heat equation applied to the system described in this paper. The coupling equations between flat-plate collectors, heating floor and ground had been developed. The model also takes into account the solar flux falling on the floor through the south oriented glazed wall. The theoretical results were compared to the experimental data performed in Bassens (southwest of France) during the period of September 1981 to May 1982. It was shown that the model outputs were in good agreement with the measured data. However, some doubts are considered concerning lower boundary conditions. Also is given a simple technique to evaluate the most appropriate initial conditions to drive the computational program developed here. Finally a study of some main parameters was carried out.

  4. 4B Drawings - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4B Drawings 4B Chamber 4B Mounting Bracket 4B Feedthrough Hole 4B Cooling Plate (-30 C)

  5. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  6. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  7. Slab reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  8. Slab Edge Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-14

    This information sheet addresses ways to mitigate heat loss and moisture management through slab on grade construction.

  9. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  10. W4B Bristol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B Bristol Jump to: navigation, search Name: W4B Bristol Place: United Kingdom Sector: Biofuels Product: UK-based biofuels project developer. The firm had a 50MW biofuel scheme...

  11. NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-4B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Policy Letter: NAP-4B Date: June 30,2008 TITLE: Corporate Performance Evaluation Process for M&O Contractors I. OBJECTIVE: To establish and implement a uniform, corporate process for evaluation of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Management and Operating (M&O) contractors' performance that promotes effective and efficient accomplishment of the NNSA mission while balancing safety and production effectively. This process results in documented, consistent and fair evaluation

  12. AP-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule AP-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American ... of American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company) and ...

  13. SHERATON STATION SQUARE FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHERATON STATION SQUARE FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR 3 DETAILED PROG RAM MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2016 REGISTRATION 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Grand Station Foyer CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Grand Station III GRAND STATION I & II OPENING SESSION Moderator: Lynn Brickett, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:00 a.m. Welcoming Remarks Lynn Brickett, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:05 a.m. Overview of DOE's Clean Coal Program

  14. VA-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule VA-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and...

  15. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  16. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST): In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents a set of idealized in-depth diagnostic test cases for use in validating ground-coupled floor slab heat transfer models. These test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST.

  17. GIZ Sourcebook Module 4b: Inspection and Maintenance and Roadworthines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b: Inspection and Maintenance and Roadworthiness Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 4b: Inspection and Maintenance and Roadworthiness...

  18. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business...

  19. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D.; Giltrud, M.E.; Luk, V.K.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  20. Development of a Leave-in-Place Slab Edge Insulating Form System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Hoeschele; Eric Lee

    2009-08-31

    floor heating), the most practical insulation strategy is to secure rigid foam insulation, such as Dow Styrofoam{trademark}, to the inside of the wooden slab edge forms. An alternative is to clad insulation to the perimeter of the slab after the slab has been poured and cured. In either case, the foam must have a 'termite strip' that prevents termites from creating hidden tunnels through or behind the foam on their way to the wall framing above. Frequently this termite strip is a piece of sheet metal that must be fabricated for each project. The above-grade portion of the insulation also needs to be coated for appearance and to prevent damage from construction and UV degradation. All these steps add time, complexity, and expense to the insulating process.

  1. Fracture of solid state laser slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    Fracture due to thermal stress limits the power output potential of modern, high average power slab lasers. Here the criteria for slab fracture and the nature of the surface flaws which constitute the strength-controlling defects are reviewed. Specific fracture data for gadolinium scandium gallium garnet and LHG-5 phosphate glass with different surface finishes are evaluated in the context of assigning appropriate slab operating parameters using Wiebull statistics. These examples illustrate both the danger of design using brittle components without adequate fracture testing, and the inadequacy of design methods which use a fixed safety factor, for this class of materials. Further consideration reveals that operation of slab lasers in contact with an aqueous coolant may lead to strength degradation with time. Finally, the evolution of the failure process in which a characteristic midplane crack forms is outlined, and the pertinent parameters for avoiding slab fracture are identified.

  2. baepgfb-mac4b | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 McIntosh Unit 4B Topped PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-193KB] (Withdrawn) Lakeland Department of Electric & Water, Lakeland, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Four Rivers Energy Modernization Project (June 1994) -- Not Available PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Four Rivers Second Generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion Project (May 1995) E.P. Holley (Air Products and

  3. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce; Blessing, Leonard J.

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  4. RAMONA-4B development for SBWR safety studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Aronson, A.L.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is a revolutionary design of a boiling-water reactor. The reactor is based on passive safety systems such as natural circulation, gravity flow, pressurized gas, and condensation. SBWR has no active systems, and the flow in the vessel is by natural circulation. There is a large chimney section above the core to provide a buoyancy head for natural circulation. The reactor can be shut down by either of four systems; namely, scram, Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI), and Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS). The safety injection is by gravity drain from the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Suppression Pool (SP). The heat sink is through two types of heat exchangers submerged in the tank of water. These heat exchangers are the Isolation Condenser (IC) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The RAMONA-4B code has been developed to simulate the normal operation, reactivity transients, and to address the instability issues for SBWR. The code has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics coupled to multiple parallel-channel thermal-hydraulics. The two-phase thermal hydraulics is based on a nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium drift-flux formulation. It employs an explicit integration to solve all state equations (except for neutron kinetics) in order to predict the instability without numerical damping. The objective of this project is to develop a Sun SPARC and IBM RISC 6000 based RAMONA-4B code for applications to SBWR safety analyses, in particular for stability and ATWS studies.

  5. CP&L-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CP&L-4-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Carolina Power & Light, Eastern Division System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available...

  6. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C. . E-mail: birchena@mail.ncifcrf.gov; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K.; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H.; Ruscetti, Francis W.

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin.

  7. Technical evaluation of a solar heating system having conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    A simple innovative solar heating design (Solar Option One) using conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab was constructed. An objective of hybrid solar design is to combine the relative advantages of active and passive design approaches while minimizing their respective disadvantages. A test house using the Solar Option One heating system was experimentally monitored to determine its energy based performance during the 1982-83 heating season. The test residence is located in Lyndonville, Vermont, an area which has a characteristically cold and cloudy climate. The two story residence has a floor area of about 1400 square feet and is constructed on a 720 square foot 5.5 inch thick floor slab. A 24 inch packed gravel bed is located beneath the slab and the slab-gravel bed is insulated by two inches of polystyrene insulation. The test building is of frame construction and uses insulation levels which have become commonplace throughout the country. The structure would not fall into the superinsulated category but was tightly constructed so as to have a low infiltration level. The building is sun-tempered in that windows were concentrated somewhat on the South side and all but avoided on the North. A solar greenhouse on the South side of the building was closed off from the structure permanently throughout the testing so as to better observe the solar heating invention without confounding variables. The monitoring equipment generated an internal gain of about 17,000 BTUs per day, roughly the equivalent of occupancy by two persons. A full description of the experimental testing program is given. System efficiency and performance are reported.

  8. Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil...

  9. CXD 4600, 9103 Second Floor Refurbishment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9103 Second Floor Refurbishment (4600) Y-12 Site Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action include: (1) development of the project baseline, design, and and...

  10. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  11. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, R.J.

    1985-12-24

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

  12. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  13. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency, which describes leading corporate energy efficiency programs.

  14. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balch, J.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Davidson, J.C.; Koo, J.C.

    1998-05-05

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system is described. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate. 4 figs.

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaResidential Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Residential Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaResidential"...

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaHotels Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Hotels Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHotels" Showing 1 page...

  17. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4b. Value of Production by Selected...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry...

  18. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 User ProgramBeam...

  19. An enhanced HOWFARLESS option for DOSXYZnrc simulations of slab geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, Kerry; Cranmer-Sargison, Gavin; Sidhu, Narinder

    2008-09-15

    The Monte Carlo code DOSXYZnrc is a valuable instrument for calculating absorbed dose within a three-dimensional Cartesian geometry. DOSXYZnrc includes several variance reduction techniques used to increase the efficiency of the Monte Carlo calculation. One such technique is HOWFARLESS which is used to increase the efficiency of beam commissioning calculations in homogeneous phantoms. The authors present an enhanced version of HOWFARLESS which extends the application to include phantoms inhomogeneous in one dimension. When the enhanced HOWFARLESS was used, efficiency increases as high as 14 times were observed without any loss in dose accuracy. The efficiency gains of an enhanced HOWFARLESS simulation was found to be dependent on both slab geometry and slab density. As the number of two-dimensional voxel layers per slab increases, so does the efficiency gain. Also, as the mass density of a slab is decreased, the efficiency gains increase.

  20. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements O 470.4B, Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program by Diane Johnson The directive is proposed for revision to reflect the establishment by the Secretary of Energy of the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), and the Office of Security Officer positions and the Security Committee. The responsibilities section of the Order will be revised to include the Chief Security Officers and the Security

  1. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K.

    2010-11-15

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  2. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

  3. Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but...

  4. Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 C)...

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property...

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the...

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property...

  8. Property:Building/FloorAreaWarehouses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaWarehouses Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Warehouses Pages using the...

  9. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  10. Property:Building/FloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Theatres,...

  11. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaSportCenters" Showing 2 pages...

  12. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  13. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  14. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of Water-Reflected Uranium Oxyfluoride Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    A series of twelve experiments were conducted in the mid 1950's at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine the critical conditions of a semi-infinite water-reflected slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). A different slab thickness was used for each experiment. Results from the twelve experiment recorded in the laboratory notebook were published in Reference 1. Seven of the twelve experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments for the inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This evaluation will not only be available to handbook users for the validation of computer codes and integral cross-section data, but also for the reevaluation of experimental data used in the ANSI/ANS-8.1 standard. This evaluation is important as part of the technical basis of the subcritical slab limits in ANSI/ANS-8.1. The original publication of the experimental results was used for the determination of bias and bias uncertainties for subcritical slab limits, as documented by Hugh Clark's paper 'Subcritical Limits for Uranium-235 Systems'.

  15. Microchannel Cooled Edge Cladding to Establish an Adiabatic Boundary Condition in a Slab Laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Beach, Raymond J.; Solarz, Richard W.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides an edge cladding for a slab laser, the edge cladding comprising a cooling channel system therein.

  16. Kondo Screening and Magnetic Ordering in Frustrated UNi{sub {bold 4}} B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacroix, C.; Canals, B.; Nunez-Regueiro, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    UNi{sub 4}B exhibits unusual properties and, in particular, a unique antiferromagnetic arrangement involving only 2/3 of the U sites. Based on the low temperature behavior of this compound, we propose that the remaining 1/3 U sites are nonmagnetic due to the Kondo effect. We derive amodel in which the coexistence of magnetic and nonmagnetic U sites is the consequence of the competition between frustration of the crystallographic structure and instability of the 5{ital f} moments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Nonlocal microscopic theory of quantum friction between parallel metallic slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despoja, Vito

    2011-05-15

    We present a new derivation of the friction force between two metallic slabs moving with constant relative parallel velocity, based on T=0 quantum-field theory formalism. By including a fully nonlocal description of dynamically screened electron fluctuations in the slab, and avoiding the usual matching-condition procedure, we generalize previous expressions for the friction force, to which our results reduce in the local limit. Analyzing the friction force calculated in the two local models and in the nonlocal theory, we show that for physically relevant velocities local theories using the plasmon and Drude models of dielectric response are inappropriate to describe friction, which is due to excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs, which are properly included in nonlocal theory. We also show that inclusion of dissipation in the nonlocal electronic response has negligible influence on friction.

  18. System for loading slab-gel holders for electrophoresis separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Norman G.; Anderson, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    A slab-gel loading system includes a prismatic chamber for filling a plurality of slab-gel holders simultaneously. Each slab-gel holder comprises a pair of spaced apart plates defining an intermediate volume for gel containment. The holders are vertically positioned in the chamber with their major surfaces parallel to the chamber end walls. A liquid inlet is provided at the corner between the bottom and a side wall of the chamber for distributing a polymerizable monomer solution or a coagulable colloidal solution into each of the holders. The chamber is rotatably supported so that filling can begin with the corner having the liquid inlet directed downwardly such that the solution is gently funneled upwardly, without mixing, along the diverging side and bottom surfaces. As filling proceeds, the chamber is gradually rotated to position the bottom wall in a horizontal mode. The liquid filling means includes a plastic envelope with a septum dividing it into two compartments for intermixing two solutions of different density and thereby providing a liquid flow having a density gradient. The resulting gels have a density gradient between opposite edges for subsequent use in electrophoresis separations.

  19. Water-Moderated and -Reflected Slabs of Uranium Oxyfluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Clinton Gross

    2010-09-01

    A series of ten experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in December 1955, and January 1956, in an attempt to determine critical conditions for a slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). These experiments were recorded in an Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Logbook and results were published in a journal of the American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Science and Engineering, by J. K. Fox, L. W. Gilley, and J. H. Marable (Reference 1). The purpose of these experiments was to obtain the minimum critical thickness of an effectively infinite slab of UO2F2 solution by extrapolation of experimental data. To do this the slab thickness was varied and critical solution and water-reflector heights were measured using two different fuel solutions. Of the ten conducted experiments eight of the experiments reached critical conditions but the results of only six of the experiments were published in Reference 1. All ten experiments were evaluated from which five critical configurations were judged as acceptable criticality safety benchmarks. The total uncertainty in the acceptable benchmarks is between 0.25 and 0.33 % ?k/keff. UO2F2 fuel is also evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-043, HEU-SOL-THERM-011, and HEU-SOL-THERM-012, but these those evaluation reports are for large reflected and unreflected spheres. Aluminum cylinders of UO2F2 are evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-050.

  20. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  1. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  2. INPP4B-mediated tumor resistance is associated with modulation of glucose metabolism via hexokinase 2 regulation in laryngeal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Joong Won; Kim, Kwang Il; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Noh, Woo Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Oh, Jeong Su; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •HIF-1α-regulated INPP4B enhances glycolysis. •INPP4B regulates aerobic glycolysis by inducing HK2 via Akt-mTOR pathway. •Blockage of INPP4B and HK2 sensitizes radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to radiation and anticancer drug. •INPP4B is associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was recently identified as a tumor resistance factor in laryngeal cancer cells. Herein, we show that INPP4B-mediated resistance is associated with increased glycolytic phenotype. INPP4B expression was induced by hypoxia and irradiation. Intriguingly, overexpression of INPP4B enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Of the glycolysis-regulatory genes, hexokinase 2 (HK2) was mainly regulated by INPP4B and this regulation was mediated through the Akt-mTOR pathway. Notably, codepletion of INPP4B and HK2 markedly sensitized radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to irradiation or anticancer drug. Moreover, INPP4B was significantly associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. Therefore, these results suggest that INPP4B modulates aerobic glycolysis via HK2 regulation in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells.

  3. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings Depend on energy cost, R-value increase, and airtightness of newly insulated floor compared to existing. Time to Complete 4-8 hours Overall Cost $0.60 to $1.00 PER SQUARE FOOT FOR R-30 BATTS Careful air sealing and insulation between an unconditioned garage and the conditioned space above can increase comfort,

  4. Repairing Walls & Floors: How To's for the Handy Homeowner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-09

    This brochure provides handy homeowners with tips on how to properly repair walls and floors in their homes that sustained damage during a hurricane. This publications is a part of the How To's for the Handy Homeowner Series.

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the property "BuildingFloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 +...

  6. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  7. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  8. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franek, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, The School of Business Administration in Karvina, Univerzitni nam. 1934, Karvina (Czech Republic); Kavicka, Frantisek; Stetina, Josef [Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); Masarik, Milos [EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel, a.s. (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  9. Floor-supply displacement air-conditioning: Laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Shinichi; Kimura, Kenichi

    1999-07-01

    The results of laboratory measurements on the performance of a floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system in comparison to a displacement ventilation system with a side-wall-mounted diffuser and a ceiling-based distribution system are described. Thermal stratification was observed, as there were greater vertical air temperature differences in both of the displacement systems than in the ceiling-based system. The floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system produced a uniformly low air velocity at each measurement height, while a rather high air velocity near the floor was observed for the displacement ventilation system with a sidewall-mounted diffuser. Local mean age of air of the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system was lower than that of the other systems, especially in the lower part of the room. According to the simulation results, the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling requires 34% less energy than the conventional air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling.

  10. Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimized Slab-on-Grade

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foundation Insulation Retrofits | Department of Energy Homes: Optimized Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimized Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits This project used a recently developed, three-dimensional, below-grade heat transfer simulation (BUilding Foundation Energy Transport Simulation-BCVTB, BUFETS-B) that operates as a subroutine of EnergyPlus to model 10 insulation upgrade options against a base (uninsulated)

  11. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Schools, including...

  13. Waste Assessment Baseline for the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel A

    2015-04-01

    Following a building-wide waste assessment in September, 2014, and subsequent presentation to Sandia leadership regarding the goal of Zero Waste by 2025, the occupants of the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing contacted the Materials Sustainability and Pollution Prevention (MSP2) team to guide them to Zero Waste in advance of the rest of the site. The occupants are from Center 3600, Public Relations and Communications , and Center 800, Independent Audit, Ethics and Business Conduct . To accomplish this, MSP2 conducted a new limited waste assessment from March 2-6, 2015 to compare the second floor, west wing to the building as a whole. The assessment also serves as a baseline with which to mark improvements in diversion in approximately 6 months.

  14. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  15. Data:9f33a9f9-21ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  16. Technology Solutions Case Study: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS worked with a builder of single- and multifamily homes in southwestern Pennsylvania (climate zone 5) to understand its methods of successfully using polyethylene sheeting over aggregate as a capillary break beneath the slab in new construction. This builder’s homes vary in terms of whether they have crawlspaces or basements. However, in both cases, the strategy protects the home from water intrusion via capillary action (e.g., water wicking into cracks and spaces in the slab), thereby helping to preserve the durability of the home.

  17. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal The Bridge from D&D to Redevelopment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conger, M Malinda; Schneider, Ken R

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D&D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. , DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL s 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 10,000 cubic yards (CY) of concrete, 2,500 CY of debris, and 500 CY of contaminated soil. The completion of this work will allow the site to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL.

  18. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.

  19. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-08-02

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  20. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-01-01

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  1. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    ) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have

  2. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  3. Instability due to a two recirculation pump trip in a BWR using RAMONA-4B computer code with 3D neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.S.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1993-06-01

    An investigation was made of the potential for thermal-hydraulic instabilities coupled to neutronic feedback in a BWR due to a two recirculation pump trip event using the RAMONA-4B computer code with 3D neutron kinetics. It is concluded that a high-power (100%) and low-flow (75%) initial condition would most likely lead to in-phase density wave oscillations after the tripping of both recirculation pumps, and that RAMONA-4B is capable of predicting such thermal-hydraulic instabilities coupled to neutronic feedback in BWR and in SBWR.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  5. Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittereder, Nick; Poerschke, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season.

  6. Laser beat wave excitation of terahertz radiation in a plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, Jetendra

    2014-10-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generation by nonlinear mixing of lasers, obliquely incident on a plasma slab is investigated. Two cases are considered: (i) electron density profile is parabolic but density peak is below the critical density corresponding to the beat frequency, (ii) plasma boundaries are sharp and density is uniform. In both cases, nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force that gives rise to electron drift at the beat frequency. In the case of inhomogeneous plasma, non zero curl of the nonlinear current density gives rise to electromagnetic THz generation. In case of uniform plasma, the sharp density variation at the plasma boundaries leads to radiation generation. In a slab width of less than a terahertz wavelength, plasma density one fourth of terahertz critical density, laser intensities ∼10{sup 17 }W/cm{sup 2} at 1 μm, one obtains the THz intensity ∼1 GW/cm{sup 2} at 3 THz radiation frequency.

  7. Experimental study on the floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Takebayashi, Yoshihisa

    1995-12-31

    These results are presented from a research project to investigate the effects of a floor-supply displacement ventilation system with practical indoor heat loads. The experiments were performed in an experimental chamber (35.2 m{sup 2}) located in a controlled environment chamber. Temperature distributions were measured at seven heights throughout the experimental chamber for each test condition. Data were analyzed to observe thermal stratification as affected by lighting, occupants, and heat loads (personal computers), and its disruption caused by walking and change of air volume. In addition, airflow characteristics and ventilation efficiencies were investigated using a smoke machine, tobacco smoke, dust for industrial testing, and a tracer gas (CO{sub 2}) step-up procedure.

  8. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  9. DESIGN OF A CONCRETE SLAB FOR STORAGE OF SNF AND HLW CASKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bisset

    2005-02-14

    This calculation documents the design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Waste (HLW) Cask storage slab for the Aging Area. The design is based on the weights of casks that may be stored on the slab, the weights of vehicles that may be used to move the casks, and the layout shown on the sketch for a 1000 Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MTHM) storage pad on Attachment 2, Sht.1 of the calculation 170-C0C-C000-00100-000-00A (BSC 2004a). The analytical model used herein is based on the storage area for 8 vertical casks. To simplify the model, the storage area of the horizontal concrete modules and their related shield walls is not included. The heavy weights of the vertical storage casks and the tensile forces due to pullout at the anchorages will produce design moments and shear forces that will envelope those that would occur in the storage area of the horizontal modules. The design loadings will also include snow and live loads. In addition, the design will also reflect pertinent geotechnical data. This calculation will document the preliminary thickness and general reinforcing steel requirements for the slab. This calculation also documents the initial design of the cask anchorage. Other slab details are not developed in this calculation. They will be developed during the final design process. The calculation also does not include the evaluation of the effects of cask drop loads. These will be evaluated in this or another calculation when the exact cask geometry is known.

  10. Data:0c7149ef-adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  11. Data:Caa5cce6-c6c8-4b7a-ac01-eb6abdf87c9b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caa5cce6-c6c8-4b7a-ac01-eb6abdf87c9b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  12. Data:759abfab-3871-4b1c-95f6-528e8c64d151 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    abfab-3871-4b1c-95f6-528e8c64d151 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1....

  13. Effects of magnetic field on the interaction between terahertz wave and non-uniform plasma slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yuan; Han, YiPing; Guo, LiXin; Ai, Xia

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the interaction between terahertz electromagnetic wave and a non-uniform magnetized plasma slab is investigated. Different from most of the published literatures, the plasma employed in this work is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Profiles are introduced to describe the non-uniformity of the plasma slab. At the same time, magnetic field is applied to the background of the plasma slab. It came out with an interesting phenomenon that there would be a valley in the absorption band as the plasma's electromagnetic characteristic is affected by the magnetic field. In addition, the valley located just near the middle of the absorption peak. The cause of the valley's appearance is inferred in this paper. And the influences of the variables, such as magnetic field strength, electron density, and collision frequency, are discussed in detail. The objective of this work is also pointed out, such as the applications in flight communication, stealth, emissivity, plasma diagnose, and other areas of plasma.

  14. AREA FACTOR DETERMINATIONS FOR AN INDUSTRIAL WORKER EXPOSED TO A CONCRETE SLAB END-STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; Patricia Lee, P; Eduardo Farfan, E; Jesse Roach, J

    2007-02-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) is decommissioning many of its excess facilities through removal of the facility structures leaving only the concrete-slab foundations in place. Site-specific, risk-based derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for radionuclides have been determined for a future industrial worker potentially exposed to residual contamination on these concrete slabs as described in Jannik [1]. These risk-based DCGLs were estimated for an exposure area of 100 m{sup 2}. During deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) operations at SRS, the need for area factors for larger and smaller contaminated areas arose. This paper compares the area factors determined for an industrial worker exposed to a concrete slab end-state for several radionuclides of concern at SRS with (1) the illustrative area factors provided in MARSSIM [2], (2) the area correction factors provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance [3], and (3) the hot spot criterion for field application provided in the RESRAD User's Manual [4].

  15. Critical Dimensions of Water-tamped Slabs and Spheres of Active Material

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Greuling, E.; Argo, H.: Chew, G.; Frankel, M. E.; Konopinski, E.J.; Marvin, C.; Teller, E.

    1946-08-06

    The magnitude and distribution of the fission rate per unit area produced by three energy groups of moderated neutrons reflected from a water tamper into one side of an infinite slab of active material is calculated approximately in section II. This rate is directly proportional to the current density of fast neutrons from the active material incident on the water tamper. The critical slab thickness is obtained in section III by solving an inhomogeneous transport integral equation for the fast-neutron current density into the tamper. Extensive use is made of the formulae derived in "The Mathematical Development of the End-Point Method" by Frankel and Goldberg. In section IV slight alterations in the theory outlined in sections II and III were made so that one could approximately compute the critical radius of a water-tamper sphere of active material. The derived formulae were applied to calculate the critical dimensions of water-tamped slabs and spheres of solid UF{sub 6} leaving various (25) isotope enrichment fractions. Decl. Dec. 16, 1955.

  16. Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  17. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  18. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  19. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal - The Bridge from D and D to Redevelopment - 12342

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travaglini, Mike; Halsey, Pat; Conger, Malinda; Schneider, Ken

    2012-07-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D and D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers and sub-grade structures, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL's 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 7,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of concrete, 2,000 m{sup 3} of debris, and 400 m{sup 3} of contaminated soil. Immediately adjacent to the 2000 Area is the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park and the modernized ORNL western campus. The Science and Technology Park is the only private sector business and technology park located within the footprint of a national laboratory. The completion of this work will not only greatly reduce the risk to the ORNL campus occupants but also allow this much sought after space to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL. Demolition of aging facilities enabled by injection of ARRA funding has significantly altered the landscape at ORNL while reducing risk to laboratory personnel and operations and providing valuable central campus land parcels for redevelopment to expand and enhance the

  20. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  1. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore » feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  2. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate; Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    This document provides content for three areas of the Building America Solution Center. First, "Insulating Closed Crawlspace Walls and Band Joist Area" describes how to install rigid foam insulation on the interior perimeter walls and band joist area in closed crawlspace foundations of homes. Second, "Removing Construction Debris from Flexible Ducts" describes how to clean flexible ducts after construction or major renovation of a home to remove debris resulting from building materials, particularly airborne dust and particulates. Third, images, CAD drawings, and a case study illustrate right and wrong ways to apply polyethylene sheeting over aggregate. Similarly, a CAD drawing is included that illustrates the use of a concrete slab over polyethylene.

  3. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

  4. Numerical modeling of the action of an explosion on an iron slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugak, S.G.; Fortov, V.E.; Kanel', G.I.; Ni, A.L.; Stel'makh, V.G.

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the explosion of a condensed high explosive (HE) by a flat Armco iron slab. The fundamental physical processes accompanying the nonstationary two-dimensional compression pulse propagation in a metal are analyzed, a mathematical model of the process is formulated, and its numerical characteristics are determined. A cylindrical charge of trinitrotoluene of 20 mm diameter and height, initiated at the axial point on the free surface, was mounted on a 10-mm-thick and 120-mm-diameter armco iron disk. A finite-difference method using a quadrangular computational mesh is employed. It is assumed that the process of detonation transformation occurs instantaneously and is characterized only by singularities in the equation of state. Numerical modeling of the loading of an iron slab by an explosion showed that the simple kinetic relationship proposed for the fracture computation will assure a realistic description of the fracture process. It is determined that the progress of a reversible polymorphic transformation in the specimen material substantially influences the nature of its fracture by explosion. The magnitude of the strain on the strength properties of the material must be taken into account in order to achieve a detailed description of the fracture.

  5. Experimental study of slab solar collection on the hydronic system of road

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qing; Huang, Yong; Li, Ming; Liu, Yan [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Yan, Y.Y. [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    This paper studied the slab solar collection (SSC) process, which is one of the essential compositions of road hydronic ice-snow melting (HISM) system that stores solar energy in summer to melt ice and snow on the road in winter. Its aim is to find out the heat transfer characteristic of the SSC and heat collecting efficiency and the influence of pipe spacing and flow rate by experiment. As shown in experimental results, the average heat collecting capacity is about 150-250 W/m{sup 2} in natural summer condition, while the solar radiation intensity is about 300-1000 W/m{sup 2}. It is shown that the increment of fluid flow results in the increment of heat collection efficiency, while the increment of pipe spacing results in the decrement of the efficiency in experiment modes. The results show that the road slab can obtain about 30% solar heat in summertime, and the solar collection can lower the pavement temperature and reduce the insolation weathering. (author)

  6. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces.more » The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.« less

  7. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces. The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.

  8. Phase control of group velocity in a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, D. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahrai, M. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Motavalli, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atomic systems is discussed. It is shown that the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can be switched from subluminal to superluminal light propagation by the thickness of the slab or the intensity of the coupling field. Furthermore, it is found that, in the presence of quantum interference, the reflected and transmitted pulses are completely phase dependent. So, the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can only be switched from subluminal to superluminal by adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields.

  9. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lewis, Nikole K.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Sada, Pedro V.; Charbonneau, David; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-20

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf star, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 {mu}m). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% 4.5 {mu}m). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with the hot Neptune GJ 436b and the hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3{sigma} upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: <0.042% (3.6 {mu}m) and <0.085% (4.5 {mu}m). We discuss these results in the context of the Spitzer secondary eclipse measurements of GJ 436b and WASP-29b. It is possible that we do not detect the eclipses of HAT-P-12b due to high eccentricity, but find that weak planetary emission in these wavelengths is a more likely explanation. We place 3{sigma} upper limits on the |e cos {omega}| quantity (where e is eccentricity and {omega} is the argument of periapsis) for HAT-P-3b (<0.0081) and HAT-P-4b (<0.0042), based on the secondary eclipse timings.

  10. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting Over Aggregate Southwestern Pennsylvania PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting Over Aggregate Location: Southwestern PA Type: Residential Partners: Builder is confidential Building America Team: IBACOS, www.ibacos.com Building Component: Foundation, water management Application: New construction; single- and multifamily homes Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All except dry

  11. RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - models and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.; Neymotin, L.Y.

    1998-03-01

    This document describes the major modifications and improvements made to the modeling of the RAMONA-3B/MOD0 code since 1981, when the code description and assessment report was completed. The new version of the code is RAMONA-4B. RAMONA-4B is a systems transient code for application to different versions of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) such as the current BWR, the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This code uses a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, non-equilibrium, drift-flux, two-phase flow formulation of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients and instability issues. Chapter 1 is an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 discusses the neutron kinetics modeling and the implementation of reactivity edits. Chapter 3 is an overview of the heat conduction calculations. Chapter 4 presents modifications to the thermal-hydraulics model of the vessel, recirculation loop, steam separators, boron transport, and SBWR specific components. Chapter 5 describes modeling of the plant control and safety systems. Chapter 6 presents and modeling of Balance of Plant (BOP). Chapter 7 describes the mechanistic containment model in the code. The content of this report is complementary to the RAMONA-3B code description and assessment document. 53 refs., 81 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Plasmon excitation in metal slab by fast point charge: The role of additional boundary conditions in quantum hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; An, Sheng-Bai; Song, Yuan-Hong Wang, You-Nian; Kang, Naijing; Mikovi?, Z. L.

    2014-10-15

    We study the wake effect in the induced potential and the stopping power due to plasmon excitation in a metal slab by a point charge moving inside the slab. Nonlocal effects in the response of the electron gas in the metal are described by a quantum hydrodynamic model, where the equation of electronic motion contains both a quantum pressure term and a gradient correction from the Bohm quantum potential, resulting in a fourth-order differential equation for the perturbed electron density. Thus, besides using the condition that the normal component of the electron velocity should vanish at the impenetrable boundary of the metal, a consistent inclusion of the gradient correction is shown to introduce two possibilities for an additional boundary condition for the perturbed electron density. We show that using two different sets of boundary conditions only gives rise to differences in the wake potential at large distances behind the charged particle. On the other hand, the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model is seen to cause a reduction in the depth of the potential well closest to the particle, and a reduction of its stopping power. Even for a particle moving in the center of the slab, we observe nonlocal effects in the induced potential and the stopping power due to reduction of the slab thickness, which arise from the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model.

  13. Dark matter vs. neutrinos: the effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jonathan H.

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments are said to run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that, using only spectral information, the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions it can still be surpassed using timing information, and so the neutrino floor is not an absolute limit on the sensitivity of Direct Detection experiments.

  14. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  15. DOE O 442.2 Differing Professional Opinions for Technical Issues Involving Environment, Safety and Health DOE O 470.4B Safeguards and Security Program DOE O 472.2 Personnel Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department issued Contractor Requirements Documents (CRDs) for the subject Directives as follows: DOE O 442.2 (July 29, 2011), DOE O 470.4B (July 21, 2011) and DOE O 472.2 (July 27, 2011).

  16. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  17. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Micca, P.L.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1986-03-11

    A stable boronated (/sup 10/B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/, at a dose of about 200 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight. The infusion is preformed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of /sup 10/B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of /sup 10/B in the tumor. 1 tab.

  18. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 1, BIPV/T system and house energy concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Athienitis, A.K.; Galal, Khaled

    2010-11-15

    This paper is the first of two papers that describe the modeling, design, and performance assessment based on monitored data of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house. This house, with a design goal of near net-zero annual energy consumption, was constructed in 2007 in Eastman, Quebec, Canada - a cold climate area. Several novel solar technologies are integrated into the house and with passive solar design to reach this goal. An air-based open-loop BIPV/T system produces electricity and collects heat simultaneously. Building-integrated thermal mass is utilized both in passive and active forms. Distributed thermal mass in the direct gain area and relatively large south facing triple-glazed windows (about 9% of floor area) are employed to collect and store passive solar gains. An active thermal energy storage system (TES) stores part of the collected thermal energy from the BIPV/T system, thus reducing the energy consumption of the house ground source heat pump heating system. This paper focuses on the BIPV/T system and the integrated energy concept of the house. Monitored data indicate that the BIPV/T system has a typical efficiency of about 20% for thermal energy collection, and the annual space heating energy consumption of the house is about 5% of the national average. A thermal model of the BIPV/T system suitable for preliminary design and control of the airflow is developed and verified with monitored data. (author)

  19. Cleaning of the ocean floor near offshore platforms in the Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.S.; Smith, S.A. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    For decades in offshore drilling, the drill cuttings were separated from the circulating drilling fluid by the shale shaker and hydrocyclone, and discharged to the ocean. The drilling fluid itself was discharged to the ocean intermittently to maintain its required properties during the drilling process. These discharges contain many environmentally undesirable chemicals, such as hydrocarbons chemical additives and heavy metals. As a result, the ocean floor near some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are covered by contaminated sediment. Ocean current is not as effective in washing out the discarded ocean muds as previously believed. An attempt was made to clean some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The quantity and characteristics of the drilling discharges are estimated the technology used to clean the ocean floor near platforms is described, and advanced treatments for hydrocarbon removal, chemical oxidation and activated carbon adsorption, are discussed. 8 references.

  20. Innovative residential floor construction: Structural evaluation of steel joists with pre-formed web openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elhajj, N.R.

    1999-03-01

    Since 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development has sponsored numerous studies to identify, evaluate, and implement innovative structural materials, such as cold-formed steel (CFS), in the residential market. The use of CFS is still very limited, partly because steel is not being effectively integrated into conventional home construction. One of the major barriers to the use of CFS floor joists is the impact it has on placement of large waste drains and ductwork installed in floor systems. This report provides an overview of tests conducted by the NAHB to integrate these systems with CFS. A brief literature review of relevant work followed by a detailed overview of the experimental and analytical approach are also provided. The report recommends adoption of the research findings in residential and commercial applications.

  1. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. I. Semi-infinite slab approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkel, M. van; Zwart, H. J.; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on semi-infinite slab approximations of the heat equation. The main result is the approximation of χ under the influence of V and τ based on the phase of two harmonics making the estimate less sensitive to calibration errors. To understand why the slab approximations can estimate χ well in cylindrical geometry, the relationships between heat transport models in slab and cylindrical geometry are studied. In addition, the relationship between amplitude and phase with respect to their derivatives, used to estimate χ, is discussed. The results are presented in terms of the relative error for the different derived approximations for different values of frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. The approximations show a significant region in which χ, V, and τ can be estimated well, but also regions in which the error is large. Also, it is shown that some compensation is necessary to estimate V and τ in a cylindrical geometry. On the other hand, errors resulting from the simplified assumptions are also discussed showing that estimating realistic values for V and τ based on infinite domains will be difficult in practice. This paper is the first part (Part I) of a series of three papers. In Part II and Part III, cylindrical approximations based directly on semi-infinite cylindrical domain (outward propagating heat pulses) and inward propagating heat pulses in a cylindrical domain, respectively, will be treated.

  2. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes) in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.

  3. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more » in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  4. Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

  5. Atomistic study on the site preference and lattice vibration of Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} (T=Al and Ge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Hai-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Hu, Yao-Wen; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the Y substitution for Gd on the structural stability and the site preference of intermetallics Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} (T=Al and Ge) are studied by using a series of interatomic pair potentials. The calculated results show Y can stabilize Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} with the tetragonal structure, and Y substitute for Gd with a strong preference for the 2b sites. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, the total and partial phonon densities of states are evaluated for the Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} compounds with the tetragonal structure. A qualitative analysis is carried out with the relevant potentials for the vibrational modes, which makes it possible to predict some properties related to lattice vibration. - Graphical abstract: The lattice cell of Gd{sub 3}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} consists of 92 atoms, or two Gd{sub 3}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} formula units, with fourteen distinct kinds of site. Rare-earth atoms occupy 2b and 4d sites, Co atoms occupy the Co1(2c), Co2(8i1), Co3(8i2), Co4(8i3), Co5(8j1), Co6(8j2) and Co7(16k), T atoms occupy the T(8i) sites, and B atoms occupy the B1(2c1), B2(2c2), B3(8i) and B4(8j) sites. - Highlights: • The application of the pair potentials obtained from lattice-inversion method. • The lattice vibrations for Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} (T=Ge and Al) are first evaluated. • The Y atoms should prefer the 2b site of Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} compounds. • The total and partial phonon densities of states are evaluated for the Gd{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 29}T{sub 4}B{sub 10} compounds with the tetragonal structure. • A qualitative analysis is carried out with the relevant potentials for the vibrational modes.

  6. Causes and solutions for cracking of coextruded and weld overlay floor tubes in black liquor recovery boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.

    1998-09-01

    Cracking of coextruded, black liquor recovery boiler floor tubes is both a safety and an economic issue to mill operators. In an effort to determine the cause of the cracking and to identify a solution, extensive studies, described in this and three accompanying papers, are being conducted. In this paper, results of studies to characterize both the cracking and the chemical and thermal environment are reported. Based on the results described in this series of papers, a possible mechanism is presented and means to lessen the likelihood of cracking or to totally avoid cracking of floor tubes are offered.

  7. Exponential-characteristic spatial quadrature for discrete-ordinates neutral-particle transport in slab geometry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoden, G.E.

    1992-03-01

    A new discrete ordinates spatial quadrature scheme is presented for solving neutral particle transport problems. This new scheme, called the exponential characteristic method, is developed here in slab geometry with isotropic scattering. This method uses a characteristic integration of the Boltzmann transport equation with an exponential function as the assumed from of the source distribution, continuous across each spatial cell. The exponential source function is constructed to globally conserve zeroth and first spatial source moments and is non-negative. Characteristic integration ensures non-negative fluxes and flux moments. Numerical testing indicates that convergence of the exponential characteristic scheme is fourth order in the limit of vanishingly thin cells. Highly accurate solutions to optically thick problems can result using this scheme with very coarse meshes. Comparing accuracy and computational cost with existing spatial quadrature schemes (diamond difference, linear discontinuous, linear characteristic, linear adaptive, etc.), the exponential characteristic scheme typically performed best. This scheme is expected to be expandable to two dimensions in a straight forward manner. Due to the high accuracies achievable using coarse meshes, this scheme may allow researchers to obtain solutions to transport problems once thought too large or too difficult to be adequately solved conventional computer systems.

  8. SICS. A Sensor-Based In-Line Control System for the Surfaces of Continuously Cast Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh

    2013-09-23

    The Phase II project has been carried out in accordance to the proposed tasks and budget, based on the original and extended schedule. The R&D team designed and implemented the test unit for the full width coverage, installed the unit in a caster. The development work further included enhanced image processing, in-depth defect study and process control models. The function, operation, and maintenance of the SICS was thoroughly studied during the Phase II research. The experience indicates additional hardware and procedures are required to make the SICS a commercially ready product in operation and maintenance aspect. Such developments have been finished and the team is contacting potential customers for the first commercial installation of SICS. Additionally, OGT is exploring the possibility to team up with a US company that specializes in surface cleaning for slabs/blooms/billets such that the in-line surface inspection can be integrated with in-line surface clean up for the maximum benefit to the steel industry.

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  11. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  12. Nonlinear dynamic response of submarine pipelines in contact with the ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamic response of a submarine pipeline to wave and current excitation is investigated by the finite-element method. The pipeline, in contact with soft clay on the ocean floor, is modeled as a continuous beam. Small-deflection theory with geometric stiffening is employed. Pipeline tension, used in the geometric stiffness matrix, is calculated using pipeline stretch. The hydrodynamic forces are calculated using the modified Morison equation. The excitation involves a long-crested regular wave propagating perpendicular to the pipeline axis with or with out the current. The distributed drag and lift forces are converted into multisegment concentrated forces by means of the beam shape functions, and the inertia force is treated as a uniformly distributed force on each element. The soil-resistance forces due to lateral sliding on a plane surface are calculated using either an elasto-plastic or a hysteretic pipeline-soil interaction model. The Newmark Method is used to integrate the nonlinear equations of dynamic equilibrium using an iterative scheme within each time step. It is found from this study that the use of geometric stiffness is necessary for pipelines in a marine environment. The significant effect of geometric stiffening on pipeline responses for cases involving current is demonstrated.

  13. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  14. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  15. Building America Case Study: Optimized Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits, Madison, Wisconsin (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimized Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits Madison, Wisconsin Existing slab-on-grade (SOG) foundations are diffcult to insulate as a retro- ft measure because of a lack of interior access to the foundation. Because SOG foundations can be insulated only on the exterior, costly and destruc- tive excavation is usually required. In addition, determining cost-effective insulation upgrade strategies has been hampered by software tools that do not accurately account for heat fow below

  16. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors

  17. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  18. Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Curry County, New Mexico Dallam County, Texas De Baca County, New Mexico Deaf Smith County, Texas Del Norte County, California Donley County, Texas El Dorado County,...

  19. Sweetwater 4b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Babcock & BrownCatamount Energy Energy Purchaser City of San Antonio Texas (Utility Company) Location...

  20. NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-4B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... be completed before interest penalties are assessed on late payment of fee, if applicable. ... evaluation period under the Conditional Payment of Fee, Profit, or Incentives clause of ...

  1. Synthesis of 3-amino-4-hydroxylaminothiazolidine-2-thiones and 2,3-dimethyl-4. cap alpha. ,5-dihydro-7-thioxothiazolo(3,4-b)-1,2,4-triazines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epshtein, S.P.; Orlova, T.I.; Rukasov, A.F.; Tashchi, V.P.; Putsykin, Yu. G.

    1987-10-01

    The reaction of dimeric nitroso chlorides of olefins with potassium dithiocarbazate was used to synthesize 3-amino-4-hydroxylaminothiazolidine-2-thiones, which undergo rearrangement to 2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazines on heating and react with butane-2,3-dione to give 2,3-dimethyl-4..cap alpha..,5-dihydro-7-thioxothiazolo(3,4-b)-1,2,4-triazine 4-oxides. The latter are reduced by sodium borohydride to the corresponding 3,4,4..cap alpha..,5-tetrahydro-7-thioxo derivatives. The IR spectra of KBr pellets of the compounds were recorded with a Perkin-Elmer spectrometer. The UV spectra of solutions in ethanol were obtained with a Specord UV spectrophotometer. The PMR spectra of solutions of the compounds in d/sub 6/-DMSO were obtained with a Varian FT-80A spectrometer with tetramethylsilane (TMS) as the internal standard.

  2. Continuous sea-floor spreading in Red Sea: an alternative interpretation of magnetic anomaly pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Brecque, J.L.; Zitellini

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly pattern over the Red Sea can be modeled as a continuous system of sea-floor spreading from the early Miocene to the present by using a timevarying process filter. The half spreading rate is approximately 1 cm/yr (0.4 in./yr) since initial rifting. The parameters that determine the process filter and development of the transition zone are the intrusion parameter (a measure of the dispersion of feeder dikes or horizontal strain about the rift axis), a flow parameter (a measure of the average flow width), and the effusion parameter (a measure of the volcanic effusion and thickness of layer 2). The authors estimate the flow parameter to be 2.7km(1.7 mi) and the intrusion parameter to be 7.5km(4.7 mi) at early rifting. These values suggest that a wide distribution of axial dikes or horizontal strain is the dominant factor in forming the magnetic anomaly pattern. Reduction in the width of the intrusion parameter and the effusion rate as rifting proceeded resulted in focusing of the strain, thinning of layer 2, and formation of the Red Sea deeps. Their modeling suggests that phase 2, or the stratoid phase, began about the time of anomaly 5C or chron C5C approximately 16 Ma. This age is compatible with geologic estimates of the initial rifting at the late Oligocene to early Miocene (Coleman, 1974; Gass, 1977). The opening rate for Africa-Arabia plate motion has remained relatively constant since early rifting although the African margin appears to be accreting faster than the Arabian plate.

  3. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  4. Initial measurements of BN-350 spent fuel in dry storage casks using the dual slab verification detonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Browne, Michael C; Freeman, Corey R; Parker, Robert F; Williams, Richard B

    2010-01-01

    The Dual Slab Verification Detector (DSVD) has been developed, built, and characterized by Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as part of the dry storage safeguards system for the spent fuel from the BN-350 fast reactor. The detector consists of two rows of 3He tubes embedded in a slab of polyethylene which has been designed to be placed on the outer surface of the dry storage cask. By performing DSVD measurements at several different locations around the outer surface of the DUC, a signature 'fingerprint' can be established for each DUC based on the neutron flux emanating from inside the dry storage cask. The neutron fingerprint for each individual DUC will be dependent upon the spatial distribution of nuclear material within the cask, thus making it sensitive to the removal of a certain amount of material from the cask. An initial set of DSVD measurements have been performed on the first set of dry storage casks that have been loaded with canisters of spent fuel and moved onto the dry storage pad to both establish an initial fingerprint for these casks as well as to quantify systematic uncertainties associated with these measurements. The results from these measurements will be presented and compared with the expected results that were determined based on MCNPX simulations of the dry storage facility. The ability to safeguard spent nuclear fuel is strongly dependent on the technical capabilities of establishing and maintaining continuity of knowledge (COK) of the spent fuel as it is released from the reactor core and either reprocessed or packaged and stored at a storage facility. While the maintenance of COK is often done using continuous containment and surveillance (C/S) on the spent fuel, it is important that the measurement capabilities exist to re-establish the COK in the event of a significant gap in the continuous CIS by performing measurements that independently confirm the presence and content

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient

  6. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR SUB-SLAB SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE FORMER BUILDING K-33, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NICK A. ALTIC

    2012-09-20

    At DOE’s request, ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the K-33 sub-slab soil during the period of August 2011 through May 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections and measurement and sampling activities. LSRS was forthcoming with information relating to surface scan results. Scans performed by the contractor were of adequate coverage and overall data appear to represent actual site conditions. However, the LSRS technicians failed to identify several areas of elevated direct gamma radiation. Most of the samples taken by ORAU at locations of elevated instrument response were above the remediation concentration for one or more radionuclides of concern (ROC). The contractor was, however, quick to perform additional remediation of areas identified to have contamination above the guidelines. Further investigation by ORAU was not requested once additional remediation was completed. It is presumed the remediation contractor’s future PCCR will present detailed and conclusive evidence that K-33 sub-slab soils either comply or do not comply with record of decision (ROD) criteria. However, ORAU concludes, based on both independent verification (IV) data and data provided by LSRS, that the remediation contractor followed appropriate and applicable procedures and that the associated data adequately represent site conditions.

  7. Evaluating the Relationship between Slabbing of Cr2O3/MgO Refractories Used in Steelmaking and Spalling of High Chrome Oxide Refractories Used in Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, J.P.; Thomas, H.; Kwong, K.-S.

    2006-10-01

    Because of its excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature properties, chrome oxide refractories have been used in a number of severe service environments, including steelmaking and gasification. Refractory failure of Cr2O3/MgO or MgO/Cr2O3 refractories in steelmaking can involve a phenomena called slabbing, peeling, or chemical spalling. A similar failure mechanism exists in the high chrome oxide materials used in gasification. Gasifiers contain the reaction between a carbon feedstock, water, and oxygen under reducing conditions; producing H2 and CO used in chemicals or as fuel for power plants. A slagging gasifier typically operates between 1250- 1575C, and with pressures between 300-1000 psi. Gasification refractory failure is by chemical dissolution and/or by spalling. Spalling is caused by slag penetration of the porous refractory surface and by expansion differences between the penetrated/non-penetrated areas, and is exacerbated by thermal cycling. Similarities between slabbing of steelmaking refractories and spalling of gasification refractories will be discussed.

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being

  9. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  10. Adaptation of methodology to select structural alternatives of one-way slab in residential building to the guidelines of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN/TC 350)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraile-Garcia, Esteban; Ferreiro-Cabello, Javier; Martinez-Camara, Eduardo; Jimenez-Macias, Emilio

    2015-11-15

    The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) through its Technical Committee CEN/TC-350 is developing a series of standards for assessing the building sustainability, at both product and building levels. The practical application of the selection (decision making) of structural alternatives made by one-way slabs leads to an intermediate level between the product and the building. Thus the present study addresses this problem of decision making, following the CEN guidelines and incorporating relevant aspects of architectural design into residential construction. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process (the LCA was developed applying CML methodology although Ecoindicator99 was used in order to facilitate the comparison of the values); this information (the carbon footprint values) is contrasted with other databases and with the information from the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) of one of the lightening materials (expanded polystyrene), in order to validate the results. Solutions of different column disposition and geometries are evaluated in the three pillars of sustainable construction on residential construction: social, economic and environmental. The quantitative analysis of the variables used in this study enables and facilitates an objective comparison in the design stage by a responsible technician; the application of the proposed methodology reduces the possible solutions to be evaluated by the expert to 12.22% of the options in the case of low values of the column index and to 26.67% for the highest values. - Highlights: • Methodology for selection of structural alternatives in buildings with one-way slabs • Adapted to CEN guidelines (CEN/TC-350) for assessing the building sustainability • LCA is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process. • Results validated comparing carbon footprint, databases and Env. Product Declarations

  11. SHERATON STATION SQUARE FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion Process Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas (FE0007453) Krish ...

  12. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency

  13. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home ...

  15. Reservoir characterization of a Permian Slope Fan/basin-floor fan complex: Cherry Canyon Formation, Ward County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spain, D.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The Cherry Canyon Formation consists of a 925-ft- (280-m) thick section of up to 25 different sandstone and siltstone units that were deposited in a deep-water environment in the Delaware basin. Lowstand sedimentation by fluid density currents with periodic turbidity currents resulted in a broad-migrating channelized slope fan/basin-floor fan complex interpreted to exhibit an intricate reservoir geometry. Thirteen lithofacies are identified. Primary reservoirs are found in massive channel sandstones, and beds of lesser reservoir quality are present in laminated overbank/interchannel sandstones. Original depositional fabric modified by diagenetic cements and authigenic clays created three petrophysical rock types. Type I reservoirs contain intergranular macroporosity relatively free of carbonate cement and authigenic clay. Types II and III reservoirs contain mesoporosity and abundant microporosity created by moderate to abundant carbonate cementation and plugging of pore throats by authigenic grain-coating chlorite and pore-bridging fibrous illite. Depositional and diagenetic factors combine with insufficient oil column height to yield low initial oil saturations that decrease with depth in a hydrocarbon-water transition zone. Mercury injection capillary pressure measurements illustrate the vertical stratification of petrophysical rock types that exist in the section; reservoirs which contain all water are interbedded with reservoirs containing mostly oil. Subsequently, a slight change in height above free water can drive production from all water to all oil. Hydrocarbon column heights greater than 60 ft are required to establish water-free oil production. Accurate reservoir water saturations can be derived using Archie's equation; when combined with a movable oil analysis and drainage relative permeability/fractional flow curves, initial water cuts can be predicted to maximize deliverability.

  16. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the behavior and strength of modular steel-plate composite (SC) slabs and floor ... of Impact The research would involve assessing modular steel-plate composite performance. ...

  17. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the cables or tubing in a solid floor and are the oldest form of modern radiant floor systems. The tubing or cable can be embedded in a thick concrete foundation slab (commonly...

  18. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  19. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  20. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements

  1. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provides a platform which solves a variety of accessibility problems associated with controlling process flow streams in remote, hard to reach locations in harsh environments. Installation of the equipment described has shown to allow access to flow streams that otherwise would require exceptional means to access and control. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to both control and monitor process fluid flow through shielding, walls or floors when direct connection is advantageous. (authors)

  2. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  3. Justification Memo DOE O 452.4B

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter functionality of the weapon and possibly cause DAU.

  4. baepgfb-mac4b | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Four Rivers Energy ... Four Rivers Second Generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion Project ...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b-Mound Reindustrilaization Workshop...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Reindustrialization Workshop Tri-Cities (Hanford) Case Study Tuesday, May 20, 2014 Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC) * Formed in 1963 * Private Not-for-Profit * 335 Members * ...

  6. Monju Transparency Suite v. 1.0.0.4b

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    The software was developed achieve real-time detection and risk calculation by monitoring the sequence of operations from the Monju training model, as reported by intrinsic model sensors whose digital data is stored in XML files, and comparing these to a set of expectations based on previous declarations.

  7. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  8. ,"Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...44924,44637,44422,44215.557,44353.557 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",341158,360748,357026,3...2,77155.21552,77850.24952,77706.30352 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",488418,511642,524995,5...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4B Mark Phifer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Consideration of Liners and Covers in Performance Assessments SRNL-STI-2014-00409 - Approaches to Consider Covers and Liners in a Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...

  10. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  11. Comparison of effectiveness of sub-slab ventilation systems for indoor radon mitigation: A numerical study; Comparaison a l`aide d`un outil numerique de l`efficacite des systemes de ventilation active du sol limitant la penetration du radon dans l`habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnefous, Y.C. |; Gadgil, A.J.; Allard, F.

    1992-04-01

    The functioning of an active sub-slab ventilation system (SVS) has been studied successfully with the help of a previously evaluated numerical model. The parameters explored are the permeability of the sub-slab and the gravel placed beneath it, the amplitude of applied pressure at the installation point of the system and the functioning method: depressurization or pressurization. The mechanisms contributing to the success of the two systems are identified. This numerical study shows that the presence of a layer of gravel beneath the sub-slab considerably improves the performance of the SVS. Considered separately from the extremely permeable sub-slabs, the depressurization systems perform better than the pressurization systems. 17 refs. [Francais] Le fonctionnement des Systemes de Ventilation active du Sol (SVS) a ete etudie a l`aide d`un outil numerique precedemment evalue avec succes. Les parametres explores sont les permeabilites du sol et du gravier place sous plancher bas, l`amplitude de la pression appliquee au point d`installation du systeme, et le mode de fonctionnement: Depressurisation ou Pressurisation. Les mecanismes contribuant au succes des deux systemes sont identifies. Cette etude numerique montre que la presence d`une couche de gravier sous plancher bas ameliore de facon considerable les performances des SVS. Mis a part le cas des sols extremement permeables, les systemes de Depressurisation ont de meilleures performances que les systemes de Pressurisation. 17 refs.

  12. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_koretz.pdf (9.14 MB) More Documents & Publications 2016 CSP Summit Day 2 2014 Concentrating Solar Power Report EIS-0416: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy

    The Gas Technology Institute, in collaboration with Cannon Boiler Works, Integrated CHP Systems Corp., Capstone Turbine Corporation, Johnston Boiler

  13. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Coal mining uses 70 million to 260 million gallons of water each day, 21 and a 500 MW coal fired power plant uses 300 million gallons of water a day just for cooling. 22 However, ...

  14. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station

  15. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  16. Aeromagnetic anomalies and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta: Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor spreading directions in the meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalola, O.O.; Gipson, M. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    An aeromagnetic contour map compiled over shallow water and onshore portions of the Nigerian continental margin, shows several elongate, long-wavelength anomaly closures with some alternating polarity, separated by steep gradient, NE lineations. The lineations are interpreted as new fracture zones or extensions of previously mapped ones. The NE trend in the western delta region is concordant with the fracture zone trends of the deeper Gulf of Guinea. Aeromagnetic lineations of the SE Niger Delta Basin however, discordantly trend ENE. Their termination against the former, is interpreted as evidence of early sea-floor spreading in a ENE-WSW direction in addition to the well documented NE-SW spreading of the Gulf of Guinea and the rest of the meso-Atlantic sea-floor; The geophysical crustal structure indicate the existence of two Early Cretaceous triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin. The two triple-junctions further support the hypothesis that the African continent was a multi-plate system (in the Niger Delta region) during the early opening of the Atlantic.

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Constructio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100% LED lights. Ferguson Design &...

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Devoted Builders, LLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Devoted Builders meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the cold climate with R-25 ICF walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  19. DOE Tour of Zero: The Shore Road Project by Murphy Brothers Contractin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    floor slab. 9 of 13 The ultra-efficient wall insulation consists of insulated concrete form (ICF) construction where rigid foam blocks have steel-reinforcing added and are...

  20. Form Approved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    is a room with a flush toilet, bathtub or shower, and a sinkwashbasin with running water. ... ALL THAT 152- ONLY ONE) APPLY 153 HOT WATER PIPES RUNNING THROUGH A SLAB FLOOR ...

  1. Form Approved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    is a room with a flush toilet, bathtub or shower, and a sinkwashbasin with running water. ... ALL THAT 152- ONLY ONE) APPLY 253 HOT WATER PIPES RUNNING THROUGH A SLAB FLOOR ...

  2. OMB No. 038-R0459 EIA 457B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    is a room with a flush toilet, bathtub or shower, and a sinkwashbasin with running water. ... heating equipment for your home? Ol HOT WATER PIPES RUNNING THROUGH A SLAB FLOOR ...

  3. OMB No. 1905-0093 * EIA 457B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    is a room with a flush toilet, bathtub or shower, and a sinkwashbasin with running water. ... your main heating fuel? HOT WATER PIPES RUNNING THROUGH A SLAB FLOOR (RADIANT HEATING) . ...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    structural insulated panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows. ...

  5. Materials Data on Al4(B2O5)3 (SG:146) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. "Order Module--DOE O 470.4B, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY PROGRAM...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    programs, including control of classified materials and the responsibilities of field elements and contractor employees in identifying classified information as covered in DOE O ...

  7. Materials Data on ErFe4B (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on NdCo4B (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ce4B2N5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-06

    The directive is proposed for revision to reflect the establishment by the Secretary of Energy of the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), and the Office of Security Officer positions and the Security Committee. The responsibilities section of the Order will be revised to include the Chief Security Officers and the Security Committee and to better reflect current Departmental structure.

  11. DOE_CX-00038-Rev4-B1.7.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. DOE_CX-00039-Rev4-B1.2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. DOE_CX-00047-Rev4-B1.30.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. Microsoft Word - A-4_B-5BroadcastEmail110911.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9/9/11 Total pages including cover sheet = 14 To: Carl Spreng, CDPHE carl.spreng@state.co.us Vera Moritz EPA moritz.vera@epa.gov Steve Berendzen USFWS steve_berendzen@fws.gov David Allen Broomfield dallen@ci.broomfield.co.us Shirley Garcia Broomfield sgarcia@ci.broomfield.co.us Laura Hubbard Broomfield lhubbard@broomfield.org Dan Mayo Broomfield dmayo@ci.broomfield.co.us Kathy Schnoor Broomfield kschnoor@ci.broomfield.co.us Shelley Stanley Northglenn sstanley@northglenn.org Bud Hart Thornton

  15. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  17. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or impending changes in the organizational structure or ownership, including any acquisitions, mergers, or divestitures; and (6) any other issues that could have a bearing on...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and operating CO 2 storage sites that are fully integrated with an upstream power plant * Store 39-million metric tonnes of CO 2 that would otherwise be emitted to the ...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuscola, Illinois June 8, 2011 FutureGen Alliance International Non-Profit Consortia 2 Project Description Project Concept 3 Project Description Project Goals * Demonstrate an approach for siting, permitting, insuring, and operating CO 2 storage sites that are fully integrated with an upstream power plant * Store 39-million metric tonnes of CO 2 that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere * Demonstrate a suite of comprehensive monitoring technologies, verification techniques, and

  20. COMET TA Floor Plan 100225.vc6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Hall Door Emg Exit W Trench Room 1107 S Structural Beam Rack Argus Chamber Interaction Chamber Work Station 8 3 0 2 - V B L as phere CL 420mm f rom N i nner wall. Lens h...

  1. Pittsburgh Airport Marriott Hotel Floor Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of LG Fuel Cell System Projects - Performance, Durability, Cost Shung Ik Lee and Adam Babcock, LG Fuel Cell Systems, Inc. 12:15 - 1:30 pm LUNCH in Coraopolis, Findlay, Moon Rooms 3 ...

  2. DOE ZERH Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5” SIP walls and 10.25” SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes — Cedarwood, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This house was the Grand Winner in the Affordable Builder category of the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, and has 6-inch SIP walls, a 10-inch structural insulated panel roof, and insulating concrete forms foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab.A single ductless heat pump heats and cools the home, which also gets passive solar heating from south-facing triple-pane windows that heat a concrete slab floor plus a connected greenhouse.

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5” SIP walls and 10.25” SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  6. DOE ZERH Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  7. Design of SC walls and slabs for impulsive loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varma, Amit H.

    2015-11-11

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures have historically been the preferred choice for blast resistant structures because of their mass and the ductility provided by steel reinforcement. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls are a viable alternative to RC for protecting the infrastructure against explosive threats. SC structures consist of two steel faceplates with a plain concrete core between them. The steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete using stud anchors and connected to each other using tie bars. SC structures provide mass from the concrete infill and ductility from the continuous external steel faceplates. This dissertation presents findings and recommendations from experimental and analytical investigations of the performance of SC walls subjected to far-field blast loads.

  8. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotora, J. Jr.; Groh, E.F.; Kann, W.J.; Burelbach, J.P.

    1984-04-10

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprises many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  9. Hybrid heat capacity-moving slab solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-03-01

    Laser material is pumped and its stored energy is extracted in a heat capacity laser mode at a high duty factor. When the laser material reaches a maximum temperature, it is removed from the lasing region and a subsequent volume of laser material is positioned into the lasing region to repeat the lasing process. The heated laser material is cooled passively or actively outside the lasing region.

  10. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotora, Jr., James; Groh, Edward F.; Kann, William J.; Burelbach, James P.

    1986-01-01

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprising many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  11. Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimized Slab...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This project used a recently developed, three-dimensional, below-grade heat transfer simulation (BUilding Foundation Energy Transport Simulation-BCVTB, BUFETS-B) that operates as a ...

  12. Green's function analysis of homogeneous slab time eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornreich, D. E.; Parsons, Donald Kent

    2004-01-01

    Several recent papers have examined higher mode eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for multiplying systems. One of the goals of these analyses was to produce benchmark-quality results of the fundamental multiplication eigenvalue along with associated higher mode eigenvalues. The Green's Function Method (GFM) was found to be quite useful in these analyses. In this paper we extend our use of the GFM to include the calculation of real time eigenvalues. Many large-scale transport codes have difficulty calculating negative time eigenvalues, and the availability of benchmark-quality positive time eigenvalues is also scarce. Thus, we enhance the suite of benchmark-quality results for nuclear code developers by adding some time eigenvalue results.

  13. "Order Module--DOE O 470.4B, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY PROGRAM, DOE O 471.6,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy

    "Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service" Report Now Available "Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service" Report Now Available November 13, 2015 - 5:12pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report entitled "Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service" that examines utilities' and consumers' experiences with prepay which is an alternative payment option in which consumers buy a

  14. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Oakland Harbor intensive study, IC-1 and OC4-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-11-01

    Oakland Harbor is located on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay in Alameda County, between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California. Oakland Harbor and its access channels are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modern deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels to {minus}44 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) ({minus}42 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdraft) in Oakland Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE. Those options include disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean sites, or at upland disposal sites. Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, specifies that all proposed disposal of dredged material into open water be evaluated to determine the potential environmental impacts to those activities. To comply with those requirements, the potential environmental impacts of the dredged material must be evaluated by chemical characterization, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation testing prior to dredging and disposal. Test results are described.

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tom Walsh & Co.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Tom Walsh & Companys homes in an urban infill project in Portland achieved meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the marine climate with R-21 fiberglass batt walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  16. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the rare-earth metals for reuse. But CMI scientist Ikenna Nlebedim said he and co-inventor Bill McCallum wanted to push further. "We decided to see if there is a possibility of...

  17. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Blanket insulation Wire fasteners Tape measure Sharp utility knife Caulk and foam sealant Caulk gun Stepladder Straightedge Respirator or dust mask Eye protection Protective ...

  18. Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 16,900 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,541 + Sweden Building...

  19. Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 17,000 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,500 + Sweden Building...

  20. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, recovers valuable rare-earth magnetic material from manufacturing waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Ames Laboratory...

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 42 without PV and a -1 with PV. This 3,192 ft2 custom home has 6-inch SIP walls, a 12-inch SIP roof, an R-28 ICF-insulated foundation slab edge with R-20 rigid foam under the slab; an air-to-water heat pump plus radiant floor heat; 100% LED lighting; filtered-fan-powered fresh air intake; triple-pane windows, 9.7 kWh PV for electric car charging station.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Construction Inc., Sagaponack, NY, Custom Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Long Island, NY, that scored HERS 43 without PV. This 5,088-square-foot custom home has R-25 double-stud walls, a vaulted roof with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100% LED lights.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Greenbank, Washington that scored HERS 37 without PV and a -5 with PV. This 1,955 ft2 custom home has 6.5-inch structural insulated panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows.

  4. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings. The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Steigauf, Brianna

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy / 3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Coupeville, WA, Systems Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case-study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home on Whidbey Island, WA, that scored HERS 45 without PV. This 2,908-square-foot custom/system home has a SIP roof and walls, R-20 rigid foam under slab, triple-pane windows, ground source heat pump for radiant floor heat, and a unique balanced ventilation system using separate exhaust fans to bring air into and out of home.

  6. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  7. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, Robert C.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  8. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Energy Savings: The Simulated Energy and Experimental Hygrothermal Performance of Cold Climate Foundation Wall Insulation Retrofit Measures -- Phase I, Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L. F.; Steigauf, B.

    2013-04-01

    A split simulation whole building energy/3-dimensional earth contact model (termed the BUFETS/EnergyPlus Model or BEM) capable of modeling the full range of foundation systems found in the target retrofit housing stock has been extensively tested. These foundation systems that include abovegrade foundation walls, diabatic floors or slabs as well as lookout or walkout walls, currently cannot be modeled within BEopt.

  9. Probing triple-Higgs productions via 4b2γ decay channel at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhao, Zhijie; Zhong, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-11

    We report that the quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or International Linear Collider (ILC) at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed Monte Carlo simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel HHH →more » $$b\\bar{b}$$$$b\\bar{b}$$γγ, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that, in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than 1.8×104 ab₋1. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear (λ3) and quartic (λ4) self-couplings of the Higgs. Ultimately, we find that, through a search in the triple-Higgs production, the parameters λ3 and λ4 can be restricted to the ranges [₋1,5] and [₋20,30], respectively. We also examine how new physics can change the production rate of triple-Higgs events. For example, in the singlet extension of the Standard Model, we find that the triple-Higgs production rate can be increased by a factor of O(10).« less

  10. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  11. Data:C6bdf72a-ed0a-4b57-b925-933e6f205d63 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  12. Data:547177e4-4225-4cc3-8d4b-95cddfe449b8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  13. Data:80c4b163-4218-4bba-b1e5-536338a1d458 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bba-b1e5-536338a1d458 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  14. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.4B, Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons, dated 1-11-2010

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-09-18

    Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter the functionality of the weapon and possible cause DAU.

  15. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Volume 2, Session 3A--Session 4B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-on-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  17. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-On-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes covers two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  18. Slab edge insulating form system and methods (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Lee, Brain E. 1 ; Barsun, Stephan K. 2 ; Bourne, Richard C. 2 ; Hoeschele, Marc A. 2 ; Springer, David A. 3 + Show Author Affiliations (Corral de Tierra, CA) ...

  19. Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ratio and 13 heating seasonal pump factor Infinity Variable Speed Heat Pump with Greenspeed Intelligence; above- and below-door transfer grilles * R-8 ductwork and air handlers ...

  20. Theoretical investigation of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of a slab-type liquid metal target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dury, T.V.; Smith, B.L.

    1996-06-01

    The thermal hydraulics codes CFDS-FLOW3D and ASTEC have been used to simulate a slabtype design of ESS spallation target. This design is single-skinned, and of tapering form (in the beam direction), with rounded sides in a cross-section through a plane normal to the beam. The coolant fluid used is mercury, under forced circulation, with an inlet temperature of 180{degrees}C. The goal of these computer studies was to understand the behaviour of the coolant flow, and hence to arrive at a design which optimises the heat extraction for a given beam power - in the sense of: (1) minimising the peak local fluid temperature within the target, (2) maintaining an acceptable temperature level and distribution over and through the target outer wall, (3) keeping the overall fluid pressure loss through the complete target to a minimum, (4) staying within the physical limits of overall size required, particularly in the region of primary spallation. Two- and three-dimensional models have been used, with different arrangements and design of internal baffles, and different coolant flow distributions at the target inlet. Nominal total inlet mass flow was 245 kg/s, and a heat deposition profile used which was based on the proton beam energy distribution. This gave a nominal total heat load of 3.23 MW - of which 8.2kW were deposited in the window steel.

  1. Ventilation rates per person and per unit floor area affect decision...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Hong Kong, July 7 - 12, 2014 Research Org: Ernest Orlando ...

  2. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a factor of 2 to 10 can have a significant impact on the economics of chemical flooding and conformance control applications. Simulation tools and experimental data presented in this report help to design and implement such polymer injection projects.

  3. K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUNT, J.W.

    1998-11-11

    The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

  4. Ventilation rates per person and per unit floor area affect decision...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Hong Kong, July 7 - 12, 2014 Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ...

  5. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Wade, Dale D.

    2006-08-01

    AbstractDead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

  6. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  7. BUILDING MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION USING A CONCRETE FLOOR AND WALL CONTAMINATION PROFILING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, Dr. S.,; Charters, G.; Thacker, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    Certain radioisotopes can penetrate concrete and contaminate the concrete well below the surface. The challenge is to determine the extent and magnitude of the contamination problem in real-time. The concrete profiling technology, TRUPROSM in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the material being sampled. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk. Performing a volumetric concrete or metal characterization safer and faster (without lab intervention) is the objective of this characterization technology. This way of determining contamination can save considerable time and money. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilizes or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the area around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated. The goal is to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with R-24 blown cellulose plus R-7.5 EPS rigid foam, membrane-coated OSB, a closed-cell spray foamed attic, R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat.

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-070.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 SECTION A. Project Title: Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) 1M Window and Tank Unit Replacement SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: Window 1M at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) has an oil leak from the window tank unit through the A-slab seal. In addition, a lead sheet has fallen from the upper window frame and is hanging with one end free. A drip system has been installed to collect oil leakage. Replacement of the window and tank unit is needed. All main floor cell

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Greenbank, Washington that scored HERS 37 without PV and a -5 with PV. This 1,955 ft2 custom home has 6.5-inch structural insulated panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows.