Sample records for 400 300 200

  1. -7000-6500-6000-5500-5000-4500-4000-3500-3000-2500-2000-1500 -500 0 200 400 600 1000 1500 3500 7000 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    topography m 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 hypocenter depth km open vectors

  2. Distance (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    Distance (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 Frequency 0.0 0.1 0.2 0 nests Expected G(d) Distance (m) 0 150 300 450 600 750 900 1050 1200 1350 Frequency 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0

  3. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent report for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report tabulates both radioactive and nonradioactive liquid and airborne effluent data for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations at the Hanford Site. The 300 Area is primarily a research and development area. The 400 Area houses the Fast Flux Test Facility. The 1100 Area contains central stores and vehicle maintenance facilities. Releases to the environment from Westinghouse Hanford Company operations within these areas during calendar year 1989 were both consistent with previous years and within regulatory limits. 2 refs., 10 tabs.

  4. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  5. PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    01713 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 101713 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL October 7, 2013 (0 Comments) I have biweekly office hours on Thursdays at LBNL. The...

  6. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy`s proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized.

  7. A Tariff for Reactive Power 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines

  8. -2500 0 2500 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    volcanoes from Siebert L, Simkin T (2002-): Volcanoes of the World: an Illustrated Catalog of Holocene

  9. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 SecondaryionIntensity(cts/sec)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    and contaminant concentrations. The 6600 D- SIMS system is equipped with Cs, O2, Ar, and Xe ion sources for a full are based on price per hour, in increments of an hour. Routine Services $300 Depth profile Cesium or oxygen contaminants and known dopants the presence and identity of the species can be confirmed. Rates are valid

  10. Communities of Pottery Production and Consumption on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia, 200 BC-300 AD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roddick, Andrew Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    299 8.41 XRF: Principles, methods and300 8.42 XRF297 8.14 XRF ternary plot (Sr, Fe, Rb) of all ceramics and

  11. Measurements of Total and Partial Charge-changing Cross Sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in Water and Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshito, T.; /CREST, Japan Sci. Tech. Corp. /KEK, Tsukuba; Kodama, K.; /Aichi U. of Education; Sihver, L.; /Chalmers U. Tech.; Yusa, K.; /Gunma U., Maebashi; Ozaki, M.; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Aoki, S.; /Kobe U.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshida, J.; /Nagoya U. /Naruto U. of Education /NIRS, Chiba /SLAC /Toho U.

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  12. Measurements of total and partial charge-changing cross sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in water and polycarbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshito, T; Aoki, S; Asai, M; Ban, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, C; Kameoka, S; Kanazawa, M; Kanematsu, N; Kodama, K; Koi, T; Komatsu, M; Komori, M; Kubota, H; Murakami, K; Naganawa, N; Nakamura, T; Nakano, T; Natsume, M; Niwa, K; Ogawa, S; Ozaki, M; Sasaki, T; Sato, S; Shibasaki, M; Shibuya, H; Sihver, L; Takahashi, S; Yoshida, H; Yoshida, J; Yusa, K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  13. Measurements of total and partial charge-changing cross sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in water and polycarbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Toshito; K. Kodama; L. Sihver; K. Yusa; M. Ozaki; K. Amako; S. Kameoka; K. Murakami; T. Sasaki; S. Aoki; T. Ban; T. Fukuda; M. Komatsu; H. Kubota; N. Naganawa; T. Nakamura; T. Nakano; M. Natsume; K. Niwa; S. Takahashi; J. Yoshida; H. Yoshida; M. Kanazawa; N. Kanematsu; M. Komori; S. Sato; M. Asai; T. Koi; C. Fukushima; S. Ogawa; M. Shibasaki; H. Shibuya

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  14. Measurements of total and partial charge-changing cross sections for 200- to 400-MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C on water and polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshito, T. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kodama, K. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya 448-8542 (Japan); Sihver, L. [Chalmers University of Technology SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia 24153 (United States); Yusa, K. [Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan); Ozaki, M. [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara 229-8510 (Japan); Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Aoki, S. [Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S. [Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200- to 400-MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon-ion therapy treatment planning systems and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, because carbon is a significant component of galactic cosmic rays.

  15. La Centrifugeuse est une salle de spectacle de 300m d'une capacit d'accueil de 200 400 personnes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dambrine, Marc

    : Système HF : -1 CD Sony CDP-M203-1 -1 MD Sony MD 570 - 3 x Micro-cravate TOA -1 CD Yamaha CDX497 - 3 x Micro Main TOA -1 DAT Sony -1 DAT Fostex D-15 Player/Recorder -1 Préampli ALTO ESOTAR 8in Système son -2 moniteurs vidéo blindés Sony 51 cm (exposition) -2 moniteurs vidéo blindés Sony 36 cm (retours

  16. Wavelength (nm) 300 400 500 600 700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a dye can be used to boost photovoltaic efficiency. In our lab continuing effort is put into the design in the development of more efficient polymer materials for organic solar cells. Introduction Organic photovoltaics. This also explains the increased efficiency of the AJ assembly compared to J. J efficiently transfers energy

  17. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  18. rho(0) photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 2001 run. Gold nuclei were collided at ?sNN = 200 GeV and the charged particle tracks were reconstructed in a cylindrical TimeProjectionChamber (TPC) [19]. TheTPC is a 4.2-m-long barrel with a 2-m... 150 200 250 300 350 400 FIG. 8. Projections of the two-dimensional efficiency-corrected #7;h vs cos( h) distributions obtained with the minimum bias data set. The solid line shows the result of the two-dimensional fit to the data with Eq. (6...

  19. 400K BEAT IT! 200K GET IT!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    a team leader for each farm: this should be CMI or Dairy One Marketing Manager. They will coordinate Module 2. Economics of Milk Quality 3. How we analyze data a. Sample Reports #12;4. Second meeting. Herd Veterinarian: 5. CMI 6. Goals For Program: 1. 2. 3. 4. Meeting 1 . z, #12;Meeting 1 Agenda: Step 1

  20. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  1. Treatability test plan for the 200-BP-1 prototype surface barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November of 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Area is divided into operable units based on waste disposal information, location, facility, type, and other characteristics. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is one specific site located within the 200 East Area. Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RI) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination and assessing risks to human health and the environment at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. In March of 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan for the 200-BP-1 operable unit was issued (DOE-RL 1990a). The work plan outlined the first phase of site characterization activities, which were completed in March of 1993 with the issuance of Phase I Remedial Investigation Report for the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit (DOE-RL 1993, Draft A). Remedial action objectives outlined in the RI report suggest that a likely remedial action at the 200-BP-1 operable unit could involve the use of a surface barrier. To further evaluate this technology, additional performance and constructability data are needed to implement this remedial action. This test plan describes the general methodology for conducting a prototype barrier treatability study. The objectives of this treatability study are to determine overall performance and constructability data on an actual waste site in conjunction with the Hanford Site Barrier Development Program.

  2. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  3. Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

  4. OGJ300; Smaller list, bigger financial totals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.; Biggs, J.B.

    1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on Oil and Gas Journal's list of the largest, publicly traded oil and gas producing companies in the U.S. which is both smaller and larger this year than it was in 1990. It's smaller because it covers fewer companies. Industry consolidation has slashed the number of public companies. As a result, the former OGJ400 has become the OGJ300, which includes the 30 largest limited partnerships. But the assets-ranked list is larger because important financial totals - representing 1990 results - are significantly higher than those of a year ago, despite the lower number of companies. Consolidation of the U.S. producing industry gained momentum throughout the 1980s. Unable to sustain profitability in a period of sluggish energy prices and, for many, rising costs, companies sought relief through mergers or liquidation of producing properties. As this year's list shows, however, surviving companies have managed to grow. Assets for the OGJ300 group totaled $499.3 billion in 1990 - up 6.3% from the 1989 total of last year's OGJ400. Stockholders' equity moved up 5.3% to $170.7 billion. Stockholders' equity was as high as $233.8 billion in 1983.

  5. The 400 MeV Linac Upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, R.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade in planned to increase the energy of the H{sup {minus}} linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHs drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MRs side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of about 7.5 MV/meter. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a 12 MW klystron-based rf power supply. Three of seven accelerator modules have been fabricated, power tested and installed in their temporary location adjacent to the existing DTL. All seven RF Modulators have been completed and klystron installation has begun. Waveguide runs have completed from the power supply gallery to the accelerator modules. The new linac will be powered in the temporary position without beam in order to verify overall system reliability until the laboratory operating schedule permits final conversion to 400 MeV operation.

  6. 200 Market Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR The 200 Market Building is a high-rise built in 1973 and located in downtown Portland, Oregon. It was purchased in 1988 by its current owner, 200 Market Associates, primarily because of its optimal location in Portland's central business district. Since 1989 the building has undergone continuous improvements in multiple phases.

  7. Online $300 300 x 250 pixels ABOUT THE JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    Online $300 300 x 250 pixels ABOUT THE JOURNAL The Journal of Modern History is recognized as the leading American journal for the study of European history. The Journal's expansive geographical. For more information contact: J-advertising@press.uchicago.edu Journal of Modern History The leading

  8. Geologic Maps Geology 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

  9. Status of EXO-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicole Ackerman

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    EXO-200 is the first phase of the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment, which searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in 136Xe to measure the mass and probe the Majorana nature of the neutrino. EXO-200 consists of 200 kg of liquid Xe enriched to 80% in 136Xe in an ultra-low background TPC. Energy resolution is enhanced through the simultaneous collection of scintillation light using Large Area Avalanche Photodiodes (LAAPD's) and ionization charge. It is being installed at the WIPP site in New Mexico, which provides a 2000 meter water-equivalent overburden. EXO-200 will begin taking data in 2009, with the expected two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4 10^25 years. According to the most recent nuclear matrix element calculations, this corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV. It will also measure the two neutrino mode for the first time in 136Xe.

  10. Status of EXO-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, Nicole; /SLAC

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    EXO-200 is the first phase of the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment, which searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}Xe to measure the mass and probe the Majorana nature of the neutrino. EXO-200 consists of 200 kg of liquid Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe in an ultra-low background TPC. Energy resolution is enhanced through the simultaneous collection of scintillation light using Large Area Avalanche Photodiodes (LAAPD's) and ionization charge. It is being installed at the WIPP site in New Mexico, which provides a 2000 meter water-equivalent overburden. EXO-200 will begin taking data in 2009, with the expected two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4 x 10{sup 25} years. According to the most recent nuclear matrix element calculations, this corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV. It will also measure the two neutrino mode for the first time in {sup 136}Xe.

  11. EML Procedures Manual, HASL-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Additions and corrections for the EML Procedures Manual, HASL-300, are presented for the following areas: wet/dry collector; ion chamber; field gamma spectrometry; TLD; reactive gas monitoring; cesium; cadmium and lead; carbon dioxide; polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; manganese precipitation samples; iron precipitation samples; aluminium precipitation samples; and lead precipitation samples.

  12. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn200

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love torwpprecipmom DocumentationDatastreamsaosacsmDatastreamsaosccn200

  13. 200 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014, 6:32 p.m. (MST) -200

  14. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  15. Retsch PM400 ball mill Nanoparticle preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    the presence of a low binding energy boride species (CexBy) XPS Catalyst Coated, Unoxidized Boron NanoparticlesRetsch PM400 ball mill pump Nanoparticle preparation Ball Milling Method Physically grind micron are coated with various ligands/capping agents to promote suspension in a variety of fuels and/or to protect

  16. Welding the AT-400A Containment Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon, E.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early in 1994, the Department of Energy assigned Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility for designing and providing the welding system for the girth weld for the AT-400A containment vessel. (The AT-400A container is employed for the shipment and long-term storage of the nuclear weapon pits being returned from the nation's nuclear arsenal.) Mason Hanger Corporation's Pantex Plant was chosen to be the production facility. The project was successfully completed by providing and implementing a turnkey welding system and qualified welding procedure at the Pantex Plant. The welding system was transferred to Pantex and a pilot lot of 20 AT-400A containers with W48 pits was welded in August 1997. This document is intended to bring together the AT-400A welding system and product (girth weld) requirements and the activities conducted to meet those requirements. This document alone is not a complete compilation of the welding development activities but is meant to be a summary to be used with the applicable references.

  17. Communities of Pottery Production and Consumption on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia, 200 BC-300 AD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roddick, Andrew Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the middle Tiwanaku Valley, Bolivia. Unpublished Ph.D.southeast Titicaca Basin, Bolivia. Journal of the Stewardchanges in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia/Peru. Quaternary Research

  18. OM300 Direction Drilling Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacGugan, Doug

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    OM300 Geothermal Direction Drilling Navigation Tool: Design and produce a prototype directional drilling navigation tool capable of high temperature operation in geothermal drilling Accuracies of 0.1 Inclination and Tool Face, 0.5 Azimuth Environmental Ruggedness typical of existing oil/gas drilling Multiple Selectable Sensor Ranges High accuracy for navigation, low bandwidth High G-range & bandwidth for Stick-Slip and Chirp detection Selectable serial data communications Reduce cost of drilling in high temperature Geothermal reservoirs Innovative aspects of project Honeywell MEMS* Vibrating Beam Accelerometers (VBA) APS Flux-gate Magnetometers Honeywell Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) High-temperature electronics Rugged High-temperature capable package and assembly process

  19. UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04 UPS 450.400 OPEN UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT POLICY I. OBJECTIVES A University. University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.400 Page 2 of 3 UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04 B. Each semester, all students enrolling through Open University

  20. Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

  1. REU 2007: SCHEDULE FOR WEEKS ONE AND TWO Morning, TTh 1:30, and M-F 4:00 talks: Ryerson 251

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    Lawler May Apprentice Discrete Mon, June 25 9:00­12:00 9:00­12:00 1:30­3:00 4:00­5:30 Tue, June 26 9/SESAME Preparation: 9:00­12:00 M­F Babai (Apprentice): 9:00­12:00 M­F Babai (Discrete mathematics): 4:00­5:30 TTh

  2. High Temperature 300C Directional Drilling System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    300C Directional Drilling System John Macpherson Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations DE-EE0002782 May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  3. High Temperature 300C Directional Drilling System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: provide a directional drilling system that can be used at environmental temperatures of up to 300C; and at depths of 10; 000 meters.

  4. Vanderbilt University 200 Smith Court

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    John Smith Vanderbilt University 200 Smith Court Smithville, TN 37000 April 12, 20xx Ms. Janice-5000 or john.smithy.smith@vanderbilt.edu, and I thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, (Signature Here) John Smith #12;

  5. Presented by Lemonade $3.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    , Blackberry, Pink Grapefruit or Pomegranate Boxed Water $3.00 Mezza Plate $6.00 Hummus, Mediterranean Eggplant.00 Traditional French Salad - Mixed Greens Tossed With Potatoes, Green Beans, "Genova Tonna" Tuna, Boiled Egg, Blackberry, Pink Grapefruit or Pomegranate Boxed Water $3.00 Presented by Dessert Menu #12;

  6. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  7. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  8. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. Federal Register Notice. PP-400NoticeFR3886907092014.pdf More Documents...

  9. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PP-400 TDI-New England Application with Appendices.pdf More Documents &...

  10. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project - Comments and Motion to Intervene of Conservation Law Foundation Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project -...

  11. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Motion to Intervene of The Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project:...

  12. PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversightandCenterBusinessSystem -,

  13. The Chena Hot Springs 400kw Geothermal Power Plant: Experience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on the PureCycle 200product released by UTC in 2004 and designed to operate offindustrial waste heat applications. The PureCycle 200 usescomponents and hardware from the Carrier...

  14. NO. REV. HO. LRRR(300) Emplacement Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    engine blast; 4 Heating From LM Exhaust Gas. - A detailed analysis has not been performed of this effect during the landing. and the effectiveness of the descent stage as a blast deflector. These uncertainties.e.~ a deployment distance of 300 feet minimum from the LM~ as is in effect for ALSEP~ is recommended. Support- ing

  15. UPS 300.018 Effective Date: 5-11-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.018 Effective Date: 5-11-12 UPS 300.018 WITHDRAWAL UNAUTHORIZED ISSUANCE OF WU GRADE When, UPS 300.016 summarizes the campus policy on authorized withdrawals; the administrative grade of W in a class. Such reasons must be documented by the student, in accordance with UPS 300.016. In the first

  16. Department of Energy Closes $400 Million Loan Guarantee for State...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chu announced today that a 400 million loan guarantee has been finalized for Abound Solar Manufacturing, LLC to manufacture state-of-the-art thin-film solar panels. The Abound...

  17. 350 400 450 500 550 Annealing Temperature (deg C)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    0 20 40 350 400 450 500 550 G/DRatio Annealing Temperature (deg C) As grown Synthesis of peapods the encapsulation of fullerenes into SWNTs annealed at temperatures above 450C. [1] T. Shimada, et al., Appl. Phys

  18. Biology Senior Thesis Seminar Presentation Schedule All Presentations are at 2:00 PM in Higgins 300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Metrix Corporation Non-Infectious Stabilized MS2 Virus As a Universal Full-Process Molecular Control April 7 1. Sam Eaton Seyfried Effects of N

  19. UPS 300.003 Effective Date: 1-28-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.003 Effective Date: 1-28-13 UPS 300.003 University-wide Student Learning Outcomes Preamble New UPS Source: Executive Committee ASD 12-146 With Campus-wide collaboration Academic Senate approved

  20. UPS 300.019 Effective Date: 3-25-08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.019 Effective Date: 3-25-08 UPS 300.019 ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY FOR MISSED INSTRUCTION DUE of the absence. Given prior notice, instructors are encouraged to allow students to make up class work, complete-25-08 EFFECTIVE DATE: March 25, 2008 Supersedes: UPS 300.019 dated 6-19-02 and ASD 07-177 University Policy

  1. Portsmouth X300 remote assay monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) have recently developed a system for monitoring and tracking the assay of enriched uranium from the production facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This work was sponsored by the USEC and has involved the expansion and improvement of an existing system that was developed by ORNL. The system provides control room operators with real-time information on the withdrawal operations of uranium hexafluoride at the withdrawal stations at PORTS. An additional system was developed to display the real-time information from each of the three withdrawal stations at a remotely located building. This report describes the remote assay monitor and display system that has been developed and installed at PORTS Building X300.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Module 2b - HTGR Motivations & Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electricity and Steam Steam Reforming of Natural Gas 300-600 o C 350-800 o C District Heating Seawater Desalination Petroleum Refining 80-200 o C 250-550 o C 0 100 200 300 400...

  3. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    subsequent fiscal years ScientificTechnical Approach - Overall Project 4 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 0 50 100 150 200 250 300...

  4. Multiple missions: The 300 Area in Hanford Site history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an historical overview of the role of the 300 Area buildings at the Hanford Reservation. Topics covered are: Early fuel fabrication at the Hanford site (313 and 314 Buildings); N reactor fuel fabrication in the 300 Area; 305 test pile was Hanford`s first operating reactor; Early process improvement chemical research (321 and 3706 Buildings); Major 1952 and 1953 expansions in the 300 area (325 and 329 Buildings); Early 300 area facilities constructed to support reactor development (326 and 327 Buildings); Hanford site ventures with the peaceful atom (309, 308 and 318 Buildings); Modern 300 Area Buildings; Significant miscellaneous buildings in the 300 area; 300 Area process waste handling and disposal.

  5. Mathematics 400 2007-2008 Comprehensive Projects Evaluation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckmire, Ron

    support all of your work with good examples and/or well-reasoned arguments or proofs. ­ You appropriately. You give a well prepared, well practiced, and well presented 20-25 minute talk which clearly conveys of completing this project. While points 2 and 3 above are explicitly part of your Math 400 grade, points 1

  6. Total revenues up, profits down for OGJ400

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.; Biggs, J.B.

    1990-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    After moving up sharply the previous 2 years, profits for the biggest 400 U.S. public oil and gas companies sagged in fiscal 1989. The total: $20.34 billion, down 8.6% from 1988. Revenues, however, gained 6.1% to $459.2 billion. Company-by-company financial results and operating statistics appear in this report.

  7. Procedure No 400.10 Subject: Fire Protection Impairment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    or testing. OVERVIEW The probability of a fire or explosion causing major damage is increased whenever a fire Procedure No 400.10 Subject: Fire Protection Impairment Program Reference: NFPA (see bottom: To establish procedures to be followed when a fire protection system is taken out of service due

  8. Mathematical Modelling of Weld Phenomena -VI Published by the Institute of Materials, eds H. Cerjak and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia, 2002,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Andren and L. Karlsson #12;#12;#12;#12;Liquid Nitrogen Filled Container Weldment Thermocouple ( Copper/wt% Toughness / J 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Titanium/ppmw Toughness / J 0 0.5 1 250 300 Molybdenum/wt% Toughness / J 0 200 400 600 800 1000 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Nitrogen

  9. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

  10. 300 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) Authorization Envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRIGHT, E.J.; STORDEUR, R.T.

    2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to establish the facility Authorization Envelope (AE) for the 300 Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEP )Project and identify the requirements related to the maintenance of the AE as Specified in HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The 300 LEF Project consists of two separate facilities operating under one management organization. They are the 310 Facility and the 340 Facility. The AE documents the limits of operations for all 300 LEF Project activities.

  11. OM300-GeoThermal MWD Navigation Instrument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Develop a 300C capable directional drilling navigation tool using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers and flux-gate magnetometers.

  12. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-300 Maine...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 Maine Public Service Company Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-300 Maine Public Service Company Applicationfrom Maine Public Service Company to construct,...

  13. Obama Administration Announces Additional $20,117,400 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Office 9,593,500 AR Conway City 564,600 AR Fayetteville City 724,900 AR Fort Smith City 878,200 AR Hot Springs City 180,000 AR Jonesboro City 634,500 AR Little Rock...

  14. Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Ovink

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

  15. HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200 MILLION YEARS OLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hoeven, William; Haug, Pat; Burlingame, A.L.; Calvin, Kelvin.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Moonie Oil "Branched- Cyclic" Hydrocarbon FractionNo. W -7405 -eng -48 HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200and Melvin Calvin July HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200

  16. DOE Moab Site Cost-Effectively Eliminates 200 Million Gallons...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Cost-Effectively Eliminates 200 Million Gallons of Contaminated Ground Water DOE Moab Site Cost-Effectively Eliminates 200 Million Gallons of Contaminated Ground Water July...

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  18. Observation of 23 supernovae that exploded <300 pc from Earth during the past 300 kyr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R. B., E-mail: rbfirestone@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four supernovae (SNe), exploding ?300 pc from Earth, were recorded 44, 37, 32, and 22 kyr ago in the radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) record during the past 50 kyr. Each SN left a nearly identical signature in the record, beginning with an initial sudden increase in atmospheric radiocarbon, when the SN exploded, followed by a hiatus of 1500 yr, and concluding with a sustained 2000 yr increase in global radiocarbon due to ?-rays produced by diffusive shock in the SN remnant (SNR). For the past 18 kyr excess radiocarbon has decayed with the {sup 14}C half-life. SN22kyrBP, is identified as the Vela SN that exploded 250 30 pc from Earth. These SN are confirmed in the {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and NO{sub 3}{sup ?} geologic records. The rate of near-Earth SNe is consistent with the observed rate of historical SNe giving a galactic rate of 14 3 kyr{sup 1} assuming the Chandra Galactic Catalog SNR distribution. The Earth has been used as a calorimeter to determine that ?2 10{sup 49} erg were released as ?-rays at the time of each SN explosion and ?10{sup 50} erg in ?-rays following each SN. The background rate of {sup 14}C production by cosmic rays has been determined as 1.61 atoms cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}. Approximately 1/3 of the cosmic ray energy produced by diffusive shock in the SNR was observed to be emitted as high-energy ?-rays. Analysis of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio in marine sediment identified 19 additional near-Earth SNe that exploded 50-300 kyr ago. Comparison of the radiocarbon record with global temperature variations indicated that each SN explosion is correlated with a concurrent global warming of ?3C-4C.

  19. inl-ext-07-12967r1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heating. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Process Temperature, C District Heating Seaw ater Desalination Petroleum Refining Oil Shale and Oil Sand Processing...

  20. UAIEE and Industrial Assessment Centers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IAC Students 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Students Year IAC Student Totals...

  1. inl-ext-07-12967r1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric heating. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Process Temperature, C District Heating Seaw ater Desalination Petroleum Refining Oil Shale and Oil Sand...

  2. Microsoft Word - NGNP PCDR_Rev0_19Sep07.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric heating. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Process Temperature, C District Heating Seaw ater Desalination Petroleum Refining Oil Shale and Oil Sand...

  3. Microsoft Word - NGNP PCDR_Rev1_16Nov07.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric heating. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Process Temperature, C District Heating Seaw ater Desalination Petroleum Refining Oil Shale and Oil Sand...

  4. Energy-dependent Lorentz covariant parameterization of the NN interaction between 50 and 200 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. P. Li; G. C. Hillhouse; J. Meng

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For laboratory kinetic energies between 50 and 200 MeV, we focus on generating an energy-dependent Lorentz covariant parameterization of the on-shell nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering amplitudes in terms of a number of Yukawa-type meson exchanges in first-order Born approximation. This parameterization provides a good description of NN scattering observables in the energy range of interest, and can also be extrapolated to energies between 40 and 300 MeV.

  5. INVESTIGATION IN HARDSURFACING A NICKEL-COPPER ALLOY (MONEL400).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CZAJKOWSKI,C.; BUTTERS,M.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigated the causes of weldability problems and materials failures encountered with the application of Monel (Ni-Cu) 400 as a base material and Stellite 6 (Co-Cr) as the hard-surfacing material when using the oxyacetylene welding process. This work was performed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the Target Rock Division of the Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Corporation. BNL evaluated two heats of Monel 400 material. One of the heats had performed well during manufacturing, producing an acceptable number of ''good'' parts. The second heat had produced some good parts but also exhibited a peculiar type of hardsurfacing/base metal collapse during the welding process. A review of the chemistry on the two heats of material indicated that they both met the chemical requirements for Monel400. During examination of the failed component, linear indications (cracks) were evident on the valve body, both on the circumferential area (top of valve body) and below the hard surfaced weld deposit. independent measurements also indicated that the two heats met the specification requirement for the material. The heat affected zone (HAZ) also contained linear discontinuities. The valve body was welded using the oxyacetylene welding process, a qualified and skilled welder, and had been given a pre-heat of between 1400-1600 F (760-871 C), which is the Target Rock qualified procedure requirement. Both original suppliers performed mechanical testing on their material that indicated the two heats also met the mechanical property requirements of the specification. The BNL investigation into the cause of the differences between these heats of material utilized the following techniques: (1) Heat Treatment of both heats of material; (2) Hardness testing; (3) Optical microscopy; (4) Scanning electron microscope (SEM)/Fractography; and (5) Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The report concludes that the cause of the failure of the valve body during welding is not obvious, however, it does not appear to be a welding issue. The observed inter-granular fractures indicate a grain boundary problem. Further research is recommended.

  6. UPS 240.200 Effective Date: 9-19-94

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 240.200 Effective Date: 9-19-94 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton UPS 240.200 POLICY ON AMOROUS OR SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS Amorous relationship will be deemed to have violated this policy. #12;UPS 240.200 Page 2 of 2 UPS 240.200 Effective

  7. FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the NCP. This FS conforms to the conditions set forth in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 2003) and amendments, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). This also includes Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-00C for completing all 200 Area non-tank farm OU pre-Record of Decision (ROD) documents on or before December 31, 2011. This FS supports the final remedy selection for the 200-ZP-1 OU, as described in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI/FS work plan) (DOE/RL-2003-55), as agreed upon by RL and EPA. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-48B required Draft A of the 200-ZP-1 OU FS and proposed plan to be transmitted to EPA by September 30, 2007. As agreed to with EPA in the 200 Area Unit Managers Meeting Groundwater Operable Unit Status (FH-0503130), the baseline risk assessment (BRA) was delayed from inclusion in the remedial investigation (RI) report and is completed and documented in this FS. The Remedial Investigation Report for 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI report) (DOE/RL-2006-24) included an evaluation of human health and ecological risks and hazards. The RI report identified the radiological and chemical contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that represent the primary risks to human health and the environment. The complete risk assessment in this FS incorporates additional analytical data from the unconfined aquifer that were obtained during or after preparation of the RI report, particularly for carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99. This FS also includes the initial results from an ongoing study of technetium-99 contamination near WMA-T, the sampling of new wells near the 216-W-LC laundry waste crib and T Plant, updated Hanford vadose zone fate and transport modeling, and groundwater particle-tracking analysis. The purpose of this FS is to develop and evaluate alternatives for remediation of

  8. Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The view at 400 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. P. Blair

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2004 marks the 400th anniversary of the sighting of SN 1604, now marked by the presence of an expanding nebulosity known as Kepler's supernova remnant. Of the small number of remnants of historical supernovae, Kepler's remnant remains the most enigmatic. The supernova type, and hence the type of star that exploded, is still a matter of debate, and even the distance to the remnant is uncertain by more than a factor of two. As new and improved multiwavength observations become available, and as the time baseline of observations gets longer, Kepler's supernova remnant is slowly revealing its secrets. I review recent and current observations of Kepler's supernova remnant and what they indicate about this intriguing object.

  9. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  10. Advice and Response 200 - 101 - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highly active and200 - 101

  11. 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Day of Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation (PAR) and near infrared (NIR) wave bands, using a two-stream canopy radiation model (Sellers 1985 is expanded to any user-specified number of bands between 400 and 2500 nm. Several external models and sensors will be used to drive, calibrate and evaluate the new features: The driving radiation data for JULES 2.0-MSR

  12. Archaeological survey of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responding to a heavy demand for cultural resource reviews of excavation sites, the Westinghouse Hanford Company contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a comprehensive archaeological resource review for the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington. This was accomplished through literature and records review and an intensive pedestrian survey of all undisturbed portions of the 200 East Area and a stratified random sample of the 200 West Area. The survey, followed the Secretary of the Interior's guidelines for the identification of historic properties. The result of the survey is a model of cultural resource distributions that has been used to create cultural resource zones with differing degrees of sensitivity. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Hanford 300 Area steam transition preliminary utility options study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, N.J.; Weakley, S.A.; Berman, M.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of steam in the Hanford 300 Area is approaching $60 per million Btu; the cost in industry is {approx} $10 per million Btu. The cost of steam in the 300 Area is expected to continue to increase because of the age of the central steam system, load decreases, safety requirements, and environmental regulations. The intent of this report is to evaluate options that would more cost-effectively met the future heating needs of the buildings in the 300 Area. In general, the options fall into two categories: central systems and distributed systems. A representative option from each category was analyzed using the life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) techniques mandated by the federal government. The central plant option chosen for evaluation was the existing central steam plant modified to allow continued operation. The distributed option chosen was a dedicated heating system for each building.

  14. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

  15. astatine 200: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, the grid, nuclear, fracking Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Energy and Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284)...

  16. 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today Vice President Biden announced that the Weatherization Assistance Program has weatherized 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act.

  17. Pion femtoscopy in p?+?p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic ...

  18. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  19. NUMBER: IT 3.00 SECTION: Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    NUMBER: IT 3.00 SECTION: Information Technology SUBJECT: Information Security DATE: September 2: William F. Hogue Issued by: Office of Information Technology I. Policy The University of South Carolina data and information technology assets. The University Information Security Office is therefore

  20. Nr. 300 / 2012 // 12. Nov. 2012 ffentliche Veranstaltung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Entdeckungsreise zum Thema ,,Virtuelles Wasser" in den kologisch-Botanischen Garten der Universitt ein. Um 16 UhrNr. 300 / 2012 // 12. Nov. 2012 ffentliche Veranstaltung Zukunftsforum 2012 zum Thema ,,Wasser im steht in diesem Jahr unter dem Motto ,,Wasser im globalen Wandel" und wird erneut gemeinsam von

  1. 300 area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan (MP). The MP describes how ongoing monitoring of the TEDF effluent stream for compliance with the NPDES permit will occur. The MP also includes Quality Assurance protocols to be followed.

  2. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis 300 Array -LRRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is to discover critical failure areas in a system and to remove failure areas. 1. 2 This memo contains the results of the final FMEA for the 300 Array LRRR experiment was successfully deployed on the moon as a part of the Apollo 11 mission, this FMEA will not dwell in the aspects

  3. A 350 MHz, 200 kW CW, Multiple Beam Inductive Output Tube - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.Lawrece Ives; George Collins; David Marsden Michael Read; Edward Eisen; Takuchi Kamura, Philipp Borchard

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This program developed a 200 kW CW, 350 MHz, multiple beam inductive output tube (MBIOT) for driving accelerator cavities. The MBIOT operates at 30 kV with a gain of 23 dB. The estimated efficiency is 70%. The device uses seven electron beams, each transmitting 1.4 A of current. The tube is approximately six feet long and weighs approximately 400 lbs. The prototype device will be evaluated as a potential RF source for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Because of issues related to delivery of the electron guns, it was not possible to complete assembly and test of the MBIOT during the Phase II program. The device is being completed with support from Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., Communications & Power Industries, LLC. and the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) in Dahlgren, VA. The MBIOT will be initially tested at NSWC before delivery to ANL. The testing at NSWC is scheduled for February 2013.

  4. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  5. 200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

  6. Supplementary information for: Insights into the secondary fraction of the organic aerosol in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Contemporary Carbon PCF : Primary Fossil Carbon PM : Particulate Matter POA : Primary Organic Aerosol POC 293 306 163 147 129 73 relativeintensity[%] 219 277 321 117 147129 73 0 100 200 300 400 m/z relativeintensity[%] 219 277 321 117 147 129 73 m/z 0 100 200 300 400 relativeintensity[%] selected fragment: m

  7. Nano-compact disks with 400 Gbit/in2 storage density fabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano-compact disks with 400 Gbit/in2 storage density fabricated using nanoimprint lithography and read with proximal probe Peter R. Kraussa) and Stephen Y. Choub) NanoStructure Laboratory, Department for publication 30 September 1997 Nano-compact disks Nano-CDs with 400 Gbit/in2 topographical bit density nearly

  8. UPS 300.004 1 Effective Date: 7-28-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.004 1 Effective Date: 7-28-09 UPS 300.004 POLICY ON COURSE OUTLINES Course outlines which to include examinations dates, "make up" policy (if any), required materials and equipment, penalties://www.fullerton.edu/senate/PDF/300/UPS300-021.pdf ); 8. Actions students should take in an emergency (http

  9. The Runaway Binary LP 400-22 is Leaving the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R; Harris, Hugh C; Dahn, Conard C; Agueros, M A; Heinke, Craig O; Kenyon, S J; Panei, J A; Camilo, Fernando

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical spectroscopy, astrometry, radio, and X-ray observations of the runaway binary LP 400-22. We refine the orbital parameters of the system based on our new radial velocity observations. Our parallax data indicate that LP 400-22 is significantly more distant (3 sigma lower limit of 840 pc) than initially predicted. LP 400-22 has a tangential velocity in excess of 830 km/s; it is unbound to the Galaxy. Our radio and X-ray observations fail to detect a recycled millisecond pulsar companion, indicating that LP 400-22 is a double white dwarf system. This essentially rules out a supernova runaway ejection mechanism. Based on its orbit, a Galactic center origin is also unlikely. However, its orbit intersects the locations of several globular clusters; dynamical interactions between LP 400-22 and other binary stars or a central black hole in a dense cluster could explain the origin of this unusual binary.

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 300 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 300 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. These determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sixteen Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 300 Area were evaluated: 303 (A, B, C, E, F, G, J and K), 303 M, 306 E, 308, 309, 313, 333, 334 A, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. The 303, 306, 313, 333, and 334 facilities Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The 340 Central Waste Complex determination was prepared by Bovay Northwest, Incorporated. The 308 and 309 facility determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Handford Company. Of the 16 facilities evaluated, 3 will require preparation of a Facility effluent Monitoring Plan: the 313 N Fuels Fabrication Support Building, 333 N Fuels fabrication Building, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. 300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures.

  12. UPS 300.023 Page 1 of 2 Effective Date: 12-23-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.023 Page 1 of 2 Effective Date: 12-23-13 4 UPS 300.023 GRADE CHANGES The university (described in UPS 300.017 and UPS 300.018, respectively). 1. In general, all course grades are final when to circumstances beyond the control of the student (see UPS 300.020). 3. A request for a change of grade initiated

  13. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  14. Hectospec, the MMT's 300 Optical Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Fabricant; Robert Fata; John Roll; Edward Hertz; Nelson Caldwell; Thomas Gauron; John Geary; Brian McLeod; Andrew Szentgyorgyi

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hectospec is a 300 optical fiber fed spectrograph commissioned at the MMT in the spring of 2004. A pair of high-speed six-axis robots move the 300 fiber buttons between observing configurations within ~300 s and to an accuracy ~25 microns. The optical fibers run for 26 m between the MMT's focal surface and the bench spectrograph operating at R~1000-2000. Another high dispersion bench spectrograph offering R~5,000, Hectochelle, is also available. The system throughput, including all losses in the telescope optics, fibers, and spectrograph peaks at ~10% at the grating blaze in 1" FWHM seeing. Correcting for aperture losses at the 1.5" diameter fiber entrance aperture, the system throughput peaks at $\\sim$17%. Hectospec has proven to be a workhorse instrument at the MMT. Hectospec and Hectochelle together were scheduled for 1/3 of the available nights since its commissioning. Hectospec has returned \\~60,000 reduced spectra for 16 scientific programs during its first year of operation.

  15. Identification of phosphatidylserine as a ligand for the CD300a immunoreceptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Shibuya, Kazuko [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)] [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Shibuya, Akira, E-mail: ashibuya@md.tsukuba.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD300a is a new phosphatidylserine receptor expressed on myeloid cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphatidylserine delivers a signal for recruitment of SHP-1 by CD300a in mast cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CD300a/phosphatidylserine interaction is blocked by MFG-E8 or anti-CD300a antibody. -- Abstract: CD300a is a member of CD300 family molecules consisting of seven genes on human chromosome 17 and nine genes in mouse chromosome 11. CD300a has a long cytoplasmic region containing the consensus immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) sequence. Upon crosslinking with antibodies against CD300a, CD300a mediates an inhibitory signal in myeloid cells. However, the ligand for CD300a has not been identified and the physiological role of CD300a remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the chimeric fusion protein of CD300a extracellular domain with the Fc portion of human IgG specifically bound phosphatidylserine (PS), which is exposed on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells. PS binding to CD300a induced SHP-1 recruitment by CD300a in mast cells in response to LPS. These results indicated that CD300a is a new PS receptor.

  16. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  17. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  18. CGS SS200: INTERNSHIP CREDIT APPLICATION Name: __________________________ E-mail: ___________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    1 CGS SS200: INTERNSHIP CREDIT APPLICATION Name: __________________________ E ___ Summer 20___ Internship Information: Company/Location: _________________________________________________ Title/Position: _____________________________________________________ Internship Supervisor

  19. U-200: Red Hat Directory Server Information Disclosure Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Red Hat Directory Server Information Disclosure Security Issue and Vulnerability U-200: Red Hat Directory Server Information Disclosure Security Issue and Vulnerability June 27,...

  20. Outdoor Programs Coordinator Outdoor Programs Assistant Coordinator Brent Gorman Nathan van der Most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    .00 $9.00 $18.00 Black Diamond Mega-Mid -3-4person/4season $5.00 $10.00 $8.00 $18.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (+20) $3.00 $6.00 $5.00 $9.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (-20) $4.00 $8.00 $7.00 $11.00 Thermarest $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Paddle $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Throw Bag $1.00 $2.00 $2.00 $4.00 Rubber Boots

  1. Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

  2. A 300 GHz collective scattering diagnostic for low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Robert A.; Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Heard, John [Department of Physics, Clarion University, Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable 300 GHz collective scattering diagnostic employing a homodyne detection scheme has been constructed and installed on the hot helicon experiment (HELIX). Verification of the homodyne detection scheme was accomplished with a rotating grooved aluminum wheel to Doppler shift the interaction beam. The HELIX chamber geometry and collection optics allow measurement of scattering angles ranging from 60 deg. to 90 deg. Artificially driven ion-acoustic waves are also being investigated as a proof-of-principle test for the diagnostic system.

  3. Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents andNR-2 Hanford Site300-FF-3

  4. Oregon - ORS 439.300 - Definitions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchard Lake439.300 - Definitions

  5. Perithecial ascomycetes from the 400 million year old Rhynie chert: an example of ancestral polymorphism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Thomas N.; Hass, H.; Kerp, H.; Krings, Michael; Hanlin, R.T.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a perithecial, pleomorphic ascomycetous fungus from the Early Devonian (400 mya) Rhynie chert; the fungus occurs in the cortex just beneath the epidermis of aerial stems and rhizomes of the vascular plant ...

  6. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to...

  7. Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

  8. A critical appraisal of Byzantine military strategy, 400 - 1000 A.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacon, Peter Kirk

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF BYZANTINE MILITARY STRATEGY, 400 - 1000 A. D. A Thesis by PETER KIRK BACON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS May 1998 Major Subject: History A CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF BYZANTINE MILITARY STRATEGY, 400 - 1000 A. D. A Thesis by PETER KIRK BACON Submitted to Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  9. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

  10. Solar and Energy Loan Fund Receives $300,000 Community Reinvestment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solar and Energy Loan Fund Receives 300,000 Community Reinvestment Act Loan to Invest in Home Energy Upgrades Solar and Energy Loan Fund Receives 300,000 Community Reinvestment...

  11. Amorphization Processes in Au Ion Irradiated GaN at 150 - 300...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes in Au Ion Irradiated GaN at 150 - 300 K. Amorphization Processes in Au Ion Irradiated GaN at 150 - 300 K. Abstract: Epitaxial single-crystal gallium nitride (GaN) films...

  12. PDSF Office Hours 1/23/14 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2314 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 12314 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL January 22, 2014 (0 Comments) PDSF office hours will be from 2:30 to 4:00 pm in 50B-2222...

  13. Delisting petition for 300-M saltstone (treated F006 sludge) from the 300-M liquid effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This petition seeks exclusion for stabilized and solidified sludge material generated by treatment of wastewater from the 300-M aluminum forming and metal finishing processes. The waste contains both hazardous and radioactive components and is classified as a mixed waste. The objective of this petition is to demonstrate that the stabilized sludge material (saltstone), when properly disposed, will not exceed the health-based standards for the hazardous constituents. This petition contains sampling and analytical data which justify the request for exclusion. The results show that when the data are applied to the EPA Vertical and Horizontal Spread (VHS) Model, health-based standards for all hazardous waste constituents will not be exceeded during worst case operating and environmental conditions. Disposal of the stabilized sludge material in concrete vaults will meet the requirements pertaining to Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, S.C. Documents set forth performance objectives and disposal options for low-level radioactive waste disposal. Concrete vaults specified for disposal of 300-M saltstone (treated F006 sludge) assure that these performance objectives will be met.

  14. UPS 300.022 1 Effective Date: 3-3-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 300.022 1 Effective Date: 3-3-14 UPS 300.022 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes DATE: March 3, 2014 Supersedes UPS 300.022 dated 8-16-2000 and ASD 13-171 University Policy Statement

  15. Technical evaluation: 300 Area steam line valve accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 7, 1993, a journeyman power operator (JPO) was severely burned and later died as a result of the failure of a 6-in. valve that occurred when he attempted to open main steam supply (MSS) valve MSS-25 in the U-3 valve pit. The pit is located northwest of Building 331 in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Figure 1-1 shows a layout of the 300 Area steam piping system including the U-3 steam valve pit. Figure 1-2 shows a cutaway view of the approximately 10- by 13- by 16-ft-high valve pit with its various steam valves and connecting piping. Valve MSS-25, an 8-in. valve, is located at the bottom of the pit. The failed 6-in. valve was located at the top of the pit where it branched from the upper portion of the 8-in. line at the 8- by 8- by 6-in. tee and was then ``blanked off`` with a blind flange. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the cause of the accident that led to the failure of the 6-in. valve. The probable cause for the 6-in. valve failure was determined by visual, nondestructive, and destructive examination of the failed valve and by metallurgical analysis of the fractured region of the valve. The cause of the accident was ultimately identified by correlating the observed failure mode to the most probable physical phenomenon. Thermal-hydraulic analyses, component stress analyses, and tests were performed to verify that the probable physical phenomenon could be reasonably expected to produce the failure in the valve that was observed.

  16. BEE 200. The BEE Experience Spring Semester 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 200. The BEE Experience Spring Semester 2007 J A Bartsch, PE, 06/28/2007 Credit: 1 hour and date: James A. Bartsch, 6/28/07 Ethical behavior statement: The expectation for ethical behavior

  17. Vice President Biden Announces 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    commitment to energy efficiency, more than 200,000 low-income families have been able to save money on their energy bills while saving energy, and thousands of people have been...

  18. Genizah MS T-S AS 18.200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    *k T-S AS 18.200 *t Philosophy *s 6.7 x 7.3; 5 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic *c Philosophical work, mentioning accidents. *e...

  19. Characterization of Large Area APDs for the EXO-200 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, R.; LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kumar, K.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Odian, A.; Prescott, C.Y.; /SLAC; Tenev, V.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ackerman, N.; /SLAC; Akimov, D.; /Moscow, ITEP; Auger, M.; /Bern U., LHEP; Benitez-Medina, C.; /Colorado State U.; Breidenbach, M.; /SLAC; Burenkov, A.; /Moscow, ITEP; Conley, R.; /SLAC; Cook, S.; /Colorado State U.; deVoe, R.; Dolinski, M.J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; /Colorado State U.; Farine, J.; /Laurentian U.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Alabama U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /SLAC /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    EXO-200 uses 468 large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs) for detection of scintillation light in an ultra-low-background liquid xenon (LXe) detector. We describe initial measurements of dark noise, gain and response to xenon scintillation light of LAAPDs at temperatures from room temperature to 169 K - the temperature of liquid xenon. We also describe the individual characterization of more than 800 LAAPDs for selective installation in the EXO-200 detector.

  20. A statistical analysis of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M.A.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study determined the frequency statistics of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities. These statistics are utilized in probability calculations for contamination risks, and are part of an effort to provide reliable information for use in safety studies. Data for this analysis were obtained from the 200 Area and the Tritium Area Fault Tree Data Banks and were analyzed with the aid of the STATPAC computer code.

  1. Phase I remedial investigation report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this remedial investigation (RI) is the 300-FF-5 operable unit, one of five operable units associated with the 300 Area aggregate of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. The 300-FF-5 operable unit is a groundwater operable unit beneath the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 source operable units. This operable unit was designated to include all contamination detected in the groundwater and sediments below the water table that emanates from the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 operable units (DOE-RL 1990a). In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 300 Area on the National Priorities List (NPL) contained within Appendix B of the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP, 53 FR 51391 et seq.). The EPA took this action pursuant to their authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, 42 USC 9601 et seq.). The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), the EPA and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), in May 1989 (Ecology et al. 1992, Rev. 2). This agreement, among other matters, governs all CERCLA efforts at the Hanford Site. In June 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) workplan for the 300-FF-5 operable unit was issued pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement.

  2. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  3. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  4. 200-UP-2 Operable Unit technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deford, D.H.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared in support of the development of a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit by EBASCO Environmental, Incorporated. It provides a technical baseline of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit and results from an environmental investigation undertaken by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Technical Baseline Report is based on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, Hanford Site drawings and photographs and is supplemented with Hanford Site inspections and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted. Each waste site in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit consists of liquid-waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, U Plant operations in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The U Plant'' refers to the 221-U Process Canyon Building, a chemical separations facility constructed during World War 2. It also includes the Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which was constructed at the same time and, like the 221-U Process Canyon Building, was later converted for other missions. Waste sites in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit are associated with the U Plant Uranium Metal Recovery Program mission that occurred between 1952 and 1958 and the UO{sub 3} Plant's ongoing uranium oxide mission and include one or more cribs, reverse wells, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, waste vaults, and the lines and encasements that connect them. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 M) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  6. 300x Faster Matlab using MatlabMPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Kepner; Stan Ahalt

    2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The true costs of high performance computing are currently dominated by software. Addressing these costs requires shifting to high productivity languages such as Matlab. MatlabMPI is a Matlab implementation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard and allows any Matlab program to exploit multiple processors. MatlabMPI currently implements the basic six functions that are the core of the MPI point-to-point communications standard. The key technical innovation of MatlabMPI is that it implements the widely used MPI ``look and feel'' on top of standard Matlab file I/O, resulting in an extremely compact (~250 lines of code) and ``pure'' implementation which runs anywhere Matlab runs, and on any heterogeneous combination of computers. The performance has been tested on both shared and distributed memory parallel computers (e.g. Sun, SGI, HP, IBM and Linux). MatlabMPI can match the bandwidth of C based MPI at large message sizes. A test image filtering application using MatlabMPI achieved a speedup of ~300 using 304 CPUs and ~15% of the theoretical peak (450 Gigaflops) on an IBM SP2 at the Maui High Performance Computing Center. In addition, this entire parallel benchmark application was implemented in 70 software-lines-of-code (SLOC) yielding 0.85 Gigaflop/SLOC or 4.4 CPUs/SLOC, which are the highest values of these software price performance metrics ever achieved for any application. The MatlabMPI software will be available for download.

  7. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings Friedhelm) Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different

  8. BREA Minutes Meeting Date and Place: Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014; Building 400, Rm RSB 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    BREA Minutes Meeting Date and Place: Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014; Building 400, Rm RSB 2 Attendees live in New York State (NYS), you can change your medical plan after the first year i.e., if you in NYS. Our current insurance with CIGNA is through the Lab, which is selfinsured. How long

  9. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai 400 076

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai 400 076 Advertisement No. D-45 /08 ten) certificate or its equivalent ; and (ii) Diploma / certificate in pre-school teacher education/Electronics/ Printing Technology of three years duration. Knowledge of computer applications. * Scales are likely

  10. 7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 1/12 David Keil, CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    D. Keil Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1/12 2. Multi-agent systems 3. Stigmergy and self-agent) and phylogenetic (evolutionary) is adaptation by multi-agent systems D. Keil Special Topics: Artificial7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 1/12 David Keil, CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence

  11. Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Fall 2013 Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences 4000 September 30 NO SEMINAR October 7 Dan Sullivan Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Phosphorus: Now and Then" October 14/CSSA/SSSA meetings) November 11 Chris Klatt Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Tracking Microbial Use of C and N

  12. Assessment of the Fingerprinting Method for Spent Fuel Verification in MACSTOR KN-400 CANDU Dry Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gowthahalli Chandregowda, Nandan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    is necessary in order for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet with safeguards regulations. The IAEA is interested in having a new effective method of re-verification of the nuclear material in the MACSTOR KN-400 dry storage facility...

  13. vClips -Entrepreneur speakers' and interviewees' videos edited to more than 400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    vClips - Entrepreneur speakers' and interviewees' videos edited to more than 400 online searchable-depth E*ntrepreneurship Studio video interviews with New Horizons speakers, entrepreneurial alumni to video interviews with the entrepreneur subjects. Stories profiling the challenges, strategies

  14. Phenomenological solar signature in 400 years of reconstructed Northern Hemisphere temperature record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    ). The sun might have contributed approximately 50% of the observed global warming since 1900 (Scafetta of global tem- perature and TSI have been carried out in order to under- stand the causes of climate; published 15 September 2006. [1] We study the solar impact on 400 years of a global surface temperature

  15. ANRV400-FL42-05 ARI 9 August 2009 14:52 Slip on Superhydrophobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    ANRV400-FL42-05 ARI 9 August 2009 14:52 R E V I E W S IN A D V A N CE Slip on Superhydrophobic, simulations, and theory of flow past superhydrophobic surfaces. In addition, the designs and limitations on a special class of materials called superhydrophobic surfaces that have been used recently to engineer large

  16. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, P. [Beijing Sciample Technology Co., Ltd., Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  17. A COMPARISON OF THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 300-M STEEL MANUFACTURED BY THE VACUUM ARC REMELT AND THE ELECTROSLAG REMELT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 300~M STEEL MANUFACTURED BY THEAND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 300~M STEEL MANUFACTURED BY THEArc Remelt (VAR) 300-M steel were measured, These were

  18. The EXO-200 detector, part I: Detector design and construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; L. Bartoszek; E. Baussan; E. Beauchamp; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; D. Chauhan; B. Cleveland; R. Conley; J. Cook; S. Cook; A. Coppens; W. Craddock; T. Daniels; C. G. Davis; J. Davis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr; J. Farine; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hagemann; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; J. Hodgson; M. Hughes; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; J. Kirk; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; F. LePort; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; K. Merkle; B. Mong; M. Montero Dez; A. R. Mller; R. Neilson; A. Odian; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; A. Rivas; E. Rollin; P. C. Rowson; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; K. Skarpaas; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; V. Strickland; M. Swift; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; J. -L. Vuilleumier; J. -M. Vuilleumier; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    EXO-200 is an experiment designed to search for double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with a single-phase, liquid xenon detector. It uses an active mass of 110 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in the isotope 136 in an ultra-low background time projection chamber capable of simultaneous detection of ionization and scintillation. This paper describes the EXO-200 detector with particular attention to the most innovative aspects of the design that revolve around the reduction of backgrounds, the efficient use of the expensive isotopically enriched xenon, and the optimization of the energy resolution in a relatively large volume.

  19. 200-BP-5 operable unit Technical Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, I.D.; Kent, S.K.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supports development of a remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit. The report summarizes baseline information for waste sites and unplanned release sites located in the 200-BP-5 operable unit. The sites were investigated by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The investigation consisted of review and evaluation of current and historical Hanford Site reports, drawings, and photographs, and was supplemented with recent inspections of the Hanford Site and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted.

  20. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  1. 300 AREA PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY FACILITY RADIONUCLIDE EMISSION POINTS AND SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Harbinson, L Jill

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide emission points for 300 Area and Battelle Private facilities are presented herein. The sampling systems and associated emission specifics are detailed.

  2. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  3. Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanfords 300 Area North Section

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. EM met a Tri-Party Agreement milestone by completing cleanup of the north portion of Hanfords 300 Area.

  4. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

  5. 150K - 200K miniature pulse tube cooler for micro satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassaing, Clment; Butterworth, James; Aigouy, Grald [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (AL-AT) - 38360 Sassenage (France); Daniel, Christophe [Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) - 31401 Toulouse (France); Crespin, Maurice; Duvivier, Eric [STEEL lectronique - 31220 Martres Tolosane (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Liquide is working with the CNES and Steel lectronique in 2013 to design, manufacture and test a Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler (MPTC) to cool infrared detectors for micro-satellite missions. The cooler will be particularly adapted to the needs of the CNES MICROCARB mission to study atmospheric Carbon Dioxide which presents absorption lines in the thermal near infrared, at 1.6 ?m and 2.0 ?m. The required cooler temperature is from 150 to 200K with cooling power between 1 and 3 watts. The overall electrical power budget including electronics is less than 20W with a 288-300K rejection temperature. Particular attention is therefore paid to optimizing overall system efficiency. The active micro vibration reduction system and thermal control systems already developed for the Air Liquide Large Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) are currently being implemented into a new high efficiency electronic architecture. The presented work concerns the new cold finger and electronic design. The cooler uses the compressor already developed for the 80K Miniature Pulse Tube Cryocooler. This Pulse Tube Cooler addresses the requirements of space missions where extended continuous operating life time (>5 years), low mass and low micro vibration levels are critical.

  6. 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoi, Cathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today Vice President Biden announced that the Weatherization Assistance Program has weatherized 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act. We're taking your questions and comments right now on weatherization. Join in the conversation! *Facebook -- http://www.facebook.com/energygov *Twitter -- http://www.twitter.com/energy

  7. 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zoi, Cathy

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Today Vice President Biden announced that the Weatherization Assistance Program has weatherized 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act. We're taking your questions and comments right now on weatherization. Join in the conversation! *Facebook -- http://www.facebook.com/energygov *Twitter -- http://www.twitter.com/energy

  8. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF 200 MeV PROTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambertson, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 - 1 1 , 1980 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF 200 MeV PROTONS Glen LT t l L8L 10757 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF ZOO HeV PROTONS* Glent i c a l and longitudinal cooling has been achieved a t the

  9. 200 SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 Construction Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    the student a basic knowledge of civil, construction, and environmental engineering, as well200 SDSU General Catalog 2010-2011 Construction Engineering In the College of Engineering OFFICE: Engineering 424 TELEPHONE: 619-594-6071 E-MAIL: construction@engineering.sdsu.edu Faculty Chair: Supernak

  10. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  11. 200 Graduate Program in Computational Science (GPCS) Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    200 Graduate Program in Computational Science (GPCS) Graduate Catalogue 201415 Graduate Program in Computational Science (GPCS) Director: Al-Ghoul, Mazen (Chemistry, FAS) Executive Committee Members: Lakkis of computational science combines domain expertise in mathematical modeling and computing disciplines as vital

  12. Riv Report No. 200 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Riv Report No. 200 Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Ris Studies-1307 CoptnlHfm K, Damuk Avalhblt on rxchange from: Litary, DMU* Atomic Energy RiM, DK-4000 Rnk Species 78 35.4. Root Crops 81 3.2.5. Wild Plants 81 3.2.6. Allium Species 82 3.2.7. Comparison

  13. surface science ELSEVIER Surface Science384 (1997) 192 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surface science ELSEVIER Surface Science384 (1997) 192 200 An ab initio Hartree-Fock study Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD, UK Received 3June 1996;acceptedfor publication 27 March 1997 arrangement is found consisting of localisedspinson the surface titanium atoms. © 1997Elsevier

  14. Bachelor of Science in Construction Management UF 100 UF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Project Management & Law Management CMGT 110 CMGT 245 CMGT 367 CMGT 417 Construction Materials DrawingsBachelor of Science in Construction Management 2014-2015 UF 100 UF 200 Intellectual Foundations Civic and Ethical Foundations ENGL 101 ENGL 102 CMGT 201 Management Elective CMGT 485 English

  15. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior to deployment and a second ITR to evaluate Phase I performance in September 2010. In this report, these ITR efforts are referenced as the '2007 ITR' and the 'current ITR', respectively. The 2007 ITR document (Looney et al., 2007) provided a detailed technical evaluation that remains relevant and this report builds on that analysis. The primary objective of the current ITR is to provide an expedited assessment of the available Phase I data to assist the PGDP team as they develop the lessons learned from Phase I and prepare plans for Phase II.

  16. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

  17. The analysis of the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem using PARCS-DIREKT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seker, V.; Downar, T. J. [Purdue Univ., 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem was developed to support the validation and verification efforts for the PBMR design. This paper describes the analysis of this problem using the PARCS-DIREKT coupled code system. The benchmark problem involved the use of two different cross-section libraries, one which was generated from a VSOP equilibrium core calculation and has no dependence on core conditions. The second library provides for dependence on five state parameters and was designed for transient analysis. The paper here reports the steady-state cases using the VSOP set of cross-sections. The results are shown to be in good agreement with those of VSOP. Also reported here are the results of the steady-state thermal-hydraulic DIRECKT solution with a given power profile obtained from VSOP equilibrium core calculation. This analysis provides some insight as to the most important parameters in the design of PBMR-400. (authors)

  18. Ambient aerosol sampling inlet for flow rates of 100 and 400 l/min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baehl, Michael Matthew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    tunnel, where three different speeds were employed; namely 2, 8, and 24 km/hr. The aerosol particles used in these tests were generated from ethanol dilutions of a master solution containing 90% ethanol, 9% oleic acid and 1% sodium fluorescein... AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLING INLET FOR FLOW RATES OF 100 AND 400 L/MIN A Thesis by MICHAEL MATTHEW BAEHL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  19. P L

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 0 0 2 400- 2 - u a , -0 300 - 07 1 Y I1 200- 0 T b 1 1 1 O C . - - - -0 a , > in Hot Cell (Figure 3.4) - I 1 I 0 200 400 600 Minutes . J 0- +-gu Added 0 Half-ring Uranium...

  20. DoD End User Perspective and DARPA Palm Power Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H2 Stack 15 W; 2.3 kg 1998 - H2 System (compressed hydrogen 50 W/ 2 kW-hr; 3.4 kg 2001 DMFCD Applications 1600 2000 4000 60000 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Micro Air Vehicles Fuel Processing " RTI " Altex ! SOFC " MSRI ! Combustion " Yale U Integrated Systems (61%) ! DMFC

  1. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  2. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  3. State waste discharge permit application 400 Area secondary cooling water. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes the Washington Administrative Code 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit Application that serves as interim compliance as required by Consent Order DE 91NM-177, for the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream. As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site that affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permitting Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order DE 91NM-177. The Consent Order DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Based upon compositional and flow rate characteristics, liquid effluent streams on the Hanford Site have been categorized into Phase 1, Phase 2, and Miscellaneous streams. This document only addresses the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream, which has been identified as a Phase 2 stream. The 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream includes contribution streams from the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility, the Maintenance and Storage Facility, the 481-A pump house, and the Fast Flux Test Facility.

  4. UPS 240.200 1 Effective Date: 9-19-94

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 240.200 1 Effective Date: 9-19-94 UPS 240.200 POLICY ON AMOROUS OR SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 240.200 UPS 240.200 2 Effective Date: 9 of this policy. EFFECTIVE DATE: September 19, 1994 [New UPS] Supersedes ASD 94-115 #12;

  5. UPS 210.200 1 Effective Date: 12-1-81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 210.200 1 Effective Date: 12-1-81 UPS 210.200 PERFORMANCE REVIEW OF ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL A not subject to UPS 210.000. These shall include the president, vice presidents, associate vice presidents #12;UPS 210.200 UPS 210.200 2 Effective Date: 12-1-81 3. Develop, in consultation with the incumbent

  6. UPS 450.200 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 450.200 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03 UPS 450.200 POLICY ON SPECIAL SESSIONS Executive Order No Code Section 89708). University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.200 UPS 450.200 2 Effective Date: 6-18-03 B. Financing Special sessions are self-supporting with fees set

  7. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  8. Colloid formation during the corrosion of SRL 200 glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonradioactive SRL 200S glass and fully radioactive SRL 200R glass were reacted at glass surface areas to leachant volume (SA/V) ratios of 20,000, 2,000, and 340 m{sup {minus}1} for times varying from several days to a few years. The particles present in the leachates of these tests have been examined by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The major colloidal clay phase was identified as a smectite clay from its characteristic electron diffraction pattern. The clay colloids eventually disappear from the solution and return to the glass; the time at which this occurs depends on the SA/V. Uranium silicate particles and calcium-bearing phases were also sometimes found in the leachates.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_GARY_LANGLIE_NMMSS 2014 NRC HEU Report...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    speech 91% of HEU exports occurred before 1990 Most HEU exported to France, Germany, and Canada HEU Imports - 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1958 1959 1960 1961...

  10. Logistics in a Low Carbon World Dr Maja I. Piecyk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Government #12;Potential CO2 Reduction and Costs in Different Sectors (idealised) Logistics Agriculture Other, batteries, solar panels etc. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Natural gas Nuclear Coal Wind

  11. Visual Memes in Social Media Tracking real-world news on YouTube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Lexing

    80 100 0 100 200 300 400 500 Swine Flu Earthquake Iran Pakistan text processing ... query definiGon pakistan military pakistan india tension pakistan taliban pakistan bhuEo pakistan ppp pakistan terrorist #12;7 Who

  12. FIGS-3&4.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    450 200 250 300 350 400 450 Average Stock Range (excludes SPR) 0 Lower Operational Inventory Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 2003 2004 Months Source:...

  13. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targets Copyright 2015 UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company 20 File Number Upgraded Pyrolysis Oil Products 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Boiling Point,...

  14. B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    " ) " ) B ig T re e C re e k 2821 2822 2823 2824 2825 0 100 200 300 400 Feet K Created: 2272013 based on Nov. 2010 design " ) " ) " ) " ) " ) " ) " ) N E F a l l s R d N E Y...

  15. May 11, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 29-Apr 1-May 3-May 5-May...

  16. June 1, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 6-May 8-May 10-May 12-May...

  17. May 18, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 6-May 8-May 10-May 12-May...

  18. ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT Queen's University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    .............................................................................................. i The year in review ...............................................14 #12;Queen's University at Kingston - Annual Financial Report - September, 1999 1 THE YEAR IN REVIEW 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 0 100 200 300 400 500 All Other Tuition Fees Government Grants

  19. Adaptive Sequential Bayesian Change Point Detection Ryan Turner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    200 250 300 350 400 450 Asia crisis, Dot-com bubble Dot-com bubble burst September 11 US presidential events: the climax of the Internet bubble, the burst of the Internet bubble, and the 2004 presidential

  20. LBNL Transactional Network Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    24 Demand (kW) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 Energy Cost () Time (hr) Critical Peak Pricing Tariff * Challenge: Total energy saved or...

  1. Pulmonary Toxicity of Manufactured Nanoparticles from the Perspective of Industrial Hygiene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    vacuum. Flammruss 101 Size Fractionation by Sedimentation in an NMR Tube 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 inflammation by detecting inflammatory cytokine expression. "DEP"=diesel exhaust particulates ( 1wt% Fe) "CFA

  2. WAC - 173-400 General Regulations for Air Pollution Sources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah: EnergydbaInformationInformation 400

  3. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 82.400 - 82.475 Competitive Bidding |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson, New5661°,Open Energy Information .400

  4. Westinghouse Offers $6,400 in College Scholarships to Eddy County Students

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHEWeekly ReportsWenjunTRUOffers $6,400 in

  5. 300C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Enable geothermal wellbore monitoring through the development of SiC based electronics and ceramic packaging capable of sustained operation at temperatures up to 300?C and 10 km depth. Demonstrate the technology with a temperature sensor system.

  6. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 300: SURFACE RELEASE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved CAU 300 CADD.

  7. NuSTAR DISCOVERY OF A CYCLOTRON LINE IN KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    We present a spectral analysis of three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations of the transient Be-neutron star binary KS 1947+300 taken during its outburst in 2013/2014. These broadband ...

  8. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 200 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for Martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo (T9) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and MA957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420{degrees}C to 200 DPA. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the Martensitic steels and {alpha}{prime} precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Overview of 200 Areas.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverviewCleanup IntegrationAUpdate U.S.Hanford's 200

  10. The 200 ft. Solar Tower at Sandia National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand Water |1 April 2000 AnThis is a200 ft.

  11. EXPERIMENT E951 POWER SUPPLY TO PULSE A 14.5 TESLA SOLENOID MAGNET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .1 15.2 Cases 2 and 3 require the same power supply, but differ in the magnet cooling scheme. #12;0 4 8EXPERIMENT E951 POWER SUPPLY TO PULSE A 14.5 TESLA SOLENOID MAGNET IOANNIS MARNERIS BOOSTER supply. #12;0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 0 2 4 6 8 10 -500 -400 -300 -200 -100 0 100 200 300 400 500

  12. DOE/LX/07-0123&D1 Secondary Document DMSA C-400-06 Solid Waste...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3&D1 Secondary Document DMSA C-400-06 Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) Assessment Report SWMUAOC NUMBER: 352 DATE OF ORIGINAL SAR: 120100 DATE OF SAR REVISIONS: 31509...

  13. Final Technical Report - 300???°C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng-Po Chen; David Shaddock; Peter Sandvik; Rich Saia; Amita Patil, Alexey Vert; Tan Zhang

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A silicon carbide (SiC) based electronic temperature sensor prototype has been demonstrated to operate at 300???°C. We showed continuous operation of 1,000 hours with SiC operational amplifier and surface mounted discreet resistors and capacitors on a ceramic circuit board. This feasibility demonstration is a major milestone in the development of high temperature electronics in general and high temperature geothermal exploration and well management tools in particular. SiC technology offers technical advantages that are not found in competing technologies such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) at high temperatures of 200???°C to 300???°C and beyond. The SiC integrated circuits and packaging methods can be used in new product introduction by GE Oil and Gas for high temperature down-hole tools. The existing SiC fabrication facility at GE is sufficient to support the quantities currently demanded by the marketplace, and there are other entities in the United States and other countries capable of ramping up SiC technology manufacturing. The ceramic circuit boards are different from traditional organic-based electronics circuit boards, but the fabrication process is compatible with existing ceramic substrate manufacturing. This project has brought high temperature electronics forward, and brings us closer to commercializing tools that will enable and reduce the cost of enhanced geothermal technology to benefit the public in terms of providing clean renewable energy at lower costs.

  14. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  15. Impulse gage development for the 100-200 ktap range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.C.; Naumann, W.J. (General Research Corp., Santa Barbara, CA (USA). Advanced Technologies Div.)

    1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Special effects underground test (UGT) material response and source diagnostics data require impulse gages that can be used in the 50--150 ktap range and have equilibrated from electrical and mechanical noise sources within 0.001 s. Such gages were designed, analyzed, and tested under this program. One- and two-dimensional stress propagation calculations were performed and predictions were developed for deformation of the gage specimen cup. These predictions were conservative when compared to gas gun test results. The response of the gage will equilibrate within 5% to its final value within 300 {mu}sec. The impulse delivered to the gages for these tests exceeded 250 ktap. The code and experimental results provides a basis for confidence in the operability of the gage in an actual UGT environment.

  16. Geothermal Heat Pump System for the New 500-bed 200,000 SF Student...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Pump System for the New 500-bed 200,000 SF Student Housing Project at the University at Albanys Main Campus Geothermal Heat Pump System for the New 500-bed 200,000 SF...

  17. Type A Accident Investigation of the July 15, 2004, Hanford 200...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 15, 2004, Hanford 200 East Area Fall Fatality Type A Accident Investigation of the July 15, 2004, Hanford 200 East Area Fall Fatality August 1, 2004 On the morning of...

  18. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

    2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  19. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  20. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of YTiO nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  1. Analysis of tank deformation from fire induced ruptures and BLEVEs of 400 l propane tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kielec, D.J.; Birk, A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of fire tests were conducted to study the thermal rupture of propane tanks. The tests involved 400 liter ASME automotive propane tanks filled to 80% capacity with commercial propane. The tanks were brought to failure using torches and pool fires. the resulting thermal ruptures varied in severity from minor fissures, measuring a few centimeters in length, to catastrophic failures where the tank was flattened on the ground. The catastrophic failures would typically be called Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosions (BLEVE). The objective of this work was to develop a correlation between the failure severity and the tank condition at failure. The deformed propane tanks were measured in detail and the extent of deformation was quantified. The tank failure severity was found to be a complex function of a number of tank and lading properties at failure. this paper presents the measured data from the tanks and a step by step description of how the correlation was determined.

  2. Analysis of fire-induced ruptures of 400-L propane tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kielec, D.J.; Birk, A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of fire tests were conducted to study the thermal rupture of propane tanks. The tests involved 400-L ASME automotive propane tanks filled to 80% capacity with commercial propane. The tanks were brought to failure using torches and pool fires. The resulting thermal ruptures varied in severity from minor fissures, measuring a few centimeters in length, to catastrophic failures where the tank was flattened on the ground. The catastrophic failures would typically be called boiling liquid expanding vapor explosions (BLEVEs). The objective of this work was to develop a correlation between the failure severity and the tank condition at failure. The deformed propane tanks were measured in detail and the extent of deformation was quantified. The tank failure severity was found to be a complex function of a number of tank and lading properties at failure. This paper presents the measured data from the tanks and a step-by-step description of how the correlation was determined.

  3. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the levelized cost of electricity. [5 points] #12;Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind Points: 102 [ER100/PP184], 113 [ER200/PP284] - 2 - 2. Wind Power Analysis [18 points grad, 10 pointsEnergy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21

  4. CEBAF 200 kV Inverted Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Grames, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, J. Hansknecht, M. Poelker, M.L. Stutzman, R. Suleiman, K.E.L. Surles-Law

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two DC high voltage GaAs photoguns have been built at Jefferson Lab based on a compact inverted insulator design. One photogun provides the polarized electron beam at CEBAF and operates at 130 kV bias voltage. The other gun is used for high average current lifetime studies at a dedicated test facility and has been operated at bias voltage up to 225 kV. The advantages of higher DC voltage for CEBAF include reduced space-charge emittance growth and the potential for prolonged photocathode lifetime. However, a consequence of operating at higher voltages is the increased likelihood of field emission or breakdown, both of which are unacceptable. Highlights of the R&D studies leading toward a production 200keV GaAs photogun for CEBAF will be presented.

  5. LLNL Site 200 Risk Management PlanAgust 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkston, D; Johnson, M

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) policy to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage using the Integrated Safety Management System. The environment, safety, and health are to take priority in the planning and execution of work activities at the Laboratory. Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements (LLNL Environment, Safety and Health Manual, Document 1.2, ES&H Policies of LLNL). The program and policies that improve LLNL's ability to prevent or mitigate accidental releases are described in the LLNL Environment, Health, and Safety Manual that is available to the public. The laboratory uses an emergency management system known as the Incident Command System, in accordance with the California Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) to respond to Operational Emergencies and to mitigate consequences resulting from them. Operational Emergencies are defined as unplanned, significant events or conditions that require time-urgent response from outside the immediate area of the incident that could seriously impact the safety or security of the public, LLNL's employees, its facilities, or the environment. The Emergency Plan contains LLNL's Operational Emergency response policies, commitments, and institutional responsibilities for managing and recovering from emergencies. It is not possible to list in the Emergency Plan all events that could occur during any given emergency situation. However, a combination of hazard assessments, an effective Emergency Plan, and Emergency Plan Implementing Procedures (EPIPs) can provide the framework for responses to postulated emergency situations. Revision 7, 2004 of the above mentioned LLNL Emergency Plan is available to the public. The most recent revision of the LLNL Emergency Plan LLNL-AM-402556, Revision 11, March 2008, has been included as an appendix to the RMP Supplemental Information document. LLNL Site 200 is a research and development laboratory with infrastructure necessary to support its operations and personnel. Research and development activities at LLNL are focused on stockpile stewardship; achieving robust and vital scientific, engineering, and manufacturing capability; inertial confinement fusion; laser technology; materials and process science; computational and information sciences; basic sciences; engineering sciences; and biological sciences. Based upon CalARP Program regulations, guidance found in California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP) Administering Guidance, Chapter 1, a review of facility specific documents, accident analyses summarized in this document & detailed in the LLNL Site 200 RMP Supporting Information document, LLNL has determined that each process meeting the CalARP threshold criteria meets the requirements for CalARP Program Level 1. In accordance with CalARP regulations, LLNL considers the natural segmentation of processes at Site 200 to be on a building basis and therefore consideration of inventory should be on a building basis rather than a 'site-wide' basis. Only those materials identified as equal to as or greater than the threshold quantities for the CalARP program on a building (process) level are reflected in this document. As such, materials and quantities reported in this document on a building (process) level will vary from materials and quantities reported in the LLNL Hazardous Materials Business Plan, Acutely Hazardous Material Registration Form on a site-wide level. For each process involving regulated quantities of lithium hydride, worst case accident analysis shows that the toxic endpoint lies within the site boundaries. These analyses document that the nearest public receptor is beyond the distance to a toxic or flammable endpoint. Refer to the LLNL Site 200 RMP Supporting Information document for a more detailed explanation of the worst case accident analyses for these processes. For the process involvin

  6. Summary of remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3), 300-FF-2 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.C.

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3) in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site were conducted as part of the 300-FF-1 operable unit Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) in accordance with the approved RI work plan. During the RI, the southwestern boundary of the 300-FF-1 operable unit was modified by all signatories to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which shifted the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches to the 300-FF-3 operable unit. As a consequence, the RI results from these waste management units were not included in the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation Report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. As a results of recent Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the 300-FF-2 operable unit now consists of the remaining 300 Area operable units within the 300 Area National Priorities List (NPL), which includes the former 300-FF-3 operable unit. Therefore, this document summarizes the RI results from the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches in the 300-FF-2 operable unit. Analysis and evaluation of these results well be included in the 300-FF-2 RI report.

  7. P300

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    > Catalog Tab upper middle right > use drop down menu > click on "Advanced Catalog Search" > Enter Course Number in ID box, click on "Search" lower right > click on "Go to...

  8. P300

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andof Fuels P - . . - - 4 v - r0

  9. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  10. The Current and Historical Distribution of Special Status Amphibians at the Livermore Site and Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hattem, M V; Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    65 surveys were completed in 2002 to assess the current distribution of special status amphibians at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Livermore Site and Site 300. Combined with historical information from previous years, the information presented herein illustrates the dynamic and probable risk that amphibian populations face at both sites. The Livermore Site is developed and in stark contrast to the mostly undeveloped Site 300. Yet both sites have significant issues threatening the long-term sustainability of their respective amphibian populations. Livermore Site amphibians are presented with a suite of challenges inherent of urban interfaces, most predictably the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), while Site 300's erosion issues and periodic feral pig (Sus scrofa) infestations reduce and threaten populations. The long-term sustainability of LLNL's special status amphibians will require active management and resource commitment to maintain and restore amphibian habitat at both sites.

  11. Electrical distribution studies for the 200 Area tank farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisler, J.B.

    1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an engineering study providing reliability numbers for various design configurations as well as computer analyses (Captor/Dapper) of the existing distribution system to the 480V side of the unit substations. The objective of the study was to assure the adequacy of the existing electrical system components from the connection at the high voltage supply point through the transformation and distribution equipment to the point where it is reduced to its useful voltage level. It also was to evaluate the reasonableness of proposed solutions of identified deficiencies and recommendations of possible alternate solutions. The electrical utilities are normally considered the most vital of the utility systems on a site because all other utility systems depend on electrical power. The system accepts electric power from the external sources, reduces it to a lower voltage, and distributes it to end-use points throughout the site. By classic definition, all utility systems extend to a point 5 feet from the facility perimeter. An exception is made to this definition for the electric utilities at this site. The electrical Utility System ends at the low voltage section of the unit substation, which reduces the voltage from 13.8 kV to 2,400, 480, 277/480 or 120/208 volts. These transformers are located at various distances from existing facilities. The adequacy of the distribution system which transports the power from the main substation to the individual area substations and other load centers is evaluated and factored into the impact of the future load forecast.

  12. 300 Area D4 Project 3rd Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Smith

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of five buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  13. 300 Area D4 Project 2nd Quarter FY06 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Smith

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of 16 buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  14. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

  15. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2007 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of twenty buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  16. Smart Museum of Art Awarded $300,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Smart Museum of Art Awarded $300,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities NEH grant to support major traveling exhibition Echoes of the Past The University of Chicago's Smart Museum of Art from the grant will be used to support the exhibition's national tour to museums in Washington DC

  17. COGS 300 Notes March 11, 2014 Today's "Fun" Example: Honda's ASIMO Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodham, Robert J.

    COGS 300 Notes March 11, 2014 Today's "Fun" Example: Honda's ASIMO Robot Honda unvealed the newest at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvruMLGiAdI For more video examples, go to http://asimo.honda.com/ Key by 3 km/hour from previous model) Example: Honda's ASIMO Robot (cont'd) The Asimo humanoid robot has

  18. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  19. Computational Design of a New Hydrogen Bond Network and at Least a 300-fold Specificity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    Computational Design of a New Hydrogen Bond Network and at Least a 300-fold Specificity Switch, conformational strain, and packing defects yielded new binding partners that exhibited specificities of at least of similar structure and sequence. Simple rules to identify protein recognition sites and predict energetic

  20. OCTOBER Results 30--Ohio Christian University Newark, OH 3:00 W 79-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Game 8:00 W 80-54 10-- Ashland University Club Newark, OH 7:30 W 100-81 14-- Ohio University Eastern-85 12-- Lindsey Wilson College Newark, OH 7:00 Canc. 13-- Ashland University Club Ashland, OH 3:00 W 135

  1. Observation of 8 B Solar Neutrinos from 300-day data at Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Observation of 8 B Solar Neutrinos from 300-day data at Super-Kamiokande Takayuki Yamaguchi me on many occasions. I would like to thank all the Super-Kamiokande collaborators for help( E recoil electron ?? 6.5MeV ) is measured by Super-Kamiokande based on 306.3-day data from May 31

  2. Financial Econometrics (29:390:300:50) Fall 2008 Professor Robert H. Patrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    1 Financial Econometrics (29:390:300:50) Fall 2008 Professor Robert H. Patrick Department requirement for students that have not taken Introduction to Econometrics already. Students who are double majors in Finance and Economics can take Introduction to Econometrics (220:322). References Course

  3. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  4. February 8th 2011 Visible light communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L, James Jian-Qiang

    400 350 300 250 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 700 500 400 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 exchange RF Wireless channel PC or portable terminal Visible optical link LED solid state lighting unit #12

  5. Analysis of HFIR Dosimetry Experiments Performed in Cycles 400 and 401

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1966. To upgrade and enhance capabilities for neutron science research at the reactor, a larger HB-2 beam tube was installed in April of 2002. To assess, experimentally, the impact of this larger beam tube on radiation damage rates [i.e., displacement-per-atom (dpa) rates] used in vessel life extension studies, dosimetry experiments were performed from April to August 2004 during fuel cycles 400 and 401. This report documents the analysis of the dosimetry experiments and the determination of best-estimate dpa rates. These dpa rates are obtained by performing a least-squares adjustment of calculated neutron and gamma-ray fluxes and the measured responses of radiometric monitors and beryllium helium accumulation fluence monitors. The best-estimate dpa rates provided here will be used to update HFIR pressure vessel life extension studies, which determine the pressure/temperature limits for reactor operation and the HFIR pressure vessel's remaining life. All irradiation parameters given in this report correspond to a reactor power of 85 MW.

  6. A New Lambertson Magnet for the FNAL 400 MeV Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy et al.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Lambertson magnet has been constructed for use at the downstream end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac. To reduce costs, the core is composed of laminations left over from the Main Injector dipoles with a round hole through one pole face. In contrast with more conventional Lambertson designs, the magnet is excited by two coils located above and below the field region. The integrated transverse fringe field at the end of the field-free region is minimized using a pole piece extension with 75% packing factor followed by a thick flux return plate. The relatively low packing factor prevents saturation of the extension by the return flux while preserving the odd longitudinal symmetry of the transverse flux distribution. Measurements show better than an order of magnitude reduction of the integrated transverse field, in good agreement with simulations. later found that despite the presence of these extensions, the dipole kicks experienced by the beam in the end regions remained substantial enough to steer the beam away from the dump. Dipole correctors were installed; however, both operationally and from a safety point of view, they are somewhat of a nuisance because the excitations need to be carefully readjusted following every shutdown. A decision was made to build an improved version of the magnet, with the constraint that the lamination geometry should not be modified.

  7. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

  9. CEBAF 200 kV Inverted Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grames, J M; Clark, J; Hansknecht, J; Poelker, M; Stutzman, M L; Suleiman, R; Surles-Law, K.E.L.; BastaniNejad, M

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two DC high voltage GaAs photoguns have been built at Jefferson Lab based on a compact inverted insulator design. One photogun provides the polarized electron beam at CEBAF and operates at 130 kV bias voltage. The other gun is used for high average current lifetime studies at a dedicated test facility and has been operated at bias voltage up to 225 kV. The advantages of higher DC voltage for CEBAF include reduced space-charge emittance growth and the potential for prolonged photocathode lifetime. However, a consequence of operating at higher voltages is the increased likelihood of field emission or breakdown, both of which are unacceptable. Highlights of the R&D studies leading toward a production 200keV GaAs photogun for CEBAF will be presented.

  10. Data:03576abd-1005-489d-b400-9a241524db7b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 2.00 Fiberglass Pole - 10.00fixture for 60 months Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):...

  11. tions (Fig. 4). The layer thicknesses observed (a 0.90 m for the 400-m fibers; a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanowicz, Barbara

    geometry. References and Notes 1. P. Yeh, A. Yariv, E. Marom, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1196 (1978). 2. J. W. D. Joannopoulos, Opt. Lett. 23, 1573 (1998). 7. P. Yeh, A. Yariv, C. Hong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 67, 423tions (Fig. 4). The layer thicknesses observed (a 0.90 m for the 400- m fibers; a 0.45 m

  12. SRP engineering and design history, Vol III, 200 F and H Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banick, C.J.

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume combines the record of events relating to the development of design for both the 200-F and H Areas. Chronologically, the definition of plant facilities was first established for the 200-F Area. The second area, 200-H, was projected initially to be a supplementary plutonium separations facility. This history explains the differences in character and capacity of the manufacturing facilities in both areas as production requirements and experience with separations processes advanced.

  13. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more complete understanding of the balance between system additions (nutrients, groundwater) and biology can be achieved, thus increasing long-term predictions of performance. These analyses uniquely provide information that can be used in optimizing the overall performance, efficiency, and stability of the system both in real time as well as over the long-term, as the system design is altered or improved and/or new streams are added.

  14. 300 Area D4 Project 1st Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Smith

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the MO-052, 3225, 334, 334A, and 334-TF Buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  15. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  16. Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

  17. THE NGC 300 TRANSIENT: AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR MEASURING PROGENITOR MASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew, E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Rd., Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an alternative technique for measuring the precursor masses of transient events in stars undergoing late stage stellar evolution. We use the well-established techniques of stellar population modeling to age-date the stars surrounding the site of the recent transient event in NGC 300 (NGC 300 OT2008-1). The surrounding stars must share a common turnoff mass with the transient, since almost all stars form in stellar clusters that remain physically associated for periods longer than the lifetime of the most massive stars. We find that the precursor of NGC 300 OT2008-1 is surrounded by stars that formed in a single burst between 8 and 13 Myr ago, with 70% confidence. The transient was therefore likely to be due to a progenitor whose mass falls between the main sequence turnoff mass (12-17 M{sub sun}) and the maximum stellar mass (16-25 M{sub sun}) found for isochrones bounding this age range. We characterize the general applicability of this technique in identifying precursor masses of historic and future transients and supernovae (SNe), noting that it requires neither precursor imaging nor sub-arcsecond accuracy in the position of the transient. It is also based on the well-understood physics of the main sequence, and thus may be a more reliable source of precursor masses than fitting evolutionary tracks to precursor magnitudes. We speculate that if the progenitor mass is {approx}>17 M {sub sun}, there may be a connection between optical transients such as NGC 300 OT2008-1 and the missing type II-P SNe, known as the 'red supergiant problem'.

  18. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  19. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  20. Calibration of the P300 BCI with the Single-Stimulus S. L. Shishkin1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    Calibration of the P300 BCI with the Single-Stimulus Protocol S. L. Shishkin1,2 , A. A. Nikolaev2 For successful calibration of a P300 based brain-computer interface the user should not attend non-target stimuli the use of the single-stimulus paradigm for calibration, at least in fresh users. In this simple paradigm

  1. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  2. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Commercial Crew Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    ,200 · The FY 2011 budget request invests $6 billion over five years to spur development of U.S. commercial a reality. 3 #12; Commercial Crew 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Commercial Crew $500 $1,400 $1,400 $1,300 $1

  4. BEE 200, J Bartsch-062807 1 ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 200, J Bartsch-062807 1 ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content This brief content (1 credit) Semester/Year: Spring 2007 Instructor: J A Bartsch Identify the outcomes associated Major only, An ability to integrate modern biology with engineering principles #12;BEE 200, J Bartsch

  5. Design and optimization of a 200 GHz SiGe HBT collector profile by TCAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    Design and optimization of a 200 GHz SiGe HBT collector profile by TCAD Andreas D. Strickera A novel simulation assisted investigation was used to obtain the optimum collector design of a 200 GHz; BJT; Collector doping profile; TCAD; Design methodology 1. Introduction The continuing trend toward

  6. All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsson, S. Lennart

    All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM200 Kapil K. Mathur S. Lennart Johnsson TR. #12; All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM--200 Kapil K. Mathur and S. Lennart@think.com Abstract Detailed algorithms for all--to--all broadcast and reduction are given for arrays mapped by binary

  7. NASA Green Flight Challenge: Conceptual Design Approaches and Technologies to Enable 200 Passenger Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Miles per Gallon Douglas P. Wells* NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 The Green 50 passenger-miles per gallon and this competition will push teams to greater than 200 passenger-miles per gallon. The aircraft must also fly at least 100 miles per hour for 200 miles. The total prize

  8. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the process. If the article comes from New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Time, etc Timeliness1 Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100/PPC184 120 for ER200/PPC284 Topics covered: Energy and development, Combustion, Exponential growth

  9. Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass spectrometry , C. Hall a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    at the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico [2]. EXO-200 is sensitive to a neutrinoless double beta decay collaboration is constructing and operating a series of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe [1]. The first such experiment, known as EXO-200, is currently collecting data

  10. C-H surface diamond field effect transistors for high temperature (400?C) and high voltage (500?V) operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarada, H., E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Material Science and Technology, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Tsuboi, H.; Naruo, T.; Yamada, T.; Xu, D.; Daicho, A.; Saito, T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Hiraiwa, A. [Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By forming a highly stable Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide on a C-H bonded channel of diamond, high-temperature, and high-voltage metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) has been realized. From room temperature to 400?C (673?K), the variation of maximum drain-current is within 30% at a given gate bias. The maximum breakdown voltage (V{sub B}) of the MOSFET without a field plate is 600?V at a gate-drain distance (L{sub GD}) of 7 ?m. We fabricated some MOSFETs for which V{sub B}/L{sub GD}?>?100?V/?m. These values are comparable to those of lateral SiC or GaN FETs. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on the C-H surface by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 450?C using H{sub 2}O as an oxidant. The ALD at relatively high temperature results in stable p-type conduction and FET operation at 400?C in vacuum. The drain current density and transconductance normalized by the gate width are almost constant from room temperature to 400?C in vacuum and are about 10 times higher than those of boron-doped diamond FETs.

  11. Reprocessing of line FFI-161 of the Brazos-Galveston area using Pro-MAX 2D to evaluate migration techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fofang, Nicholas Ndeh

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) saa ssa Fig. 14. Autocorrelograms of: (a) near trace, shot 1013; (b) near trace, shot 2024; (c) far trace, shot 1013; and (d) far trace, shot 2024. 34 the center lobe). The -30 dB point is at 88 Hz. Thus, the useable bandwidth lies between 0... Tsss (ms) 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 PRED CTIOH DIST CE 1$ ms 50 100 150 ZM 450 500 550 z50 300 350 mm Tlms (ms) Fig. 15. Output autocorrelograms for prediction distance 18 ms. lime (ms) 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 410 500 55 PRE...

  12. Broad band X-ray spectrum of KS 1947+300 with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Naik; P. J. Callanan; B. Paul; T. Dotani

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results obtained from three BeppoSAX observations of the accretion-powered transient X-ray pulsar KS 1947+300 carried out during the declining phase of its 2000 November -- 2001 June outburst. A detailed spectral study of KS 1947+300 across a wide X-ray band (0.1--100.0 keV) is attempted for the first time here. Timing analysis of the data clearly shows a 18.7 s pulsation in the X-ray light curves in the above energy band. The pulse profile of KS 1947+300 is characterized by a broad peak with sharp rise followed by a narrow dip. The dip in the pulse profile shows a very strong energy dependence. Broad-band pulse-phase-averaged spectroscopy obtained with three of the BeppoSAX instruments shows that the energy spectrum in the 0.1--100 keV energy band has three components, a Comptonized component, a ~0.6 keV blackbody component, and a narrow and weak iron emission line at 6.7 keV with a low column density of material in the line of sight. We place an upper limit on the equivalent width of the iron K_\\alpha line at 6.4 keV of ~13 eV (for a width of 100 eV). Assuming a spherical blackbody emitting region and the distance of the source to be 10 kpc, the radius of the emitting region is found to be in the range of 14--22 km, which rules out the inner accretion disk as the soft X-ray emitting region.

  13. Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

  14. Safety assessment document for the environmental test complex (Building 834) at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odell, B.N.; Pfeifer, H.E.

    1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety assessment was performed to determine if accidents occurring at the 834 Complex at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. These were earthquake, extreme wind (including missiles), lightning, flood, criticality, high explosive (HE) detonation that disperses uranium and beryllium, spontaneous oxidation of plutonium, explosions due to finely divided particles, and a fire. Seismic and extreme wind (including missiles) analyses indicate that the buildings are basically sound. (However, there are a few recommendations to further enhance the structural integrity of these facilities). Additional lightning protection for these facilities is being installed. These buildings are located high above the dry creek bed so that a flood is improbable. A criticality or a high explosive detonation involving plutonium is very remote since the radioactive materials are encased and plutonium and HE are not permitted concurrently in the same area at Site 300. (The exceptions to this policy are that explosive actuating devices are sometimes located in assemblies containing fissile materials. However, a planned or accidental actuation will not effect the safe containment of the fissile material within the assembly). Even though the possibility of an HE explosion involving uranium and beryllium is remote, the off-site lung doses were calculated and found to be below the accepted standards. It was determined that a fire was unlikely due to the low fire loading and the absence of ignition sources. It was also determined that the consequences of any accidents were reduced by the remote location of these facilities, their design, and by administrative controls.

  15. Use of Polyphosphate to Decrease Uranium Leaching in Hanford 300 Area Smear Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to summarize the laboratory investigations performed to evaluate short- and long-term effects of phosphate treatment on uranium leaching from 300 area smear zone sediments. Column studies were used to compare uranium leaching in phosphate-treated to untreated sediments over a year with multiple stop flow events to evaluate longevity of the uranium leaching rate and mass. A secondary objective was to compare polyphosphate injection, polyphosphate/xanthan injection, and polyphosphate infiltration technologies that deliver phosphate to sediment.

  16. VENTURERS CC FIXTURES 2013 Sun 21/4 Kilmington away 2:00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    VENTURERS CC FIXTURES 2013 Sun 21/4 Kilmington away 2:00 Sun 28/4 Bathford home 2:00 Tue 30/4 Novia home 6:00 Wed 1/5 Monkton Combe away 6:00 Wed 8/5 Atworth away 6:00 Thu 9/5 Royal Oak away 6:00 Sun 12/5 Priston away 2:30 Wed 15/5 Kingswood away 6:00 Sun 19/5 Bristol Venturers home 2:00 Thu 23/5 Bradford 39

  17. Page 1 of 7 ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2013 Total Points: 94 [ER100/PP184] or 149 [ER200/PP284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    (estimate its shape as a regular prism). Assume a coal density of 2,200 kg/m3 and that coal- fired plants nameplate capacity of all coal-fired power plants in the United States is 343 GW. Given TOE)? [6 points] Combustion Stoichiometry 2. Coal and natural gas are the two chief forms of fossil

  18. The Weekend Effect: the scienceThe Weekend Effect: the science suggests that we are embarking onsuggests that we are embarking on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    decreased ozone formation. The conclusion, quoted from NRC (1977) was: These data do not mean as a function of time in Los Angeles Simplified ozone model -200 -150 -100 -50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 4:00 6 is BETTER OFF Disregard negative ozone concentrations. In reality they stop at zero Base case #12;The

  19. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LiTFSI LiPF6 Current (mAcm 2 ) Voltage (V) Cyclic voltammetry of LiECEMC (37 vv) + 1.2M LiXGraphite cell; 1mVs, 25 o C 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 100 200...

  20. Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

  1. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Ludowise; K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the final hazard categorization for the remediation of six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Burial Grounds, the 618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 sites.

  2. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment Spring 2006 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Queen; S. G. Weiss

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the sampling approaches, modifications made to the 100 Area and 300 Area component of the RCBRA Sampling and Analysis Plan, summarize validation efforts, and provide sample identification numbers.

  3. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  4. Radiant transmittance of cerium doped quartz from 300 to 1270K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havstad, M.A.; Dingus, C.

    1997-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The transmittance of curved slabs of cerium doped quartz is reported as a function of wavelength and temperature. The spectral range of measurement is 0.25 to 0.725 {micro}m and temperature varies from 300K to 1270K. The short wavelength cutoff for transmission shifts to longer wavelengths monotonically with temperature at a rate of {approximately}3nm/l 00K. The tmnstnittance data for wavelengths less than 0.36 {micro}m are fit to a classical pole fit model using 8 modes (Oscillators) and the temperature dependence of the modes is given. For wavelengths beyond 0.36 {micro}m the data are fit to an ``Urbach rule.`` The bandgap parameter in the Urbach rule decreases linearly with temperature to 1270K and varies from 3.394eV at 300K to 3,183 eV at 1270K, while the steepness parameter also decreases approximately linearly from 8.51 eV{sup -1} to 5.80 eV{sup -1}. The fits are used to compute the spectral and temperature dependent absorption coefficient.

  5. THE AGES OF HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN NGC 2403 AND NGC 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Binder, Breanna A.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16803 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: bbinder@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: mce@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon Company, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined resolved stellar photometry from HST imaging surrounding 18 high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) candidates in NGC 300 and NGC 2403 as determined from combined Chandra/HST analysis. We have fit the color-magnitude distribution of the surrounding stars with stellar evolution models. All but one region in NGC 300 and two in NGC 2403 contain a population with an age between 20 and 70 Myr. One of the candidates is the ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 2403, which we associate with a 60 {+-} 5 Myr old population. These age distributions provide additional evidence that 16 of these 18 candidates are HMXBs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the most common HMXB age in these galaxies is 40-55 Myr. This preferred age is similar to observations of HMXBs in the Small Magellanic Cloud, providing new evidence of this formation timescale, but in higher metallicity populations. We suggest that this preferred HMXB age is the result of the fortuitous combination of two physical effects. First, this is the age of a population when the greatest rate of core-collapse events should be occurring, maximizing neutron star production. Second, this is the age when B stars are most likely to be actively losing mass. We also discuss our results in the context of HMXB feedback in galaxies, confirming HMXBs as a potentially important source of energy for the interstellar medium in low-mass galaxies.

  6. Tests of Fiber Optic Cables at 300 and 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huisman, F

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Strange ''cavity lights'' have been observed in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) Cavities. In order to understand this phenomenon a spectral analysis of the light is necessary. However, the extreme conditions presented within the cavity require the equipment to function at cryogenic temperatures. Ocean optics P600 UV/VIS fiber optic cables were studied at 300 K and 4.2 K to determine whether or not they would be appropriate for cryogenic temperatures. At 300 K the performance of different lengths of cable, the effect of a lens and the effect of a junction were investigated by taking spectra of red, green, and yellow LEDs at a variety of distances from where the source and the cable/spectrometer were aligned. It was found that there was significant attenuation of the signal between the spectrometer alone and the spectrometer with any combination of cables. The lens reduced the number of locations where a readable signal was produced, but the intensity increased greatly when the lens was aligned with the light source. The junction did not seem to make a difference except when there was a large angle between the light source and the cable. At 4.2 K a 4 m cable and a lens were submerged in liquid Helium to test their capabilities at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber optic cable was found unsuitable for use as it did not function at 4.2 K, and the signal was essentially lost. However, the lens survived.

  7. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrtico J. Beltrn 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldn-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrtico J. Beltrn 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Crdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Crdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  8. Report on geological surveys in the 300-FF-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandness, G.A.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. These actions were terminated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company before completion in December 1989. Work was reinitiated in October 1990, to complete the processing of the data that had already been collected and to report the results. Because the field work was only partially completed, the task objectives, as presented in the Statement of Work, could not be fully met. This report is, therefore, a progress report covering the work performed through December 11, 1989. This task involved (1) ground-penetrating radar surveys of the 618-4 and 618-5 Burial Grounds, and (2) ground-penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction surveys along the assumed routes of the abandoned process sewers and radioactive liquid waste sewers in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The surveys in the burial grounds were intended to identify burial trenches and pits, to determine the depth of fill, and to locate waste materials, including any that might be outside the perimeter fences. The surveys along the sewer routes were intended, first, to confirm the locations of the sewers as shown on existing maps or to otherwise accurately determine their locations, and second, to attempt to identify locations of possible leaks. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  10. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  11. 3/4/13 FBI --Eighteen People Charged in International $200 Million Credit Card Fraud Scam www.fbi.gov/newark/press-releases/2013/eighteen-people-charged-in-international-200-million-credit-card-fraud-scam 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    3/4/13 FBI -- Eighteen People Charged in International $200 Million Credit Card Fraud Scam www.fbi $200 million in confirmed losses. This morning, hundreds of law enforcement officers from the FBI

  12. Evolution of domestic traffic and fares at the top 200 US airports between 1990 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Abda, Mehdi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this thesis is to analyze the evolution of domestic Origin- Destination (O-D) traffic and fares at the Top 200 airports in the United States between 1990 and 2008. The impetus behind this research is ...

  13. Waste status and transaction record summary for the northwest quadrant of the Hanford 200 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, S.F.; Corbin, R.A.; Duran, T.B.; Jurgensen, K.A.; Ortiz, T.P.; Young, B.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document contains a database of waste transactions and waste status reports for all the waste tanks in the northwest quadrant of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  14. Geothermal Heat Pump System for the New 500-bed 200,000 SF Student...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Pump System for the New 500-bed 200,000 SF Student Housing Project at the University at Albany's Main Campus Principal Investigator: Indumathi Lnu Presenters: Indumathi Lnu &...

  15. Closed out tank 241-SY-101 DACS system change requests No. 101-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauck, G.J.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a record closed out System Change Request No. 101-200 used during the development of the 241-SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Project Data Acquisition Control System.

  16. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Fall

  17. Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Mark D.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

  18. Optimized nuclear and solar dynamic organic Rankine cycles for Space Station applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eubanks, Dana Len

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the power conver- sion scheme without a regenerative heat exchanger). In the process of finding the state points, a set of property data lookup functions are called. Around this framework of a thermodynamic cycle, with or without a regen- erator... regenerative heat exchanger state 9 state 6 feed ump Fig. 7. Organic Rankine Cycle Schematic including Numbered State Points. 1000 900 800 700 600 500 I dc 400 Cd CL E 300 Cp 200 12PP -1000 -800 -600 -400 -200 0 200 400 600 800 relative...

  19. Electron impact excitation of the low-lying 3s[3/2]{sub 1} and 3s{sup ?}[1/2]{sub 1} levels in neon for incident energies between 20 and 300 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, M., E-mail: masami-h@sophia.ac.jp; Murai, H.; Kato, H.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Brunger, M. J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CaPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia) [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CaPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Itikawa, Y. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact of the two lower-lying 3s[3/2]{sub 1} ({sup 3}P{sub 0}) and 3s{sup ?}[1/2]{sub 1} ({sup 1}P{sub 1}) electronic states in neon (Ne) have been determined for eight incident electron energies in the range 20300 eV. Comparisons between our results and previous measurements and calculations, where possible, are provided with best agreement being found with the recent large-scale B-spline R-matrix computations [O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat, Phys. Rev. A 86, 022717 (2012)]. Based on these DCSs at 100, 200, and 300 eV, a generalised oscillator strength analysis enabled us to determine estimates for the optical oscillator strengths of the 3s[3/2]{sub 1} and 3s{sup ?}[1/2]{sub 1} levels. In this case, excellent agreement was found with a range of independent experiments and calculations, giving us some confidence in the validity of our measurement and analysis procedures. Integral cross sections, derived from the present DCSs, were presented graphically and discussed elsewhere [M. Hoshino, H. Murai, H. Kato, Y. Itikawa, M. J. Brunger, and H. Tanaka, Chem. Phys. Lett. 585, 33 (2013)], but are tabulated here for completeness.

  20. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a variety of applications, e.g., accelerator shielding design, neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc., it is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy (greater than or equal to20 MeV) neutrons. A previous paper described neutron-photon multigroup cross sections in the ANISN format for neutrons from thermal to 400 MeV. In the present paper the cross-section data presented previously have been revised to make them agree with available experimental data. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Multistructural examination of low activation ferritic steels following irradiation in ORR at 330 and 400 degrees C to ~ 10 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 C to {approx}10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2% Cr, 9% Cr and 12% Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Results include compositional changes in precipitates and microstructural changes as a function of composition and irradiation temperature. It is concluded that temperatures in ORR are on the order of 50 C higher than anticipated.

  2. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Lengths Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23.054 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23 M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles 4 Gabrielsen Susanne F 25.00 lengths 0.894 miles 16.700 miles 3.770 miles 21.364 miles 6 Porter Paul M 50+ 53.00 lengths 0.803 miles 16

  3. NF-{kappa}B suppresses HIF-1{alpha} response by competing for P300 binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendonca, Daniela B.S., E-mail: daniela_mendonca@dentistry.unc.edu [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Av. W5 Norte, 70790-160 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 330 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Mendonca, Gustavo [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Av. W5 Norte, 70790-160 Brasilia, DF (Brazil) [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Av. W5 Norte, 70790-160 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 330 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Aragao, Francisco J.L. [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Av. W5 Norte, 70790-160 Brasilia, DF (Brazil) [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Av. W5 Norte, 70790-160 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Embrapa Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Laboratorio de Introducao e Expressao de Genes, PqEB W5 Norte, 70770-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Cooper, Lyndon F., E-mail: lyndon_cooper@dentistry.unc.edu [Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 330 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} p65 completely blocked HIF-1{alpha} activity at the HRE on different cell lines. {yields} p65 caused minor changes in HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-1{alpha} target genes mRNA expression. {yields} p65 reduced transcription of VEGF promoter. {yields} p65 competes with HIF-1{alpha} for p300. -- Abstract: Hypoxia has emerged as a key determinant of osteogenesis. HIF-1{alpha} is the transcription factor mediating hypoxia responses that include induction of VEGF and related bone induction. Inflammatory signals antagonize bone repair via the NF-{kappa}B pathway. The present investigation explored the functional relationship of hypoxia (HIF-1{alpha} function) and inflammatory signaling (NF-{kappa}B) in stem like and osteoprogenitor cell lines. The potential interaction between HIF-1{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B signaling was explored by co-transfection studies in hFOB with p65, HIF-1{alpha} and 9x-HRE-luc or HIF-1{alpha} target genes reporter plasmids. Nuclear cross-talk was directly tested using the mammalian Gal4/VP16 two-hybrid, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation/western blotting assays. The results show that inflammatory stimulation (TNF-{alpha} treatment) causes a marked inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} function at the HRE in all cell lines studied. Also, co-transfection with p65 expression vector leads to reduced hVEGFp transcription after DFO-induced hypoxia. However, TNF-{alpha} treatment had little effect on HIF-1{alpha} mRNA levels. The functional interaction of Gal4-HIF-1{alpha} and VP16-p300 fusion proteins is effectively blocked by expression of p65 in a dose dependent manner. It was concluded that NF-{kappa}B-mediated inflammatory signaling is able to block HIF-1{alpha} transactivation at HRE-encoding genes by direct competition for p300 binding at the promoter. Inflammation may influence the stem cell niche and tissue regeneration by influencing cellular responses to hypoxia.

  4. Data:Caae3ee7-ac64-400a-b41e-72b051525c14 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Effective date: 20090201 End date if known: Rate name: SL- 400 Watt MV 169 kWh (Steel Pole Overhead) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Source Parent:...

  5. 2002 Small Mammal Inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, E; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist the University of California in obtaining biological assessment information for the ''2004 Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'', Jones & Stokes conducted an inventory of small mammals in six major vegetation communities at Site 300. These communities were annual grassland, native grassland, oak savanna, riparian corridor, coastal scrub, and seep/spring wetlands. The principal objective of this study was to assess the diversity and abundance of small mammal species in these communities, as well as the current status of any special-status small mammal species found in these communities. Surveys in the native grassland community were conducted before and after a controlled fire management burn of the grasslands to qualitatively evaluate any potential effects of fire on small mammals in the area.

  6. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes: The Sculptor Galaxy NGC 300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazak, J Zachary; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee; Davies, Ben; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand; Bresolin, Fabio; Bender, Ralf; Wegner, Michael; Bonanos, Alceste Z; Williams, Stephen J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantitative spectroscopic study of twenty-seven red supergiants in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 300. J-band spectra were obtained using KMOS on the VLT and studied with state of the art synthetic spectra including NLTE corrections for the strongest diagnostic lines. We report a central metallicity of [Z]= -0.03 +/- 0.05 with a gradient of -0.083 +/- 0.014 [dex/kpc], in agreement with previous studies of blue supergiants and H II-region auroral line measurements. This result marks the first application of the J-band spectroscopic method to a population of individual red supergiant stars beyond the Local Group of galaxies and reveals the great potential of this technique.

  7. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S. [Golder Associates, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

  8. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  9. A Novel Fuel/Reactor Cycle to Implement the 300 Years Nuclear Waste Policy Approach - 12377

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carelli, M.D.; Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Petrovic, B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorium-based fuel cycle system can effectively burn the currently accumulated commercial used nuclear fuel and move to a sustainable equilibrium where the actinide levels in the high level waste are low enough to yield a radiotoxicity after 300 years lower than that of the equivalent uranium ore. The second step of the Westinghouse approach to solving the waste 'problem' has been completed. The thorium fuel cycle has indeed the potential of burning the legacy TRU and achieve the waste objective proposed. Initial evaluations have been started for the third step, development and selection of appropriate reactors. Indications are that the probability of show-stoppers is rather remote. It is, therefore, believed that development of the thorium cycle and associated technologies will provide a permanent solution to the waste management. Westinghouse is open to the widest collaboration to make this a reality. (authors)

  10. Pitting Corrosion in CVD SiC at 300?C in Deoxygenated High-Purity Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.; Senor, David J.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Painter, Chad L.

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SiC is a candidate for nuclear applications at elevated temperatures but has not been fully studied under typical light-water reactor operating conditions, such as moderate temperatures and high pressures. Coupons of high-purity chemical vapor deposited SiC were exposed to deoxygenated, pressurized water at 573K and 100 Bar for up to 4000 hours. Ceramographic examination of the exposed SiC surfaces revealed both embryonic and large, d > 300 m, pits on the surface. The pits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy for structure and chemistry analysis. Pit densities were also determined by standard counting methods. The chemical analysis revealed that the pits are associated with the formation of silica and subsequent loss of Si, which is expected due to several suggested reactions between SiC and water.

  11. A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF DWPF LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS GENERATED DURING THE PROCESSING OF BATCHES 300 THROUGH 356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides summaries and comparisons of composition measurements for glass samples that were generated during the processing of batches 300 through 356 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These analyses, which include measurements of samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as samples of glass standards, were provided to SCS by the DWPF Laboratory (DWPF Lab) of Waste Laboratory Services. The comparisons made by SCS were extensive given that these data allowed for contrasts between preparation methods and between the two spectrometers that are currently in use at the DWPF Lab. In addition to general comparisons, specific questions that were posed in the Technical Task Request (TTR) behind this effort were addressed in this report.

  12. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS AT 400 TeV WITH ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} muon events with a median angular resolution of {approx}3 Degree-Sign . A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3{sigma}. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  14. A Chandra X-ray study of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant 3C400.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broersen, Sjors

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of archival Chandra observations of the mixed-morphology remnant 3C400.2. We analysed spectra of different parts of the remnant to observe if the plasma properties provide hints on the origin of the mixed-morphology class. These remnants often show overionization, which is a sign of rapid cooling of the thermal plasma, and super-solar abundances of elements which is a sign of ejecta emission. Our analysis shows that the thermal emission of 3C400.2 can be well explained by a two component non-equilibrium ionization model, of which one component is underionized, has a high temperature ($kT \\approx 3.9$ keV) and super-solar abundances, while the other component has a much lower temperature ($kT \\approx 0.14$ keV), solar abundances and shows signs of overionization. The temperature structure, abundance values and density contrast between the different model components suggest that the hot component comes from ejecta plasma, while the cooler component has an interstellar matter origin. This ...

  15. The Application of the PEBBED Code Suite to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark - FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the recent developments of the PEBBED code suite and its application to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark. This report addresses an FY2006 Level 2 milestone under the NGNP Design and Evaluation Methods Work Package. The milestone states "Complete a report describing the results of the application of the integrated PEBBED code package to the PBMR-400 coupled code benchmark". The report describes the current state of the PEBBED code suite, provides an overview of the Benchmark problems to which it was applied, discusses the code developments achieved in the past year, and states some of the results attained. Results of the steady state problems generated by the PEBBED fuel management code compare favorably to the preliminary results generated by codes from other participating institutions and to similar non-Benchmark analyses. Partial transient analysis capability has been achieved through the acquisition of the NEM-THERMIX code from Penn State University. Phase I of the task has been achieved through the development of a self-consistent set of tools for generating cross sections for design and transient analysis and in the successful execution of the steady state benchmark exercises.

  16. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680%C2%B0C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680%C2%B0C were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680%C2%B0C, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400%C2%B0C. At 500%C2%B0C, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680%C2%B0C, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  17. Application of RAD-BCG calculator to Hanford's 300 area shoreline characterization dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Patton, Gene W.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RAD-BCG Calculator. The RAD-BCG Calculator, a computer program that uses an Excel spreadsheet and Visual Basic software, showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RAD-BCG-Calculators site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the programs kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RAD-BCG Calculator results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  18. Radiant transmittance of cerium doped quartz from 300 to 1270 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havstad, M.A.; Dingus, C.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particularly massive application of cerium doped quartz flashlamps is scheduled as part of the fusion energy research program at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to be built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As many as 10,000 flashlamps will fire in support of each laser driven fusion experiment. Over the 350 {micro}sec firing period, the lamps provide visible and IR output (the pump band is 0.4 to 1.0 {micro}m) to a solid state laser slab. Emission from the lamp toward its envelope corresponds roughly to a 10,000 K Planck distribution and causes envelope heating to approximately 1,070 K. Temperature dependent radiation transmission by the doped glass envelope is important to lamp performance and laser operation for several reasons. Here, the transmittance of curved slabs of cerium doped quartz is reported as a function of wavelength and temperature. The spectral range of measurement is 0.25 to 0.725 {micro}m and temperature varies from 300 K to 1,270 K. The short wavelength cutoff for transmission shifts to longer wavelengths monotonically with temperature at a rate of {approximately} 3 nm/100K. The transmittance data for wavelengths less than 0.36 {micro}m are fit to a classical pole fit model using 8 modes (oscillators) and the temperature dependence of the modes is given. For wavelengths beyond 0.36 {micro}m the data are fit to an Urbach rule. The bandgap parameter in the Urbach rule decreases linearly with temperature to 1,270 K and varies from 3.394 eV at 300 K to 3.183 eV at 1,270 K, while the steepness parameter also decreases approximately linearly from 8.51 eV{sup {minus}1} to 5.80 eV{sup {minus}1}. The fits are used to compute the spectral and temperature dependent absorption coefficient.

  19. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  20. IMPACT MELT CLASTS IN LUNAR METEORITES DAR AL GANI 262 AND DAR AL GANI 400. Barbara A. Cohen, David A. Kring, and Timothy D. Swindle, Department of Planetary Sciences, The University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    IMPACT MELT CLASTS IN LUNAR METEORITES DAR AL GANI 262 AND DAR AL GANI 400. Barbara A. Cohen, David, Tucson AZ 85721 (bcohen@lpl.arizona.edu). Introduction: Dar al Gani 262 and Dar al Gani 400 are lunar

  1. Biology 4250 Evolutionary Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, David J.

    Pop1 Pop2 Pop3 1 500 500 500 2 550 550 550 3 400 400 400 4 450 450 450 5 100 50 10 300 350 400 450 e Pop1 Pop2 Ne = n (1/Ni) Harmonic mean 6 350 350 350 7 400 400 400 8 450 450 450 9 400 400 400 10 300

  2. 1324 McCormick Road, W. Lafayette, 47907 ~ Phone 765-494-3600 www.purduetennis.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    :00 - 5:30pm Members: $147. Non-M: $178. Tournament I Players This program is for high school varsity:00 - 3:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Hot Shots (ages 7 8) Sundays 2:00 - 3:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Aces (ages 9 10) Sundays 3:00 - 4:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Sport Players This program

  3. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  4. REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

  5. Irradiation Creep and Swelling from 400 C to 600 C of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Gelles, David S.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Abe, Katsunori

    2004-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications. As part of an extensive study performed at PNNL on the ODS steel MA957 [1], irradiation creep tests were performed on pressurized tubes made from MA957 by two different methods. The tubes were made either by gun drilling alone or by a combination of rod drawing and gun drilling. The different fabrication methods were explored because ODS steels have been difficult to form. The pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The effective stresses resulting from the pressurization of the tubes ranged from 0 MPa to 175 MPa.

  6. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

  7. 300-FF-1 physical separations CERCLA treatability test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct physical separations soil treatability tests in the north process pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site. The overall objective of these tests is to evaluate the use of physical separations systems as a means of concentrating chemical and radioactive contaminants into fine soil fractions, and thereby minimizing waste volumes. If successful, the technology could be applied to clean up millions of cubic meters of contaminated soils at Hanford and other sites. In this document, physical separations refers to a simple and comparatively low cost technology to potentially achieve a significant reduction in the volume of contaminated soils without the use of chemical processes. Removal of metals and radioactive contaminants from the fine fraction of soils may require additional treatment such as chemical extraction, electromagnetic separation, or stabilization. Investigations/testing of these technologies are recommended to assess the economic and technical feasibility of additional treatment, but are not within the scope of this test. This plan provides guidance and specifications for two proposed treatability tests: one to be conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company; and another proposed as competitive bid service contract. The main body of this test plan discusses the tests in general and items that are common to both tests. Attachment A discusses in detail the EPA system test and Attachment B discusses the vendor test.

  8. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

  9. Experimental evidence of improved thermoelectric properties at 300K in Si/Ge superlattice structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.; Colpitts, T.; Watko, E.; Malta, D. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have found that it may be possible to obtain significant enhancement in ZT at 300 K, over conventional bulk SiGe alloys, through the use of Si/Ge Superlattice (SL) structures. The Seebeck coefficient in Si/Ge SL structures was observed to increase rapidly with decreasing SL period with no loss of electrical conductivity. The carrier mobilities in Si/Ge SLs were higher than in a comparable thin-film Si/Ge alloy. The best power factor of the short-period Si/Ge SLs is 112.2 {micro}W/K{sup 2} cm, over five-fold better than state-of-the-art n-type, bulk SiGe alloys. Approximately a two to four-fold reduction in thermal conductivity in short-period SL structures, compared to bulk SiGe alloy, was observed. The authors estimate at least a factor of five improvement over current state-of-the-art SiGe alloys, in several Si/Ge SL samples with periodicity of {approximately}45 to 75 {angstrom}. The results of this study are promising, but tentative due to the possible effects of substrate and the developmental nature of the thermoelectric property measurements.

  10. Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, P.H.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions attendant on the deep land burial of nuclear waste products raise a number of possible scenarios to cover the necessary 10,000 years of burial. However, no matter what kind of futuristic scenario obtains, it is desirable to develop an information system indicating the locale and nature of the deposit site and the types of materials stored, along with forewarnings not to interefere with the sites. A variety of such informational sites are suggested. Attention then turns to the recipients of such messages, recognizing from the outset that the psychological/perceptual makeup of individuals across the next 300 or so generations is virtually impossible to predict, particularly since new technologies may well alter that makeup in the furture. Nevertheless, current evidence suggests that certain human characteristics may be considered universal, and that these suggest the incorporation of selected sign signification into the message system. There are other such characteristics that, while probably not intrinsic, can probably be acquired with a minimum of formal training. That still leaves much of the message content to be deliberately created and, hence, learned. The common trefoil or other developed biohazardous signs emerge as the best candidates for a generic base symbol for the buried material.

  11. [J over ?] polarization in p+p collisions at ?s = 200 TeV in STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, M.

    We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive [J over ?] mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2200 GeV. Data were taken with the STAR detector ...

  12. Dielectron production from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Zhao; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first STAR dielectron measurement in 200 GeV Au + Au collisions. Results are compared to hadron decay cocktail to search for vector meson in-medium modification in low mass region and quark gluon plasma thermal radiation in the intermediate mass region. The transverse mass slope parameters in the intermediate mass region is also discussed.

  13. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-East Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study supports the Hanford Groundwater/Vadose integration project objectives to better understand the risk of groundwater contamination and potential risk to the public via groundwater flow paths. The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-East Area and vicinity.

  14. COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200, 11 and Peter T. Timbie6 Receivved 2003 Auggust 19; accepted 2004 April 12 ABSTRACT COMPASS is an on with the Cosmic Microwave Polari- zation at Small Scales (COMPASS) telescope. Although this limit is about

  15. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 200.1A, Information Technology Management--Withdrawn

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Withdrawn 3-24-14. Although DOE O 200.1A was revised in December 2008, there have been significant changes in IT governance processes and Departmental use of new technologies such as Web 2.0 technologies since that time.

  16. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    countries with average annual per capita energy consumption rates under 1 TOE)? [5 points] 2. Exponential, poverty and gender The chapter "Energy and Poverty" from the 2002 World Energy Outlook, states "...theEnergy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v(1)), elliptic flow (v(2)), and the fourth harmonic (v(4)) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV are summarized and compared...

  18. Volume xx (200y), Number z, pp. 110 3D Line Textures and the Visualization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Kristin

    set of line textures which indicate material properties while maintaining interactive frame rates. In this illustration, the sketchiness of the feature edges and material property lines is modified basedVolume xx (200y), Number z, pp. 110 3D Line Textures and the Visualization of Confidence

  19. Heavy Quarkonium Production at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Matthew

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -alignment (polarization) and Upsilon + hadron correlations (? + h) to investigate the Upsilon production mechanism, using triggered data from Run-8 (2008) d+Au and Run-9 (2009) p+p collisions at sqrt(sN N) = 200 GeV, detected at STAR. The result of the spin...

  20. Silicon epitaxy below 200C: Towards thin crystalline solar cells R. Carioua,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Silicon epitaxy below 200°C: Towards thin crystalline solar cells R. Carioua,b , R. Ruggeria,c , P spectroscopic ellipsometry and HRTEM measurements. Moreover, we build heterojunction solar cells with intrinsic of current devices. KEYWORDS Silicon epitaxy, RF-PECVD, low temperature, thin crystalline solar cells

  1. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  2. Seminar Center for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Thursday, 04/29 -2:00pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Advisor to the CEO Maxwell Technologies, Inc. Abstract We live in an era of unprecedented interestSeminar Center for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Thursday, 04/29 - 2:00pm 101 Bevill Hall The Role and Future of Power Electronics in Energy Storage Systems John M. Miller, PE, Ph.D. Technical

  3. Management and Organizational Behavior Section 301-08 @ 2:00 3:15 MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    MGMT 301 Management and Organizational Behavior Fall 2013 Section 301-08 @ 2:00 3:15 MW Beatty organizational goals by working with, and through, people and other resources. Organizations are treated. To understand management and organizational behavior (OB) concepts associated with continuous improvement

  4. 8 RIS N Y T 2/00 Riss kemikere har kon-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 RIS N Y T 2/00 Riss kemikere har kon- strueret en sensor, der kan genkende ephedrin, som str kemisk fagjargon for at have fundet to stoffer, der passer sam- men. S specifikt at det er som en ls fundet et stof, der pas- ser perfekt sammen med ephedrin. Dermed har de udviklet en sensor, der kan

  5. 200 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Geology/Mathematics/Computer Science 413

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    200 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Geology/Mathematics/Computer Science 413 TELEPHONE: 619 by the Department Master of Science degree in computer science. Major in computer science with the B.S. degree in applied arts and sciences. Minor in computer science. Certificate in geographic information science

  6. 7900 SE 28th Street, Suite 200 Mercer, Island, WA 98040-2970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7900 SE 28th Street, Suite 200 Mercer, Island, WA 98040-2970 v 206.236.7200 f 206.236.3019 www Administration. The Joint Proposal is a comprehensive settlement that will bring to an end the long costs, when the responsibility for reaching agreements with IPPs, is dispersed directly to the load

  7. International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Copyright 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Copyright 200x Inderscience.fr] Abstract: Today, within the global Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) approach, success of design the whole product lifecycle. The emergence of the PLM concept with the deployment of PLM systems has

  8. International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Copyright 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Copyright 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Design and logistics IT federation through Product Lifecycle Support standard Thomas Paviot.lamouri@supmeca.fr Abstract: Wide diffusion of methodologies and software relevant to Product Lifecycle Management (PLM

  9. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    CO2 (in $/ton CO2) over time. Assume a GHG emission rate of 530g CO2/kWh from the natural gas power CO2 for the society (as represented by these four entities) on an annual basis. A net benefit/PP184 120 for ER200/PP284 Topics covered: NPV, Energy efficiency, Electricity grid, Learning curve 1

  10. Congreso Internacional 1810-2010: 200 aos de Iberoamrica -1641 LA IMAGEN DEL PROCESO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Congreso Internacional 1810-2010: 200 años de Iberoamérica - 1641 LA IMAGEN DEL PROCESO las relaciones entre ambos países durante el período revolucionario, la imagen transmitida y ofrecida países y por consecuencia la imagen que se ha transmitido de ambos en sus respectivos gobiernos. Un

  11. Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat bogs peat bogs and backwatersin Bohemia. Localities in the vicinity of the reservoir and in the core zone microbiotopes (Table 1) in the following investigated areas: acidophilous peat bog Mrtv Iuh, Smrinsk

  12. Turbo-SMT: Accelerating Coupled Sparse Matrix-Tensor Factorizations by 200x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbo-SMT: Accelerating Coupled Sparse Matrix-Tensor Factorizations by 200x Evangelos E maintaining good accuracy? We intro- duce Turbo-SMT, a meta-method capable of doing exactly that: it boosts, with comparable accuracy to the baseline. We apply Turbo-SMT to BrainQ, a dataset consisting of a (nouns, brain

  13. School of Dentistry Skourtes Tower: named $10 million 200-Seat Auditorium: named $500,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    School of Dentistry Skourtes Tower: named $10 million 200-Seat Auditorium: named $500,000 Floor 1 Tower Floor 8: Pre-doctoral Clinic Space: named $5 million Pre-Doctoral Integrated Group (IGP) Practices $75,000 Skourtes Tower Floor 9: Pre-doctoral Clinic Space: named $5 million Pre-doctoral Integrated

  14. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis calculates the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94 Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. This document supports the development of the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident in the tank farm documented safety analysis. Consequently, it: (1) Provides a comprehensive review of potential unplanned excavation scenarios (i.e., backhoe, buried pressurized line ruptures, drilling, Guzzler vacuum) to determine the representative activity that would bound unmitigated, unplanned, or inadvertent excavations of 200 Area soils. (2) Evaluates radiological isotope inventories of all current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) liquid waste disposal sites [i.e., cribs, ditches, and ponds (including French drains)], and isotope inventories of unplanned release sites (UPR) and plume columns. (3) Establishes the radiological consequences to the maximum offsite individual (MOI) from an unplanned/inadvertent 200 Area soil disturbance based on bounding site development and representative accident determination.

  15. Facile synthesis, spectral properties and formation mechanism of sulfur nanorods in PEG-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xin-yuan; Li, Li-yun; Zheng, Pu-sheng [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zheng, Wen-jie, E-mail: tzhwj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Bai, Yan; Cheng, Tian-feng; Liu, Jie [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Homogeneous rod-like structure of sulfur with a typical diameter of about 80 nm and an average aspect ratio of about 68 was obtained. The sulfur nanoparticles could self-assemble from spherical particles to nanorods in PEG-200. During the self-assembling process, the absorption band showed a red shift which was due to the production of nanorods. Highlights: ? A novel, facile and greener method to synthesize sulfur nanorods by the solubilizing and templating effect of PEG-200 was reported. ? S{sup 0} nanoparticles could self assemble in PEG-200 and finally form monodisperse and homogeneous rod-like structure with an average diameter of about 80 nm, the length ca. 600 nm. ? The absorption band showed a red shift and the RRS intensity enhanced continuously during the self-assembling process. ? PEG-200 induced the oriented attachment of sulfur nanoparticles by the terminal hydroxyl groups. -- Abstract: The synthesis of nano-sulfur sol by dissolving sublimed sulfur in a green solvent-PEG-200 was studied. Homogeneous rod-like structure of sulfur with a typical diameter of about 80 nm and an average aspect ratio of 68 was obtained. The structure, morphology, size, and stability of the products were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The spectral properties of the products were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UVvis) absorption and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy (RRS). The results showed that the spherical sulfur nanoparticles could self-assemble into nanorods in PEG-200. During the self-assembling process, the absorption band showed a red shift and the RRS intensity enhanced continuously. There was physical cross-linking between PEG and sulfur nanoparticles. PEG-200 induced the oriented attachment of sulfur nanoparticles by the terminal hydroxyl groups. This research provides a greener and more environment-friendly synthetic method for the production of sulfur nanorods.

  16. 300 MHz RF coils for MR studies of Macaca mulatta brain at 7 Tesla Hellmut Merkle2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    300 MHz RF coils for MR studies of Macaca mulatta brain at 7 Tesla Hellmut Merkle2 , Josef Pfeuffer, customized for a vertical ultra high field 7 Tesla system develop for vision research in the alert, trained macaque. Methods A prototype primate chair was designed and built for the vertical 7-Tesla/60-cm BRUKER

  17. >300GHz Fixed-Frequency and Voltage-Controlled Fundamental Oscillators in an InP DHBT Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    >300GHz Fixed-Frequency and Voltage-Controlled Fundamental Oscillators in an InP DHBT Process, 93106, USA Abstract -- We report fundamental fixed-frequency and voltage-controlled oscillators bandwidth. Index Terms -- Millimeter-wave oscillators, voltage-controlled oscillators, MMIC oscillators. I

  18. Solar Energy With an average of over 300 sunny days a year, Israel is an ideal labo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maoz, Shahar

    35 Solar Energy With an average of over 300 sunny days a year, Israel is an ideal labo- ratory for testing one particularly promising alternative to fossil fuels: solar energy. In contrast to fossil fuels as much energy strikes the earth in the form of solar radiation as is used in a whole year throughout

  19. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study (FS) examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred altemative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965-1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-:levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228 and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9 {times} 10{sup 5}.

  20. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  1. PDF Document (400k)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview P

  2. PDF Document (400k)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i-C C lKansasNORTH

  3. PDF Document (400k)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversightandCenterBusinessSystem - notFig.!

  4. PDF Document (400k)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y earEnergy Ttritium activity in Japan 2.PBA2007

  5. Oxford System 400

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight Board TheOverview of thethe

  6. Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdomo, Dario

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Load Settlement Curves "Good Guess" Example for Actual Curve(from Briaud et al, 1985) TOP LOAD (HIPS) 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 iJ PILE I. D. NO. 28 Actual Wild Guess + Penpile- Verbrugge (L. P. C. Cone) Coyle Briaud-Tucker L. P. C... ' 7. 2 Mgbinpina1. JLDglxaim ~ The results of the statistical analysis are shown in Tables 10 600 DRIVEN PILES SAND COYLE'S METHOD 500 M 0 400 (A o o UJ 300 X I? O UJ I- 200 O L0 K 100 No. OF PILES=S MEAN PRED/MEAS=1. 01...

  7. 2/21/13 4:15 PMUnited States Patent: 8300220 Page 1 of 38http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOF...m&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8,300,220.PN.&OS=PN/8,300,220&RS=PN/8,300,220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    2/21/13 4:15 PMUnited States Patent: 8300220 Page 1 of 38http ) United States Patent 8,300,220 Mahadevan-Jansen , et al. October 30, 2012 Device and method for non and proximal to the third optical port. #12;2/21/13 4:15 PMUnited States Patent: 8300220 Page 2 of 38http

  8. Adjudication of a contract for the Heating and Ventilation Equipment for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjudication of a contract for the Heating and Ventilation Equipment for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  9. Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  10. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  11. Mechanical Analysis of the 400 MHz RF-Dipole Crabbing Cavity Prototype for LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, Subashini U. [ODU; Park, HyeKyoung [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Li, Z. [SLAC

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade requires two crabbing systems in increasing the peak luminosity, operating both vertically and horizontally at two interaction points of IP1 and IP5. The required system has tight dimensional constraints and needs to achieve higher operational gradients. A proof-of-principle 400 MHz crabbing cavity design has been successfully tested and has proven to be an ideal candidate for the crabbing system. The cylindrical proof-of-principle rf-dipole design has been adapted in to a square shaped design to further meet the dimensional requirements. The new rf-dipole design has been optimized in meeting the requirements in rf-properties, higher order mode damping, and multipole components. A crabbing system in a cryomodule is expected to be tested on the SPS beam line prior to the test at LHC. The new prototype is required to achieve the mechanical and thermal specifications of the SPS test followed by the test at LHC. This paper discusses the detailed mechanical and thermal analysis in minimizing Lorentz force detuning and sensitivity to liquid He pressure fluctuations.

  12. Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-400: Exhuming the Buried Signature of a Cool, Jovian-Mass Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Subo; Gould, A; Kozlowski, Szymon; Miyake, N; Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Abe, F; Gilmore, A C; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagaya, M; Ohnishi, K; Okumura, T; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Bolt, G; Christie, G W; De Poy, D L; Han, C; Janczak, J; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; McCormick, J; Monard, B; Maury, A; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Santallo, R; Stanek, K Z; Udalski, A; Kubiak, M; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007-BLG-400Lb. The planet was detected in a high-magnification microlensing event (with peak magnification A_max = 628) in which the primary lens transited the source, resulting in a dramatic smoothing of the peak of the event. The angular extent of the region of perturbation due to the planet is significantly smaller than the angular size of the source, and as a result the planetary signature is also smoothed out by the finite source size. Thus the deviation from a single-lens fit is broad and relatively weak (~ few percent). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the planetary nature of the deviation can be unambiguously ascertained from the gross features of the residuals, and detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q = 0.0026+/-0.0004, in accord with the large significance (\\Delta\\chi^2=1070) of the detection. The planet/star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy, leading to two indistinguishabl...

  13. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karc?, zgr [NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd., Hacettepe - ?vedik OSB Teknokent, 1368. Cad., No: 61/33, 06370, Yenimahalle, Ankara (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Dede, Mnir [NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd., Hacettepe - ?vedik OSB Teknokent, 1368. Cad., No: 61/33, 06370, Yenimahalle, Ankara (Turkey); Oral, Ahmet, E-mail: orahmet@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ?12 fm/?Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  14. Description of work for vadose borings in support of 200-UP-2 Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelty, G.G.

    1993-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the vadose zone drilling and soil sampling in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit (Task 2, 3, and 5) and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the 200-UP-2 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study (DOE-RL 1993a,[LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Vadose zone borings are being constructed to characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminants in sediments within and beneath the cribs. The locations for the proposed borings are presented in Figure 1. The contaminants of concern for the project are presented in Table 1.

  15. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

  16. Hydrogeology of the Hanford Site Central Plateau A Status Report for the 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Thorne, Paul D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Parker, Kyle R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Bruce A.

    2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remediation Decisions Support (RDS) function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (managed by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company [CHPRC]) is responsible for facilitating the development of consistent data, parameters, and conceptual models to resolve technical issues and support efforts to estimate contaminant migration and impacts (i.e., the assessment process). In particular, the RDS function is working to update electronic data sources and conceptual models of the geologic framework and associated hydraulic and geochemical parameters to facilitate traceability, transparency, defensibility, and consistency in support of environmental assessments. This report summarizes the efforts conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists in fiscal year 2008 (FY08) that focused primarily on the 200 West Area, as well as a secondary effort initiated on the 200 East Area.

  17. Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office, under contract DE-AC06-87RL10930. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive material that has been buried and stored in the 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities from startup in 1944 through calendar year 1994. This report does not include backlog waste: solid radioactive wastes in storage or disposed of in other areas or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

  18. Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive materials that have been buried and stored in the 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities since startup in 1944 through calendar year 1993. This report does not include backlog waste, solid radioactive waste in storage or disposed of in other areas, or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, ``Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria,`` (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

  19. Prioritization and accelerated remediation of groundwater contamination in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.; Ford, B.H.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site, operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), occupies about 1,450 km{sup 2} (560 mi{sup 2}) of the southeastern part of Washington State north of the confluence of the Yakima and Columbia Rivers. The Hanford Site is organized into numerically designated operational areas. The 200 Areas, located near the center of the Hanford Site, encompasses the 200 West, East and North Areas and cover an area of over 40 km{sup 2}. The Hanford Site was originally designed, built, and operated to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons using production reactors and chemical reprocessing plants. Operations in the 200 Areas were mainly related to separation of special nuclear materials from spent nuclear fuel and contain related chemical and fuel processing and waste management facilities. Large quantities of chemical and radioactive waste associated with these processes were often disposed to the environment via infiltration structures such as cribs, ponds, ditches. This has resulted in over 25 chemical and radionuclide groundwater plumes, some of which have reached the Columbia River. An Aggregate Area Management Study program was implemented under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order to assess source and groundwater contamination and develop a prioritized approach for managing groundwater remediation in the 200 Areas. This included a comprehensive evaluation of existing waste disposal and environmental monitoring data and the conduct of limited field investigations (DOE-RL 1992, 1993). This paper summarizes the results of groundwater portion of AAMS program focusing on high priority contaminant plume distributions and the groundwater plume prioritization process. The objectives of the study were to identify groundwater contaminants of concern, develop a conceptual model, refine groundwater contaminant plume maps, and develop a strategy to expedite the remediation of high priority contaminants through the implementation of interim actions.

  20. Report of spectral gamma-ray surveys acquired for the 200-UP-2 project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kos, S.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten boreholes were logged with the high-resolution, high-purity germanium (PHGe) passive gamma-ray tool, Radionuclide Logging System (RLS), for the 200-UP-2 project. The surveys were acquired during the period September, 1993 to March, 1994. All of the surveys identified the presence of gamma-emitting man-made radionuclides in the sediments surrounding the boreholes. In all of the wells, contamination occurred at or very near ground surface.

  1. Investigation of gamma induced degradation of Amberlite 200 cation resin by mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitag, Albert Antonio

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering INVESTIGATION OI' GAMMA INDUCED DEGRADATION OF AMBERLITE 200 CATION RESIN BY MASS SPECTROMETER AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH A Thesis by ALBERT ANTONIO FREITAG... and to Dr. Robert G. Cochran, Head of the Nuclear Engineering Department, for providing the financial support necessary for completion of this work. DEDICATION I dedicate this work to my wife, Diann, for her tolerance and support. Vi TADLE OF CONTL...

  2. Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; E. Beauchamp; V. Belov; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; T. Brunner; A. Burenkov; B. Cleveland; S. Cook; T. Daniels; M. Danilov; C. G. Davis; S. Delaquis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; A. Dolgolenko; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr.; J. Farine; W. Feldmeier; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; M. Hughes; A. Johnson; T. N. Johnson; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; B. Mong; M. Montero Diez; A. R. Muller; R. Neilson; R. Nelson; A. Odian; I. Ostrovskiy; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; P. C. Rowson; J. J. Russell; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; T. Tolba; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; P. Vogel; J. -L. Vuilleumier; A. Waite; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen; O. Ya. Zeldovich

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200. No signal is observed for an exposure of 32.5 kg-yr, with a background of ~1.5 x 10^{-3} /(kg yr keV) in the $\\pm 1\\sigma$ region of interest. This sets a lower limit on the half-life of the neutrinoless double-beta decay $T_{1/2}^{0\

  3. LESSONS LEARNED - STARTUP AND TRANSITION TO OPERATIONS AT THE 200 WEST PUMP AND TREAT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINK DE; BERGQUIST GG; BURKE SP

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document lists key Lessons Learned from the Startup Team for the 200 West Pump and Treat Facility Project. The Startup Team on this Project was an integrated, multi-discipline team whose scope was Construction Acceptance Testing (CAT), functional Acceptance Testing Procedures (ATP), and procedure development and implementation. Both maintenance and operations procedures were developed. Included in the operations procedures were the process unit operations. In addition, a training and qualification program was also part of the scope.

  4. Congreso Internacional 1810-2010: 200 aos de Iberoamrica -733 LA IMAGEN DE LA VIRGEN DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Congreso Internacional 1810-2010: 200 años de Iberoamérica - 733 LA IMAGEN DE LA VIRGEN DE como la imagen había sido compuesta y como se reconoció su naturaleza divina. Por fin, Lorenzana interpreta los significados de la imagen y de la aparición. El análisis considerará la importancia de la

  5. Assessment of unsaturated zone radionuclide contamination in the 200 areas of the Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodeur, J.R.; Wittreich, C.D.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 East and 200 West Areas at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington, contain chemical and nuclear fuel processing facilities that disposed of large volumes of chemical and radionuclide effluents to the ground via various structures such as ponds, cribs and ditches. A geophysical logging investigation was implemented in 1992 to assess the nature and extent of contamination beneath select liquid disposal sites in the 200 Areas. The borehole geophysical logging was accomplished with a recently developed spectral gamma-ray logging system called the Radionuclide Logging System (RLS). This system has a high-resolution, intrinsic germanium detector mounted in a downhole probe and is calibrated and operated specifically for use in a borehole environment. It provides a means to develop in-situ, gamma-emitting radioelement concentration profiles. Approximately 50 boreholes were logged in this study. The RLS log data provided information about the migration and deposition patterns of specific radionuclides in the unsaturated zone and their impacts on the groundwater. Approximately 10 radionuclide species were detected and quantified. Results of the field investigation are being used to refine site specific conceptual models, support Hanford Site remediation decisions and focus future characterization activities.

  6. Description of work for 200-UP-1 characterization of monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innis, B.E.; Kelty, G.G.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the drilling, soil sampling, and construction of groundwater monitoring and dual-use wells in the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit (Tasks 2, 3, and 5 in the 200-UP-1 RI/FS Work Plan DOE/RL 1993a) and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater operable Unit (DOE-RL 1993a, [LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Groundwater wells are being constructed to characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of the Uranium and {sup 99}{Tc} plumes and to define aquifer properties such as hydraulic communication between aquifers and hydrostratigraphy. Some of these wells may be utilized for extraction purposes during the IRM phase anticipated at this operable unit and are being designed with a dual use in mind. These data will be used to optimize the Interim Remedial Measures (IRM) for the cleanup of these two plumes. The data will also be used with later Limited Field Investigation (LFI) data to perform a Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) for the operable unit. The locations for the proposed groundwater wells are presented in Figure 1. The contaminants of concern for the project are presented ih Table 1.

  7. Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

  8. Symmetry, Integrability and Geometry: Methods and Applications SIGMA ? (200?), 00?, ?? pages Structure theory for second order 2D superintegrable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Willard

    Symmetry, Integrability and Geometry: Methods and Applications SIGMA ? (200?), 00?, ?? pages online ???? Original article is available at http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/200?/00?/ Abstract], for a precise definition, it has been shown that the algebra is finite dimensional and closes at order six

  9. 1248 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 44, NO. 4, APRIL 2009 A 350 W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel

    --Recent advances in the medical field are spurring the need for ultra-low power transceivers for wireless communi and 400 W OOK Super-Regenerative Receiver for Medical Implant Communications Jose L. Bohorquez, Student- cation with medical implants. To deal with the growing demand for medical telemetry, the FCC commissioned

  10. 2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yayu

    2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron Collider" Abstract: With the discovery of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron) Prof. Mellado is an expert on the Higgs boson a sub-atomic particle that is thought to give matter

  11. Environmental Health & Safety Policy Manual Issue Date: 4/23/2010 Updated: 4/23/2014 Policy # EHS-400.09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Policy Manual Issue Date: 4/23/2010 Updated: 4/23/2014 Policy # EHS-400.09 Executive Committee for Environmental Health and Safety Charter 1.0 PURPOSE: The Executive for Environmental Health and Safety shall: Assess prior year accomplishments and coming year goals

  12. Evaluation and Screening of Remedial Technologies for Uranium at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimmons, Michael J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is presently conducting a re-evaluation of remedies addressing persistent dissolved uranium concentrations in the upper aquifer under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This work is being conducted as a Phase III feasibility study for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. As part of the feasibility study process, a comprehensive inventory of candidate remedial technologies was conducted by PNNL. This report documents the identification and screening of candidate technologies. The screening evaluation was conducted in accordance with guidance and processes specified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations associated with implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act process.

  13. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  14. 2001-2002 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, W; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Condor County Consulting on behalf of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed wet season surveys for listed branchiopods at Site 300, located in eastern Alameda County and western San Joaquin County. LLNL is collecting information for the preparation of an EIS covering ongoing explosives testing and related activities on Site 300. Related activities include maintenance of fire roads and annual control burns of approximately 607 hectares (1500 acres). Control burns typically take place on the northern portion of the site. Because natural branchiopod habitat is sparse on Site 300, it is not surprising that listed branchiopods were not observed during this 2001-2002 wet season survey. Although the site is large, a majority of it has topography and geology that precludes the formation of static seasonal pools. Even the relatively gentle topography of the northern half of the site contains few areas where water pools for more than two weeks. The rock outcrops found on the site did not provide suitable habitat for listed branchiopods. Most of the habitat available to branchiopods on the site is puddles that form in roadbeds and dry quickly. The one persistent pool on the site, the larger of the two modified vernal pools and the only one to fill this season, is occupied by two branchiopod species that require long-lived pools to reach maturity. In short, there is little habitat available on the site for branchiopods and most of the habitat present is generally too short-lived to support the branchiopod species that do occur at Site 300.

  15. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 page 1 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003 , Anton not LBNL 7 11:18.8 Singer, Brett C 30-39 men 3 8 11:20.2 Yegian, Derek 30-39 men 4 9 11:20.4 Nihei 45 13:26.9 card not turned in 46 13:27.4 Elliott, James B 30-39 men 18 #12;LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3

  16. THE 300 km s[superscript 1] STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunnan, Ragnhild

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s[superscript 1] stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine ...

  17. Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-400: Exhuming the Buried Signature of a Cool, Jovian-Mass Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subo Dong; I. A. Bond; A. Gould; Szymon Kozlowski; N. Miyake; B. S. Gaudi; D. P. Bennett; F. Abe; A. C. Gilmore; A. Fukui; K. Furusawa; J. B. Hearnshaw; Y. Itow; K. Kamiya; P. M. Kilmartin; A. Korpela; W. Lin; C. H. Ling; K. Masuda; Y. Matsubara; Y. Muraki; M. Nagaya; K. Ohnishi; T. Okumura; Y. C. Perrott; N. Rattenbury; To. Saito; T. Sako; S. Sato; L. Skuljan; D. J. Sullivan; T. Sumi; W. Sweatman; P. J. Tristram; P. C. M. Yock; G. Bolt; G. W. Christie; D. L. DePoy; C. Han; J. Janczak; C. -U. Lee; F. Mallia; J. McCormick; B. Monard; A. Maury; T. Natusch; B. -G. Park; R. W. Pogge; R. Santallo; K. Z. Stanek; A. Udalski; M. Kubiak; M. K. Szymanski; G. Pietrzynski; I. Soszynski; O. Szewczyk; L. Wyrzykowski; K. Ulaczyk

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007-BLG-400Lb. The planet was detected in a high-magnification microlensing event (with peak magnification A_max = 628) in which the primary lens transited the source, resulting in a dramatic smoothing of the peak of the event. The angular extent of the region of perturbation due to the planet is significantly smaller than the angular size of the source, and as a result the planetary signature is also smoothed out by the finite source size. Thus the deviation from a single-lens fit is broad and relatively weak (~ few percent). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the planetary nature of the deviation can be unambiguously ascertained from the gross features of the residuals, and detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q = 0.0026+/-0.0004, in accord with the large significance (\\Delta\\chi^2=1070) of the detection. The planet/star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy, leading to two indistinguishable solutions that differ in separation by a factor of ~8.5. Upper limits on flux from the lens constrain its mass to be M < 0.75 M_Sun (assuming it is a main-sequence star). A Bayesian analysis that includes all available observational constraints indicates a primary in the Galactic bulge with a mass of ~0.2-0.5 M_Sun and thus a planet mass of ~ 0.5-1.3 M_Jupiter. The separation and equilibrium temperature are ~0.6-1.1AU (~5.3-9.7AU) and ~103K (~34K) for the close (wide) solution. If the primary is a main-sequence star, follow-up observations would enable the detection of its light and so a measurement of its mass and distance.

  18. Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

  19. Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWMAN, R.C.

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  20. Report of spectral gamma-ray surveys acquired for the 200-UP-1 project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kos, S.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four (4) boreholes were surveyed for the 200-UP-1 project utilizing the high-purity germanium and sodium logging systems. The surveys were acquired during the period April-September, 1994. The objectives of the surveys were to identify the presence, species, and relative activities of man-made gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, and to use log data to correlate stratigraphic features between boreholes. No man-made radionuclides were detected in the subsurface below 2 feet in depth in any of the boreholes.

  1. Compilation of Earthquakes from 1850-2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Seth Carpenter

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated earthquake compilation was created for the years 1850 through 2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory. To generate this compilation, earthquake catalogs were collected from several contributing sources and searched for redundant events using the search criteria established for this effort. For all sets of duplicate events, a preferred event was selected, largely based on epicenter-network proximity. All unique magnitude information for each event was added to the preferred event records and these records were used to create the compilation referred to as INL1850-2007.

  2. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. 38 39 Information provided in this Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 40 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility permit application documentation is 41 current as of June 1, 1997.

  3. Historical tank content estimate for the southeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Quadrant provides historical information on a tank-by-tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks for the Hanford 200 Areas. This report summarized historical information such as waste history, level history, temperature history, riser configuration, tank integrity, and inventory estimates on a tank- by-tank basis. Tank farm aerial photographs and interior tank montages are also provided for each tank. A description of the development of data for the document of the inventory estimates provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory are also given in this report.

  4. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information derived form the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the main text. This Volume contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text.

  5. Microstructural development in low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 420{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density change and microstructural development are reported for nine low activation ferritic steels covering the range 2.3 to 12 Cr with varying additions of V and/or W for hardening and up to 6.5 Mn for austenite stability. Specimens were examined following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA at 4200{degree}C to a dose exceeding 200 dpa. Void swelling was found, but the swelling remained at 5% or below, with the worst case in an alloy of 9Cr-2Mn-1WV. The carbide structure pinning Martensite lath boundaries remains in place.

  6. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water.

  7. Pion femtoscopy in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; 3 B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal. B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevsky; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic analysis of the correlations, though this analysis is complicated by the presence of strong non-femtoscopic effects. Our results are put into the context of the world dataset of femtoscopy in hadron-hadron collisions. We present the first direct comparison of femtoscopy in p+p and heavy ion collisions, under identical analysis and detector conditions.

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Bser; O. Botner; J. Braun; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirrs; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Daz-Vlez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. R. Duvoort; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegrd; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Gro; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hl; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; N. Kemming; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Khne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kpke; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; K. Kuehn; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; R. Lehmann; J. Lnemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; M. Matusik; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mszros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; A. R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nieen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Prez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; M. Prikockis; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; S. Schlenstedt; T. Schmidt; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; K. Singh; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; B. T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; O. Tarasova; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Voge; B. Voigt; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; G. Wikstrm; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  9. The Evolved Red Stellar Contents of the Sculptor Group Galaxies NGC55, NGC300, and NGC7793

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep J, H, and K images are used to probe the evolved stellar contents in the central regions of the Sculptor group galaxies NGC55, NGC300, and NGC7793. The brightest stars are massive red supergiants (RSGs) with K ~ 15 - 15.5. The peak RSG brightness is constant to within ~0.5 mag in K, suggesting that NGC55, NGC300, and NGC7793 are at comparable distances. Comparisons with bright RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds indicate that the difference in distance modulus with respect to the LMC is = 7.5. A rich population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, which isochrones indicate have ages between 0.1 and 10 Gyr, dominates the (K, J-K) color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of each galaxy. The detection of significant numbers of AGB stars with ages near 10 Gyr indicates that the disks of these galaxies contain an underlying old population. The CMDs and luminosity functions reveal significant galaxy-to-galaxy variations in stellar content. Star-forming activity in the central arcmin of NGC300 has been suppressed for the past Gyr with respect to disk fields at larger radii. Nevertheless, comparisons between fields within each galaxy indicate that star-forming activity during intermediate epochs was coherent on spatial scales of a kpc or more. A large cluster of stars, which isochrones suggest has an age near 100 Myr, is seen in one of the NGC55 fields. The luminosity function of the brightest stars in this cluster is flat, as expected if a linear luminosity-core mass relation is present.

  10. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information derived from the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. This volume contains the main text. Volume 2 contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text. This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report are the preliminary interpretations of the hydrogeologic environment of six low-level burial grounds, which comprise four waste management areas (WMAs) located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretations were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the construction of 35 ground-water monitoring wells as well as a multitude of previously existing boreholes. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a ground-water monitoring program initiated in 1986. This ground-water monitoring program is based on requirements for interim status facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976).

  11. Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

  12. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  13. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  14. Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product Description Destination Tons Cords MBF Stumpage Amount Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 1 Aspen 0.35 400.00$ 140.00$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 2 Aspen 3.29 250.00$ 822.50$ Hard Maple Sawtimber Grade 3 Aspen 2.38 160.00$ 380.80$ Hard Maple Veneer Aspen 600.00$ -$ Hard Maple Birdseye Aspen 0.055 700.00$ 38

  15. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the binary systems of 1-butanol with some halohydrocarbons at 40.0 and 101.3 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artigas, H.; Lafuente, C.; Cea, P.; Royo, F.M.; Urieta, J.S. [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)] [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements at 40.0 and 101.3 kPa are reported for 1-butanol + chlorocyclohexane, + chlorobenzene, + bromocyclohexane, + bromobenzene. Some of the studied systems show minimum temperature azeotropes. The experimental data were tested for thermodynamic consistency and satisfactorily correlated with the Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Predictions with the UNIFAC method and ASOG method were also obtained.

  16. 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim400 wileyonlinelibrary.com www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    , and light- to-electricity conversion in solar cells is one of the best-devel- oped renewable energy.MaterialsViews.com www.advenergymat.de PROGRESSREPORT Adv. Energy Mater. 2012, 2, 400409 DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201100630 A Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY, UK E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk S. Chen, X.-G. Gong Key Laboratory

  17. Treatment/Disposal Plan for Drummed Waste from the 300-FF-1Operable Unit, 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Lerch.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this plan is to support selection of a safe, environmentally responsible, and cost-effective treatment and disposal method for drums containing depleted uranium metal chips submergedin oil that have been and will be excavated from the 618-4 Burial Ground. Remediation of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, 618-4 BurialGround was initiated in fiscal year (FY) 1998 as an excavation andremoval operation. Routine processes were established to excavateand ship contaminated soil and debris to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal.

  18. The interaction second virial coefficient for the helium-carbon dioxide system between 230 and 300 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Michael Quealy

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    closed during the entire experiment. After purging the system with the test gas (either helium or carbon dioxide), it was filled to some pressure below the limit of the dead-weight gauge (720 psi). The feed valve was closed and the system was allowed...THE INTERACTION SECOND VIRIAL COEFFICIENT FOR THE HELIUM-CARBON DIOXIDE SYSTEM BETWEEN 230 AND 300 K A Thesis by MICHAEL MEALY WATSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  19. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2015) 200, 390401 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fracturing becoming a common practice for uncon- ventional gas and oil fields, there has been an increasedGeophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2015) 200, 390401 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu398 GJI

  20. Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV p + p and Central Au + Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Justin

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au + Au and p + p collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population ...

  1. Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1200 km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale (1200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

  2. On-Road Emissions in Asia Measured by Remote Sensing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    -92 10138934,400Auckland NZ, 2004 11 15 7 50 61 17 66 209 16 35,000 6,659 14,944 Sri Lanka, 2004 Petrol cars,891 8544 Hong Kong, 1993 Petrol 2003 *2202645,260Bangkok THA, 1993 Mean gNO/kg Mean gHC/kg Mean gCO/kgoffuel #12;2003-2005 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 HK Petrol Average USA Singapore Tokyo JPN New Delhi

  3. Mimbres faunal subsistence A.D. 200-1150, Mimbres Valley, Grant and Luna Counties, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Julia Lynn

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIMBRES FAUNAL SUSSISTENCE A. D ~ 200 - 1150, MIMBRES VALLEY, GRANT AND LUNA COUNTIES, NEW MEXICO A Thesis JULIA LYNN SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Committee) Douglas Slack (Member) Har . Sha, er (Me er) Vaughn M. Bry n, (Head of Department) May 1992 Mimbres Faunal Subsistence A. D. 200-1150, Mimbres Valley, Grant and Luna Counties, New Mexico. (May 1992) Julia Lynn Sanchez, B. S. , Texas ASM...

  4. A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

  5. Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

  6. Heavy Quark production at HERA and Heavy Quark contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlef Bartsch, University of Bonn on behalf of the ZEUS and H1 Collaborations · Introduction · Heavy 1500 0 100 200 300 400 electrons positrons low E HERA-1 HERA-2 Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production at HERA, Feb. 23rd 2008 3 #12;pQCD approximations Massive scheme

  7. Using Brain Weight to Predict Gestation in Mammals Bivariate Fit of Gestation By Brain Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    1 Using Brain Weight to Predict Gestation in Mammals Bivariate Fit of Gestation By Brain Weight 0 100 200 300 400 500 Gestation 0 500 1000 1500 BrainWgt Linear Fit (All 50 mammals) Predicted Gestation = 85.248543 + 0.299867 Brain Weight Summary of Fit RSquare 0.372483 RSquare Adj 0.35941 Root Mean

  8. DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL ICP PLASMA TOOL FOR HIGH SPEED AND HIGH ACCURACY DRIE PROCESSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    the ion density profile across the plasma chamber in a research DRIE tool. The plasma conditions are: Ar ion density. Process chamber centre EdgeEdge 0 100 200 300 400 Sheetthickness(m) Process chamber argon ion density measured in a conventional ICP. 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Process chamber centre Edge

  9. TATE OF CALIFORNI NERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prices. Figure 3 PG&E Natural Gas Price Forecast Electric Generation Sector 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5 Gray Davis, Governor DECEMBER 2000 P700-00-018 ENERGY FACILITY LICENSING PROCESS Natural Gas Supply NATURAL GAS SUPPLY INFORMATION Introduction This paper was prepared in response to AB 970 in an effort

  10. CENTER FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS RESEARCHCENTER FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS RESEARCHCENTER FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS RESEARCHCENTER FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH Air Travel at the Edge of Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 ATL JFK PHL MSP ORD MIA EWR DTW DFW IAD CLT FLL LGA MEM BOS MCO DFW EWR PHL MSP DTW DEN BOS JFK LGA IAH IAD CLT MCO DCA PHX MIA LAX LAS BWI SEA FLL CVG CLE MDW SFO

  11. 16-11-051ETSAP Modelling Issues in Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption in 2001 and 1980 · Household consumption decreasing · Service consumption nearly constant · Manufacturing consumption depending on economic activity · Transport energy steadily increasing · Less direct energy use and more electricity and district heating0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 80 '82 '84 '86

  12. Crown Copyright 2014 Spatial biophysical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic factors Socio-economic & policy drivers Opportunity costs Forest policy 10 0 100 200 300 400 500 to forestry. model incentives to evaluate where and when expanding woodland landscapes will provide benefits, land capability for agriculture, less favoured area status etc. In addition, socio- economic models

  13. How much do I pay? Our state gas tax is 20 per gallon. The average driver pays $9.52 a month in state fuel taxes. Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in state fuel taxes. Of this, a nickel goes to public education. The monthly net to the highway fund is $7 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 $350 $400 $450 $500 California Florida Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas the 2030 Committee Report. Utilities $265 (includes gas, electricity, wastewater and garbage collection

  14. M. Beck, B. Delaur, V.V. Golovko, S. Kopecky, V.Yu. Kozlov, I.S. Kraev, A. Lindroth, T. Phalet, N. Severijns, F. Ames, D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, Giovanni

    collaborations Recent progress at the WITCH experiment #12;Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles #12' ions Cooler Trap Decay trap 100ms cooling 39K200ms cooling 39K300ms cooling 39K O(103) ions 400ms cooling 39K500ms cooling 39K600ms cooling 39K · 39K+ ions from REXTRAP surface ion source (offline

  15. 4,398 words Src family tyrosine kinases-driven colon cancer cell invasion is induced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . (a), ASN2324598 inhibits Csk activity in vitro (upper panel) and in MCF7 cells (lower panel). (b), ASN2324598 potentiates growth in soft-agar (left) and invasion (right) of MCF7 cells. (c), Csk 160 Colo205 cellinvasion MCF7 a b MCF7 0 100 200 300 400 500 Colo205 #colonies 5 10 - 5- 10

  16. Adaptive Sequential Bayesian Change Point Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 September 11 Lehman collapseAsia crisis, Dot-com bubble US presidential election Northern Rock bank runDot-com bubble burst Major rate cut Figure 2: The BOCPD run length with significant events: the climax of the Internet bubble, the burst of the Internet bubble, and the 2004

  17. MATERIAL R&D FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM PROGRESS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , 2005 #12;GOAL SEARCH for and evaluate under irradiation environment NEW materials or composites) Load(N) non treated Invar Temp (300 C) Temp (500 C) #12;PHASE II -TARGET MATERIAL R&D · Carbon-Carbon and property measurements) #12;Carbon-Carbon Composite Target Temp. % elongation 23 o C 0% 200 o C -0.023% 400o

  18. Grassland afforestation in Southern South America: Carbon sequestration potential & soil/water costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    on field measurements on existing plantations in the Pampas and Patagonia. Four situations were used for regional scaling-up: Patagonia "dry": Patagonia "wet": >500 mm/yr ­ Pines (data from & Jackson 2003) Argentina Brazil Chile Uruguay patagonia pampas campos afforestation foci 0 100 200 300 400

  19. 2014 Corrosion Symposium The Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    2014 Corrosion Symposium The Impact of Oxidizers on Corrosion Chris K. Davis Solenis #12;After this Discussion Identify Oxidizers Measure Oxidizers DPD ORP Understand methods for controlling corrosion #12 peroxide #12;Impact of Peroxide Level on Corrosion #12;ORP 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 0 0.1 0.2 0

  20. LS-115

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    " ;: 70." 60.0 150.0 f 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 j 0.0 -10.0 0 5 10 US 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 isis DISTANC FROM BUNH HEAD (01) .. .. .. z w .. o 0. W :. A-6 REAL LONGI Z (FOR A BUNCH)...

  1. Energy/Water Sustainability and the Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    demand for clean, fresh water Increased concern for environmental protection and enhancement Unknown impacts of climate variability and change All regions of US vulnerable to water shortages #12;5 2009 are using wet cooling tower) Water Use by Plant Type 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Nuclear Coal Oil

  2. D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D a vi s P e a k R d D e e C r e e k D e e C r e e k 1210 1211 1212 1213 1214 0 100 200 300 400 Feet K Created: 2272013 based on Nov. 2010 design J a c k r a b b i t R d D...

  3. We have used our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) as a basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract We have used our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) as a basis.5 -0.25 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 DiffIRT Easy Medium Hard 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 time multi-level homework problems, where students choose to work easy (+1), medium (+2), or hard (+3

  4. Bachelor of Applied Science, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Writing and Research 3 CID BAS 300 Communication in the Applied Sciences 3 UF 100 Intellectual FoundationsBachelor of Applied Science, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency: Total 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 FF BAS 400 Capstone in Applied Sciences 3 DLM Mathematics 3

  5. Bachelor of Applied Science, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Writing and Research 3 CID BAS 300 Communication in the Applied Sciences 3 UF 100 Intellectual FoundationsBachelor of Applied Science, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency: Total 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 FF BAS 400 Capstone in Applied Sciences 3 DLM Mathematics 3

  6. Bachelor of Applied Science, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Writing and Research 3 CID BAS 300 Communication in the Applied Sciences 3 UF 100 Intellectual FoundationsBachelor of Applied Science, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency: Total 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 FF BAS 400 Capstone in Applied Sciences 3 DLM Mathematics 3

  7. Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won't Last Real Price Projections, Selected Commodities 2007-2017 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 and Environment Institute (GDAE), Tufts University Project of Working Groups on Development and Environment, Tufts University Three-year Collaborative Project Rationale: assess the promise of agro

  8. Detecting exotic heavy leptons at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B C; Harris, Chris M; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P; Webber, Bryan R

    the cuts actually slightly increases with mass due to the longer time delays. 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 1000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Cr os s se ct io n (fb ) Mass of heavy lepton (GeV) Before applying cuts After applying cuts Figure 5: Cross...

  9. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.992 0.994 0.996 0.998 1 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Baseline: 1.2 M LiPF 6 in ECEMC (30:70) Baseline + 5 mM PFBP Baseline + 10 mM AFAC Cycle Number ANL LMNOGR Full Cells...

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been to significantly improve the efficiency of televisions. The average electricity use of new Cost- Effective Potential from Televisions 386400 450 150 200 250 300 350 400 avings (Average MW improvements in television efficiency as a major source of cost-effective regional conservation potential. Over

  11. Desarrollo del mercado elctrico y rol de los consumidores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    : International Energy Agency BP Energy Outlook 2030 CDECs, CNE, Systep #12;3 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 0 5Energypercapita(GJ) US Australia Russia Brazil China S. Korea Mexico Ireland Greece France UK Japan Malaysia India Bioenergy Solar PV CSP Geothermal Ocean Numberofcountries(>100MW) IEA MRMR 2012 Creciente ingreso de otras

  12. MC & Tuning at CMS December 16, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Richard

    Rick Field ­ Florida/CDF/CMS Page 5 JIMMY at CDFJIMMY at CDF The Energy in the "Underlying Event "Leading Jet" JIMMY Default JM325 "Transverse" ETsum Density: dET/dd 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 0 100 200 300 400 Tune A MidPoint R = 0.7 |(jet)| JIMMY

  13. The Clean Tech Revolution: Why It's Real

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    2014 2015 Total Market Value ($ billions) #12;4/1/2011 4 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 $0.0 $5.0 $10 Clean tech is a global phenomenon Even the... #12;4/1/2011 6 What areas are hot? in home energy Gov't Standards Smart Grid & Utility Enhancements Green Building Materials Energy Storage: Cars

  14. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Hydrates Shale Oil Tar Sands ? ** #12;Caption if needed #12;"Free Will" Alternative 1. Phase Out Coal CO2 Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100 300 0 500 *Oil & gas from EIA ** Unconventional oil & gas; uncertain, could be large Other Methane

  15. A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  16. Exploring Jet Properties in p-p Collisions at 200 GeV with STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen Caines

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms underlying hadronization are not well understood, both in vacuum and in hot QCD matter. Precise characterization of jet fragmentation to hadrons in p-p collisions will help elucidate the fundamental process of hadronization, and will serve as essential reference to measure the modification of hadronization in heavy ion collisions. We present measurements of fragmentation functions for unidentified particles in jets produced in p-p collisions at 200 GeV using the STAR detector at RHIC. The results from different jet reconstruction algorithms are compared, including variations of the resolution parameter. It is found that the results are largely insensitive to details of the jet-finding algorithm at RHIC energies. Particle production inside and outside of these reconstructed jets will be compared to improve our understanding of the hadronization mechanisms for soft and hard particles in p-p events at RHIC energies.

  17. Fission Fragments Produced from Proton Irradiation of Thorium Between 40 and 200 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engle, Jonathan W; Weidner, John W; Fassbender, Michael E; Bach, Hong T; Ullmann, John L; Couture, Aaron J; Bitteker, Leo J; Gulley, Mark S; John, Kevin D; Birnbaum, Eva R; Nortier, Francois M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the formation of five residual radionuclides (72Se, 97Zr, 112Pd, 125Sb, and 147Nb) from 40- to 200-MeV proton irradiation of thorium have been measured and are reported. The atomic masses of these fragments span the expected mass distribution of radionuclides formed by fission of the target nucleus. Especially in mass regions corresponding to transitions between different relaxation mechanisms employed by available models, these data are expected to be useful to the improvement of high-energy transport codes. The predictions of the event generators incorporated into the latest release of the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP6) are compared with data measured in this work in the hope that these results may be useful to the continued process of code verification and validation in MCNP6.

  18. Fission Fragments Produced from Proton Irradiation of Thorium Between 40 and 200 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan W. Engle; Stepan G. Mashnik; John W. Weidner; Michael E. Fassbender; Hong T. Bach; John L. Ullmann; Aaron J. Couture; Leo J. Bitteker; Mark S. Gulley; Kevin D. John; Eva R. Birnbaum; Francois M. Nortier

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the formation of five residual radionuclides (72Se, 97Zr, 112Pd, 125Sb, and 147Nb) from 40- to 200-MeV proton irradiation of thorium have been measured and are reported. The atomic masses of these fragments span the expected mass distribution of radionuclides formed by fission of the target nucleus. Especially in mass regions corresponding to transitions between different relaxation mechanisms employed by available models, these data are expected to be useful to the improvement of high-energy transport codes. The predictions of the event generators incorporated into the latest release of the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP6) are compared with data measured in this work in the hope that these results may be useful to the continued process of code verification and validation in MCNP6.

  19. Manganese-Based Magnets: Manganese-Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: PNNL is working to reduce the cost of wind turbines and EVs by developing a manganese-based nano-composite magnet that could serve as an inexpensive alternative to rare-earth-based magnets. The manganese composite, made from low-cost and abundant materials, could exceed the performance of todays most powerful commercial magnets at temperature higher than 200C. Members of PNNLs research team will leverage comprehensive computer high-performance supercomputer modeling and materials testing to meet this objective. Manganese-based magnets could withstand higher temperatures than their rare earth predecessors and potentially reduce the need for any expensive, bulky engine cooling systems for the motor and generator. This would further contribute to cost savings for both EVs and wind turbines.

  20. Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Northwest Quandrant of the Hanford 200 East Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Pickett, W.W.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Northeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East area. This report summaries historical information such at waste history, temperature, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance, along with the components of the data management effort, such as waste status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layering Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates to generate these tank content estimates are also given in this report.

  1. Void swelling resistance in Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a serious of binary Fe-cr alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 425 C in a fast breeder reactor. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  2. Predictions for {radical} (s) =200A; GeV Au+Au collisions from relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlei, B.R. [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D. [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic hydrodynamical model HYLANDER-C is used to give estimates for single inclusive particle momentum spectra in {radical} (s) =200 GeV/nucleon Au+Au collisions that will be investigated experimentally in the near future. The predictions are based on initial conditions that the initial fireball has a longitudinal extension of 1.6 fm and an initial energy density of 30.8 GeV/fm{sup 3} as obtained from a cascade model. For the collision energy considered here, different stopping scenarios are explored for the first time. Our calculations give particle yields of the order of 10thinsp000 to 20thinsp000 charged particles per event. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Upsilon cross section in p+p collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; M. Kopytine; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; J. M. Rehberg; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; E. Wingfield; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a measurement of the Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) -> e+e- cross section at midrapidity in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV. We find the cross section to be 114 +/- 38 (stat.) +23,-24 (syst.) pb. Perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order in the Color Evaporation Model are in agreement with our measurement, while calculations in the Color Singlet Model underestimate it by 2 sigma. Our result is consistent with the trend seen in world data as a function of the center-of-mass energy of the collision and extends the availability of Upsilon data to RHIC energies. The dielectron continuum in the invariant mass range near the Upsilon is also studied to obtain a combined cross section of Drell-Yan plus (b b-bar) -> e+e-.

  4. SEASONAL VARIABILITY AND BILEVEL DISTRIBUTION OF RADON AND RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS IN 200 NEW JBRSEY HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith B- Miller; Robert A. Hchaverv M-s; Camp Dresser; Udee Inc

    To provide data necessaw to perform a health risk assessment of the radon problem in New Jersey, concurrent radon and radon progeny measurements were made in 200 homes on two lowest floors in two different seasons. The homes were divided into categories based on their substructure, heat distribution system, and the degree of air flow between the basement and first floor levels. Specific conversion factors (equilibrium coefficients, inter-floor radon ratios, inter-season radon ratios) were determined for each house type. Basement equilibrium coefficients were generally lower in the winter than in the non-winter season. First floor equilibrium coefficients were higher than basement values. First floor to'basement radon ratios were higher for forced air houses than for houses with hot water or electric heat distribution systems and the ratios for both types of houses were higher in the winter than in the non-heating season. The winter to non-winter ratio for first floors is

  5. An analysis of the thermal structure within the Gulf Stream's shoreward boundary and inshore waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulter, Robert Earl

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 7 9 if 15 300 I %01 0 IO O'OT4 ~ . I I I 7400 42434=' I. POIEO FiET. H. ' eI, . peratIsre soot-. o;I lil, the looation of the i) C isotherm at the re f7;2-eno g'. nt depth of 400 39'51' ~ 25' 5 59 36'09 I Tl 95 100 ' 200 600? l7 300...

  6. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  7. The radiological impact of the 2000 Hanford Fire (24-Command Fire)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Ashley David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irradiation of uranium fuel for production of plutonium, 200 ? chemical separation of irradiated fuel, 300 ? new uranium fuel assembly, 400 ? Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), 600 ? any buildings not serving one specific area. DOE identifies and numbers a few... separation facilities for all irradiated fuel, as well as the storage, packaging, and transportation processes associated with the fuel and the resulting plutonium and fission products. The surface of the central plateau upon which the 200 areas sit is 73...

  8. DUSTY EXPLOSIONS FROM DUSTY PROGENITORS: THE PHYSICS OF SN 2008S AND THE 2008 NGC 300-OT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SN 2008S and the 2008 NGC 300-OT were explosive transients of stars self-obscured by very dense, dusty stellar winds. An explosive transient with an unobserved shock breakout luminosity of order 10{sup 10} L{sub sun} is required to render the transients little obscured and visible in the optical at their peaks. Such a large breakout luminosity then implies that the progenitor stars were cool, red supergiants, most probably {approx}9 M{sub sun} extreme asymptotic giant branch stars. As the shocks generated by the explosions propagate outward through the dense wind, they produce a shock luminosity in soft X-rays that powers the long-lived luminosity of the transients. Unlike typical cases of transients exploding into a surrounding circumstellar medium, the progenitor winds in these systems are optically thick to soft X-rays, easily absorb radio emission, and rapidly reform dust destroyed by the peak luminosity of the transients. As a result, X-rays are absorbed by the gas and the energy is ultimately radiated by the reformed dust. Three years post-peak, both systems are still significantly more luminous than their progenitor stars, but they are again fully shrouded by the reformed dust and only visible in the mid-IR. The high luminosity and heavy obscuration may make it difficult to determine the survival of the progenitor stars for {approx}10 years. However, our model indicates that SN 2008S, but not the NGC 300-OT, should now be a detectable X-ray source. SN 2008S has a higher estimated shock velocity and a lower density wind, so the X-rays begin to escape at a much earlier phase.

  9. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. V. RADIAL STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF NGC 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Roskar, Rok; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Quinn, Thomas R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cole, Andrew [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Debattista, Victor P. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); De Jong, Roelof S. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Karachentsev, Igor D., E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed [Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhnij Arkhyz, KChR (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of NGC 300 taken as part of the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). Individual stars are resolved in these images down to an absolute magnitude of M{sub F814W} = 1.0 (below the red clump). We determine the star formation history of the galaxy in six radial bins by comparing our observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with synthetic CMDs based on theoretical isochrones. We find that the stellar disk out to 5.4 kpc is primarily old, in contrast with the outwardly similar galaxy M33. We determine the scale length as a function of age and find evidence for inside-out growth of the stellar disk: the scale length has increased from 1.1 +- 0.1 kpc 10 Gyr ago to 1.3 +- 0.1 kpc at present, indicating a buildup in the fraction of young stars at larger radii. As the scale length of M33 has recently been shown to have increased much more dramatically with time, our results demonstrate that two galaxies with similar sizes and morphologies can have very different histories. With an N-body simulation of a galaxy designed to be similar to NGC 300, we determine that the effects of radial migration should be minimal. We trace the metallicity gradient as a function of time and find a present-day metallicity gradient consistent with that seen in previous studies. Consistent results are obtained from archival images covering the same radial extent but differing in placement and filter combination.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  11. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  12. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  13. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  14. Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800C? and pressures to 200 MPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Theodor William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the direction of o&. In dry experiments, between 600' and 800'C, both GBC and IGC densities increase with increasing temperature. The increase in crack abundance is responsible for the thermal weakening of the rock . With increasing temperature, GBC play a... from boundary loads. Sprunt and Brace (1974) observed extensive cracking in granites when cycled to 400'C, particularly a'long grain boundaries. In unconfined Westerly granite subjected to slow, uniform temperature change, significant microcracking...

  15. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  16. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

  17. A Review of Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at the 200-PW-1/3/6 Operable Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report begins with a brief summary of the history and current status of 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs in section 2.0. This is followed by a description of our concentual model of Pu/Am migration at the 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs, during both past artificial recharge conditions and current natural recharge condictions (section 3.0). Section 4.0 discusses data gaps and information needs. The final section (section 5.0) provides recommendations for futher work to address the data gaps and information needs identified in section 4.0.

  18. Hydrogen-Atom Excitation and Ionization by Proton Impact in 50-Kev to 200-Kev Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitchard, E.; Ford, A. Lewis; Reading, John F.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PH YSICAL RE VIE% A VOLUME 16, N UMBER 8 SEPTEMBER 1977 Hydrogen-atom excitation and ionization by proton impact in the 50- to 200-keV energy region E. Fitchard, A. L. Ford, and J. F. Reading Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics, Texas A..., and include all terms in the Born series. For projectile energies between SO and 200 keV the results are in excellent agreement with rec'ent experiments. The excitation and ionization of a hydrogen atom by proton impact has been for many years, and still...

  19. Description of work for 200-UP-1 characterization of monitoring wells. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innis, B.E.; Kelty, G.G.

    1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This description of work details the field activities associated with the drilling, soil sampling, and construction of groundwater monitoring and dual-use wells as part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with DOE-RE and Environmental Investigations and Site Characterization Manual. Groundwater wells are being constructed to characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of the Uranium and {sup 99}Tc plumes and to define aquifer properties such as hydraulic communication between aquifers and hydrostratigraphy. Some of these wells may be utilized for extraction purposes during the Interim Remedial Measures (IRM) phase anticipated at this operable unit and are being designed with a dual use in mind. These data will be used to optimize the IRM for the cleanup of these two plumes. The data will also be used with later Limited Field Investigation data to perform a Qualitative Risk Assessment for the operable unit. The locations for the proposed groundwater wells are presented. The contaminants of concern for the project are presented also.

  20. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

  1. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier -- 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Link, Steven O.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring is an essential component of engineered barrier system design and operation. A composite capacitive cover, including a capillary break and an evapotranspiration (ET) barrier at the Hanford Site, is generating data that can be used to help resolve these issues. The prototype Hanford barrier was constructed over the 216-B-57 Crib in 1994 to evaluate surface-barrier constructability, construction costs, and physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. The barrier has been routinely monitored between November 1994 and September 1998 as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) treatability test of barrier performance for the 200 BP 1 Operable Unit. Since FY 1998, monitoring has focused on a more limited set of key water balance, stability, and biotic parameters. In FY 2009, data collection was focused on: (1) water-balance monitoring, consisting of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture storage, and drainage measurements with evapotranspiration calculated by difference; (2) stability monitoring, consisting of asphalt-layer-settlement, basalt-side-slope-stability, and surface-elevation measurements; (3) vegetation dynamics; and (4) animal use. September 2009 marked 15 years since the start of monitoring and the collection of performance data. This report describes the results of monitoring activities during the period October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, and summarizes the 15 years of performance data collected from September 1994 through September 2009.

  2. Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425{degrees}C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  3. Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 DPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3 to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both {sub 2}{sup a}<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  4. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S. [AL-AT, 2 rue de Clmencires, 38360 Sassenage (France); Baguer, G. M. Gistau [CRYOGUY, 44, chemin de la Buisse, 38330 Biviers (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  5. Technical basis document for the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  6. Conceptual study of the potential for automotive-derived and free-piston Stirling engines in 30- to 400-kilowatt stationary power applications. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsky, A.; Chen, H.S.; Dineen, J.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of applying automotive-derived kinematic and free-piston Stirling engine concepts for stationary applications was explored. Automotive-derived engines offer cost advantages by providing a mature and developed engine technology base with downrating and parts commonality options for specific applications. Two engine sizes (30 and 400 kW), two Stirling engine configurations (kinematic and free-piston), and two output systems (crankshaft and hydraulic pump) were studied. The study includes the influences of using either hydrogen or helium as the working gas. The first kinematic configuration selects an existing Stirling engine design from an automotive application and adapts it to stationary requirements. A 50,000-hour life requirement was established by downrating the engine to 40 kW and reducing auxiliary loads. Efficiency improvements were gained by selective material and geometric variations and peak brake efficiency of 36.8 percent using helium gas was achieved. The second design was a four-cylinder, 400 kW engine, utilizing a new output drive system known as the z-crank, which provides lower friction losses and variable stroke power control. Three different material and working gas combinations were considered. Brake efficiency levels varied from 40.5 percent to 45.6 percent. A 37.5 kW single-cycle, free-piston hydraulic output design was generated by scaling one cylinder of the original automotive engine and mating it to a counterbalanced reciprocal hydraulic pump. Metallic diaphragms were utilized to transmit power.

  7. Organic materials for second harmonic generation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twieg, R.J. (comp.)

    1985-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials were chosen by screening the Cambridge Crystallographic Index for new noncentrosymmetric crystalline compounds, by screening commercially available materials or by synthesis of unique new substances. Measurements were then made on the powder form of these materials. Langmuir-Blodgett films were deposited and studied. In addition to the above studies, a computer program was developed to calculate (hyper) polarizabilities of organic molecules and thus aid in the selection of materials for testing. The nonlinear molecules have been divided into three classes according to absorption cutoff: 400 to 500 nm, 300 to 400 nm, and 200 to 300 nm. 108 refs., 7 tabs. (WRF)

  8. Canoe* $16.00 $30.00 $44.00 Tent 4 person (Sierra Design, Kelty or ALPS) $6.00 $12.00 $19.00 Tandem kayak sit On top (Tribe 13.5)* $12.00 $20.00 $30.00 Tent 6 person (Sierra Design, Kelty or Eureka) $7.00 $14.00 $21.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    bag - 108L $5.00 $8.00 $13.00 Stove 2 burner (propane not included) $4.00 $8.00 $12.00 Dry storage bag and rack foams for transportation are also included on fees Cooler $2.00 $4.00 $6.00 Dry storage bag - Bill - XL (38L) & L (44L) $3.00 $5.00 $8.00 Stove 1 burner (propane not included) $3.00 $6.00 $9.00 Dry

  9. PDF Document (300k)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview P

  10. Hanford 300 Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and

  11. wgc300.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO FVehicle30,1996 N6,7weverett713

  12. ALSNews Vol. 300

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS2 Print846 Print7882990

  13. ALSNews Vol. 300

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS2 Print846

  14. ALSNews Vol. 300

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS2 Print8460 Print In This

  15. ALSNews Vol. 300

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS2 Print8460 Print In This0

  16. PDF Document (300k)

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversightandCenterBusinessSystem - notFig.

  17. 300 Area - Hanford Site

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th Meeting of the14Processes1 2300

  18. Systems Analysis Model Simul, 200?, Vol. 00, No. 0, pp. 114 MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF HYSTERESIS IN

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    PROOFS {GandB}Gsam/GSAM-31049.3d Systems Analysis Model Simul, (GSAM) Paper: GSAM-31049 Keyword ISSN 0232 of energy storage and dissipation in harmonic drives [10,11,1315]. The accurate modeling of a total-9298 print: ISSN 1029-4902 online 200? Taylor & Francis Ltd DOI: 10.1080/0232929032000115137 #12;some

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    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. X, NO. X, NOVEMBER 200X 1 Digital Topography Models for Martian Surfaces Tomasz Stepinski and Ricardo Vilalta Abstract-- We introduce a concept of the digital topography model, an extension to the familiar notion of the digital elevation model. The new

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    Vilalta, Ricardo

    IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. X, NO. X, NOVEMBER 200X 1 Digital Topography Models for Martian Surfaces Tomasz Stepinski and Ricardo Vilalta Abstract-- We propose to use and geologic mapping of the planet. We construct a digital topography model (DTM), a multi-layer grid