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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

3rd Rock Systems and Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Systems and Technologies Rock Systems and Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name 3rd Rock Systems and Technologies Place Burlingame, California Zip 94010 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Provides proven renewable energy technologies and consulting services to residential, commercial, and industrial clients. Coordinates 38.753055°, -95.834619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.753055,"lon":-95.834619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

3rd annual biomass energy systems conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objectives of the 3rd Annual Biomass Energy Systems Conference were (1) to review the latest research findings in the clean fuels from biomass field, (2) to summarize the present engineering and economic status of Biomass Energy Systems, (3) to encourage interaction and information exchange among people working or interested in the field, and (4) to identify and discuss existing problems relating to ongoing research and explore opportunities for future research. Abstracts for each paper presented were edited separately. (DC)

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on Social Network Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Third Workshop on Social Network Systems (SNS'10) will gather researchers to discuss novel ideas about computer systems and social networks. Online social networks are among the most popular sites on the Web and continue to grow rapidly. They provide ...

Eiko Yoneki; Elie Bursztein; Tao Stein

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Proceedings: 3rd EPRI Optical Sensor Systems Workshop  

SciTech Connect

These are the proceedings of the third Optical Sensor System Workshop, part of an ongoing effort by EPRI to support development of optical sensor technology, to identify benefits for utility users, and to position EPRI members as more ''informed buyers'' and users.

None

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Design Study of the Extraction System of the 3rd Generation ECR Ion Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design study for the extraction system of the 3rd Generation super conducting ECR ion source at LBNL is presented. The magnetic design of the ion source has a mirror field of 4 T at the injection and 3 T at the extraction side and a radial field of 2.4 T at the plasma chamber wall. Therefore, the ion beam formation takes place in a strong axial magnetic field. Furthermore the axial field drops from 3 T to 0.4 T within the first 30 cm. The influence of the high magnetic field on the ion beam extraction and matching to the beam line is investigated. The extraction system is first simulated with the 2D ion trajectory code IGUN with an estimated mean charge state of the extracted ion beam. These results are then compared with the 2D code AXCEL-INP, which can simulate the extraction of ions with different charge states. Finally, the influence of the strong magnetic hexapole field is studied with the three dimensional ion optics code KOBRA. The introduced tool set can be used to optimize the extraction system of the super conducting ECR ion source.

Leitner, M.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Wutte, D.; Xie, Z.Q.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009 for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009 Outline · Background work #12;3/193rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009

Engelmann, Christian

7

Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Mobile systems, applications, and services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to MobiSys 2005: The Third International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services. We are honored to serve as the Program Co-Chairs of this premier event for publishing research about mobile and wireless systems. We thank everybody ...

David Kotz; Brian Noble; Kang G. Shin

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Technical Issues Map for the NHI System Interface and Support Systems Area: 3rd Quarter FY 07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a mapping of technical issues associated with development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) intermediate heat transport loop and nuclear hydrogen plant support systems to the work that has been accomplished or is currently underway. The technical issues are ranked according to priority and by assumed resolution dates. Due to funding limitations, not all high-priority technical issues are under study at the present time, and more resources will need to be dedicated to tackling such issues in the future. This technical issues map is useful for understanding the relative importance of various technical challenges and will be used as a planning tool by the NHI technical leadership for future work package planning. The technical map in its present form will be discontinued in FY08 and will be folded into a larger NHI System Interface and Support Systems project management plan and scope baseline statement in FY08.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Louisiana's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Louisiana's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Louisiana. Registered Energy Companies in Louisiana's 3rd congressional district Wind Energy Systems Technologies LLC WEST Energy Generation Facilities in Louisiana's 3rd congressional district Jeanerette Biomass Facility Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Louisiana%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=192539" Categories: Places Stubs Congressional Districts What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

10

Missouri's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Missouri. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Missouri's 3rd congressional district The Boeing Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project Registered Energy Companies in Missouri's 3rd congressional district A2Wind Limited Affinity Wind LLC Akermin Inc Armstrong Teasdale Future Energy Group Clean Power Design CleanTech Biofuels International Fuel Technology Inc Secure Energy Inc Solar Night Industries Inc Solutia Supercritical Recovery Systems LLC Wind Capital Group Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Missouri%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=194599

11

Utah's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Utah. Registered Energy Companies in Utah's 3rd congressional district Better Biodiesel Composite Tower Solutions Domestic Energy Partners Evergreen Clean Energy FT Solutions LLC Intermountain Renewable Power International Automated Systems Inc IAUS Powerball Technologies Raser Technologies Inc Tasco Engineering Inc Trulite Inc Windward Engineering Energy Generation Facilities in Utah's 3rd congressional district Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utah%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=205296

12

Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Application and Theory of Automation in Command and Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technological and operational developments in Air Traffic Management (ATM) are more based on industrial and national interests than on a consensus approaches. This contributes to the lack of cohesion and interoperability of the ATM system and tends to ...

Antonio Moccia, Alberto Pasquini, Eduardo Garcia

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Designing for, with or within: 1st, 2nd and 3rd person points of view on designing for systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As society is constantly changing and crises emerge, opportunities to develop society arise. A series of technology developments are coming from the research field. But research needs to be brought into practice. Designers can go from a vision to the ... Keywords: 1st person perspectives, design within society, points of views on systems, social transformation

O. Tomico; V. O. Winthagen; M. M. G. van Heist

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district Massachusetts Technology Collaborative - Renewable Energy Trust Registered Energy Companies in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district American Superconductor Corporation AMSC Aspen Aerogels Aspen Aerogels Inc Atmosclear Climate Club BiOctane Biomass Combustion Systems Inc Boston Power CTP Hydrogen CellTech Power Inc Conservation Services Group Evergreen Solar, Inc. Guardian Energy Management Solutions Hy9 Hy9 Corporation Mass Megawatts Wind Power Inc Massachusetts Electric Company Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust MRET Noresco LLC Northern Energy Services Inc Protonex Technology Corporation ThermoEnergy Corporation Trenergi Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Massachusetts%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=193518

15

Connecticut's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut. Registered Energy Companies in Connecticut's 3rd congressional district Avalence LLC Lite Trough LLC Nxegen Opel International Inc Poulsen Hybrid, LLC Sunlight Solar...

16

Oregon's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon. Oregon. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Oregon's 3rd congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in Oregon's 3rd congressional district 3 Registered Policy Organizations in Oregon's 3rd congressional district 4 Registered Energy Companies in Oregon's 3rd congressional district 5 Registered Financial Organizations in Oregon's 3rd congressional district 6 Utility Companies in Oregon's 3rd congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Oregon's 3rd congressional district Pacific Northwest Generating Cooperative Smart Grid Project Registered Research Institutions in Oregon's 3rd congressional district Clean Edge Inc Registered Policy Organizations in Oregon's 3rd congressional district Bonneville Environmental Foundation

17

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR, LLC, a subsidiary of Ur- Energy USA Inc. Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Under Construction Under Construction

18

Software Engineering, 3rd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Book:Preface: Software systems are now ubiquitous. Virtually all electrical equipment now includes some kind of software; software is used to help run manufacturing industry, schools and universities, health care, finance and ...

Ian Sommerville

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3rd Thermoelectrics 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Key Publications Plans & Roadmaps Partnership Documents Annual Progress Reports Success Stories

20

Colorado's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district 3rd congressional district 2 Registered Networking Organizations in Colorado's 3rd congressional district 3 Registered Policy Organizations in Colorado's 3rd congressional district 4 Registered Energy Companies in Colorado's 3rd congressional district 5 Energy Incentives for Colorado's 3rd congressional district 6 Utility Companies in Colorado's 3rd congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Colorado's 3rd congressional district Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project Registered Networking Organizations in Colorado's 3rd congressional district Haiti Repowered Peak Oil Awareness Network Peak Oil Food Network Registered Policy Organizations in Colorado's 3rd congressional district Sustainability Center of the Rockies Registered Energy Companies in Colorado's 3rd congressional district

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Florida's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Florida. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Florida's 3rd congressional district 2 Registered Networking Organizations in Florida's 3rd congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Florida's 3rd congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in Florida's 3rd congressional district 5 Utility Companies in Florida's 3rd congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Florida's 3rd congressional district Intellon Corporation Smart Grid Project JEA Smart Grid Project Registered Networking Organizations in Florida's 3rd congressional district

22

Tennessee's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Tennessee. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district 4 Utility Companies in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district Electric Power Board of Chattanooga Smart Grid Project Registered Research Institutions in Tennessee's 3rd congressional district Energy Technology Data Exchange Oak Ridge National Laboratory

23

2003 TMS Annual Meeting: 3rd International Symposium on Gamma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2003 ... 2003 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: 3rd International Symposium on Gamma Titanium Aluminides (ISGTA-3) Banquet...

24

EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY09, 3rd Quarter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the science and publications that occurred at EMSL during the 3rd quarter of FY09.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status" 4. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of" ,,,,2012,"1st Quarter 2013","2nd Quarter 2013","3rd Quarter 2013" "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

26

Accelerated life test of the USDOE OC-OTEC experimental system refurbished with magnetic bearings for the 3rd stage vacuum compressor. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the accelerated life test (time-to-failure) performed, at the request of DOE, to evaluate the viability of the magnetic bearing system installed in the stage 3 vacuum pump. To this effect the plant was successfully operated for over 500 hours during the period September-November 1996. The first part of this report discusses system performance by deriving subsystem and system performance parameters from a typical record. This is followed by the discussion of the life tests. The instrumentation used to estimate the performance parameters given here is depicted. The third stage pump was operated for 535 hours without incident. It is concluded that magnetic bearings are the preferable choice for the OC-OTEC centrifugal vacuum pumps.

Vega, L.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

New Mexico's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico. New Mexico. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district Ktech Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Public Service Company of New Mexico Smart Grid Demonstration Project Registered Research Institutions in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district Howe Group LLC Sandia National Laboratories Registered Energy Companies in New Mexico's 3rd congressional district Advent Solar Inc Affordable Solar Group Array Technologies, Inc.

28

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report Subject: U.S ... drilling, employment, exploration, in situ leach, inventory, mill, mine, nuclear, ...

29

Michigan's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan. Registered Energy Companies in Michigan's 3rd congressional district Benteler Industries Mackinaw Power LLC Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMichiga...

30

Nebraska's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska. Registered Energy Companies in Nebraska's 3rd congressional district Chief Ethanol Fuels Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Husker Ag LLC Kaapa Ethanol LLC Mid America Agri...

31

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3rd Quarter 2011 January 2012 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

32

Alabama's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Companies in Alabama's 3rd congressional district Auburn University Electric Fuel Battery Corporation Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAlabama%27s3rdco...

33

Arkansas's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Arkansas's 3rd congressional district Appro-Tec Renewable Energy Highline Hydrogen Hybrids Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleArkansas%27s3rdcongr...

34

Maryland's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

district Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Maryland's 3rd congressional district Alten Industries Inc Constellation Energy...

35

Georgia's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia. Registered Energy Companies in Georgia's 3rd congressional district Pine Mountain Builders Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgia%27s3rdcongressi...

36

Minnesota's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota. Registered Energy Companies in Minnesota's 3rd congressional district Cardinal Glass Industries Ecologic Analytics Geothermal Bore Technologies Inc Geronimo Wind Energy...

37

Virginia's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia. Registered Energy Companies in Virginia's 3rd congressional district EarthCraft Virginia Enviva Materials LLC Ingenco Intrinergy Mead Westaco Retrieved from "http:...

38

Kansas's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Companies in Kansas's 3rd congressional district Clean Energy Technologies E3 BioFuels Energy Savings Store Generation Resources Holding Co Integrated Energy Solutions LLC...

39

Texas's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rd congressional district rd congressional district Oncor Electric Delivery Company, LLC Smart Grid Demonstration Project Registered Energy Companies in Texas's 3rd congressional district 10Charge Inc 1Soltech Inc 21 Century Solar Inc 21-Century Silicon, Inc. AEP Wind Energy LLC ASAlliances Biofuels Defunct AT T Inc American Renewable Fuels Applied Optical Systems Biodiesel Investment Group Biomass Energy Resources BroadStar Wind Systems Catalyst Renewables Climate Leaders Joint Venture Consolidated Biofuels Inc Continental Biofuels Corporation Digital Gas Inc Distribution Drive ES Alternatives Englehard/ICC Evolution Energy formerly Earth Biofuels Inc FAS Technologies LLC G3 Energy LLC Havoco Wind Energy LLC Hudson Ranch Power I LLC InfiniRel Corporation Lighting Science Group Meridian Biorefining Corporation

40

Ohio's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Ohio. Registered Research Institutions in Ohio's 3rd congressional district University of Dayton Research Institute Registered Energy Companies in Ohio's 3rd congressional district Edison Material Technology Center EMTEC JatroDiesel Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp Precision Energy Technology Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ohio%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=196999" Categories: Places Stubs Congressional Districts What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2010 3rd Quarter 2010 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 Inside this Update: Public Access Established for the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum in Rincόn, Puerto Rico; Draft LM Strategic Plan Available for Review; Legacy Management Business Center Awarded Second Energy-Efficiency Award; LM Assumes Responsibility for Yucca Mountain Records and Information; Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico; Rio Blanco and Rulison, Colorado; Nuclear Gas Sites; Students from Native American Environmental Youth Camp Tour Tuba City, Arizona, Site; 2010 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Conference, and more. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, July-September 2010 More Documents & Publications Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012

42

Coal mine ground control. 3rd ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The third edition not only completely revises and updates the original subject areas, but also is broadened to include a number of new topics such as high horizontal stresses, computer modeling, and highwall stability. The subject areas covered in this book define the current field of coal mine ground control, except for the recently emerging topic of mine seals and some conventional subjects such as coal/rock cutting and impoundment dams. It contains 1,134 references from all published sources, and archived since 1876.

Peng, S.S.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Illinois' 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Illinois. Registered Networking Organizations in Illinois' 3rd congressional district Chicago Clean Energy Alliance Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 3rd congressional district Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co Brad Foote Gear Works CNT Energy Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Carbon Opportunity Group Carbon Solutions Group Centre for Neighbourhood Technology Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Chromatin Inc

44

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000

45

Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Education  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Education Showcase Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Education Showcase January 28, 2013 9:45AM EST to January 29, 2013 5:00PM EST Knoxville Convention Center The Tennessee Veterans Business Association is hosting their 3rd Annual Business and Education Showcase. It will be held Jan. 28 and 29 at the Knoxville Convention Center. The theme is "Celebration of Diversity within the East Tennessee Business Community." This one-of-a-kind, high-energy event that connects government and non-government entities under one roof. This event is both a trade show and hiring expo. There will be informative breakout sessions. The keynote speaker on Jan. 28 is Jim Haslam, founder of Pilot Corporation and an

46

Nevada's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3rd congressional district: Energy Resources 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nevada's 3rd congressional district NV Energy, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 3rd congressional district Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Innovative Energy Solutions Inc K2 Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc Merlin Contracting Power Efficiency Corporation PEFF Powered by Renewables formerly Nevada Wind Renewable Capital Renewable Energy Resources Inc Renewable Powertech Inc Sol-Up USA, LLC Summit Energy Ventures LLC

47

SOP Quarterly Report FY-94 3rd Quarter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Vehicle Program Site Operator Program Quarterly Progress Report for April thru June 1994 (3rd Quarter of FY-1994) INEL-940072-Qtr 3 Formerly: EGG-EP-11237-Qtr 3 D. M. Kiser...

48

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

49

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 Inside this Update: Public Access Established for the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum in Rincόn, Puerto Rico; Draft LM Strategic Plan Available for Review; Legacy Management Business Center Awarded Second Energy-Efficiency Award; LM Assumes Responsibility for Yucca Mountain Records and Information; Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico; Rio Blanco and Rulison, Colorado; Nuclear Gas Sites; Students from Native American Environmental Youth Camp Tour Tuba City, Arizona, Site; 2010 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Conference, and more. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, July-September 2010 More Documents & Publications Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013

50

Proceedings: 3rd EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held its 3rd International Decommissioning Workshop in collaboration with EDF in Lyon, France. This workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects with the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Table 1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 3rd Quarter 2013 pounds U 3 O 8 Calendar-Year Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Calendar-Year Total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683 983,330 981,948 973,585 3,975,545 2001 709,177 748,298 628,720 553,060 2,639,256 2002 620,952 643,432 579,723 E500,000 E2,344,107 2003 E400,000 E600,000 E400,000 E600,000

52

Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. October 2013

53

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: LM Co-Hosts International Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites; LM Communication and Stakeholder Satisfaction Independent Survey; LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood; LM's First Year with the Title X Uranium/Thorium Reimbursement Program; DOE and Colorado Mesa University Education Agreement Expands LM's Site Reuse Portfolio; Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

54

Microsoft Word - S07307_3rd_qtr_2010  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2010 January 2011 LMS/RFS/S07307 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S07307 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2010 January 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-3rd Quarter CY 2010 January 2011 Doc. No. S07307 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1

55

Microsoft Word - S08538_3rd Qtr 2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 January 2012 LMS/RFS/S08538 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S08538 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2011 January 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-3rd Quarter CY 2011 January 2012 Doc. No. S08538 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iv 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1

56

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Mills - conventional milling 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operations 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants 3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 3 Not including in-situ-leach plants that only produced uranium concentrate from restoration. 4 Uranium concentrate as a byproduct from phosphate production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report." End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 1 Milling uranium-bearing ore. 2 Not milling ore, but producing uranium concentrate from other (non-ore) materials.

57

Resonance-like nuclear processes in solids: 3rd and 4th order processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is recognized that in the family of heavy charged particle and electron assisted double nuclear processes resonance-like behavior can appear. The transition rates of the heavy particle assisted 3rd-order and electron assisted 4th-order resonance like double nuclear processes are determined. The power of low energy nuclear reactions in $Ni-H$ systems formed in $Ni$ placed in $H_{2}$ gas environment is treated. Nuclear power produced by quasi-resonant electron assisted double nuclear processes in these $Ni-H$ systems is calculated. The power obtained tallies with experiments and its magnitude is considerable for practical applications.

Pter Klmn; Tams Keszthelyi

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Resonance-like nuclear processes in solids: 3rd and 4th order processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is recognized that in the family of heavy charged particle and electron assisted double nuclear processes resonance-like behavior can appear. The transition rates of the heavy particle assisted 3rd-order and electron assisted 4th-order resonance like double nuclear processes are determined. The power of low energy nuclear reactions in $Ni-H$ systems formed in $Ni$ placed in $H_{2}$ gas environment is treated. Nuclear power produced by quasi-resonant electron assisted double nuclear processes in these $Ni-H$ systems is calculated. The power obtained tallies with experiments and its magnitude is considerable for practical applications.

Klmn, Pter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Microsoft Word - VUVX2013-3rd Announcement.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 10, 2013 April 10, 2013 3 rd Announcement Dear colleague, The 38 th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet and X-ray Physics (VUVX-2013) will be held in Hefei during 12-19 July 2013. However, information updated continuously is available at the URL: http://vuvx2013.ustc.edu.cn/dct/page/1. Important dates Conference will start registration on Friday 12 July, open on Saturday 13 July and end on Friday 19 July 2013. Important dates and deadlines are the following: 15 April 2013: abstract submission deadline 15 April 2013: end of application for VUVX Student Prize 30 April 2013: author notification 30 April 2013: end of early registration 15 June 2013: end of on-line registration Plenary speakers Xueming Yang, Robin Santra, Marie-Emmanuelle Couprie, Shik Shin.

60

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress; Weaving Community and Science; LM Completes Construction of Well Pad at CNTA; DOE Salute - Grand Junction, Colorado, Business Incubator of the Year; Replacement of Rocky Flats Water Monitoring Flume; LM Data Safer than Ever with FM-200; LM Security Guard Saves a Life; Fernald Preserve Mini-BioBlitzs; Mound Site Property Transfer; Flag Raising Ceremony at Grand Junction Office; Injection of Soybean Oil at Pinellas Site; Support Contractor Receives VPP Award; Environmental Justice Activities; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" "Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities","End of 1996","End of 1997","End of 1998","End of 1999","End of 2000","End of 2001","End of 2002","End of 2003","End of 2004","End of 2005","End of 2006","End of 2007","End of 2008","End of 2009","End of 2010","End of 2011","End of 2012","End of 3rd Quarter 2013" "Mills - conventional milling 1",0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,1,1,0 "Mills - other operations 2",2,3,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,1 "In-Situ-Leach Plants 3",5,6,6,4,3,3,2,2,3,3,5,5,6,3,4,5,5,5

62

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

63

KTH Innovative Centre for Embedded Systems 3rd Annual Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generation, coal still providing a large percentage of our electricity. The demand in a developed country, reliable and relatively cheap provision of energy, including electricity, is the norm on increased availability yet not wanting climate change and environmental collapse. Currently electricity

Haviland, David

64

Passive solar progress: a simplified guide to the 3rd national passive solar conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the concepts and practices that have come to be known as passive solar heating and cooling are introduced, and a current picture of the field is presented. Much of the material presented is derived from papers given at the 3rd National Passive Solar Conference held in San Jose, California in January 1979 and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Extracts and data from these papers have been integrated in the text with explanatory and descriptive material. In this way, it is attempted to present technical information in an introductory context. Topics include design considerations, passive and hybrid systems and applications, sizing methods and performance prediction, and implementation issues. A glossary is included. (WHK)

Miller, H.; Howell, Y.; Richards, D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd Edition released Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd Edition released Attached is Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd Edition released The Handbook is available online at the following website: http://energy.gov/management/downloads/acquisition-certifications-program-handbook Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Linda Ott of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management, Professional Development Division, at (202) 287-5310 or at linda.ott@hq.doe.gov. Policy Flash 2013_25 AMCP Handbook 3rd Edition Released.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition

67

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation The 3rd U.S./German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation was held in Albuquerque and Carlsbad, New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop topics included: 1) Safety case for heat-generating waste disposal in salt; 2) Benchmark modeling in preparation for thermomechanical field-scale tests; and 3) Reconsolidation of granular salt. Collaboration being pursued by U.S. and German salt repository researchers is presented in the report.

68

Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Theory and practice of electronic governance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3rd International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, ICEGOV2009, was organized in Bogota, Colombia during 10-13 November 2009. The conference took place under the patronage of the Ministry of Information and Communication ...

Tomasz Janowski; Jim Davies

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, & Waxes, 3rd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The third edition of Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes includes updated material as well as 25% more new content. Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, & Waxes, 3rd Edition Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound B

70

Modeling streamers in transformer oil: The transitional fast 3rd mode streamer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an electro-thermal hydrodynamic model that explains the development of different streamer modes in transformer oil. The focus is on the difference between the slow 2nd and fast 3rd mode streamers ...

Zahn, Markus

71

California's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Association Clean Energy Systems Jadoo Power Systems Inc Marquiss Wind Power Quantum Energy Solutions Silicon Crystals Inc SolarAire LLC Spectrum Energy Inc SEI...

72

The 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.A, 11-15 May 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS J. ROUDAUT1,2,* , H. BOUCHEKARA1 , A. KEDOUS-LEBOUC1 , J of Design of Experiments (DOE) method in magnetic refrigeration (MR) understanding and optimizationThe 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Measurement and correction of the 3rd order resonance in the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Fermilab Tevatron BPM system has been recently upgraded resulting much better accuracy of beam position measurements and improvements of data acquisition for turn-by-turn measurements. That allows one to record the beam position at each turn for 8000 turns for all BPMs (118 in each plane) with accuracy of about 10-20 {micro}m. In the last decade a harmonic analysis tool has been developed at CERN that allows relating each FFT line derived from the BPM data with a particular non-linear resonance in the machine. In fact, one can even detect the longitudinal position of the sources of these resonances. Experiments have been performed at the Tevatron in which beams have been kicked to various amplitudes to analyze the 3rd order resonance. It was possible to address this rather large resonance to some regular machine sextupoles. An alternative sextupole scheme allowed the suppression of this resonance by a good factor of 2. Lastly, the experimental data are compared with model calculations.

Schmidt, F.; /CERN; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mechanical engineers' handbook, energy and power. 3rd ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to chapters on thermophysical properties of fluids, fundamentals of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, combustion, and furnaces, Book 4 of the Handbook features coverage of both conventional (gaseous and liquid fuels, coal, and nuclear) and alternative (solar, geothermal, and fuel cells) energy sources, plus chapters on power machinery, refrigeration and cryogenics, environmental issues, and thermal systems optimization. Much of the material in this book is new or extensively revised, including coverage of such topics as: Heat pipes; Wind turbines; Fuel cells; Thermal systems optimization; Combustion; Fans, blowers, compressors, and pumps; Indoor environmental control; and Fluid power. Chapters of particular interest are: Combustion by Eric Eddings; Furnaces by Carroll Cone; Gaseous fuels by Richard J. Reed; Coals, lignite, peat by James Keppeler; and Air pollution-control technologies by C.A. Miller.

Myer Kutz (ed.)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 3rd Quarter 2012 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles will build and deploy 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems  

SciTech Connect

Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 9 July, 2013 - 20:57 Alaska analysis appropriations Categorical Exclusions Coordinating Permit Office Cost Mechanisms Cost Recovery geothermal Hawaii NEPA permitting quarterly meeting White Papers On June 26th, we held the 3rd Quarter GRR Stakeholder Update at the Grand Sierra Resort in Reno, NV. The meeting was well-attended with over 40 attendees, including in-person and webinar attendance. Thanks to all who attended! Presentation During the meeting, we reviewed the current status of the GRR efforts, including: * Roadmap Development: expansion to Colorado and Texas - both sets of flowcharts are developed and available online!

79

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC November 28, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis RICHMOND, VA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis Spurgeon today commended Dominion North Anna, LLC (Dominion) for submission of a combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction of a new nuclear power plant in the United States. Dominion's application seeks approval to build and operate one General Electric-Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) at its

80

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 3rd Quarter FY 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 1999 September 1999 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Third Quarter FY 1999 September 1, 1999; Issue No. 20 Proposed Arizona-Mexico Transmission Project Presents Challenges to NEPA Process and Analysis By: Ellen Russell, NEPA Document Manager, Fossil Energy with Carolyn Osborne, Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance continued on page 3 Fossil Energy (FE) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for what would be the first cross-border high-voltage transmission project to connect the main power delivery systems of the United States and Mexico (DOE/EIS-0307). EIS scoping has been complex. Through the scoping process, FE has identified and worked with many stakeholders to define a broad range

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,837 167 196 - 2,200 Alabama Railroad 1,051 25 10 - 1,087 Alabama River 730 - - - 730 Alabama Truck 56 141 186 - 384 Colorado Total 456 - 16 - 472

82

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 3rd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,198 151 353 - 1,702 Alabama Railroad 796 26 20 - 842 Alabama River 307 - 3 - 310 Alabama Truck 96 125 330 - 551 Georgia Total - - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck - - 3 - 3 Indiana Total

83

THE ART OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ERRATA TO VOLUME 2 (3rd edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#30; THE ART OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING #30; #30;#30;#30;#30; ERRATA TO VOLUME 2 (3rd edition) #30 corrections or improvements that most readers don't want to know about, because they are so trivial. You Programming, Volume 2 (third edition) since it was #12;rst printed in 1997. Four levels of updates | \\errors

Pratt, Vaughan

84

THE ART OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ERRATA TO VOLUME 1 (3rd edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#30; THE ART OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING #30; #30;#30;#30;#30; ERRATA TO VOLUME 1 (3rd edition) #30 corrections or improvements that most readers don't want to know about, because they are so trivial. You Programming, Volume 1 (third edition) since it was #12;rst printed in 1997. Four levels of updates | \\errors

Pratt, Vaughan

85

INTEGRAL JOINS THE 3RD INTERPLANETARY NETWORK and A. Rau, A. von Kienlin, G. Lichti2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

community. Key words: gamma rays; gamma-ray bursts; soft gamma repeaters. 1. INTRODUCTION Despite the great progress which has been made in understanding the nature of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), a number (ACS) in the 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) of gamma- ray burst detectors is an important one, which

California at Berkeley, University of

86

Citrus Production Texas ranks 3rd in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citrus Production · Texas ranks 3rd in U.S. production. · Cash receipts for farmers exceed $29 million annually. · Total impact in the Texas economy exceeds $93 million. · Over 32,000 acres are grown for citrus production in Texas. · Key problems include mites, scales, leaf cutting ants and fire ants. Citrus

Wilkins, Neal

87

Proceedings of the 3rd international symposium on Principles and practice of programming in Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to Las Vegas, Nevada for the 3rd International Conference on Principles and Practice of Programming in Java.Forty one papers were submitted and a total of twenty four (58%) have been selected for presentation ...

John Waldron

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Meet Anup Bhagat, 3rd place winner @ the Boston Cleanweb Hackathon | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meet Anup Bhagat, 3rd place winner @ the Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Meet Anup Bhagat, 3rd place winner @ the Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 8 May, 2012 - 09:15 imported OpenEI I had the pleasure of going out to the Boston Cleanweb Hackathon on behalf of OpenEI.org and NREL, representing open data across the map - from OpenEI, energy.data.gov, REEGLE and the upcoming Apps for Energy challenge. Through the 36 hours of coding, I assisted Anup Bhagat of Divya Energy find open datasets for his team's work to develop a Cleanweb energy app. This was a proof of concept application to assist with Divya Energy's business offerings. This was a shining moment for open government data: an up-and-coming entrepreneur building a great app with open data and open APIs. Anup used

89

Event:The 3rd Global Energy Basel (GEB) Summit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basel (GEB) Summit Basel (GEB) Summit Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png The 3rd Global Energy Basel (GEB) Summit: on 2013/01/22 The GEB Foundation organises a yearly conference: The GEB Sustainable Infrastructure Investment Summit. The 3rd GEB Summit will take place from 22-23 January 2013 at the Congress Center in Basel, back to back with the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. The GEB Summit 2013 program will be articulated around the following four thematic pillars: 1) Infrastructure in a changing world - investing for people, planet and profit; 2) Innovative financing for sustainable infrastructure - paving the way for a new asset class; 3) Policy and best practice of financing sustainable infrastructure development - good news

90

Characterization of hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering of heat exchange systems by which geothermal heat can be efficiently extracted from hot impermeable rocks is studied. The system currently under investigation at Fenton Hill, New Mexico consists of a network of large fractures created through the hydraulic pressurization of a well penetrating hot basement rocks and subsequently intersected by a second well drilled to form a flow-thru system. Cool water pumped into the fractures through one well, once heated in the reservoir, returns to the surface through the second well, is cooled, and then recirculated. While much is known about the performance parameters of the fracture network from short-term flow tests, little is understood concerning the spatial dimensions and geometrical relationship of individual fractures comprising the network. Ultimately, the success one has in estimating the long-term performance of such a system where commercialization is an issue, and in engineering future systems with optimal performance, depends on the success in characterizing the flow-thru fracture networks. To date only nonconventional application of oil field logging techniques and acoustic emissions studies have been used in the characterization of the fracture network.

Albright, J.N.; Newton, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microsoft Word - S06087_3rd qtr 2009 rpt - final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Third Quarter Calendar Year 2009 January 2010 LMS/RFS/S06087 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S06087 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2009 January 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-3rd Quarter CY 2009 January 2010 Doc. No. S06087 Page i Contents Abbreviations.................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction ..........................................................................................................................

93

Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Computer graphics, virtual reality, visualisation and interaction in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to AFRIGRAPH 2004, the 3rd international conference on Computer Graphics, Virtul Reality, Visualisation and Interaction in Africa. This conference follows two very successful conferences in 2001 and 2003, and is the main showcase for the Afrigraph ...

Lynette van Zijl; Patrick Marais

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of Coherence Properties of 3-rd Generation Synchrotron Sources and Free-Electron Lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wavefields are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source.

Vartanyants, I A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor site (EDS the location to host a global nuclear fusion project during the latest round of talks in Vienna with four other ministry's nuclear fusion development office, told reporters that neither Japan nor the EU is in a mood

97

3rd International Conference on Sustainable Development Indicators 495 in the Minerals Industry, June 2007, Milos island, Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to develop a process for stake- holder education and engagement in sustainable energy. 1. INTRODUCTION 1 the release of greenhouse gases and the development of sustainable energy technologies. Figure 2: U.S. DOE3rd International Conference on Sustainable Development Indicators 495 in the Minerals Industry

98

Future of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Where natural groundwater circulation does not exist, the obvious method of extracting heat from the earth's crust is to imitate nature by creating it. A means of doing so by hydraulic fracturing has been demonstrated. Alternatively, explosives or mechanical or chemical methods might be used to open circulation paths. However, where permeabilities are sufficient so that fluid loss is excessive, other approaches are also possible. The magnitude and distribution of hot dry rock and the variety of possible heat-extraction techniques make it appear inevitable that this energy supply will eventually be used on a large scale.

Smith, M.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Gravity-Gradient Subtraction in 3rd Generation Underground Gravitational-Wave Detectors in Homogeneous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a new approach to gravity-gradient noise subtraction for underground gravitational-wave detectors in homogeneous rock. The method is based on spatial harmonic expansions of seismic fields. It is shown that gravity-gradient noise produced by seismic fields from distant sources, stationary or non-stationary, can be calculated from seismic data measured locally at the test mass. Furthermore, the formula is applied to seismic fields from stationary local sources. It is found that gravity gradients from these fields can be subtracted using local seismic measurements. The results are confirmed numerically with a finite-element simulation. A new seismic-array design is proposed that provides the additional information about the seismic field required to ensure applicability of the approach to realistic scenarios even with inhomogeneous rock and non-stationary local sources.

Jan Harms; Riccardo DeSalvo; Steven Dorsher; Vuk Mandic

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

Norton, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Summary of the 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 3rd International Workshop on a Far Detector in Korea for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam was held at the Hongo Campus of Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan on Sep. 30th and October 1, 2007. Forty seven physicists from Japan and Korea, as well as Europe and USA, participated in the workshop and discussed the physics opportunities offered by the J-PARC conventional neutrino beam detected by a new large underground neutrino detector in Korea. In this paper, we highlight some of the most relevant findings of the workshop.

T. Kajita; S. B. Kim; A. Rubbia

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

Hartshorn, K.G. [Chevron Petroleum Company of Colombia, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Austin, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. ABSTRACT R ock-physics models are presented describing gas-hydrate systems. Knapp, and R. Boswell, eds., Natural gas hydrates--Energy resource potential and associated geologic

Texas at Austin, University of

106

Expanding the Model-Tracing Architecture: A 3rd Generation Intelligent Tutor for Algebra Symbolization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following Computer Aided Instruction systems, 2nd generation tutors are Model-Tracing Tutors (MTTs) (Anderson & Pelletier, 1991) which are intelligent tutoring systems that have been very successful at aiding student learning, but have not reached the ... Keywords: Intelligent tutoring systems, algebra, model-tracing, student learning, teaching strategies

Neil T. Heffernan; Kenneth R. Koedinger; Leena Razzaq

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Technical and cost analysis of rock-melting systems for producing geothermal wells. [GEOWELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells makes up a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and economic systems studies are summarized regarding the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to the production of deep wells such as may be used for dry hot rock or geopressurized geothermal energy-extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene features are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. In fact, some special features could lead to improved well production techniques. These include the buildup of a glass lining along the borehole wall which provides structural resistance to collapse; close control of hole geometry; the existence of a barrier between the drilling fluids and the formations being penetrated; nonrotation; potentially better bit life; and faster rates of penetration in deep, hard rock. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost savings are significant: a 30 percent or 3.9 million dollar (1975 $) reduction from rotary-drilled well costs are estimated for a 10-km depth well with a bottom hole temperature of 673 K. Even for relatively cool normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 1..pi..-km well are estimated as 23 percent of 2.1 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Broadband Cable Access Networks: The HFC Plant, 3rd Ed edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book focuses on broadband distribution and systems architecture and concentrates on practical concepts that will allow the reader to do their own design, improvement, and troubleshooting work. The objective is to enhance the skill sets of a large ... Keywords: Data Transmission Systems, Networking

David Large; James Farmer

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

June the 3rd, 1992 Energy Spectrum of Anyons in a Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the many-anyon system in external magnetic field, we derive the energy spectrum as an exact solution of the quantum eigenvalue problem with particular topological constraints. Our results agree with the numerical spectra recently obtained for the 3- and the 4-anyon systems.

Fabrizio Illuminati

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Use of 2nd and 3rd Level Correlation Analysis for Studying Degradation in Polycrystalline Thin-Film Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The correlation of stress-induced changes in the performance of laboratory-made CdTe solar cells with various 2nd and 3rd level metrics is discussed. The overall behavior of aggregated data showing how cell efficiency changes as a function of open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), and fill factor (FF) is explained using a two-diode, PSpice model in which degradation is simulated by systematically changing model parameters. FF shows the highest correlation with performance during stress, and is subsequently shown to be most affected by shunt resistance, recombination and in some cases voltage-dependent collection. Large decreases in Jsc as well as increasing rates of Voc degradation are related to voltage-dependent collection effects and catastrophic shunting respectively. Large decreases in Voc in the absence of catastrophic shunting are attributed to increased recombination. The relevance of capacitance-derived data correlated with both Voc and FF is discussed.

Albin, D. S.; del Cueto, J. A.; Demtsu, S. H.; Bansal, S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The 3rd DBCLS BioHackathon: improving life science data integration with Semantic Web technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The story so far. J Semantic Web Inf Syst 2009, 5:122. 9.Splendiani A: RDFScape: Semantic Web meets systems biology.Discovery and Integration (SADI) Web service Design-Pattern,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The 3rd DBCLS BioHackathon: improving life science data integration with Semantic Web technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligence community further specified this definition for their own field, as the models that capture and describe specific domains [47]. At the intersection of the life sciences and the com- puter sciences, we find ontologies being used for a wide variety... data integrity and correct out- put formatting, the output was successfully visualized in Cytoscape 2.7.0 beta 3 (Figure 2). Systems biology In systems biology, most curated models are developed by a graphical tool (e.g., CellDesigner [78...

Katayama, Toshiaki; Wilkinson, Mark D; Micklem, Gos; Kawashima, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oouchida, Kenta; Chun, Hong-Woo; Aerts, Jan; Afzal, Hammad; Antezana, Erick; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Aranda, Bruno; Belleau, Francois; Bolleman, Jerven; Bonnal, Raoul JP; Chapman, Brad; Cock, Peter JA; Eriksson, Tore; Gordon, Paul MK; Goto, Naohisa; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Horn, Heiko; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Kaminuma, Eli; Kasprzyk, Arek; Kawaji, Hideya; Kido, Nobuhiro; Kim, Young Joo; Kinjo, Akira R; Konishi, Fumikazu; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Labarga, Alberto; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Lin, Yu; Lindenbaum, Pierre; McCarthy, Luke; Morita, Hideyuki; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Nagao, Koji; Nishida, Kozo; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nishizawa, Tatsuya; Ogishima, Soichi; Ono, Keiichiro; Oshita, Kazuki; Park, Keun-Joon; Prins, Pjotr; Saito, Taro L; Samwald, Matthias; Satagopam, Venkata P; Shigemoto, Yasumasa; Smith, Richard; Splendiani, Andrea; Sugawara, Hideaki; Taylor, James; Vos, Rutger A; Withers, David; Yamasaki, Chisato; Zmasek, Christian M; Kawamoto, Shoko; Okubo, Kosaku; Asai, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Toshihisa

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is a short history, so far as it can now be assembled, of early speculations and observations concerning the existence and origin of natural heat in the earth's crust; of some of the many methods proposed to extract and use it; and of recent investigations designed to develop and demonstrate such methods. It is probably only the preface to a much longer

114

LANL Water Protection Status Report - FY12 3rd Qtr. (Apr thru Jun 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued monitoring of the Buckman Direct Diversion and Los Alamos County Water Supply Wells; Groundwater Protection - Continued implementation of the Interim Facility-Wide Groundwater Monitoring Plan (IFGMP); Surface Water Protection - Continued protection of surface water through implementation of the Individual Stormwater Permit (IP); Buckman Early Notification System operability at 100% per MOU Requirements.

Douglass, Craig R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Quartz dissolution and silica deposition in hot-dry-rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of quartz dissolution control the produced fluid dissolved silica concentration in geothermal systems in which the downhole residence time is finite. The produced fluid of the Phase I, Run Segment 5 experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system at Fenton Hill, NM, was undersaturated with respect to quartz in one pass through the reservoir, suggesting that the rate of granite dissolution governed the outlet dissolved silica concentration in this system. The literature data for the rate of quartz dissolution in water from 65 to 625/sup 0/C is correlated using an empirical rate law which is first order in quartz surface area and degree of undersaturation of the fluid. The Arrhenius plot (ln k vs T/sup -1/) is linear over eight orders of magnitude of the rate constant, verifying the validity of the proposed rate expression. Carefully performed quartz dissolution experiments in the present study duplicated the literature data and completed the data base in the temperature range from 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Identical experiments using crushed granite indicate that the rate of quartz dissolution in the presence of granite could be as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the rates observed in the pure quartz experiments. A temperature dependent HDR reservoir model incorporates the quartz dissolution rate law to simulate the dissolved silica behavior during the Fenton Hill Run Segment 5 experiment. For this low-permeability, fracture-dominated reservoir, the assumptions of one-dimensional plug flow through a vertically-inclined rectangular fracture and one-dimensional rock heat conduction perpendicular to the direction of flow are employed. These simplifications lead to an analytical solution for the temperature field in the reservoir.

Robinson, B.A.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Feasibility of detecting artificial magnetic anomalies in hydrofractured rock by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the signal physics of magnetic anomaly detection by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems to determine the feasibility of possible applications to the geothermal energy program is described. The system would make full use of the incredible sensitivity of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) which can be in the range of 10/sup -11/ Oe. In addition to magnetic anomalies in the earth's field produced by spherical distributions of magnetic matter, anomalies that would be artificially produced by flooding magnetic material into cracks produced by hydrofracturing in deep boreholes drilled into dry rock geothermal sources are considered. The study indicates that surface detection by horizontal and vertical gradiometers of crack anomalies will not be feasible if the magnetic material flooding the crack is a paramagnetic solution. However, one can concoct a slurry to carry prepolarized ferromagnetic particles of a size sufficiently large to permit domain formation but small enough to permit rotation and alignment in the earth's field. In this case, the anomaly signal is large enough to permit extraction of anomaly orientation information out of the background of magnetic noise and earth's field gradients. The superconducting gradiometer-SQUID system is shown to be exceptional in its capability of removing undesirable magnetic noise and gradients. The greatest promise was found in systems that would be comprised of a magnetometer or gradiometer that could be lowered into the borehole to positions opposite the formations cracked by hydrofracturing. The use of a paramagnetic material to produce the artificial anomaly will not provide signals of sufficient amplitude to overcome the magnetic noise. However, the slurry containing only one percent by volume of ferromagnetic particles will produce a crack anomaly that is easily detectable by magnetometer or by the superconducting gradiometer-SQUID system.

Overton, W.C. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Simulation and optimization of hot dry rock geothermal energy conversion systems: process conditions and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently engaged in a field program aimed at designing and testing man-made geothermal reservoirs in hot granitic formations of low permeability created by hydraulic fracturing. A very important segment of the program is concerned with defining and optimizing several parameters related to the performance of the reservoir and their impact on the potential commercial feasibility of the hot dry rock technique. These include effective heat transfer area, permeation water loss, depth to the reservoir, geothermal temperature gradient, reservoir temperature, mass flow rate, and geochemistry. In addition, the optimization of the energy end use system (process or district heating, electricity or cogeneration) is directly linked to reservoir performance and associated costs. This problem has been studied using several computer modeling approaches to identify the sensitivity of the cost of power to reservoir and generation plant parameters. Also examined were a variety of important economic elements including rate of return on invested capital, discount or interest rates, taxes, cash flow, energy selling price, plant and reservoir lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, and royalties.

Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australias Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the worldrock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft Word - CX-SpacerInsulatorRepProg3rd4thQtr2012FY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Frank Weintraub Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: 2012 Spacer and Insulator Replacement Program; Third and Fourth Quarter Projects Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1899 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: Various transmission lines located within BPA's Service Area. See Table 1 for locations of transmission lines. Description of the Proposed Action: In order to provide continued system reliability, BPA proposes to replace worn spacers and insulators along various transmission lines throughout BPA's service area.

125

Microsoft Word - CX-SpacerInsulatorRepProgram3rd4thQtr2013_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 15, 2013 July 15, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Frank Weintraub Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Corinn Castro Program Manager - TPO-TPP-3 Proposed Action: 2013 Spacer and Insulator Replacement Program; Third and Fourth Quarter Projects Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1899 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: Various transmission lines located within BPA's Service Area. See Table 1 for locations of transmission lines. Description of the Proposed Action: In order to provide continued system reliability, BPA proposes to replace worn spacers and insulators along various transmission lines throughout

126

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems  

SciTech Connect

Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Visual display of reservoir parameters affecting enhanced oil recovery. 3rd Quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Wireline logs from most of the 45 wells that penetrate the Miocene within the study area on the Pioneer Anticline were digitized by DPI, Data preparation and log calibration were completed on six wells and model selection and analysis were performed on the one cored well, Tenneco 62X-30, in Pioneer Field. The 59 samples collected from the McKittrick Front wells in Cymric Field were forwarded to MTU where graduate students R. Kramer and D. Popko began Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. After reviewing PC-based software from most major vendors, a consensus began to emerge that the best approach would be to link the best modules from three different systems, a wireline log analysis program, a mapping program, and a 2D and 3D visualization program, into a flexible, user-friendly unit. This would result in a product that could be used by small gas and oil companies to accomplish similar analyses. Finally, a multimedia shell was constructed using Macromind Director to display project results at the AAPG exhibit in Denver. This computer-visualization technical innovation, although not a principal component of the original proposal, elicited a great amount of interest from visitors to the booth.

Wood, J.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

PROCEEDINGS 3rd RESEARCH WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to development of colonic neo- plasia. 5 Analysis of catechol estrogens and depurinating adducts using facile could lead to tumor initiation through the formation of 4-catechol estrogens from estradiol (E2) and/or estrone (E1). These catechol estrogens are further oxidized by CYP450 to the correspond- ing catechol

132

EMSL 3rd Quarter Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M Bliss, and JE Jaffe. 2009, "Preferential Orientation of Te Precipitates in Melt-Grown CZT." Journal of Crystal Growth 311(9):2641 - 47. 10.1016j.jcrysgro.2009.03.002 Hess, NJ,...

133

"Problem-based Learning: helping your students gain the most from PBL" 3rd edition, Instructor's Guide for "Problem-based Learning: how to gain the most from PBL" ISBN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Problem-based Learning: helping your students gain the most from PBL" 3rd edition, March 1996 the students to learn. Don't be afraid to integrate subject material across disciplines. ·Pose the problem-1 purposely paints a very black and white picture. In truth, I think both programs are somewhere between

Thompson, Michael

134

Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition  

SciTech Connect

This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

137

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and rock fall source and impact areas, it possible to a rock fall source area in the possible to a rock fall source area. There are

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

140

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Capacitive discharge firing system for providing acoustic sources in the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a capacitive discharge firing unit designed to initiate electrically exploded foil slapper detonators in a subsurface, high-pressure (5000 psi), high-temperature (> 200/sup 0/C) environment is described. The unit is used to conduct acoustic ranging experiments in deep boreholes (approx. = 10,000 ft) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Hot Dry Rock experiment.

Patterson, W.W.; Deam, D.R.; MacDonald, H.J.; Rochester, R.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The relationship between teacher Levels of Technology Integration (LoTi) on 3rd-5th Grade Students on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores at Alamo Heights Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) teacher self-ratings and Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores. The study assessed the relationship between LoTi ratings and TAKS scores of 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students as reported in student records at Alamo Heights Independent School District (AHISD), San Antonio, Texas. The study determined the degree to which teacher LoTi ratings were a predictor of success on TAKS exam scores as reported in student records at Alamo Heights Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas. In addition, the study determined whether a teacher's LoTi scores impacted students' achievement levels for the variable of socioeconomic status. School and student performance analysis included only Cambridge and Woodridge Elementary Schools in the Alamo Heights Independent School District. The student data in the study came from approximately 278 3rd graders, 268 4th graders, and 283 5th graders (829 total students). A total of 47 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading and math teachers from the two elementary campuses made up the population under study. The research findings of this study included: 1. There was no significant relationship at the elementary level between teacher LoTi ratings and TAKS scores for reading and math for grades 3, 4, 5 students. 2. The grade 4 reading analysis results demonstrate that teachers with a higher LoTi level do impact student achievement on the TAKS test for students who are in the economically disadvantaged subpopulation. The following recommendations were made: 1. Additional research is needed to examine how technology is specifically implemented in both reading and math classrooms at the elementary level. 2. Additional research is needed to examine how staff development on the LoTi instrument affected classroom practice and teacher responses on the LoTi survey. 3. Continued support is needed to provide teachers with professional development regarding the integration of technology as a teaching tool and repeat the research procedures after this initial year of using the LoTi instrument.

Bashara, Dana Marie

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

In N. Taatgen & J. Aasman (Eds.), Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Cognitive Modelling. 202-209. Veenendaal, The Netherlands: Universal Press.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling. 202-209. Veenendaal, The Netherlands: Universal Press. 202 Extending Tcl-Tk to provide in Tcl/Tk, a common interface creation language. This approach can be viewed as extending cognitive architectures to include eyes and hands that exist in the world of Tcl/Tk. This system is most naturally used

Ritter, Frank

145

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Isotopic evidence for the infiltration of mantle and metamorphic CO2-H2O fluids from below in faulted rocks from the San Andreas Fault System  

SciTech Connect

To characterize the origin of the fluids involved in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system, we carried out an isotope study of exhumed faulted rocks from deformation zones, vein fillings and their hosts and the fluid inclusions associated with these materials. Samples were collected from segments along the SAF system selected to provide a depth profile from upper to lower crust. In all, 75 samples from various structures and lithologies from 13 localities were analyzed for noble gas, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions. Fluid inclusions exhibit helium isotope ratios ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) of 0.1-2.5 times the ratio in air, indicating that past fluids percolating through the SAF system contained mantle helium contributions of at least 35%, similar to what has been measured in present-day ground waters associated with the fault (Kennedy et al., 1997). Calcite is the predominant vein mineral and is a common accessory mineral in deformation zones. A systematic variation of C- and O-isotope compositions of carbonates from veins, deformation zones and their hosts suggests percolation by external fluids of similar compositions and origin with the amount of fluid infiltration increasing from host rocks to vein to deformation zones. The isotopic trend observed for carbonates in veins and deformation zones follows that shown by carbonates in host limestones, marbles, and other host rocks, increasing with increasing contribution of deep metamorphic crustal volatiles. At each crustal level, the composition of the infiltrating fluids is thus buffered by deeper metamorphic sources. A negative correlation between calcite {delta}{sup 13}C and fluid inclusion {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He is consistent with a mantle origin for a fraction of the infiltrating CO{sub 2}. Noble gas and stable isotope systematics show consistent evidence for the involvement of mantle-derived fluids combined with infiltration of deep metamorphic H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} in faulting, supporting the involvement of deep fluids percolating through and perhaps weakening the fault zone. There is no clear evidence for a significant contribution from meteoric water, except for overprinting related to late weathering.

Pili, E.; Kennedy, B.M.; Conrad, M.E.; Gratier, J.-P.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

FRONTCOVER (3rd Qtr 2012).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Imports and Exports Third Quarter Report 2012 LNG LNG Japan Trinidad and Tobago Canada Mexico Qatar POINTS OF IMPORT 1. Sumas, Washington 2. Eastport, Idaho 3. Whitlash / Babb / Port of Del Bonita / Sweetgrass, Montana 4. Port of Morgan, Montana / Portal, North Dakota 5. Sherwood, North Dakota 6. Noyes / Warroad, Minnesota 7. Detroit / St. Clair / Marysville, Michigan 8. Niagara Falls / Grand Island, New York 9. Waddington, New York 10. Massena / Champlain, New York 11. Highgate Springs, Vermont 12. Pittsburg, New Hampshire 13. Calais, Maine 14. Ogilby, California 15. Alamo / Hidalgo, Texas 16. McAllen / Galvan Ranch, Texas 17. Northeast Gateway Deepwater Port 18. Neptune Deepwater Port 19. Everett, Massachusetts 20. Cove

151

Vehicle Technologies Office: 3rd Thermoelectrics Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Materials Rama Venkatasubramanian RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC Thermoelectric Applications III Tom Avedisian, Cornell University, Chair High...

152

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview - 3rd ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow and ... cyber environment that encourages efficiency, innovation, and ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

EMSL 3rd Quarter Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rd Quarter, Fiscal Year 2008 rd Quarter, Fiscal Year 2008 (April 1, 2008, through June 30, 2008) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by

154

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

155

C# 2008 for Programmers, 3rd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The professional programmers Deitel guide to C# and the powerful Microsoft .NET FrameworkWritten for programmers with a background in C++, Java or other high-level languages, this book applies the Deitel signature live-code approach to teaching programming ...

Paul J. Deitel; Harvey M. Deitel

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

157

SOP 3rd quarter report - 1995  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage for environmental reasons, two national organizations have joined DOE and the major vehicle manufacturers in EV promotion. q The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles...

158

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tyn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan nkkulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittmn rock-ravintolayrittmisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tmn hetkist tilaa. (more)

Vyli, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED DURING IN-SITU HEATER TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Haught, Instrumentation evaluation, calibration, and27 - 30,1979. ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCEDdiscussed here,l INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

Binnall, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

165

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

167

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Motivational aspects in energy feedback systems design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In harmony with the 3rd HCI wave, the design of residential energy feedback systems (REFS) is an emerging research area in HCI, stimulated by the changes the world has suffered for economic and environmental reasons. Theoretical background ... Keywords: eco-feedback technology, motivation, residential energy feedback systems

Lara Schibelsky Godoy Piccolo; Maria Ceclia Calani Baranauskas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

171

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Influence of soil parameters on the motion of rocking walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduced as a system in earthquake engineering in 2004 [6], rocking walls are a fairly new system in earthquake engineering. Their performance has been proven, both in research as in practice. However, a few uncertainties ...

Houbrechts, Jeroen J. J. (Jeroen Jose Julien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Single-Well Enhanced Geothermal System Front-End Engineering and Design: Optimization of a Renewable Geothermal System for Harvesting Heat from Hot, Dry Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, GTherm and the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, under an EPRI Polaris grant, evaluated the potential for a GTherm single-well enhanced geothermal system (SWEGS) and bottom-hole HeatNest to produce enough heat from deep geothermal wells to be an effective alternative for generating electric power. The research focused on the thermodynamic properties of the SWEGS design and the optimal geologic conditions. The results indicated that, given the right conditions, the SWEGS can extr...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

177

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Rock properties in support of geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal rock mechanics needs have been defined and subsequently a test system was designed and built for providing appropriate material properties. The development areas identified as requiring rock mechanics were stimulation, reservoir engineering, subsidence prediction, surface exploration and subsurface evaluation, and drilling. The resulting test system provides mechanical, electrical, thermal and physical properties on 2 and 4 inch diameter cores at confining pressures and pore fluid pressures to 200 MPa (30,000 psi) and temperatures to 535/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). The test system development was continued and site specific rock mechanics requirements were identified. (MHR)

Butters, S.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity of rocks from LASL geothermal test holes GT-1 and GT-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conductivities on a number of dry rocks have been measured in an air environment. These experimental values are probably about 10 percent lower than the in situ values. Initial attempts to prepare ''wet'' rock samples (rocks saturated with water) have so far resulted in only ''damp'' rocks. Considerable effort will be required to characterize the crack system in ''solid'' rocks and to predict the probable conductivity values for in situ conditions.

Sibbitt, W.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Predicting Perceptions: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Appearance, pp. 79-81, Edinburgh, UK, ISBN 978-1-4716-6869-2, April 2012. Visual and Material Identity in Natural Scenes: Predicting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a prototype of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control with On the concept of an advanced daylighting control system. #12;Deliverable 3.3.15 Final Report TWS

Foster, David H.

189

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS-CO2: New Zealand TVZ Geothermal Systems as a Natural Analog Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

190

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

191

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The economics of heat mining: An analysis of design options and performance requirements of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

A generalized economic model was developed to predict the breakeven price of HDR generated electricity. Important parameters include: (1) resource quality--average geothermal gradient ({sup o}C/km) and well depth, (2) reservoir performance--effective productivity, flow impedance, and lifetime (thermal drawdown rate), (3) cost components--drilling, reservoir formation, and power plant costs and (4) economic factors--discount and interest rates, taxes, etc. Detailed cost correlations based on historical data and results of other studies are presented for drilling, stimulation, and power plant costs. Results of the generalized model are compared to the results of several published economic assessments. Critical parameters affecting economic viability are drilling costs and reservoir performance. For example, high gradient areas are attractive because shallower well depths and/or lower reservoir production rates are permissible. Under a reasonable set of assumptions regarding reservoir impedance, accessible rock volumes and surface areas, and mass flow rates (to limit thermal drawdown rates to about 10 C per year), predictions for HDR-produced electricity result in competitive breakeven prices in the range of 5 to 9 cents/kWh for resources having average gradients above 50 C/km. Lower gradient areas require improved reservoir performance and/or lower well drilling costs.

Tester, Jefferson W.; Herzog, Howard J.

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

195

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from A.D. 200 and A.D. 1150. Physical remains of pithouses, pueblos, irrigation systems, artifacts, and rock art have survived the years to provide clues for contemporary understanding of this prehistoric culture and society. Knowledge of the symbolism and belief system has eluded understanding or remained sketchy as a result of examining only physical remains. Based on the hypothesis that by studying the archaeological record and the established characteristics of cultures with origins similar to those of the Mimbres, then assumptions can be made and applied to the understanding of the symbolism, purpose, and use of the rock art for the Mimbres. Specific to this study is the rock art adjacent to and within a one and one-half mile radius of the NAN Ranch Ruin. Research reveals how the rock art of the NAN Ranch Ruin connects to: 1) cultural context to other regional systems, 2) spatial context within the landscape, 3) temporal context with respect to Mimbres development, and 4) symbolic context, tying the rock art to its environment and revealing it as a living part of the universe as it fits into the world view of those who created it.

Tidemann, Kathryn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

199

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in airwater system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tex. , 3rd Ann. Solar Heating & Cooling R&D Contractors'Proceedings, Passive Solar Heating & Cooling~'-~&-l~orkshop,Solar Jubilee, Phoenix, AZ, June 2-6, 1980 A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING

Tavana, Medhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Synchronization and cell search algorithms in 3GPP long term evolution systems (FDD mode)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper initial downlink synchronization (sync) and cell identification algorithms for the 3rd generation partnership project (3GPP) long term evolution (LTE) systems are presented. The frequency division duplex (FDD) mode is used in the downlink ... Keywords: 3GPP LTE, MIMO, OFDM, cell search, frequency and time synchronization

Abdo N. Gaber; Loay D. Khalaf; Ahmad M. Mustafa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal energy experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent heat flow data indicates that about 95,000 sq. mi. in 13 western U.S. states is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft) by hot dry rock at temperatures above 290/sup 0/C (440/sup 0/F.). Therefore a geothermal energy development program was undertaken to develop methods from extracting thermal energy from hot rock in the earth crust by man-made underground circulation systems; demonstrate the commercial feasibility of such systems; and encourage use of this technology. Experiments performed on the Jemez Plateau in New Mexico are described with information on the drilling of boreholes, hydraulic fracturing of hot rocks, well logging, and environmental monitoring to establish base line data and define the potential effects of the project. The technical achievements of the project include boreholes were drilled to 3k (10,000 ft) with bottomhole temperatures of approximately 200/sup 0/C (390/sup 0/F); hydraulic fracturing produced fractured regions with 150 m (500 ft) radii; at least 90 percent of the water injected was recovered; and data was obtained on geologic conditions, seismic effects, and thermal, fracturing, and chemical properties of the downhole rocks. A geothermal power-production system model was formulated for evaluating the total cost of developing power production using a hot-dry-rock geothermal energy source. (LCL)

Pettitt, R.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

205

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

206

Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

208

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 3rd Quarter FY 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEPTEMBER 1998 1 SEPTEMBER 1998 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT DOE NEPA Community to Meet in October For Third Quarter FY 1998 September 1, 1998, Issue No. 16 On October 14 and 15, 1998, the DOE NEPA Community will meet in North Las Vegas, hosted by the Nevada Operations Office at its new Support Facility. The Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance is sponsoring this meeting to improve DOE NEPA performance through sharing of lessons learned and discussion of current issues. Managing the NEPA Process Managing the NEPA Process Managing the NEPA Process Managing the NEPA Process Managing the NEPA Process The meeting will focus on issues that NEPA Document Managers face daily: What tools and techniques can help

209

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

500000,2344107 500000,2344107 2003,400000,600000,400000,600000,2000000 2004,600000,400000,588738,600000,2282406 2005,709600,630053,663068,686456,2689178 2006,931065,894268,1083808,1196485,4105626 2007,1162737,1119536,1075460,1175845,4533578 2008,810189,1073315,980933,1037946,3902383 2009,880036,982760,956657,888905,3708358 2010,876084,1055102,1150725,1146281,4228192 2011,1063047,1189083,846624,892013,3990767 2012,1078404,1061289,1048018,957936,4145647 "P2013",1147031,1394232,1171278,"NA","--" "E = Estimated data." "P = Preliminary data." "NA = Not available." "-- = Not applicable." "Notes: The reported 4th quarter 2002 production amount was adjusted by rounding to the nearest 100,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. This also affects the 2002 annual production. The reported 2003 and 1st, 2nd, and 4th quarter 2004 production amounts were adjusted by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. The reported 2004 total is the actual production for 2004. Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

210

Iowa's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Energy Ewing Land Development Services Iowa Department of Economic Development Iowa Office of Energy Independence Iowa Renewable Fuels Association IRFA Iowa Stored Energy...

211

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 3rd Quarter FY 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gary Palmer at (202) 586-1785. John J. Pulliam, III, will retire in September after 30 years of service with the Federal Government. A biologist by training, John served his...

212

NETL Publications: 3rd Annual Energy and Innovation Conference...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Advanced Optical Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments - Paul Ohodnicki Nano-structured Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Reforming - Todd Gardner Improved LIBS Elemental...

213

3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Metallurgical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... Basic Research of Direct Pyrolysis Performance of MgCl2 in Molten State ... Strengthening Sintering of Refractory Iron Ore with Biomass Fuel.

214

Excel for Windows 95 Quick and Easy, 3rd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Short, informal chapters make this handbook a breeze to read. Learn how to use formulas, create charts, or design your own expense report. Each self-contained lesson covers a fundamental task you can master in minutes. Straightforward ...

Gerald E. Jones

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

National Labs Offer 3rd Party Evaluation on Elastomers ...  

... extremely common in oil and gas operations, are critical to the functioning of many technologies but are highly prone to dysfunction at high ...

216

Arizona's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agenera, LLC Alchemix Corporation Amereco Biofuels Corp Arizona Public Service Company APS Arizona Solar Tech EDGE Energy LLC EGreenIdeas Ecotality North America formerly eTec...

217

3rd World Materials Research Institute Forum & Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1: Energy/Materials policy H.Kung (DOE), R.Tomellini (EC), M.Kitagawa (NIMS) Session 2: Materials Technologies for Solar Energy Session 3 ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 3rd Quarter FY 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

believe that having preliminary data right from the start will shorten Halliburton NUS's learning curve and will expedite preparation of the SWEIS. For more information, contact...

219

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

December 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 . Quarterly Coal Distribution Report

220

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for 3rd...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. McDuffie, EM-40 Todd N. Lapointe, EM-41 Peter B. Lyons, NE-1 Tracey L. Bishop, NE-3 William F. Brinkman, SC-1 Carol L. Sohn, SC-3 Joseph A. McBrearty, SC-3 Glenn S. Podonsky,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter  

SciTech Connect

The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

Showalter, Mary Ann

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

3rd Cybersecurity Framework Workshop - July 10-12 2013 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cybersecurity Framework, July 1, 2013 The purpose of this document is to define the overall Framework and provide guidance on its usage. ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"E500,000","E2,344,107" "E500,000","E2,344,107" 2003,"E400,000","E600,000","E400,000","E600,000","E2,000,000" 2004,"E600,000","E400,000",588738,"E600,000",2282406 2005,709600,630053,663068,686456,2689178 2006,931065,894268,1083808,1196485,4105626 2007,1162737,1119536,1075460,1175845,4533578 2008,810189,1073315,980933,1037946,3902383 2009,880036,982760,956657,888905,3708358 2010,876084,1055102,1150725,1146281,4228192 2011,1063047,1189083,846624,892013,3990767 2012,1078404,1061289,1048018,957936,4145647 "P2013",1147031,1394232,1171278,"NA","--" "E = Estimated data." "P = Preliminary data." "NA = Not available." "-- = Not applicable."

224

The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents, 3rd Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revised - 092513 Page 1 The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) has provided the Department of Energy with expertise related to the medical management...

225

Rock bed storage with heat pump. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study, Rock Bed Storage with Heat Pump, established the feasibility of mating a heat pump to a rock bed storage to effect optimal performance at the lowest cost in single family residences. The operating characteristics of off-the-shelf components of heat pump/rock bed storage systems were studied, and the results were used to formulate configurations of representative systems. These systems were modeled and subsequently analyzed using the TRNSYS computer program and a life cycle cost analysis program called LCCA. A detailed load model of a baseline house was formulated as part of the TRNSYS analysis. Results of the analysis involved the development of a technique to confine the range of heat pump/rock bed storage systems to those systems which are economical for a specific location and set of economic conditions. Additionally, the results included a comparison of the detailed load model with simple UA models such as the ASHRAE bin method. Several modifications and additions were made to the TRNSYS and LCCA computer programs during the course of the study.

Remmers, H.E.; Mills, G.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

229

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Practices of information and secrecy in a punk rock subculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By examining the information practices of a punk-rock subculture, we investigate the limits of social media systems, particularly limits exposed by practices of secrecy. Looking at the exchange of information about "underground" shows, we use qualitative ... Keywords: information practices, secrecy, social network sites, subcultures

Jessica Lingel; Aaron Trammell; Joe Sanchez; Mor Naaman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

235

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

236

Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Generalized geologic and other data are tabulated for 24 potential hot dry rock (HDR) sites in the contiguous United States. The data show that HDR resources occur in many geologic and tectonic settings. Potential reservoir rocks at each prospect are described and each system is categorized according to inferred heat sources. The Fenton Hill area in New Mexico is discussed in detail because this region may be considered ideal for HDR development. Three other prospectively valuable localities are

237

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

238

Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Duchane, D.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Preliminary assessment of high-resistivity cap-rock shale in the Frio Formation of the Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mapping of high resistivity cap rock shales in the Frio Formation of the Texas Gulf Coast shows that few areas of thin cap rock occur in the upper Texas Gulf Coast, and more extensive, thicker cap rock occurs in the lower Texas Gulf Coast. Increases in (1) maximum shale resistivity, (2) unstable minerals (volcanic rock fragments, detrital carbonate grains), and (3) authigenic cementation parallel the increase in cap rock from the upper to the lower Gulf Coast. Similarity in cap rock distribution in two major Frio deltaic depocenters is not evident. Facies analysis of regional cross sections in the lower Texas Gulf Coast and of cross sections in Sarita East field, Kenedy County, shows preferential development of cap rock in the delta-front/slope facies of the Norias delta system. Sand content of the cap rock interval varies from 23 to 41 percent in part of Sarita East field, suggesting that if cap rock is due to authigenic cementation, such sands may act as fluid conduits during mineralization. Cap rock is rarely developed in the shale-rich prodelta and distal delta-front facies. High resistivity cap rock shales have been considered a result of authigenic calcite cementation, but definite evidence for this origin is lacking. Preliminary mineralogic analyses of well cuttings have not yielded satisfactory results. Analysis of core through cap rock and non-cap rock intervals will be required to determine the mineralogic variability within each interval and to accurately assess any mineralogic control of the high resistivity log response.

Finley, R.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

244

LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of the hot-dry-rock project is traced. Efforts to establish a two-hole and connecting fracture system on the southwest flank of the Valles Caldera in north-central New Mexico are summarized. Problems encountered in drilling and hydraulic fracturing are described. Current results with the loop operation for heat extraction are encouraging, and plans for a second energy extraction hole are underway. (JBG)

Hill, J.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hot dry rock fracture propagation and reservoir characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North America's largest hydraulic fracturing opeations have been conducted at Fenton hill, New mexico to creae hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs. Microearthquakes induced by these fracturing operations were measured with geophones. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the pre-existing joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60)degree) to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. Field testing of HDR reservoirs at the Fenton Hill site shows that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area. These temporal increases indicate that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock system occurred. For future reservoir testing, Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts. Recent studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene, which can be used in reservoirs as hot as 275)degree)C.

Murphy, H.; Fehler, M.; Robinson, B.; Tester, J.; Potter, R.; Birdsell, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous solid (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (porosity) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Progress of the US Hot-Dry-Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While other geologic environments and possible heat-extraction methods are recognized, the US Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program has so far concentrated on the use of hydraulic fracturing to create flow passages and heat-transfer surface between two wells drilled into hot crystalline rock of low initial permeability. A recirculating pressurized-water loop has been used at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, to extract heat at rates up to 5MW(t) from a system of this type in granitic rock at a depth of 2600 m. The two wells for a larger, deeper, hotter system have now been drilled at the same location. They will be connected during 1982 by a set of hydraulic fractures, and the resulting heat-extraction loop is expected to yield the engineering experience and performance data required to demonstrate the commercial usefulness of such systems. Meanwhile, an evaluation of the HDR resource base of the United States is continuing, together with detailed investigation of local areas that appear especially promisng either for future heat-extraction experiments or for eventual commercial development.

Smith, M.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pistol-packin' rock bit shoots its way to TD (total depth)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tround International Inc. and Dresser Industries are developing a drill bit that fires ceramic bullets to fracture the rock ahead of it. Initial testing shows it to increase penetration rates through hard formations by 200 to 400%. It incorporates an open chamber system and fires 3 ceramic projectiles per salvo into the rock face at intervals staggered by milliseconds to create overlapping stress waves. Upon impact the ceramic bullets disintegrate and do not interfere with drilling efficiency of the bit cones. The stress waves fracture the rock one or more feet ahead of the drill.

Booker, C.H.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Deep Read: A Reading Comprehension System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes initial work on Deep Read, an automated reading comprehension system that accepts arbitrary text input (a story) and answers questions about it. We have acquired a corpus of 60 development and 60 test stories of 3 rd to 6 th grade material; each story is followed by short-answer questions (an answer key was also provided). We used these to construct and evaluate a baseline system that uses pattern matching (bag-of-words) techniques augmented with additional automated linguistic processing (stemming, name identification, semantic class identification, and pronoun resolution). This simple system retrieves the sentence containing the answer 30--40% of the time.

Lynette Hirschman Marc; Marc Light; Eric Breck; John D. Burger

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Deep Read: A reading comprehension system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes initial work on Deep Read, an automated reading comprehension system that accepts arbitrary text input (a story) and answers questions about it. We have acquired a corpus of 60 development and 60 test stories of 3 rd to 6 th grade material; each story is followed by short-answer questions (an answer key was also provided). We used these to construct and evaluate a baseline system that uses pattern matching (bag-of-words) techniques augmented with additional automated linguistic processing (stemming, name identification, semantic class identification, and pronoun resolution). This simple system retrieves the sentence containing the answer 3040 % of the time. 1

Lynette Hirschman; Marc Light; Eric Breck; John D. Burger

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

254

Electricity from hot dry rock geothermal energy: technical and economic issues  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of energy from hot dry rock would make available a nearly unlimited energy source. Some of the technical problems and possible economic tradeoffs involved in a power generating system are examined and possible solutions proposed. An intertemporal optimization computer model of electricity production from a hot dry rock geothermal source has been constructed. The effects of reservoir degradation, variable fluid flow rate, and drilling operations are examined to deetermine optimal strategies for reservoir management and necessary conditions for economic feasibility.

Tester, J.W.; Morris, G.E.; Cummings, R.G.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Recent developments in the hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, most of the Hot Dry Rock Programs effort has been focused on the extraction technology development effort at the Fenton Hill test site. The pair of approximately 4000 m wells for the Phase II Engineering System of the Fenton Hill Project have been completed. During the past two years, hydraulic fracture operations have been carried out to develop the geothermal reservoir. Impressive advances have been made in fracture identification techniques and instrumentation. To develop a satisfactory interwellbore flow connection the next step is to redrill the lower section of one of the wells into the fractured region. Chemically reactive tracer techniques are being developed to determine the effective size of the reservoir area. A new estimate has been made of the US hot dry rock resource, based upon the latest geothermal gradiant data. 3 figs.

Franke, P.R.; Nunz, G.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, 7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to create an Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Demonstration Project involving new technology, techniques, and advanced monitoring protocols for the purpose of testing the feasibility and viability of EGS for renewable energy production. BLM is the lead agency for this EA and DOE is a cooperating agency. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download April 5, 2012 EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon April 5, 2012 EA-1897: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Limitations of rock mechanics in energy-resource recovery and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock-mechanics problems which limit energy-resource recovery and development are assessed. The most serious limitations were found in the fields of geothermal exploration, mining and in-situ recovery, nuclear-waste disposal, oil and gas recovery, underground storage, and under-ocean tunneling. Recommendations include research to determine and predict porosity, permeability, and fluid flow in situ; research to develop better methods for determining and obtaining shallow and deep in situ stresses; research to improve the ability to map fracture patterns, particularly major fractures and faults, at depth; research to improve the understanding of rock-fragmentation processes for increasing the effectiveness of drilling and excavation systems; research to increase understanding of the relation of laboratory-measured quantities to in situ conditions; and research to provide the thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of rock, including fractured rock. (JRD)

Not Available

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire-cracked rock (FCR) is the archaeological by-product of the systemic use of hot rocks for cooking and heating purposes. As a record of various cooking and heating facilities, FCR has substantial potential for addressing research questions on past settlement and subsistence systems. To be able to address these questions requires reliable methods that can identify or infer how a given FCR was used. A series of ethnoarchaeological replication experiments are conducted in order to improve the understanding of the geothennodynamics of FCR production. FCR from two experimental data sets are cut to expose flat surfaces that are inspected for thermal-weathering characteristics under low-power magnification. Analytical results indicate that rock structure and the length of heat application have the most control over thermal weathering. The five most important rock structure characteristics are (1) strength of the bond between grains/crystals, (2) degree of porosity, (3) grain/crystal mineralogy, (4) presence of discontinuities, and (5) grain size; thin section analysis can identify these characteristics for any rock sample. The length of heat application varies dependent on the type of cooking or heating facility, for instance, a typical earth oven remains hot for a longer duration than a typical stone-boil facility; multiple uses of a rock in a facility also increases the sum total of heat application. In broad terms, experimental tests indicate igneous rock types withstand thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations of archaeological FCR also all for the re-evaluation of the current model which explains the occurrence of various FCR shape types within features.

Jackson, Michael A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

Tester, Jefferson W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

267

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

273

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical methods have been applied for the prediction of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through water-saturated fractured porous rock. The presence of colloids may enhance the transport of radionuclides in groundwater by reducing retardation effects. The colloids existing in the groundwater act as carriers, adsorbing radionuclides on their large surface area and moving faster than the average water velocity. With colloids present, the system consists of three phases, i. e., an aqueous phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full-equilibrium model was developed to describe the transport and fate of the radionuclides in the fracture. Sorption onto rock matrix, fracture surface and sorption into mobile and immobile colloids are included. The effect of colloidal particle size was also considered. Mass partition mechanisms between the colloids and solid matrix and between colloid and contaminant are represented by local equilibrium. In the three-phase i.e., retardation coefficient, hydrodynamic dispersion system, the coefficient, and fracture width are modified to include the equilibrium distribution coefficient of contaminant with a carrier. In the three phase model, much smaller retardation and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are obtained and the effect of fracture width is larger. With the additional consideration of colloidal particle sizes, these effects become ever larger. Numerical solutions for the model were obtained using a fully implicit finite difference scheme. A significant sensitivity to model parameters was discovered, and in particular, the equilibrium distribution coefficients between a contaminant and the carrier were found to be the most important factors.

Baek, Inseok

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

280

Use of hot-dry-rock geothermal resources for space heating: a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study shows that a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heat system proposed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's Wallops Flight Center (WFC) will cost $10.9 million, saving $4.1 million over the existing oil heating system over a 30-yr lifetime. The minimal, economically feasible plan for HDR at WFC is shown to be the design of a single-fracture reservoir using a combined HDR preheat and a final oil burner after the first 4 years of operation. The WFC cost savings generalize and range from $3.1 million to $7.2 million for other HDR sites having geothermal temperature gradients ranging from 25/sup 0/C/km to 40/sup 0/C/km and depths to basement rock of 2400 ft or 5700 ft compared to the 30/sup 0/C/km and 9000 ft to basement rock at WFC.

Cummings, R.G.; Arundale, C.J.; Bivins, R.L.; Burness, H.S.; Drake, R.H.; Norton, R.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Developing hot dry rock reservoirs with inflatable open hole packers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open hole packer system was designed for high pressure injection operations in high temperature wells at the Fenton Hill, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Site. The packer runs were required to verify that the HDR reservoir fractures had been penetrated during the drilling of well EE-3A. They were also used to stimulate fractures connecting EE-3A to the reservoir and to conduct two massive hydraulic fracture treatments at the bottom of EE-3A. An attempt to use a modified packer design as a temporary well completion system was not successful but with modification the system may prove to be an important HDR completion technique. The eleven packer runs have demonstrated that formation testing, stimulation and HDR reservoir development can now be conducted with an open hole inflatable packer operating over large temperature ranges and high differential pressures.

Dreesen, D.S.; Miller, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hot dry rock: A climate change action opportunity for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of heat found in rock that is hot but is not in contact with sufficient mobile fluid to transport that heat to the surface are a large, as yet virtually unexploited, source of clean energy. The technology to extract useful amounts of energy from this ubiquitous hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development for more than twenty years. During the last two years, flow testing at the Fenton Hill HDR pilot facility in New Mexico has answered many of the questions about the viability of HDR heat mining. While the most important issue of thermal longevity of the artificial geothermal reservoir that is the heart of an HDR energy system was not fully resolved, the test results provided good reasons to be optimistic that such reservoirs can have long lifetimes. No decline was observed in the temperature of the fluid produced during the relatively short test period and tracer testing indicated that the reservoir may be thermally self sustaining. In addition, water consumption during the circulation test was reduced to very low levels, the production of significant excess energy over that required simply to operate the system was verified, and routine energy production with virtually no emissions to the environment, except waste heat, was demonstrated.

Duchane, D.V.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Rapid excavation by rock melting. LASL subterrene program, December 31, 1972--September 1, 1973  

SciTech Connect

Research is continuing on establishing the technical and economic feasibility of excavation systems based upon the rockmelting (Subterrene) concept. A series of electrically powered, small-diameter prototype melting penetrators have been developed and tested. Research activities include optimizing penetrator configurations, designing high-performance heater systems, and improving refractory-metals technology. The properties of the glass linings that are automatically formed on the melted holes are being investigated for a wide variety of rocks and soils. Thermal and fluid-mechanics analyses of the melt flows are being conducted with the objective of optimizing penetraton designs. Initial economic models of the rock-melting concept extended to large tunnelers are being developed. Field tests and demonstrations of the prototype devices continue to be performed in a wide range of rock and soil types. The conceptual design of the electrically powered, self-propelled, remotely guided, horizontal tunnel-alignment prospecting system (Geoprospector) has been initiated. Such a device will also find applications in energy transmission, i.e., utility and pipeline installations. The long-term goal of the research is to develop the technology and prototype hardware that will ultimately lead to large tunneling devices, with improved advance rates and reduced tunnel project costs. The rockmelting concept includes elements that will result in innovative solutions to the three major functional areas of tunneling: rock disintegration, materials handling, and hole-support linings. The proposed excavation method, which is relatively insensitive to variations in rock formation, produces a liquid melt that can be chilled to a glass and formed into a dense, strong, firmly attached hole lining. Unique applications to large automated tunneling systems, ultradeep coring for geoscience research, and hot-rock penetration for geothermal energy development are being investigated, (auth)

Hanold, R.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A digital rock density map of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital geological maps of New Zealand (QMAP) are combined with 9256 samples with rock density measurements from the national rock catalogue PETLAB and supplementary geological sources to generate a first digital density model of New Zealand. This digital ... Keywords: Crust, Database, Density, Geological mapping, Gravimetry, Rock types

Robert Tenzer; Pascal Sirguey; Mark Rattenbury; Julia Nicolson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications  

SciTech Connect

Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

Calculation of explosive rock breakage: oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Improved efficiency in explosive rock breakage becomes increasingly important as mining costs and the need to tap underground resources continue to grow. Industry has recognized this need for many years and has done a great deal in developing new products and new blasting techniques, generally by purely empirical means. One particular application that has received added attention within the past several years, and one that lends itself to a more objective theoretical study, is explosive fracture of oil shale for conventional and in situ fossil energy recovery. Numerical calculation of oil shale fracturization with commercial explosives has the potential to add to an objective understanding of the breakage process. Often, in such numerical studies, only one or two parts of the total problem are addressed with any degree of sophistication or completeness. Here an attempt is made to treat the entire problem, i.e., explosive characterization, constitutive behavior of intact rock, and a mathematical description of rock fracture. The final results are two-dimensional calculations of explosively induced fracture damage in oil shale.

Johnson, J.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers 3 rd Edition McGraw-A. L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers 3 rd Edition McGraw-that short and compact NDHX heat exchanger designs can be

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Collaborative multi-agent rock facies classification from wireline well log data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas and oil reservoirs have been the focus of modeling efforts for decades as an attempt to locate zones with high volumes. Certain subsurface layers and layer sequences, such as those containing shale, are known to be impermeable to gas and/or liquid. ... Keywords: Applied artificial intelligence, Collaborative learning, Multi-agent systems, Rock classification, Well logs

Christopher M. Gifford; Arvin Agah

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

Lee, Abraham P. (Arlington, VA); Simon, Jonathon N. (San Leandro, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

303

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

306

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 87Sr/86Sr values of thermal waters and hydrothermal calcites of the Long Valley caldera geothermal system are more radiogenic than those of young intracaldera volcanic rocks. Five thermal waters display 87Sr/86Sr

308

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeasternmost base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these approximately 12-mi lines. This was accomplished with the simultaneous operation of two 1024-channel sign bit recording systems while four

309

Candidate sites for future hot-dry-rock development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generalized geologic and other data are tabulated for 24 potential hot dry rock (HDR) sites in the contiguous United States. The data show that HDR resources occur in many geologic and tectonic settings. Potential reservoir rocks at each prospect are described and each system is cateogrized accoridng to inferred heat sources. The Fenton Hill area in New Mexico is discussed in detail because this region may be considered ideal for HDR development. Three other prospectively valuable localities are described: The Geysers-Clear lake region in California, the Roosevelt Hot Springs area in Utah, and the White Mountains region in New Hampshire. These areas are singled out to illustrate the roles of significantly different geology and geophysics, reservoir rocks, and reservoir heat contents in possible HDR developments.

Goff, F.; Decker, E.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the mechanisms of fluid-rock interactions. The main objective of this study is to examine the potential and efficiency of low-salinity water in secondary and tertiary oil recovery for sandstone reservoirs. Similarly, this study aims to help in understanding the dominant mechanisms that aid in improving oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Furthermore, the impact of cation type in injected brines on oil recovery was investigated. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water salinity and chemistry on oil recovery in the secondary and tertiary modes. The contact angle technique was used to study the impact of water salinity and composition on rock wettability. Moreover, the zeta potential at oil/brine and brine/rock interfaces was measured to explain the mechanism causing rock wettability alteration and improving oil recovery. Deionized water and different brines (from 500 to 174,000 mg/l), as well as single cation solutions were tested. Two types of crude oil with different properties and composition were used. Berea sandstone cores were utilized in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood tests indicated that injection of deionized water in the secondary mode resulted in significant oil recovery, up to 22% improvement, compared to seawater flooding. However, no more oil was recovered in the tertiary mode. In addition, injection of NaCl solution increased the oil recovery compared to injection of CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Contact angle results demonstrated that low-salinity water has an impact on the rock wettability; the more reduction in water salinity, the more a water-wet rock surface is produced. In addition, NaCl solutions made the rock more water-wet compared to CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Low-salinity water and NaCl solutions showed a highly negative charge at rock/brine and oil/brine interfaces by zeta potential measurements, which results in greater repulsive forces between the oil and rock surface. This leads to double-layer expansion and water-wet systems. These results demonstrate that the double-layer expansion is a primary mechanism of improving oil recovery when water chemical composition is manipulated.

Nasralla, Ramez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Concepts for the Measurements Subsystems of the Third Generation Attributes Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract The 3rd Generation Attribute Measurement System project has been tasked by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Verification to develop the next generation of attribute measurement system for potential verification applications. The primary improvements of this effort, compared to previous attribute measurement systems, are to address authentication and certification concerns throughout the design and development process and to conduct attribute measurements for highly enriched uranium and high explosives in addition to plutonium. This paper will present attribute measurement techniques under consideration by the project.

Warren, Glen A.; Archer, Daniel E.; Cunningham, Mark; McConchie, Seth; Thron, Jonathon

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Rapid excavation by rock melting (LASL Subterrene Program). Status report, September 1973--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research was directed at establishing the technical and economic feasibility of excavation systems based upon the rock-melting (Subterrene) concept. A series of electrically powered, small-diameter prototype melting penetrators was developed and tested. Research activities include optimizing penetrator configurations, designing high-performance heater systems, and improving refractory metals technology. The properties of the glass linings that are automatically formed on the melted holes have been investigated for a variety of rocks and soils. Thermal and fluid-mechanics analyses of the melt flows were conducted with the objective of optimizing penetrator designs. Field tests and demonstrations of the prototype devices continue to be performed in a wide range of rock and soil types. Primary emphasis was placed on the development of a penetrator designed for more economical extraction of geothermal energy and of small-diameter penetrators which can be utilized in support of geothermal energy exploration programs. Optimization of well design, the trade-off of advance rate with operating life, the advantages of using the melt-glass hole casing for well-bore seal-off, rig automation, and the benefits which result from the insensitivity of rock melting to formation temperatures and geologic variations were also studied. Subsystem hardware development was directed toward resolution of critical technical questions related to penetrators for dense rock, debris handling, electrical heater configuration, and establishing penetrator life. Laboratory experiments and field tests provide data for final system design optimizations and indicate proof of applicability of the concept to a geothermal well hole-forming system. A field test unit to form relatively shallow vertical holes for heat flow surveys in support of geothermal exploration studies has been designed, fabricated, and field tested.

Hanold, R.J. (comp.)

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

City of Rock Falls, Illinois (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois (Utility Company) Illinois (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Falls Place Illinois Utility Id 16198 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Economic Development Rate Rider Irrigation System: Off-Peak Rider Commercial Rate C (Commercial) Commercial Rate GS: municipal and governmental entities Commercial Rate GS: other than municipal or governmental entities Commercial Rate R (Residential) Residential

319

The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Combined seismic and hydraulic method of modeling flow in fractured low permeability rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling flow of ground water in hard rocks where a network of fractures provides the dominant flow paths is a major problem. This paper summarizes a program of investigations currently underway in this laboratory to characterize the geometry of fractured rocks and develop methods of handling flow in such systems. Numerical models have been developed to investigate flow behavior in two- and three-dimensional fracture networks. The results demonstrate the insights that can be gained from modeling studies of fractured rocks. A key problem is gathering the necessary data on fracture geometry. Investigations have been started to determine how vertical seismic profiling (VSP) might be improved and applied to this problem. A VSP experiment in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, where fracture orientation is known, produced shear wave splitting and velocity anisotropy in agreement with theory. The results suggest the potential application of 3-component, multi-source VSP data in determining fracture orientation and average spacing. We believe a combination of seismic and hydraulic methods can greatly enhance an understanding of fluid flow and transport in low permeability rock systems where fractures provide the dominant paths. 40 refs, 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Long, J.C.S.; Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

West-east stratigraphic transect of Cretaceous rocks - Southwestern Montana to western Minnesota  

SciTech Connect

In Montana, North and South Dakota, and Minnesota, Cretaceous strata of the Western Interior foreland basin are preserved today in Laramide structural and cratonic basins. The Western Interior basin was asymmetric: more than 17,000 ft of strata are present in southwestern Montana, less than 1,000 ft in eastern South Dakota. Asymmetry resulted from varying rates of subsidence due to tectonic and sediment loading. Cretaceous rocks consist primarily of sandstone, siltstone, claystone, and shale. Conglomerate is abundant along the western margin, whereas limestone is generally restricted to the eastern shelf. A west-east transect of the Cretaceous system from southwestern to east-central Montana, the Black Hills and Williston basin, and eastern South Dakota and western Minnesota includes regional facies relations, sequence boundaries, and biostratigraphic and radiometric correlation. These strata include more than 10,000 ft of synorogenic conglomerate facies of the Late Cretaceous Beaverhead Group. Cretaceous strata in east-central Montana (about 4,500 ft thick) lie at the approximate depositional axis of the basin and are mostly marine terrigenous rocks. Chert-pebble units in these rocks reflect unconformities to the west. The Cretaceous system in North and South Dakota (1,500 - 2,000 ft thick) represents a marine shelf sequence dominated by shale and limestone overlain by coastal sandstone and nonmarine rocks. Major sequence boundaries are at the base of the Lakota Formation, Fall River Sandstone, and Muddy Sandstone, and bracket the Niobrara Formation.

Dyman, T.S.; Cobban, W.A.; Rice, D.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Anderson, S.B. (North Dakota Geological Survey, Bismark (United States)); Fox, J.E. (South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City (United States)); Hammond, R.H. (South Dakota Geological Survey, Vermillion (United States)); Setterholm, D.R. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul (United States)); Shurr, G.U. (St. Cloud State Univ., MN (United States)); Porter, K.W.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah. (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

329

Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRockSamplingAtYel...

330

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

331

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands. 6.8.2006 Neville Brothers, Dr. John and Mavis Staples Highlight the ...

332

Using Ornamental Rock Waste in the Manufacture of Pressed Brick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major producer of rock trimmest, with its production destined largely for export. ... Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the...

333

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

335

An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository  

SciTech Connect

A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock in the earth's crust was investigated. The concept being investigated involves drilling a deep hole, creating an artificial geothermal reservoir at the bottom of the hole by hydraulic fracturing, and then intersecting the fracture with a second borehole. At the beginning of FY77, the downhole system was complete, but the impedance to the flow of fluid was too high to proceed confidently with the planned energy extraction demonstration. Therefore, in FY77 work focused on an intensive investigation of the characteristics of the downhole system and on the development of the necessary tools and techniques for understanding and improving it. Research results are presented under the following section headings: introduction and history; hot dry rock resource assessment and site selection; instrumentation and equipment development; drilling and fracturing; reservoir engineering; energy extraction system; environmental studies; project management and liaison; and, looking back and ahead. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.

Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A model for the development of a lobate alpine rock glacier in southwest Colorado, USA: implications for water on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock glaciers play a significant role in the alpine debris transport system. For practical and engineering considerations, identifying the internal structure and its relationship to surface characteristics is significant in terms of how a rock glacier settles during periods of melting, and the mode of deformation. A better understanding of these factors is important for engineers, engineering geologists and geomorphologists who must make prudent evaluations of rock glaciers as potential sites for human development and uses. It is equally important for evaluating potential stores for water on other planets such as Mars. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) shows that the internal structure of a lobate rock glacier located in the San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado consists of continuous to semi-continuous horizontal layers of ice-supersaturated sediments and coarse blocky rockslide debris which likely formed through catastrophic episodes of rockfall from the cirque headwall. Folds in the uppermost layers correspond to the surface expression of ridges and furrows, indicating that compressive stresses originating in the steep accumulation zone are transmitted downslope through the rock glacier. The rock glacier is a composite feature that formed by a process involving the development and overlap of discrete flow lobes that have overridden older glacial moraine and protalus rampart materials. The latter materials have been incorporated into the present flow structure of the rock glacier. The discovery of rock glacier-like features on Mars suggests the presence of flowing, or once-flowing ice-rock mixtures. These landforms, which include lobate debris aprons, concentric crater fill and lineated valley fill, hold significant promise as reservoirs of stored water ice that could be used as fuel sources for human exploration of Mars and provide a frozen record of the climatic history of the planet. To this end, the rock glacier in this study was used as a surrogate for similar Martian landforms. Liquid water, found to be abundant in this rock glacier, occurs within a network of interconnected channels that permeate throughout the landform. In terms of water storage within Martian analogs, consideration must include the possibility that some water ice may be stored in relatively pure form within lenses and vein networks that are supplied by seasonal frost accumulation and/or water influx from below.

Degenhardt, John Jerome

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

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341

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Subterrene rock-melting concept applied to the production of deep geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells comprises a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and cost studies were made of the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to deep wells such as may be used for dry-hot-rock or geopressure geothermal energy extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene requirements are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. Certain features of the rock-melting concept such as the glass lining on the borehole wall, and nonrotation, provide opportunities for the development of better well production techniques in hot wells. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost-savings are significant: a 33 percent or 4.5 million dollars reduction from rotary drilled well costs are estimated for a 10 km depth well with bottom hole temperatures of 673 K. Even for normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 10 km depth is estimated as 23 percent or 2 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Ward, Jr., Jack A. (Oakmont, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Results of fluid-circulation experiments: LASL hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first large-scale field experiment to investigate the extraction of heat from hot dry rock is now in progress on the Jemez Plateau in northern New Mexico. The experimental system consists of two holes about 3 km deep, from each of which hydraulic fractures have been made. The two major fractures appear to be approximately vertical and parallel, and separated by about 9 m of granodiorite through which fluid is transmitted probably along a distributed set of secondary fractures. Experiments to this point have demonstrated that the surface area of each hydraulic fracture is sufficient to accomplish effective heat transfer from the rock, at about 200/sup 0/C, to water circulated through the system; that there is no significant short-circuiting of the water within the fractures; but that the impedance to fluid flow through the rock between the fractures is too high to permit the rate of heat extraction (initially about 10 MWt) desired of the experimental system. An attempt to reduce impedance by leaching with dilute sodium carbonate solution was unsuccessful. Therefore an attempt is now being made to reduce it by re-drilling from near the bottom of one hole in order to produce a simple system geometry in which the two holes are connected directly through a single hydraulic fracture.

Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

348

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

349

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

350

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

351

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

352

Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Author J.D. McNeill Organization Geonics Limited Published Geonics Limited, 1980 Report Number TN-5 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Citation J.D. McNeill (Geonics Limited). 1980. Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks. TN-5 Edition. ?: Geonics Limited. Report No.: TN-5. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Electrical_Conductivity_of_Soils_and_Rocks&oldid=695344"

353

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Density Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Density_At_Alum_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402985" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

354

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

355

WETTING BEHAVIOR OF SELECTED CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of aging and displacement temperatures, and brine and oil composition on wettability and the recovery of crude oil by spontaneous imbibition and waterflooding has been investigated. This study is based on displacement tests in Berea Sandstone using three distinctly different crude oils and three reservoir brines. Brine concentration was varied by changing the concentration of total dissolved solids of the synthetic brine in proportion to give brine of twice, one tenth, and one hundredth of the reservoir brine concentration. Aging and displacement temperatures were varied independently. For all crude oils, water-wetness and oil recovery increased with increase in displacement temperature. Tests on the effect of brine concentration showed that salinity of the connate and invading brines can have a major influence on wettability and oil recovery at reservoir temperature. Oil recovery increased over that for the reservoir brine with dilution of both the initial (connate) and invading brine or dilution of either. Removal of light components from the crude oil resulted in increased water-wetness. Addition of alkanes to the crude oil reduced the water-wetness, and increased oil recovery. Relationships between waterflood recovery and wettability are summarized.

G.Q. Tang; N.R. Morrow

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geochemistry of Sediments from the Rock Analysis Storage System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Email Unique Identifier DOI-26 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary included in metadata Data Download URL http:tin.er.usgs.govplutosoil...

357

Energy Savings at a Rock Crushing and Finishing Operation: Energy Efficiency Assessment Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility asked the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to conduct an energy assessment of a manufacturer of rock-based product for use in construction materials in their service area. The EPRI energy audit team worked with facility personnel and the utility to understand energy usage in the facility and to identify areas where energy could be saved. The energy audit occurred during the summer season at a location in the upper Midwest United States. The areas of attention concerned system losses, ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Potential for hot-dry-rock geothermal energy in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

ABS>The U. S. Geological Survey has identified 1.5 million acres (2800 square miles) of western lands as having a significant potential for geothermal development.'' The LASL for the past 2 years has been actively investigating the potential for and preblems associated with extracting geothermal energy from the much more numerous regions of the western United States containing hot, but essentially dry, rock at moderate depths. A recent survey reveals that about 7% of the 13-state area comprising the Western Heat Flow Province---about 95,000 square miles--is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft), by hot rock at temperature levels above 290 deg C (>550 deg F). In the Los Alamos concept a man- made geothermal reservoir would be formed by first drilling into suitably hot rock, and then creating a very large surface area for heat transfer using conventional hydraulic fracturing techniques developed by the oil industry. After forming a circulation loop by drilling a second hole into the top of the fractured region, the heat contained would be convected to the surface by the buoyant circulation of water, without the need for pumping. The water in the Earth loop would be maintained as a liquid throughout by pressurization at the surface, both increasing the amount of heat transport up the second (withdrawal) hole, and enhancing the rate of heat removal from the fractured reservoir, when compared to steam. Thermal stresses resulting from the cooling of the hot rock in such a man-made reservoir may gradually enlarge the initial fracture system so that its useful lifetime will be greatly extended beyond the planned 10 to 15 years provided by the original reservoir. If these thermal stress cracks grow preferentially downward and outward into regions of hotter rock, as seems probable, the quality of the geothermal source may actually improve as energy is withdrawn from it. (auth)

Brown, D.W.

1973-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 th U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium. 1321-?1333. 38 th U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium, 1313-?1320. Introduction to Rock Mechanics. John Wiley and

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust  

SciTech Connect

Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and to quantify the importance of feedback in complex fluid-rock systems and its affects on time and space scales and rates of reaction. We have made significant contributions toward understanding feedback and its impacts by numerical experimentation using 3D computational modeling of fluid-rock systems and by chemical and textural analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks.

Dutrow, Barbara

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling rock fracturing in bench-blasting problems  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of rock blasting is being developed to examine the blasting problems associated with in situ oil shale processing. This model, however, will also be useful as a design tool for the traditional problems in rock blasting. The model includes fundamental treatment of both shock-wave propagation and the accumulation of brittle fracture in the rock. As a result, the model accurately predicts the degree and extent of fracturing as functions of design parameters. The model has proven useful for making parametric studies and for evaluation of alternate blast designs. This paper demonstrates the use of the numerical model to simulate the fracturing induced by the detonation of a vertical explosive column near a bench. The fracturing induced by three different explosives indicate that (in the chosen geometry) the most efficient breakage is done by a column of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixture (ANFO) used with a toe charge of aluminized ANFO. There was too much unfractured rock left when ANFO was used alone; aluminized ANFO used for the entire explosive column caused excessive fracturing. A final case involves ANFO used alone to fracture a different rock type. This case points out that in a different rock type, the ANFO will not leave excessive unfractured rock.

Kuszmaul, J.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms CHP System Using Renewable Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G379 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer Martin Machinery System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 200 kW0.2 MW 200,000 W 200,000,000 mW 2.0e-4 GW 2.0e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 1366072 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Custom Made Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2007/05/02 Monitoring Termination Date 2007/05/26

365

EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Summary This EA evaluates the...

366

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses. FIELD TESTS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT . BOREHOLE,Rock Masses . Radionuclide Field Tests. Borehole andaints. . Barriers to Radionuclide Movement. THE ROCK

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock  

SciTech Connect

We present a fully coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock, where the fluid flow depends on the joint openings and the joint openings depend on the fluid pressure. The joints and rock blocks are modeled discretely using the finite element method. Solutions for the fluid and rock are obtained and iteration is performed until both solutions converge. Example applications include an examination of the effects of back-pressure on flow in a geothermal reservoir and transient fluid injection into a reservoir.

Swenson, Daniel; Martineau, Rick; James, Mark; Brown, Don

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An Analytical Model for Solute Transport in Unsaturated Flow through a Single Fracture and Porous Rock Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture matrix solute source rock matrix rock matrix vin fracture; b) solute source in rock matrix. Draft 8-11-04for a point source in the rock matrix are presented in

Houseworth, J.E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Thermal maturation and source rock potential of sedimentary succession in southeast Anatolia, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that there are numerous oil fields in southeast Anatolia, near the northern extension of the Arabian Plate. The formations range for Cambrian to Miocence. Maturation and source rock potential of these formations are determined using reflectance and geochemistry. Tectonic features of these formations and oil reserves in the region are elaborated and oil generation is interpreted using these data. The maturity of rock units generally increases from west to east, while physical and chemical properties of oils also change accordingly. Oil reserves are generally located in east-west trending anticline systems in Cretaceous reservoirs. The API gravities and the alkane content of oils increase toward the east, while asphaltene content decreases in the same direction. All geological and geochemical data leads us to interpret that the oil is most probably generated near the west border of districts IX and X and migrated to the east.

Harput, O.B.; Erturk, O. (Turkish Petroleum Co. Research Center, Mudafaa Caddesi No. 22 Bakanliklar, Ankara (TR)); Goodarzi, F. (Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, AB (Canada))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

An ultra-high-energy-neutrino detector using rock salt and ice as detection media for radar method  

SciTech Connect

We had found radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for detection of an ultra-high energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) which is generated in GZK processes in the universe. When an UHE{nu} interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, the energy converts to a thermal energy. Consequently, a temperature gives rise along an UHE{nu} shower at the interaction location. The permittivity arises with respect to the temperature at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower which is composed of hadronic and electromagnetic multiplication processes. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium for radio wave rises to a reflection. The reflection effect with a long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE{nu}. They could be used for detection media in which the UHE{nu} interacts with. We could find a huge amount of rock salt or ice over 50 Gt in a natural rock salt formation or Antarctic ice sheet. Radio wave transmitted into the medium generated by a radar system could be reflected by the irregularity of the refractive index at the shower. Receiving the reflected radio wave yields information about the UHE{nu}.

Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Department of Applied Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo-shi, Shimane 693-8501 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

373

Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Florida Mountains Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa)

374

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL ( IL.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD facility and operated under AEC control. Exact nature or time period of operations not clear. No indication that radioactive materials were involved. Contract work with Albuquerque Operations office performed. IL.09-1 IL.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DOD IL.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated IL.09-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

375

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Split Rock Site - 043 Split Rock Site - 043 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Split Rock Site (043) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI) Split Rock site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Jeffrey City, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of

376

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

377

Permeability Estimation From Velocity Anisotropy In Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cracks in a rock mass subjected to a uniaxial stress will be preferentially closed depending on the angle between the fracture normal vectors and the direction of the applied stress. If the prestress fracture orientation ...

Gibson, Richard L., Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Laser Rock Drilling Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demo A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam at Argonne's Laser Applications Lab is being shown in this movie to drill oil reservoir rock, a potential application in gas and oil well...

379

Laser Spallation of Rocks for Oil Well Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LASER SPALLATION OF ROCKS FOR OIL WELL DRILLING Zhiyue Xu 1 , Claude B. Reed 1 , Richard Parker 2 , Ramona Graves 3 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 2 Parker...

380

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Expectations for a second US Hot Dry Rock Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The worlds first hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir was created at Fenton Hill, NM in the late 1970`s. Today, Fenton Hill is the site of the largest, deepest, and hottest HDR reservoir. Over the past two decades, HDR systems have also been developed in a number of other countries. However, HDR reservoirs to date have always been created as part of research and development programs aimed at understanding the fundamentals of HDR technology. The time has come to begin planning the construction of a commercial-scale facility which will show the world that HDR can be a practical source of power. The second domestic HDR facility should demonstrate that commercial production of energy from HDR is feasible at a variety of locations. Day-today operating data should provide the cost figures needed in order to unambiguously design and build future commercial HDR power production plants. Successful construction and operation of the second HDR plant will both supply needed electric power at competitive costs and set the stage for the widespread application of HDR technology both domestically and throughout the world. If preliminary work is begun promptly, it should be possible to develop a fully operational second site by 1997. The Clearlake region of northern California may be an ideal area in which to locate the second HDR site.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Expectations for a second US Hot Dry Rock Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The worlds first hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir was created at Fenton Hill, NM in the late 1970's. Today, Fenton Hill is the site of the largest, deepest, and hottest HDR reservoir. Over the past two decades, HDR systems have also been developed in a number of other countries. However, HDR reservoirs to date have always been created as part of research and development programs aimed at understanding the fundamentals of HDR technology. The time has come to begin planning the construction of a commercial-scale facility which will show the world that HDR can be a practical source of power. The second domestic HDR facility should demonstrate that commercial production of energy from HDR is feasible at a variety of locations. Day-today operating data should provide the cost figures needed in order to unambiguously design and build future commercial HDR power production plants. Successful construction and operation of the second HDR plant will both supply needed electric power at competitive costs and set the stage for the widespread application of HDR technology both domestically and throughout the world. If preliminary work is begun promptly, it should be possible to develop a fully operational second site by 1997. The Clearlake region of northern California may be an ideal area in which to locate the second HDR site.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Microsoft Word - 3rd US Rpt on SNF JC-- COMPLETE REPORT - 10.13.08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM-0654, Rev. 2 EM-0654, Rev. 2 October 2008 United States of America Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management United States Department of Energy In Cooperation with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Department of State ii This page intentionally left blank U.S. Third National Report-Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management iii ABSTRACT AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The United States of America ratified the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) on

385

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3rd Quarter 2009 Presentation _final.ppt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* 3.34 inches total precipitation * 82 percent of WY 93-08 average Flow rates (percentage of average): * GS01 (9 percent) * GS03 (no flow) * GS10 (21 percent) * SW027 (no...

386

Proceedings of BIOMed2008 3rd Frontiers in Biomedical Devices Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neuroimaging in freely moving mice. The pump comprises a pressurized reservoir, and a parylene electrothermal, single-use miniature infusion pump (MIP) was designed to allow radiotracer injection and functional µl elastomeric reservoir was built by molding silicone in two-part metal casts. The valve was powered

Meng, Ellis

387

Build Your Own 486/486dx and Save a Bundle, 3rd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:In this 50,000-copy bestseller, noted author Aubrey Pilgrim delivers a completely updated non-technical guide to building a custom-made 486 PC for hundreds less than a commercially manufactured computer. Pilgrim provides clear, step-by-step ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3rd Qtr 2011 Presentation - Final.ppt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 Surveillance and Maintenance Report for the LM Rocky Flats Site July-September 2011 2 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Third Quarter 2011 Third Quarter 2011 3 3 Pond Operations - Third Quarter 2011 Terminal Pond Discharges: * Valves at both A-4 and B-5 were opened on 9/12/11; A-4 and B-5 are now operated in a flow-through mode Transfers: * A-3 in flow-through to A-4 Pond Levels: * As of October 1, 2011, Ponds A-3, A-4, B-5, and C-2 and the Landfill Pond were holding approximately 8.4 MG (8.5 percent of capacity) January 13, 2012, Pond Levels * Landfill (~6.0 percent) * A-3 (0.0 percent) * A-4 (9.6 percent) * B-5 (10.2 percent) * C-2 (2.4 percent) 4 4 Hydrologic Data - Third Quarter 2011 Precipitation * 5.25 inches total precipitation * 129 percent of WY 1993-2010 average

389

Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computing for Geospatial Research and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

COM.Geo Conference is a leading-edge conference on computer science and technology for geospatial information research and application. It focuses on the latest computing technologies for multidisciplinary research and development that enables the exploration ...

Lindi Liao

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Proceedings of the 3rd international workshop on Vehicular ad hoc networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to VANET 2006, the Third ACM International Workshop on Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks! After the success of the first two VANET workshops in 2004 and 2005, 2006 is a great year to continue this exciting workshop. The application of short- to medium-range ...

Wieland Holfelder; Dave Johnson; Hannes Hartenstein; Victor Bahl

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

3rd ASM Conference on Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the final program and provides the abstracts presented at the fourth American Society of Microbiology-sponsored conference on Cell-cell Communication in Bacteria, held November 6-9, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Bacteria are the paradigm for unicellular life, yet they also exhibit elaborate coordinated behaviors that often defy unicellularity. Research over the past two decades has revealed that a wide range of microbes communicate by diverse mechanisms. In most cases these microbial conversations occur through the exchange of diffusible signals, although there are also clear examples of contact-dependent communication. Many microbes use these signaling mechanisms to monitor and respond to population density, a process often described as quorum sensing. Interbacterial communication is not, however restricted to quorum sensing mechanisms, and there is mounting evidence that signaling can function in a range of different capacities. Communication between microorganisms has profound impacts on host interactions, as pathogens and commensals often regulate factors critical for interaction with their hosts via signal production and perception. The CCCB-4 conference provided a unique forum for the discussion, dissemination and exchange of new information and ideas among researchers working within this rapidly developing, yet mature field. Sessions were arranged around topics such as: the diversity of signal generation and identity; mechanisms of signal transduction and interference; cell-cell communication in bacterial development and antibiotic synthesis; host-microbe signaling and pathogenesis; symbiosis, mutualism, and microbe-microbe communication; ecology and evolution; advancements in the technological tool-kit for studying cell-cell communication. The conference served as a conduit for the exchange and synthesis of new ideas among leading US and international scientists working on bacterial communication.

Nalker, Lisa K. [ASM

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

CCNA 640-802 Official Cert Library, Simulator Edition, 3rd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment, review, and practice package for the CCNA 640-802 exams Master all CCNA 640-802 exam topics with the official study guides Learn with more than one hour of personal video instruction Practice with hundreds of exam realistic questions in the ...

Wendell Odom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fuel-producing Geobacter receives support from new research May 3rd, 2010 in Technology / Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growing the bacteria on the surface of graphite electrodes located on a rooftop. A rooftop solar panel generated from solar panels to produce fuels and other useful products. The researchers are currently efficiency than traditional photosynthesis. This efficiency is partly due to the fact that solar panels can

Lovley, Derek

394

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(COL) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction of a new nuclear power plant in the United States. Dominion's application seeks approval to build...

395

S&P- no rating impact from Indian Oils,3rd Qtr Net loss  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services said today that the net loss of Indian rupee (Re) 58.3 million (US$1.3 million) reported by Indian Oil Corp. ...

396

The 3rd workshop on active internet measurements (AIMS-3) report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 10-12, 2011, CAIDA hosted the third Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-3) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with the previous two AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our ... Keywords: active measurement, internet measurement techniques, management techniques, validation

kc claffy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop...

398

Proceedings of the 3rd symposium on Usable privacy and security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the Third Symposium On Usable Privacy and Security! This year's program features 13 technical papers, a workshop, two tutorials, 16 posters, a panel, three discussion sessions, and an invited talk. Continuing the tradition of interesting SOUPS ...

Lorrie Faith Cranor

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Summary of talks third annual hot dry rock geothermal information conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three basic comparisons can be made between weapon system development and energy system development in the US--driving factors, system lifetime, and development time. Weapon system development and response is determined by a perceived threat to national security. Because the threat can change radically in this high technology atmosphere, weapon systems are usually designed for a 5 to 20 year lifetime. Development time from idea to capability is about 20 years on the average. In contrast, energy system development has been influenced by economics--demand, supply, return on investment--until the recent threat created by our dependence on oil. Energy systems are expected to operate 20 to 50 years and even longer. Development time is correspondingly long, i.e., 40 years from idea to large-scale use. The US needs to adopt a ''defense-oriented'' approach to protect its threatened energy security. Geothermal energy from hot dry rock is a new concept. The Hot Dry Rock Program is designed to minimize development time and may become a prime example of how a recognized threat to energy security can be answered by combined government/industry effort.

Gaddy, James

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Semiannual report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of energy extracted from hot dry rock (HDR) was investigated as a commercailly feasible alternate energy source. Run Segments 3 and 4 were completed in the prototype reservoir of the Phase I energy-extraction system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Results of these tests yielded significant data on the existing system and this information will be applicable to future HDR systems. Plans and operations initiating a Phase II system are underway at the Fenton Hill site. This system, a deeper, hotter commercial-size reservoir, is intended to demonstrate the longevity and economics of an HDR system. Major activity occurred in evaluation of the national resource potential and in characterizing possible future HDR geothermal sites. Work has begun in the institutional and industrial support area to assess the economics and promote commercial interest in HDR systems as an alternate energy source.

Brown, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Cremer, G.M.; Smith, M.C.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

403

Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock?s elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. These weak rocks and sands are intended to represent analogs to the formations that present oil and gas engineers with problems during oil and gas production and drilling operations. A series of new axial acoustic sensors have been constructed (and tested) to allow measurement of compressional and shear wave velocities during high pressure triaxial tests on these weak rock and sand samples. In addition, equipment to be utilized over the next 18 months of the project have tested and calibrated. These include the load frames, triaxial pressure cells, pressure sensors, load cells, extensometers, and oscilloscopes have been calibrated and tested. The multichannel acoustic emission and acoustic pulse transmission systems have also been tested. Graduate research assistant, research faculty, and the laboratory technician have begun Tasks 4 and 5 which involve preparing the sand samples and rock samples for testing. The construction of the lateral acoustic sensors has also been started during this quarter as outlined in the project timeline. With the equipment having been tested and calibrated, and the samples now being prepared, the experiments are on schedule to be started in April, 2001.

Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Environmental analysis of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Techniques for the extraction of geothermal energy from hot dry rock within the earth's crust were tested at the first experimental system at Fenton Hill and proved successful. Because new concepts were being tried and new uses of the natural resources were being made, environmental effects were a major concern. Therefore, at all phases of development and operation, the area was monitored for physical, biological, and social factors. The results were significant because after several extended operations, there were no adverse environmental effects, and no detrimental social impacts were detected. Although these results are specific for Fenton Hill, they are applicable to future systems at other locations.

Kaufman, E.L.; Siciliano, C.L.B. (comps.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Deriving the shape factor of a fractured rock matrix  

SciTech Connect

Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.

Chang, Ming-Ming

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The design and construction of a hot dry rock pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward demonstrating the potential of the hot dry rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Since the inception of the program, scientists and engineers have perfected drilling and fracturing techniques to create underground reservoirs for the purpose of tapping the potential heat energy from the hot rock in the earth. One of the achievements to date has been the creation of a reservoir at the Laboratory's test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. This reservoir, located at a depth of 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth, has an estimated fluid capacity of one million gallons within the large volume of fractured rock. To evaluate the thermal power potential of this reservoir, preparations are currently underway to conduct a test which will entail the circulation of fluid through the reservoir by the injection of water at high pressures. A major part of the preparations involves the building of a demonstration pilot plant. The process concept poses a number of unique technical challenges with regard to the design and construction of the equipment and facilities. This paper reviews the system design and operating features of this plant. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Ponden, R.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two-models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gills Onions Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System Turning a Waste Liability into a Renewable Resource Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Washington, DC J 13 2011 January 13, 2011 Dave Reardon, , PE National Director - Water Sustainability HDR Engineering, Inc., Folsom, CA t Gills Onions Backg ground ● 3 rd largest onion p producer in the nation ● 100,000 square-foot processing facility in Oxnard, CA ● 800,000 lbs of onions processed every day ● Prepackaged diced, sliced, whole, pureed, and ring product line P i l 6 ● Process is operati ional 6 days a week - - The Problem... ● 250,000 lbs/day waste onion hauled off site - H l Hauled b d by t tract tor and d wagon t to l local fi l field ld s t to incorporate into soil - Disrupted traffic

412

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Exploration methods for hot dry rock. Report of the panel held June 22, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geological and geophysical characteristics of hot dry rock (HDR) necessary for an effective exploration program were discussed. The type of HDR project discussed, that being developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), would utilize hydraulic fracturing to develop a large surface area in rock of low permeability, 10/sup -6/ darcys, and at temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C. A better definition of the thermal regime in the crust and mantle at reconnaissance (hundreds to tens of kilometers) and exploration (tens of kilometers to 1 km) scales is needed. Geophysical methods capable of deep investigation would be used with the near-surface geologic information to extrapolate conditions at the depth of interest. Detection of HDR per se may be difficult because the contrast in physical properties of HDR and other rock is not always unambiguous, but boundaries between rock environments can be delineated. When patterns and coincidence of various types of geophysical anomalies and geologic maps are used, the probability of the detection of HDR is greatly increased, especially when a consistent picture is described. Various geophysical methods are required to detect these anomalies: (a) electromagnetic techniques can map deep electrically conductive structures, which to some extent can be used to infer isotherms. (b) Bouguer gravity maps corrected for regional topography are found to correlate with large silicic intrusive bodies, which are often associated with high heat flow. (c) isotherms and open crack systems at depth can be inferred from seismic wave attenuations, dispersions, and delay times. (d) heat flow measurements are useful as a primary tool and as a check on the results of other methods. Abstracts for individual presentations by the twelve panel members are included. 111 references.

West, F.G.; Shankland, T.J. (comps.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing the damaged zone. In matrix acidizing of carbonates, there are four parameters that affect performance: the concentration of calcite present, injection rate of the acid, reaction type, and heterogeneity. Of these parameters, this paper will focus on how rock heterogeneity affects performance. To do this, a coreflood and acidizing apparatus was used to acidize heterogeneous limestone core samples. Rock characterizations and volumetric measurements were considered with the results from these experiments, which made it possible to correlate and quantify the results with rock and volume parameters. It was found that the core samples with more and larger heterogeneities generally required less acid (measured in pore volumes) to achieve breakthrough, that is, a wormhole created axially from one end of the core to the other. This value for pore volumes to breakthrough was one to two orders of magnitude less than more homogeneous samples. The general procedure and best practices for acidizing the core samples is also detailed in this thesis. This procedure was followed for preparation, coreflooding, and acidizing for all core samples.

Keys, Ryan S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 2a. Project Area (North) Staging Area #4 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 Structure 3/4 Structure 3/7 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Structure 4/6 Legal Description N N 1:24000 scale 1:24000 scale Section Township Range 17 20 2 N 27 E 31 11 N 18 W 6 10 N USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas

418

Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 3495 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC THERMAL STORAGE Commercial GENERAL SEASONAL Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Three Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Three Phase Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE Commercial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND SEASONAL SERVICE Residential

420

City of Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Hill Place South Carolina Utility Id 16195 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 175 Watt HPS lighting Lighting Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -1) Commercial Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -2) Industrial Flood Lighting Rate 1000 Watt HPS Lighting Flood Lighting Rate 400 Watt HPS Lighting General Service/ Non Demand (Schedule GS) Commercial General Service/Demand (Schedule GD) Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

422

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal

423

AltaRock Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AltaRock Energy Inc AltaRock Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AltaRock Energy Address 7900 E Green Lake Drive N Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Geothermal energy Product Creates geothermal energy reservoirs, develops geothermal facilities Website http://www.altarockenergy.com/ Coordinates 47.6855466°, -122.3364827° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6855466,"lon":-122.3364827,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $9.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$/gram is set on the monopole density in the search samples.

K. Bendtz; D. Milstead; H. -P. Hchler; A. M. Hirt; P. Mermod; P. Michael; T. Sloan; C. Tegner; S. B. Thorarinsson

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

426

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two wells, GT-2 and EE-1, were originally drilled to a depth of 9600 ft (2.93 km) and 10,000 ft (3.05 km), respectively, and, after some difficulties, including redrilling of the bottom portion of GT-2, a good fracture connection was made between EE-1 and GT-2B, as the modified GT-2 was called. The circulation system was studied extensively for the purpose of establishing a number of fracture properties. Techniques were developed to determine orientation, geometry, heat exchange area, volume, flow impedance and impedance distribution. A much larger fracture system was then created from a depth of 9620 ft (2.93 km) in EE-1. The techniques used and results obtained in the study of the new and old fracture systems are discussed. (MHR)

Aamodt, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Simulation of blasting induced rock motion using spherical element models  

SciTech Connect

Control of the rock motion associated with blasting can have significant economic benefits. For example, surface coal mining can be made more efficient if the overburden material can be cast further with explosives, leaving less work for mechanical equipment. The final muck pile shape in very type of surface and underground blasting is controlled by the blasting induced motion of the rock. A theoretically sound method of predicting rock motion will be beneficial to understanding the blasting process. Discrete element methods have been used for some time to predict rock motion resulting from blasting. What all of these approaches had in common was the use of polygonal elements with corners and sides as well as aspect ratio. Reasonably good results were obtained but treatment of the interactions of the corners and sides of elements was a computationally intensive process that made long simulations with many elements expensive to perform. The use of spherical elements showed increased efficiency but lacked the mechanisms for treating the bulking of the rock mass. The computer program developed was converted from an explicit code to an event-driven code and some bulking mechanisms were added that allowed spherical elements to exert a torque on other spherical elements with which contact was made. The architecture of this program and its event-driven nature made it difficult to vectorize for efficient execution on vector processing machines. A new code called DMC (Distinct Motion Code) has been developed this past year. DMC was designed and written especially to take advantage of super computer vector processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the use of DMC to perform accurate rock motion calculations with very reasonable computation times. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Taylor, L.M.; Preece, D.S. (Hibbitt, Karlsson and Sorensen, Providence, RI (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Los Alamos hot-dry-rock project: recent results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new deeper reservoir is presently being investigated at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site. The region surrounding the lower of two inclined boreholes, directionally-drilled to about 4 km in hot crystalline rock, has been pressurized in a sequence of injection tests. Based primarily on the measurements made by two close-in microseismic detectors, two similar volumetric reservoir regions have been developed by massive hydraulic fracturing, but with no significant hydraulic communication with the upper borehole as yet.

Brown, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

432

Data Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the data collected during the hot dry rock experimental project conducted by the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico from about 1971 through 1995. Five main categories of data were reviewed: (1) geologic data; (2) flow test data; (3) reservoir modeling data; (4) chemical tracer data; and (5) seismic data. The review determines the important data sets from the project, determines where and how these data are stored, and evaluates whether further analyses of the data might be likely to yield additional information valuable to the geothermal industry or to the further development of enhanced geothermal systems.

GeothermEx, Inc.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Response of Alum Rock springs to the October 30, 2007 Alum Rock earthquake and implications for the origin of increased discharge after earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of increased stream flow and spring discharge following earthquakes have been the subject of controversy, in large part because there are many models to explain observations and few measurements suitable for distinguishing between hypotheses. On October 30, 2007 a magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred near the Alum Rock springs, California, USA. Within a day we documented a several-fold increase in discharge. Over the following year, we have monitored a gradual return towards pre-earthquake properties, but for the largest springs there appears to be a permanent increase in the steady discharge at all the springs. The Alum Rock springs discharge waters that represent a mixture between modern ('shallow') meteoric water and old ('deep') connate waters expelled by regional transpression. After the earthquake, the increased discharge at the largest springs was accompanied by a small decrease in the fraction of connate water in the spring discharge. Combined with the rapid response, this implies that the increased discharge has a shallow origin. Increased discharge at these springs occurs for earthquakes that cause static volumetric expansion and those that cause contraction, supporting models in which dynamic strains are responsible for the subsurface changes that cause flow to increase. We show that models in which the permeability of the fracture system feeding the springs increases after the earthquake are in general consistent with the changes in discharge. The response of these springs to another earthquake will provide critical constraints on the changes that occur in the subsurface.

Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manga, Michael [UC BERKELEY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Present status of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field experiments have been conducted principally at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The completed phase I confirmed the technical feasibility of the HDR concept by creating a small hydraulically fractured reservoir and extracting heat from it for over a year at rates up to 5 megawatts. The second phase extends the technology to the creation and operation of an industrial-scale HDR system that will produce heat at a temperature and rate suitable for producing electricity, with thermal drawdown of less than 20% in 10 years. Operations have created three-dimensional fractured volumes capable of producing at least 35 MW(t) for not less than 10 years. Design, procurement, and construction of the phase II surface system is proceeding in preparation for an initial closed-loop flow test of two to four weeks duration in the third quarter of FY 1986. (ACR)

Nunz, G.J.; Franke, P.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heat flow in relation to hydrothermal activity in the southern Black Rock Desert, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an investigation of the Gerlach NE KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) a number of heat-flow measurements were made in playa sediments of the southern Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. These data together with additional previously unpublished heat-flow values reveal a complex pattern of heat flow with values ranging between 1.0 to 5.0 HFU (40 to 100 mWm/sup -2/) outside of the hot springs area. The mean heat flow for the 13 reported sites in the southern Black Rock Desert is 1.8 +- 0.15 HFU (75 +- 6 mWm/sup -2/). The complexity of the pattern of heat flow is believed to arise from hydrothermal circulation supporting the numerous hot springs throughout the region. The fact that the lowest observed heat flow occurs in the deepest part of the basin strongly suggests that fluid movement within the basin represents part of the recharge for the hydrothermal system. A thermal balance for the system incorporating both anomalous conductive heat loss and convective heat loss from the spring systems indicate a total energy loss of about 8.0 Mcal/sec or 34 megawatts over an estimated 1000 km/sup 2/ region. Consideration of this additional heat loss yields a mean regional heat flow of 2.5 + HFU (100 + mWm/sup -2/) and warrants inclusion of this region in the Battle Mountain heat-flow high (Lachenbruch and Sass, 1977, 1978).

Sass, J.H.; Zoback, M.L.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Roth Rock Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Wind Power Project Rock Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Roth Rock Wind Power Project Facility Roth Rock Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gestamp Wind North America Developer Synergics Energy Purchaser Delmarva Power Location South of Red House MD Coordinates 39.30105°, -79.458032° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.30105,"lon":-79.458032,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dependent creep driven by stress corrosion and subcritical crack growth (Lockner, 1998). This creep strongly1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of distributed damage long before, 1994, Lyakhovsky et al. 1997; Lockner, 1998). Further, the stress-induced damage may facilitate time

Ze'ev, Reches

439

Research paper Rock magnetic stratigraphy of a mafic layered sill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research paper Rock magnetic stratigraphy of a mafic layered sill: A key to the Karoo volcanics intrusion and part of the Karoo Large Igneous Province in South Africa. This well-exposed intrusion consists reserved. Keywords: AMS; magnetic susceptibility; Karoo; Insizwa; gabbro 1. Introduction Studies of Large

Ferré, Eric

440

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "3rd rock systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Micro-crack Damage Evolution of Fracturing Rock Chaotic Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chaotic theory and bifurcation of modern nonlinear science were used to study the evolution of micro-cracks under the hydraulic fracturing of the rock mass characteristics, the tensor damage variable which described the chao evolution of micro-cracks ... Keywords: chaos theory, bifurcation theory, damage evolution

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Issues facing the developmt of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat will be discussed. Topics covered will include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return.

Tester, J.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Rock mass response to the decline in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical problems of mining in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin were studied on the basis of longterm experience gained from seismological observations. They could serve as reasonable models of rock-mass response to temporary reduction and gradual decline in mining activities and mine closure.

Holub, K. [Academy of Science in Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

GEOS898 History on the Rocks Assignment 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goggles and aprons Magnifier Graph paper Ruler Colored pencils Small white marker boards (2x3 ft) (Prepare the remaining pictures and rock samples and continue drawing the column using graph paper, rules and colored pencils. (Additional pictures may be used from textbook and internet sources for added clarity.) (20

Frank, Tracy D.

445

New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin  

SciTech Connect

The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

Karakitsios, V. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Rigakis, N. [Public Petroleum Corp., Athens (Greece)

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z