Sample records for 301-916 ww tment

  1. W-W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W C -h J I Z?f;SF *W-W -

  2. WW and WZ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipeles, Elliot; /UC, San Diego

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

  3. Jet Vetoes interfering with H ? WW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moult, Ian James

    Far off-shell Higgs production in H ? WW, ZZ, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements ...

  4. Gudrun's (NLO) list pp->WW jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Joey

    Gudrun's (NLO) list 2->3 pp->WW jet pp->VVV pp->H + 2 jets 2->4 pp->4 jets pp->tT + 2jets p->tT bB pp->V+ 3 jets pp->VV + 2 jets pp->VVV + jet pp->WW bB From technology point-of-view start with massless cases such as + 2 jets then add progressively more difficult calculations (additional scales

  5. Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings are presented from a study of WW/WZ? e?jj events produced in pp collisions at s?=1.8?TeV. Results from the analysis of data collected using the D detector during the 19931995 Tevatron collider run...

  6. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY | DEpArTMENT OF EArTH, ATMOSpHErIC AND pLANETArY SCIENCES S AN UNDErGrADUATE at Carleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    at the forefront of debates on topics ranging from carbon capture and sequestration to space exploration, and EApMASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY | DEpArTMENT OF EArTH, ATMOSpHErIC AND pLANETArY SCIENCES of new sources of oil and gas, geological storage of carbon and nuclear waste, and the development

  7. Jet Vetoes Interfering with H->WW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Moult; Iain W. Stewart

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Far off-shell Higgs production in $H \\rightarrow WW,ZZ$, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements require an understanding of the cross section in the far off-shell region in the presence of realistic experimental cuts. We analytically study the effect of a $p_T$ jet veto on far off-shell cross sections, including signal-background interference, by utilizing hard functions in the soft collinear effective theory that are differential in the decay products of the $W/Z$. Summing large logarithms of $\\sqrt{\\hat s}/p_T^{veto}$, we find that the jet veto induces a strong dependence on the partonic centre of mass energy, $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$, and modifies distributions in $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$ or $M_T$. The example of $gg\\rightarrow H \\rightarrow WW$ is used to demonstrate these effects at next to leading log order. We also discuss the importance of jet vetoes and jet binning for the recent program to extract Higgs couplings and widths from far off-shell cross sections.

  8. $W^+W^-$ production at hadron colliders in NNLO QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gehrmann; M. Grazzini; S. Kallweit; P. Maierhfer; A. von Manteuffel; S. Pozzorini; D. Rathlev; L. Tancredi

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged gauge boson pair production at the Large Hadron Collider allows detailed probes of the fundamental structure of electroweak interactions. We present precise theoretical predictions for on-shell $W^+W^-$ production that include, for the first time, QCD effects up to next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbation theory. As compared to next-to-leading order, the inclusive $W^+W^-$ cross section is enhanced by 9% at 7 TeV and 12% at 14 TeV. The residual perturbative uncertainty is at the 3% level. The severe contamination of the $W^+W^-$ cross section due to top-quark resonances is discussed in detail. Comparing different definitions of top-free $W^+W^-$ production in the four and five flavour number schemes, we demonstrate that top-quark resonances can be separated from the inclusive $W^+W^-$ cross section without significant loss of theoretical precision.

  9. International civil air transport : transition following WW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pogue, L. Welch

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International air transport, like many 20th Century marvels which are taken so much for granted today, broke out from its cocoon, so to speak, shortly after the end of World War II (WW II), took wing, and soared. Theretofore, ...

  10. WW Production at the LHC in NLO Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranjes, N.; Simic, Lj.; Reljic, D.; Vudragovic, D.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The WW production via leptonic decay is studied using next-to-leading order generators. The output from the Baur, Han and Ohnemus (BHO) NLO code is compared with MC-NLO generator.

  11. Effects of the Noncommutative Standard Model in WW Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, John A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine W pair production in the Noncommutative Standard Model constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. Consideration of partial wave unitarity in the reactions WW {yields} WW and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} WW shows that the latter process is more sensitive and that tree-level unitarity is violated when scattering energies are of order a TeV and the noncommutative scale is below about a TeV. We find that WW production at the LHC is not sensitive to scales above the unitarity bounds. WW production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, however, provides a good probe of such effects with noncommutative scales below 300-400 GeV being excluded at LEP-II, and the ILC being sensitive to scales up to 10-20 TeV. In addition, we find that the ability to measure the helicity states of the final state W bosons at the ILC provides a diagnostic tool to determine and disentangle the different possible noncommutative contributions.

  12. Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing Tungsten Dimer CpW(CO)2(IMe)2. Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeBourgeois, Matthew; LeBourgeois, Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Search for the Higgs Boson in the WW Decay Channel . . .

  14. A study of W(+)W(?)? events at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; OPAL Collaboration; Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Å kesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.

    2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of strahlung from the W-pairs (WSR), and the im- ntation of O(?) electroweak NL corrections. e KORALW program [8] is used to simulate the round from four-fermion final states which are patible with coming from the decays of two W- s (e.g., e+e? ? qq+?? ). e... two-fermion background processes, e+e? ? ? qq and e+e? ? Z0/? ? ?+??, are sim- using KK2F [19]. The background in the ?? event selection from multi-peripheral two- n diagrams was found to be negligible. addition, the RacoonWW program [5] is used...

  15. PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, R.B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  16. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb? of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure ?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  17. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb? of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measuremore?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.less

  18. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for WW and WZ production in final states that contain a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least two jets, produced in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, using data corresponding ...

  19. Fuel Scheduling (Chapter 6 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    an interval of time. Since energy can be quantified in terms of amounts of fuel (natural gas, coal, oil1 Fuel Scheduling (Chapter 6 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction In economic dispatch we assumed the only it in the current context of LMP electricity markets: "In this context, it is known that a thermal plant

  20. CMS High mass WW and ZZ Higgs search with the complete LHC Run1 statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelliccioni, Mario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the decay of a heavy Higgs boson in the H$\\to$ZZ and H$\\to$WW channels is reported, analyzing several final states of the H$\\to$ZZ and H$\\to$WW decays. The search used proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and up to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV recorded with the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. A Higgs boson with Standard Model-like coupling and decays in the mass range of 145 $< m_H <$ 1000 GeV is excluded at 95\\% confidence level, based on the limit on the product of cross section and branching fraction. An interpretation of the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model is reported.

  1. Measurement of the W+W- Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous WW? and WWZ Couplings in pp[over-bar] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings in pp[over-bar] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ...

  2. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H?WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential of the process gg ? H? WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H? ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H ? WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H ? ZZ.

  3. Bose-Einstein Correlations in W+W- events at LEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The DELPHI Collaboration; J. Abdallah

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) between final state particles in the reaction e+e- -> W+W- -> q_1 anti-q_2 q_3 anti-q_4 have been studied. Data corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 550 pb^{-1}, recorded by the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 189 to 209 GeV, were analysed. An indication for inter-W BEC between like-sign particles has been found at the level of 2.4 standard deviations of the combined statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  4. A Search for Higgs Boson in $H\\rightarrow W^+W^-$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Sung; for the CMS Collaboration

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

  5. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H to WW Channel at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pursley; for the CDF Collaboration

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson to WW(*) production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8/fb of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c^2.

  6. Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass cells direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We present a comprehensive review of the state

  7. Measurement of the WW plus WZ Production Cross Section Using the lepton plus jets Final State at CDF II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW+WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp[over-bar] collision data at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV ...

  8. Combination of Tevatron Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the W(+)W(?) Decay Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W(+)W(?). The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron...

  9. Discovery of blue companions to two southern Cepheids: WW Car and FN Vel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovtyukh, V; Chekhonadskikh, F; Lemasle, B; Belik, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of high-dispersion spectra of classical Cepheids were obtained in the region of the CaII H+K spectral lines. The analysis of these spectra allowed us to detect the presence of a strong Balmer line, H$\\epsilon$, for several Cepheids, interpreted as the signature of a blue companion: the presence of a sufficiently bright blue companion to the Cepheid results in a discernible strengthening of the CaII H + Hepsilon line relative to the CaII K line. We investigated 103 Cepheids, including those with known hot companions (B5-B6 main-sequence stars) in order to test the method. We could confirm the presence of a companion to WW Car and FN Vel (the existence of the former was only suspected before) and we found that these companions are blue hot stars. The method remains efficient when the orbital velocity changes in a binary system cannot be revealed and other methods of binarity detection are not efficient.

  10. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  11. On the contribution of the double Drell-Yan process to WW and ZZ production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieczyslaw Witold Krasny; Wieslaw Placzek

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate consequences of an assumption that the discrepancy of the predicted and observed W+W- production cross sections at the LHC is caused by the missing contribution of the double Drell-Yan process (DDYP). Using our simple model of DDYP of Ref. [1] we show that inclusion of this production mechanism leads to a satisfactory, parameter-free description of the two-lepton mass distribution for 0-jet W+W- events and the four-lepton mass distribution for ZZ events. In such a scenario the Higgs-boson contribution is no longer necessary to describe the data. An experimental programme to prove or falsify such an assumption is proposed.

  12. Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

  13. Top Background to SM Higgs Searches in the W^-W^+=>2l2nu Decay Mode at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Davatz; A. S. Giolo-Nicollerat; M. Zanetti

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark and its properties within and beyond the Standard Model will be extensively studied at the incoming Large Hadron Collider. Nonetheless the top quark will play the role of the main background for most of the Higgs and new physics searches. In this paper the top as a background to H=>WW=>2l2nu Higgs discovery channel will be studied. The current status of the Monte Carlo tools for t-tbar and single top simulation will be presented. Finally the problem on how to evaluate the top background from the data will be addressed and the related systematics will be discussed.

  14. Measurement of the W?W? Cross Section in ?s=7 TeV pp Collisions with ATLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amors, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter presents a measurement of the W?W? production cross section in ?s=7 TeV pp collisions by the ATLAS experiment, using 34 pb? of integrated luminosity produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Selecting events with two isolated leptons, each either an electron or a muon, 8 candidate events are observed with an expected background of 1.70.6 events. The measured cross section is 41+20-16(stat)5(syst)1(lumi) pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction of 443 pb calculated at next-to-leading order in QCD.

  15. Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300754 GeV at 95% C.L.

  16. Measurement of WW Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

  17. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW?l?jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amors, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW?l?jj channel in 1.04 fb? of pp collision data at ?s=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeVH=400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H?WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

  18. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; deJong, S. J.; DeLaCruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4??<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  19. Search for the Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays in p(p)over-bar collisions at root(s)=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays with e(+)e(-), e(+/-)mu(-/+), and mu(+)mu(-) final states in p (p) over bar collisions at a center-of-mass-energy of root s = 1.96 TeV. The data, collected from April 2002...

  20. Search for the Higgs boson in the H ? WW ? ?vjj decay channel at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW???jj channel using 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the ...

  1. Search for new phenomena in the WW??????? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter reports a search for a heavy particle that decays to WW using events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of ...

  2. Search for resonant WW and WZ production in ppbar collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model of particle physics is expected to be a low energy effective theory valid for particle interactions below the TeV scale. Above this scale, extensions to the standard model (SM) augment the existing particle content, leading to enhanced production of many final states at colliders. Specifically, the production and decay of massive charged or neutral particles can produce an excess of W boson pairs for neutral particles or W and Z boson pairs for charged particles. We search for resonant WW or WZ production using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass using the sequential standard model (SSM) W{prime} boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude an SSM W{prime} boson in the mass range 180-690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300-754 GeV at 95% CL.

  3. First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

  4. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to W+W- production via vector-boson fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Jager; Carlo Oleari; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Vector-boson fusion processes constitute an important class of reactions at hadron colliders, both for signals and backgrounds of new physics in the electroweak interactions. We consider what is commonly referred to as W+W- production via vector-boson fusion (with subsequent leptonic decay of the Ws), or, more precisely, e+ nu_e mu- nubar_mu + 2 jets production in proton-proton scattering, with all resonant and non-resonant Feynman diagrams and spin correlations of the final-state leptons included, in the phase-space regions which are dominated by t-channel electroweak-boson exchange. We compute the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, at order alpha^6 alpha_s. The QCD corrections are modest, changing total cross sections by less than 10%. Remaining scale uncertainties are below 2%. A fully-flexible next-to-leading order partonic Monte Carlo program allows to demonstrate these features for cross sections within typical vector-boson-fusion acceptance cuts. Modest corrections are also found for distributions.

  5. $W^{+}W^{-}$ production and triple gauge boson couplings at LEP energies up to 183 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Bhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Frtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruw, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Hcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horvth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Khl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yal; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martnez, G; Mashimo, T; Mttig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; gren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Plinks, J; Psztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Prez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runlfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schning, A; Schrder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Sldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Strhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Trne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trcsnyi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of W-pair production in e+e- annihilations at Lep2 is presented, based on 877 W+W- candidates corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 57 pb-1 at sqrt(s) = 183 GeV. Assuming that the angular distributions of the W-pair production and decay, as well as their branching fractions, are described by the Standard Model, the W-pair production cross-section is measured to be 15.43 +- 0.61 (stat.) +- 0.26 (syst.) pb. Assuming lepton universality and combining with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies, the W branching fraction to hadrons is determined to be 67.9 +- 1.2 (stat.) +- 0.5 (syst.)%. The number of W-pair candidates and the angular distributions for each final state (qqlnu,qqqq,lnulnu) are used to determine the triple gauge boson couplings. After combining these values with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies we obtain D(kappa_g)=0.11+0.52-0.37, D(g^z_1)=0.01+0.13-0.12 and lambda=-0.10+0.13-0.12, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties and each co...

  6. Colour reconnection in $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=189-209 GeV$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; kesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruw, M; Gnther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horvth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von, J H; Krogh, A; Khl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yal; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; L, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mttig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Psztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schrner-Sadenius, T; Schrder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Sldner-Rembold, S; Span, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Strhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trcsnyi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvri, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the final state interaction phenomenon known as colour reconnection are investigated at centre-of-mass energies in the range $\\sqrt{s}~ 189-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Colour reconnection is expected to affect observables based on charged particles in hadronic decays of W+W-. Measurements of inclusive charged particle multiplicities, and of their angular distribution with respect to the four jet axes of the events, are used to test models of colour reconnection. The data are found to exclude extreme scenarios of the Sjostrand-Khoze Type I (SK-I) model and are compatible with other models, both with and without colour reconnection effects. In the context of the SK-I model, the best agreement with data is obtained for a reconnection probability of 37%. Assuming no colour reconnection, the charged particle multiplicity in hadronically decaying W bosons is measured to be (nqqch) = 19.38+-0.05(stat.)+-0.08 (syst.).

  7. Search for the Higgs boson in H ---> WW(*) decays in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in H {yields} WW{sup (*)} decays with e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} final states in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data, collected from April 2002 to June 2004 with the D0 detector, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 300-325 pb{sup -1}, depending on the final state. The number of events observed is consistent with the expectation from backgrounds. Limits from the combination of all three channels on the Higgs production cross section times branching ratio {sigma} x BR(H {yields} WW{sup (*)}) are presented.

  8. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|WC/?|<0.0092 GeV?.

  9. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermorelimits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|WC/?|less

  10. Determination of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damin; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jrg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states in the mass range above the $2m_Z$ and $2m_W$ thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents a determination of the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the $ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell2\

  11. Determination of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states in the mass range above the $2m_Z$ and $2m_W$ thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents a determination of the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the $ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell2\

  12. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

  13. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145

  14. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in CMS via Vector Boson Fusion in the H->WW->l?l?Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Yazgan; J. Damgov; N. Akchurin; V. Genchev; D. Green; S. Kunori; M. Schmitt; W. Wu; M. T. Zeyrek

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the potential for discovering the Standard Model Higgs boson produced by the vector-boson fusion mechanism. We considered the decay of Higgs bosons into the W+W- final state, with both W-bosons subsequently decaying leptonically. The main background is ttbar with one or more jets produced. This study is based on a full simulation of the CMS detector, and up-to-date reconstruction codes. The result is that a signal of 5 sigma significance can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 12-72 1/fb for Higgs boson masses between 130-200 GeV. In addition, the major background can be measured directly to 7% from the data with an integrated luminosity of 30 1/fb. In this study, we also suggested a method to obtain information in Higgs mass using the transverse mass distributions.

  15. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW*?l??l?? Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amors, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW*?l??l?? channel (l=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb? of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeV

  16. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; deJong, S. J.; DeLaCruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4?<0.4 and -0.08?<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  17. Search for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson decaying into WW to l nu qqbar in exclusive jet bins in pp collisions at sqrt s = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into the WW final state is performed with an integrated luminosity of up to 19.3~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$~=~8~TeV in the high mass region $600 < m_{\\rm H} < 1000$~GeV.

  18. UNITED STATES DEPAR.TMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a clear oil. At this stage the #12;oil is ready for market as crude marine oil. Marine oils have been by filtration, and the filtrate is marketed as light cold- pressed marine oil. Thus, light cold FISHERIES WASHINGTON, D.C. FISHERY LEAFLET 528 #12;MARINE OILS - ') NEW AVENUES FOR VENTURE Marine oils

  19. U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSIS (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  20. U.S. DEPAR T.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  1. U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the protocols in place for laboratory safety, risk management, chemical handling and waste disposal. SolarBridge is located at 9229 Waterford Centre Boulevard 110, Austin....

  2. Study of the Higgs boson decaying to $WW^*$ produced in association with a weak boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or a $Z$ boson, in the decay channel $H \\to WW^*$, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7~{\\rm TeV}$ and $8~{\\rm TeV}$, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in three and two lepton final states, while a four lepton final state is used to search for $ZH$ production. The observed significance is of 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected for a Standard Model Higgs boson. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{\\rm VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{\\rm VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for a Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ channels are also combined with the gluon-gluon fusion and vector boson fusion ...

  3. The Chemical Compositions of the SRd Variable Stars. III. KK Aquilae, AG Aurigae, Z Aurigae, W Leo Minoris, and WW Tauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Giridhar; D. L. Lambert; G. Gonzalez

    2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical compositions are derived from high-resolution spectra for five field SRd variables. These supergiants not previously analysed are shown to be metal-poor: KK Aql with [Fe/H] = -1.2, AG Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.8, Z Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.4, W LMi with [Fe/H] = -1.1, and WW Tau with [Fe/H] = -1.1. Their compositions are, except for two anomalies, identical to within the measurement errors with the compositions of subdwarfs, subgiants, and less evolved giants of the same [Fe/H]. One anomaly is an s-process enrichment for KK Aql, the first such enrichment reported for a SRd variable. The second and more remarkable anomaly is a strong lithium enrichment for W LMi, also a first for field SRds. The Li I 6707 A profile is not simply that of a photospheric line but includes strong absorption from red-shifted gas, suggesting, perhaps, that lithium enrichment results from accretion of Li-rich gas. This potential clue to lithium enrichment is discussed in light of various proposals for lithium synthesis in evolved stars.

  4. Study of $(W/Z)H$ production and Higgs boson couplings using $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson, in the $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two-lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the $ZH$ production mode. The observed significance, for the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ produc...

  5. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H to WW to l nu jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeV < m{sub H} < 600 GeV. The best sensitivity is reached for m{sub H} = 400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H {yields} WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

  6. First analysis of eight Algol-type systems: V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zasche, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing available photometry from the Super WASP and other databases, we performed the very first light curve analysis of eight eclipsing binary systems V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri. All of these systems were found to be detached ones of Algol-type, having the orbital periods of the order of days. 722 new times of minima for these binaries were derived and presented, trying to identify the period variations caused by the third bodies in these systems.

  7. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sfyrla, Anna; /Geneva U.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is {sigma}{sub WW/WZ}{sup theory} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 2.09 {+-} 0.14 pb. They measured N{sub Signal} = 410 {+-} 212(stat) {+-} 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 1.47 {+-} 0.77(stat) {+-} 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be {sigma} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels consist of 4088 silicon modules, with a total of 6.3 million readout channels. The coherent and safe operation of the SCT during commissioning and subsequent operation is the essential task of the Detector Control System (DCS). The main building blocks of the DCS are the cooling system, the power supplies and the environmental system. The DCS has been initially developed for the SCT assembly phase and this system is described in the present work. Particular emphasis is given in the environmental hardware and software components, that were my major contributions. Results from the DCS testing during the assembly phase are also reported.

  8. ww.biocycle.net Curbside Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    combusted at waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities (includes MSW combusted with out energy recovery - less than 1, 28.5 percent is recycled and composted, 7.4 percent is combusted in waste-to- energy plants and 64 by region, 2004 Westt tAlso includes Alaska and Hawaii SOURCE: BloCycie ORIGINAL METHODS Midwest The 2004

  9. As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it !D;rC. ,, *'As

  10. Limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings B. Abbott,31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Go´mez,1 G. Go´mez,25 P. I. Goncharov,38 J. L. Gonza´lez Soli´s,11 H. Gordon,4 L. T. Goss,48 K

  11. ffiregwrewKwWw 0nIneAntalctiGPeninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    are support staff hired by Raytheon Cor- poration to run the station. Experimentsin sucha remote location it to Raytheon. (

  12. Studies of WW and WZ production and limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings B. Abbott,45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,27 Y. Gershtein,51 B. Gibbard,48 B. Gobbi,30 B. Go´mez,5 G. Go´mez,38 P. I. Goncharov,18 J. L. Gonza

  13. 1. This document is VM148, one of a series of the Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences Depar tment, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    to a Suspected Toxin-Induced Fish Kill 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd and Christopher Brooks, and Denise Petty2 Occasionally catastrophic fish kills occur in aquaculture production facilities as well as in home aquaria or emotional loss, and because it is often unexpected it can be a shock. A catastrophic fish kill is one

  14. BMRB is a member of the wwPDB BMRB collaborates with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    -Rosetta? ! It is an existing software package " "System for chemical shifts based protein structure prediction using ROSETTA annealing " Simulated heating and cooling of protein results in a protein shape with the lowest net energy file to Condor and monitors progress ! Sends e-mails to author to inform them of progress #12;Condor

  15. The Higgs boson and the physics of $WW$ scattering before and after Higgs discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Szleper

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a comprehensive overview of the physics of vector boson scattering (VBS) in the dawn of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Recalled here are some of its most basic physics principles, the historical relation between vector boson scattering and the Higgs boson, then discussed is the physics of VBS processes after Higgs discovery, and the prospects for future VBS measurements at the LHC and beyond. This monograph reviews the work of many people, including previously published theoretical work as well as experimental results, but also contains a portion of original simulation-based studies that have not been published before.

  16. Limits on WW and WWZ couplings from W boson pair production B. Abbott,31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,23 B. Go´mez,1 G. Go´mez,25 P. I. Goncharov,38 J. L. Gonza´lez Soli´s,11 H. Gordon,4 L. T. Goss,48 K

  17. Limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings from WWWZ\\e jj production B. Abbott,47

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Genser,29 C. E. Gerber,29 Y. Gershtein,53 B. Gibbard,50 R. Gilmartin,27 G. Ginther,48 B. Gobbi,32 B. Go´mez,5 G. Go´mez,40 P. I. Goncharov,19 J. L. Gonza´lez Soli´s,15 H. Gordon,50 L. T. Goss,55 K. Gounder,26

  18. Off-Shell Scattering Amplitudes for WW Scattering and the Role of the Photon Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bartels; F. Schwennsen

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytic expressions for high energy $2 \\to 2$ off-shell scattering amplitudes of weak vector bosons. They are obtained from six fermion final states in processes of the type $e^+ e^- \\to \\bar\

  19. QCD radiation effects on the H ---> WW ---> l nu l nu signal at the LHC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dissertori, Gunther; Stockli, Fabian; Webber, Bryan R

    -De Ridder, T. Gehrmann, E. W. N. Glover and G. Heinrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 132002 (2007) [arXiv:0707.1285 [hep-ph

  20. Production Costing (Chapter 8 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    and branch limits. Locational marginal prices: LMPs may be computed. Maintenance schedules: Maintenance. For example, the Midwest ISO used a production cost program to understand the effect on energy prices

  1. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] and 19.4 fb[superscript ?1] collected with ...

  2. Y. Tang W.W. Hsieh Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: II ENSO prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    skills shifted eastward in the 1990s. A nonlinear canonical correlation analysis of the zonal wind stress have to be parameterized; (3) proper initialization of the coupled model is difficult; and (4) the cost understanding of the coupled mechanisms and lower computing cost than a full CGCM (Blanke et al. 1997), and (3

  3. W$w 'ffi,ffiffiffiffi lJniversityof NewMexicoNROTCUnit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    '''from 0700to 2100. Early check-inwill be coordinatedthroughmyself.Early check-inis highly encouraged you know what hall you will be in. A feeof $30will be assessedto your bursars account.Early check-inis

  4. EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune- BatteryVehicles | EVofDepartment of3

  5. AGC (Chapter 9 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    clocks Steam-turbine blades may lose life or fail under frequencies that vary from design levels. Some. 1a below). Fig. 1a Figure 9.2 should also provide a "local" loop feeding back a turbine speed signal

  6. EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroup Report |of Energyof6, 2012,ofOn

  7. Edge-reinforced random walk on a ladder 1 2 Franz Merkl 3 Silke W.W. Rolles 4 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    walk, recurrence, random environment, Gibbs measure, transfer operator. 3 Mathematical Institute] in the special case of reversible chains. The distribution of the environment is given by a joint density which of the ladder as a random walk in a random environment. This environment is given by a marginal of a multi

  8. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  9. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; /ABC Federal U.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  10. Measurement of triple gauge boson couplings from $W^{+}W^{-}$ production at LEP energies up to 189 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Ainsley, C; kesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Baumann, S; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Bhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Cammin, J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Frtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruw, M; Gnther, P O; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauke, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horvth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Khl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yal; Lanske, D; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; L, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martnez, G; Mashimo, T; Mttig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Mndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; gren, H O; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Psztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runlfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schrder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Sldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Strhmer, R; Stumpf, L; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tarem, S; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Toya, D; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trcsnyi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Vachon, B; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of triple gauge boson couplings is presented, based on W-pair data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP during 1998 at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 183 pb^-1. After combining with our previous measurements at centre-of-mass energies of 161-183 GeV we obtain k_g=0.97 +0.20 -0.16, g_1^z=0.991 +0.060 -0.057 and lambda_g=-0.110 +0.058 -0.055, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties and each coupling is determined by setting the other two couplings to their SM values. These results are consistent with the Standard Model expectations.

  11. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

  12. Measurement of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calandri, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster is focused on the indirect measurement of the Higgs boson width through the constraints on the off-shell Higgs coupling in the high mass region using the H->4l decay channel. The production cross section for the off-shell Higgs boson with decay into vector bosons is proportional to the product of the couplings squared for production and decay. Unlike the on-shell cross section, this observable is independent of the total Higgs width. Therefore, the ratio of the on and off-shell couplings provides an indirect measurement on the total Higgs width. Two different versions of the posters (CONF note and paper results) are provided.

  13. http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/368079_gatesqa24ww.html Q&A: Gates talks about letting go, the future and the foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    'm prodding people: 'Hey, have you looked at this,' or 'Boy, this is a really good piece of work,' or 'Maybe things, or even helping them with some of their agricultural things, or using DVD availability to help behavior, and at the company's business practices -- would you have done anything differently? Gates: Well

  14. Measurement of the WW production cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root(s)over-bar=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the observed signal is 2.3x10(-7), equivalent to 5.2 standard deviations. The measurement yields a cross section of 13.8(-3.8)(+4.3)(stat)(-0.9)(+1.2)(syst)+/- 0.9(lum) pb, in agreement with predictions from the standard model....

  15. Measurement of the pp-bar?W?+X cross section at s?=1.96 TeV and WW? anomalous coupling limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Christofek, L.|J|abeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The cross section times branching fraction for pp-bar?W(?)+X????+X with E(?)(T)>8 GeV and ?R(??)> 0.7 is 14.81.6(stat)1.0(syst)1.0(lum)??pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are ?0.88

  16. [MRO] Search for resonant diboson production in the WW/WZ???jj decay channels with the ATLAS detector at ?s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for resonant diboson production using a data sample corresponding to 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV ...

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in p anti-p Interactions with the Decay Mode H --> W+W- --> mu+nu mu-anti-nu at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Dale Morgan; /Nebraska U.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions resulting in two muons and large missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected between April 2002 and December 2008 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant excess above the background estimation is observed and limits are derived on Higgs boson production.

  18. Measurement of W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous WWZ and WW? couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This paper presents a measurement of the W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production cross section in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The leptonic decay channels are analyzed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

  19. How We Achieved a 41% Energy Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maze, M. E.

    in this pape~. Abbott Labo~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide health ca~e company with 1984 sales in excess of $3.1 billion. Abbott employs some 34,000 people in 28 domestic and 44 inte~ational locations. ou~ ene~gy conse~vation p~og~am was sta~ted in 1973 du...~ing the A~ab oil emba~go, but the ene~gy conse~vation depa~tment was not fo~ed until 1977. This depa~tment consists of myself, 2 enginee~s, and a sec~eta~y, and we a~e the only people in the company devoting full time to ene~gy conse~vation. Each plant...

  20. Construction of tree volume tables from integration of taper equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffman, Jerry Gale

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 1973 Major Subject: Forest Science CONSTRUCTION OF TREE VOLUME TABLES FROM INTEGRATION OF TAPER EqUATIONS A Thesis by JERRY GALE COFFMAN Approved as to style and content by: , . . -('7)i- 7 Jf A~(''~--- (Chairman of Committee) (8 ad... of Dsp ar tment) (Member) (Member August 1973 488899 ABSTRACT Construction of Tree Volume Tables From Integration of Taper Equations. (August. 1973) Jerry Gale Coffman, B. S. F. , University of Arkansas at Monticello; Directed by: Dr. De~id M...

  1. Removal of testa from food grade copra by air classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopitakwong, Rommanee

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOVAL OF TESTA FROM FOOD GRADE COPRA BY AIR CLASSIFICATION A Thesi. s by ROMMANEE LOPITAKWONG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1975 Major Subject: Food Technology REMOVAL OF TESTA FROM FOOD GRADE COPRA BY AIR CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by ROMMANEE LOPITAKWONG Approved as to style and content by: (Ch irman of Comm'ttee) ad of Dep tment) Member) (Member) December 1975...

  2. Identification of added rye chromosomes in wheat-rye addition lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Kuang Shy

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION OF ADDED RYE CHROMOSOMES IN WHEAT-RYE ADDITION LINES A Thesis by Kuang Shy Tang Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&K University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975... Major Subject: Genetics IDENTIFICATION OF ADDED RYE CHROMOSOMES IN WHEAT-RYE ADDITION LINES A Thesis by Kuang Shy Tang Approved as to style and content by: Chairm f Committee ember Head of Dep tment Member May 1975 428045 ABSTRACT...

  3. Biochemical changes in speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus) preserved with ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, James Donald

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN SPECKLED TROUT (CYNOSCION NEBULOSUS) PRESERVED WITH ICE A Thesis by JAMES DONALD GLOVER Approved as to style and content by: (C irman of Committee) emb ) (Head of Depa tment) (Member ) August 1970 ABSTRACT... Biochemical Changes in Speckled Trout (Cynoscion Nebulosus) Preserved with Ice. (August 1970) James Donald Glover, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Bryant F. Cobb III One hundred-sixty speckled trout were purchased from retail fish markets...

  4. Heavy metals emission from controlled combustion of PVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ayyoubi, Mohammed A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Malave (Mem er) G. mble Bennett (Head of Depar tment) August 1989 ABSTRACT Heavy Metals Emission from Combustion of PVC. (August 1989) Mohammed A. El-Ayyoubi, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. John P. Wagner... The primary purpose of this research paper is the identification of heavy metals and other potentially harmful smoke components emitted to the atmosphere as a result of Poly(vinyl chloride) combustion in municipal incinerators . In addition, analysis...

  5. The effect of diagenesis on enhanced recovery methods in Frio reservoir sandstones of the middle Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mark Alan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (H of Depa tment) (Member) ABSTRACT The Effect of Diagenesis on Enhancec Recovery Methods in Frio Reservoi- Sandstones of the Middle Texas Gulf Coast. (May, lg81) Hark Alan West, B. S. , Baylor University Chairman... of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas T. Tieh The Frio reservoir sanostcnes at Agua Dulce, Nine Mile Point, McCampbell Deep and Mesquite Bay fields provide an interesting study of how complex diagenetic histories affect reservoir quality. Bur''al depths...

  6. Ultrasound as a method for reducing bacteria on poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feria, Rebeca

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control in poultry. . Processing . Temperature. . Acid treatmen. ts. Chlorination. Packaging Ultrasonic radiat ion. MATERIAL ANO MET:HOO'S. Use of ultrasound: in a pre-chill treatment. . Use of ultrasound in a I'X lactic acid post-chill treatment... Microbiological eval. uation Statistical analysts. RESULTS. Effect of pre-chill ultrasonic treatments on total aerobic bacterial numbers. . . . . . Effect of IX lactic acid post-chill ultrasonic tree, tments on total aerobic bacterial numbers . OISCU...

  7. The effect of osmotic shock on purine base transport in Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Hubert

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OP OSMOTIC SHOCK ON PURINE BASE TRANSPORT IN NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by James Hubert Thomas Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... tment) December 1977 ABSTRACT The Effect of Osmotic Shock on Purine Base Transport i ~N . (D |, 1977) James Hubert Thomas, B, S. , University of Texas Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jane M. Magill The transport of adenine was found...

  8. Visual discrimination at varying distances in domestic goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakeman, Nancy Elizabeth

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VISUAL DISCRIMINATION AT VARYINS DISTANCES IN DOMESTIC BOATS A Theaia by NANCY ELIZABETH SLAKEMAN Submitted ta the Sraduate Cel lege ef Taxaa ACcH Univaraity in partial fulfil leant of the requireeents far the degree ef MASTER OF 'SCIENCE... ) J. W. Bassett (Member ) S. C. Bait (Head' o+ Dept-tment) December 1983 Visual Discrimination at Varying Distances in Domestic Boats (December 1983) Nancy Elizabeth Blakeman, B. S. ~ Texas A S N University Chairman of Advisory Coemittee. Dr...

  9. actinide soil contaminants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resulted in an approximate 20 to 30 % reduction of Aroclor concentration compared to the controls. Tests applying Tween 80 at 15% (ww) with NaOH at 2 % (ww) indicated that the...

  10. Le Dieu cach de Craig : aspects spirituels de l'esthtique craigienne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    't-- conviction it is. Sur une reproduction du Repas Emmas de Rembrandt, il inscrit les initiales WW au

  11. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Lepton + Missing Transverse Energy + Jets Final State in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H \\rightarrow WW \\rightarrow l{\

  12. Producing methane from electrical current generated using renewable energy sources using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where WW flows into the ocean Waste Heat Energy 500 GW from industrial waste heat 1000 GW from

  13. Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

  14. Aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuien, Larry Jay

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AEROELASTIC ANALYSIS OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis by LARRY JAY NcQUIEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&'N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject...: Aerospace Engineering AEROELASTIC ANALYSIS OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis LARRY JAY McQUIEN Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) / l (Co-Chair an o f Commi t tee) (Head of Depa tment) (Nember) (Nember) December 1977...

  15. Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ eluding equipment, installation, and both consumer, and vendor engineering; 2) the most likely future power savings, Predicting the likely power savings of a prot posed ORC system involves substantial uncertainty!. One can be assured, however..., the effect of source temperature and condenser temperature on output can be approximated by the fo 11 OI"i nr:: C3~t ~ Base Source Temp 350?F - Base Condenser Tem ( lO03F, AdJus tment t~ew Source Temp -t~e\\, oondenser emp Normally air cooled condensers...

  16. A study of the design criteria for drilled-and-belled footings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Clark Thomas

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED?AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis Clark Thomas Lehmann Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964... Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED-AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis By Clark Thomas Lehmann Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommittee Head ep tment Nay, 1964 4 0 0 N F 5 O ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  17. The oxidation of ethylene glycol by a salt-requiring bacterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caskey, William Horton

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE OXIDATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL BY A SALT-REQUIRING BACTERIUM A Thesis by WILLIAM HORTON CASKEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1975 Major Subject: Microbiology THE OXIDATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL BY A SALT-REQUIRING BACTERIUM A Thesis by WILLIAM HORTON CASKEY Approved as to style and content by: '2~~m- P, &~- Chairman of Committee (Head o f D epar tment) Member...

  18. Editorials and fiction in "The Craftsman Magazine" (1901-1916): mirror of an age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holm, Judith Stout

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDITORIALS AND FICTION IN THE CRAFI'SMAN MAGAZINE (1901 ? 1916): MIRROR OF AN AGE A Thesis by JUDITH STOUT HOLM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS December 1975 Major Subject: English EDITORIALS AND FICTION IN THE CRAFTSMAN MAGAZINE (1901 ? 1916): MIRROR OF AN AGE A Thesis by JUDITH STOUT HOLM Approved as to style and content by: t (Chairman of Committee) (He of D pa tment...

  19. A real-time airborne scatterometer data processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisor, Gary James

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A REAL-TIME AIRBORNE SCATTEROMETER DATA PROCES'SOR A Thesis by Gary James Reisor Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M Vniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major... Subject: Electrical Fngineering A REAL-TIME AIRBORNE SCATTEROMETER DATA PROCESSOR A Thesis by Gary James Reisor Approved as to style and content by: arrman o Committee Hea o Depa tment em er Mem er August 1976 ABSTRACT A Real-time Airborne...

  20. Hot gas path analysis and data evaluation of the performance parameters of a gas turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanawa, David Allen

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HOT GAS PATH ANALYSIS AND DATA EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF A GAS TURBINE A Thesis by DAVID AI, LEN HANAWA Approved as to style and content by: PfnA J 7 EY3 .j (Chairman... of -Committee) zr (Head of Depai'tment) Member) /i ~E" Egg(JQJ a g i (Member) (Member) December l974 ABSTRACT Ho Gas Path Ana'ysis and Data Evaluation o. the Performance Parameters of a Gas Turbine (December 1974) David Allen Hanawa, B. S. , Texas A...

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity of activated alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Gerald Leland

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to choose between the various theories presented concerning the actual phenomena respon sible for loss of Catalyst activity on firing. The activity loss mey be due to a growth in siss of particles having homogeneous eur? facese or a decrease...EFFECT OF lRAT 5KATJRNT ON 1HE CATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF ACTIVAmD ALUMINA A Thesis Gerald Leland Farrar January~ 1950 Approval as to style and content recosnendedi ~ ~ Head of tte tment of Chemical E ring EFFECT CF HEAT THEATMPNT QN...

  2. Conceptual development of a continuous burning system for oil spill remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataramaiah, Ramesh H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system for channelization of burning oil. TOW BOAT TOW BOAT TETHER TO MAINTAIN ~ V - V 0 N F I G U R A T I 0 N IGNITION SLED WITH FUEL TANK, RADIO CONTROL IGNITION SYSTEM AND BURNERS RADIO CONTROL BY VESSEL BURNING OIL IN FIRE CHANNEL BXI FEET... of Co 'ttee) Tom D. l s (Member) R. B. Igonz (Metnber) mes T, P. ao (Head of De tment) December 1992 111 ABSTRACT Conceptual Development of a Continuous Burning System for Oil Spill Remediation . (December 1992) Rsmesh H. Venkataramaiah, B. E...

  3. Sex as a factor in attitudes toward the mentally ill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Hal Dennis

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's fictitious name on a fake list of subjects and then the following dialogue took place, depending upon which condition was being carried out: Condition l. E: "Uh, (fake name), you mis, , ed your appoin'tment last week, right?" Confederate: "Yeah. " 24 E..., on how to perform on the task. The confederate then finished the task part, of' the experiment by performing 5 final trials. After this, the E said 26 he wanted to talk *o each S alone and tolo. the confederate, "Nhy do you wait outside first, (fake...

  4. Expenses as a component of inventory cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Eugene H

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?ocess cost accounting. While it is not necessary to give exhaust1ve t eetment to this sub]ect, a short desc?ip tion of the method' used 1. necessa?y to establish an 1m- portant point Job order cost accounting is us, d in manufactu?ing when p?oduction... of total manufacturing cost applicable to clearly dis tinguishable lots as they pass through various manufacturing processes or depa?tments ~ In this system, it is possible to compute the unit cost of each finished p?oduct by accumulating the total...

  5. A study of clear-air turbulence from detailed wind profiles over Cape Kennedy, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, James Harvey

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF CLEAR-AIR TURBULENCE FROM DETAII. ED WIND PROFILES OVER CAPE KENNEDY, FLORIDA A Thesis by James Harvey Blackburn, Jr. Captain United States Air Force Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ittee) (Head of Dep tment...) (Amber) (Member) May 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Clear-Air Turbulence from Detailed Wind Profiles Over Cape Kennedy, Florida. James H. Blackburn, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A6N University Directed by: Dr. James R. Scoggins Clear-air turbulence (CAT...

  6. c3fa52728ece 9. Sustainable cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .co.uk/energy/ cos0 QQ Lamberts Law This requires cos(), ww.brighton-web which in turn is de- pendent on location.co.uk/energy/ ii cossinsincos the azimuth angle of the plane ww.brighton-web coscoscoscos cossincossin p.co.uk/energy/ 6364.1 07995.9650572.0cos 1 AM This is due to gases and particles that absorb heat ww.brighton-web

  7. Preweaning growth characteristics for Brahman-Angus embryo transfer calves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Billy Jack

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Kriese et al. (1991) reported maternal heritability estimate ranges of . 15 to . 21 for Brahman-derived breeds. These estimates were similar to those reported by Bertrand and Benyshek (1987). Higher estimates for WW heritability of paternal half... similar to those reported by Bertrand and Benyshek (1987) . Paternal half-sibs had a WW heritability estimate of . 24 + . 18. Similar estimates for WW heritability of paternal half-sibs was been reported several authors. Aaron et al. (1987), reported...

  8. Perfect single error-correcting codes in the Johnson scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Dan

    a necessary condition for a code to be regular: Theorem 1: If C is k-regular, then 1(w, a) = 1 + w(w + a) 2w

  9. Mechanisms for Fatigue of Micron-Scale Silicon Structural Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsem, Daan Hein; Pierron, Olivier N.; Stach, Eric A.; Muhlstein, Christopher L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2003, 12, 313. 13.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2001, 10, 593. 25.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2006, 15, W.W. van

  10. Complete off-shell effects in top quark pair hadroproduction with leptonic decay at next-to-leading order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Bevilacqua; Michal Czakon; Andreas van Hameren; Costas G. Papadopoulos; Malgorzata Worek

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the pp(p\\bar{p}) -> t \\bar{t} -> W^+W^- b\\bar{b} -> e^{+} \

  11. Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models as an example) Jim Jr-Min Lin 2014.09.26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models (Max) Energy Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAS-22NB 1.00 3.20 0 Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAM-5FNS(B) - 12.5 - 2.91 - 4.3 RAM-6FNS

  12. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITE NAME: CITY: & &&at leg co Current: --- Owner contacted 0 yes p no; if yem, date contacted --w---w------ TYPE OF OPERATION The TSYI L-- Tj flmf...

  13. Study of the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in diboson decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the spin, parity and tensor couplings of the Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ , $H\\rightarrow WW^* \\rightarrow e\

  14. Development of segmented x-ray mirrors for Constellation-X R. Petrec, c. Chen", L.M. Cohenc, D.A. Content', R. J. Harmsd, G. Monnellyb, T. T. Saha", ML.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .A. Content', R. J. Harmsd, G. Monnellyb, T. T. Saha", ML. Schattenburg", p j Serlemitsos a and W.W. Zhang a a

  15. Lab subcontractor a major asset to Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ww.quiviracoalition.org) Cochiti Community Development Corporation: After extensive fire damage last year, Cochiti Pueblo needed to obtain grants and other support for...

  16. Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Francis

    Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment of WW2 Japanese Naval Intercepts Peter W. Donovan M work in all areas, from the Japanese codes to the German Enigma machine which Alan Turing had begun of communications intelligence to the WW2 Allies in the Pacific. Alan Turing's Work on Applied Probability

  17. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12; EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12; EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  18. Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12; EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

  19. Semicontinuity properties of Kazhdan-Lusztig cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnaf, Cdric

    algebra: H = wW ATw #12;Kazhdan-Lusztig cells Notation A = Z[R] = R Zv , K = Frac(A) A Zv Hecke algebra: H = wW ATw Tx Ty = Txy if (xy) = (x) + (y) (Ts - v(s) )(Ts + v-(s) ) = 0

  20. Low Temperature Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

  1. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  2. VP? 5""(ZTI K)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1. Fr: 03/1? @4112 1* 1-. (1)? Fit-L4 Li "Par-tad of +14- ~F-ww'f-iipm. VP? 5""(ZTI K). Sm.ij. $93.1: U) Th whd : L3)

  3. RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W.W. Nazaroff, Radon in Energy-Efficient Houses, LawrenceStudies, pp. 18- 23 in Energy Efficient Buildings Program,AMD ITS DAUCHTERS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINCS A.V. Nero,

  4. Invited Paper Journal of Nonlinear Optical Physics & Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    amounts (0.1% w/w) of a dichroic dye of the family of anthraquinone derivatives to a transparent NLC could, the used anthraquinone dyes are stable upon light excitation, and therefore, besides thermal effect

  5. Notices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notices 1 75 FR 66078 (October 10, 2010). 2 The Final EIS can be found on Western's Web site at: http:ww2.wapa.govsitesWestern transmissioninterconnDocumentsricesolar...

  6. tel-00799897,version1-12Mar2013 tel-00799897,version1-12Mar2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    D tustine humy et elexndr toux wwF weri prtiulirement ierreD xuriD elex et on pour m9voir ide lors des

  7. UNCORRECTED 2 Stochastic adaptive control model for traffic signal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Stochastic adaptive control model for traffic signal systems 3 X.-H. Yu a,1 , W.W. Recker b,* 4 a Department of Electrical Engineering, California Polytechnic State University

  8. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff or adequacy of the information in this report. #12;Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Ozone Reductions Using

  9. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles produced by ozone/limonene reactions in indoor airgas-phase reactions of ozone with organic compounds underNazaroff, W.W. , 2008. Ozone levels in passenger cabins of

  10. Higgs boson couplings to bosons with the ATLAS detector: run 1 legacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Elisabeth; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final ATLAS measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channels $H \\rightarrow ZZ^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\\ell\\ell\\ell$, $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow WW^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  11. Empower Women, Save the Planet? Science, Strategy, and Population-Environment Advocacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasser, Jade

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1948. Our Plundered Planet. Boston, MA: Little, Brown andLester. 2003. Plan B: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and aWake up Call for a Small Planet. NY: W.W. Norton & Co.

  12. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  13. Relative Potencies and Combination Effects of Steroidal Estrogens in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    life-stages of roach, Rutilus rutilus, exposed to estrogenic effluent during the period of sexual of roach (9) and gudgeon, Gobio gobio, (10) living in UK rivers downstream of WwTW effluent discharges

  14. ATLAS Sensitivity to Anomalous WWV Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj.; Vranjes, N.; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the strategy in extracting information on triple gauge boson couplings in WW production and summarize the expected limits on WWV couplings from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

  15. TABLE DR1. PARAMETER VALUES FOR MARS THERMAL EVOLUTION MODEL Property Symbol Units Value Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    , Sound speed and thermophysical properties of liquid iron and nickel: Physical Review B, v. 42, p. 6485 Anderson, W.W., and Ahrens, T.J., 1994, An equation of state for liquid-iron and implications for the Earth

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klug, Victoria

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WW, Apte MG. 2011. Natural Gas Variability in California:by cooking activities and natural gas cooking burners. To74% of the sample had natural gas cooktops. In this sample,

  17. Vortex dynamics : a window into the properties of type-II superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Benjamin Jeremy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7] Anisotropy E?ects in Superconductors, edited by H. W.W. Weber, Ed. , High-T c Superconductors, Plenum Press, NewThe Physics of Superconductors, Vol I. , Conventional and

  18. A's-1.x.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    either the Print: of Ha H13, or Tycho Brahe, m" e:- leefl a: I my jelfe he've deee; and ... ww?ed, whereof that #0515 Tycho Brahe lmrh afordedgrmp. Eyapa) HM!

  19. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection into a fractured reservoir system. A reservoirIn the case of fractured reservoirs, Equations (25) and (26)c ww q a >> For fractured reservoirs, the former expression

  20. antimony 125: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Tevatron Higgs data are interpreted as constraints on an effective theory of a Higgs boson with mass close to 125 GeV. We focus on the diphoton, ZZ*, WW* channels at the LHC,...

  1. anomalous scattering factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Mitra; D. R. Lorimer; A. G. Lyne 2001-11-08 5 Anomalous gauge couplings of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: Semileptonic mode in WW scatterings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv)...

  2. Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleere, Jason James

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), gain on grass (GG), feedlot average daily gain (FG), and slaughter weight (SW). Analyses of variance were performed using the procedures of SAS (1988) to determine differences between CC, family code nested...

  3. Diboson cross sections at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, A.W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief survey of the results on diboson production at the Tevatron is presented. Measured cross sections for W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, WW, and limits on WZ/ZZ are summarized.

  4. A retrospective on the LBNL PEM project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submitted to Physica Medica LBNL 56612 [6] M. Pedrali- Noy,Submitted to Physica Medica LBNL 56612 ARETROSPECTIVE ON THE LBNL PEM PROJECT J.S. Huber, W.W.

  5. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W.W. Patton, Jr. , 1974. "Petrology of the Nepheline SyenitePart I. Geology and Petrology," l? D. 'Nauka , Moscow^ USSR,E. B. & E. Wm. Heinrich; Petrology and Mineralogy of the Mt.

  6. Linear Algebra Chapter 4 Test Name: Ar15Wec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Tin-Yau

    -wiing@ww.tu-Berlin.de, abacus@math.tu-berlin.de, Prufungsamter IB 1,IB 2,IB 3,IB 4, IB 5 Prufungsberechtigte im Mathematik

  7. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan Biosolids Covered Subgrade basins Malfunction in Point Loma South Bay North City Metro Biosolids Center WW Pumping

  8. BRING TO LIGHT, COME ACROSS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    us at ww.luc.edu/experiential. Kelly Christopher, M.A. Patrick Green, Ed.D. Program Manager ..............................................................3:30pm (Sullivan, Multi-Purpose Room) Loyola University Libraries Research Paper Award Program

  9. Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Benchmarking Materials Screening Silicon Electrodes & Binders 1.2M LiPF 6 in ECEMC + 3%(ww) FEC 0.05 to 2V Binders tested: -poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) -poyacrylic...

  10. Search for supersymmetry using a diphoton plus ETmiss final state with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damiani, Daniel Scott

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the underlying event by JIMMY [74]. Next-to-next-to-leading + ? Z ? ?? + ? WW ZZ WZ t t Generator Alpgen +Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy MadGraph+

  11. Dr. Stirling A. Colgate has been a staff physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (1952-1965) and was a staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory, [LANL] from 1976 to 1991 and from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr. Stirling A. Colgate has been a staff physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (1952 in WW II in the US Merchant Marine. Dr. Stirling A. Colgate is an associate staff member at Los Alamos

  12. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in protonproton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: ??, bb, ?? , WW, and ZZ. The explored Higgs boson mass range is ...

  13. Microbial Fuel Cell and Reverse Electrodialysis Technologies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) (20 GW available where WW flows into the ocean) Waste Heat Energy Capture heat in "water" (USA) 500 GW from industrial "waste heat" 1000 GW from power plant waste heat (Does not include solar

  14. Field Notes, Idaho, Borell & Orr (1930-1932)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    -y nkimsi, ;, Utrsj-y nkimsi, Knn? nkimsi, ?, Lfnjtfsto, w?, )tfonl-y nkimsi, ww, Fkindn?syt imsi, w, L N ? I q-, rnk?ytb?-ffty oaniqklp sl j-ot,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, w xtf d-l s?sys-f? ?-ffty mnf oaniqklp ,5vp ,5?p nf ,1w?,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,w xtf...-j? utyuti ?-j?qfnklr,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,w )tf )-s Ka-lqslq ?-q,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,w )tf )-? K-dtyba-sf ?fkoa,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, w,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,yxtfx-s...

  15. Uncomputability 7.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolper, Pierre

    ) if the Turing machine Mi does not accept the word wj (loops or rejects the word). L0 = {w|w = wi A[Mi, wi] = N RE R. 195 #12;Lemma The language L0 = {w|w = wi Mi accepts wi} is in the class RE. Theorem the hypothesis that L1 is an undecidable language. 197 #12;The universal language UL UL = {w >| M accepts w

  16. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D. Fredrickson, W.W. Heidbrink, C.Z. Cheng, N.N. Gorelenkov, E. Belova, A.W. Hyatt, G.J. Kramer, J. Manickam, J.D. Fredrickson,a W.W. Heidbrink,b C.Z. Cheng,a N.N. Gorelenkov,a E. Belova,a A.W. Hyatt,c G.J. Kramer,a J

  17. Neural-Symbolic Learning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    and semi-linear neurons such that N computesTp r1 : A (B C D) r2 : A (E F) r3 : B #12;Logic Programs #12;Why Neurons and Symbols To study the statistical nature of learning and the logical nature Programming A B !A !B W WW !1 h1 !2 h2 !3 h3 B FEDC WWW -WW Interpretations For each propositional general

  18. Measurement of $W^+ W^-$ Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

  19. Implementation of Iterative Map turbo Decoder on TMS320C40 DSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sunil S

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ENDM MAIN PROGRAM STORED AT ERAM BANK2 . TEXT MAIN GAM TMP ADR; LOAD PAGE POINTER IOSTACK PTR, SP ; LOAD STACK POINTER OCQNSTi, Rii; STORE CQNSTi IN Rii LDP LDI LDF LDI O, RO BIGGER LOOP: STI RO, OBIG ITER LDI O, RO INITIALIZE MEMORY... OF ENCODER TQ ZERO LDA eMEM ADR, ARO STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +AROi+ STI RO, +AROt+ 'W444W48WW8WW4884W84'CWWW4W4'444WW4W8'C4'CWWW444W4W44'C+4444444 GENERATE A BLOCK QF RANDOM BITS USING 32 BIT PN SEQUENCE GENERATOR LDA e...

  20. Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

  1. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001-6/2003 (d) Santo Tomas River Drain 1985-1990 (d) 1 d - daily data, m - monthly data, n ? no data C o n c e p t u a l M o d e l o f R i o G r a n d e P r o j e c... t F l o w 8 Site Available Data Since 1975 1 WW #25 (Santo Tomas Lateral) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001 (d) WW #26 (Upper Chamberino Lateral) 1979-1999 (d), 2000-5/2001(n), 6/2001-5/2005 (d) WW #18 (Eastside Canal) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001...

  2. Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

  3. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  4. Concentrating aqueous acetate solutions with tertiary amines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Champion

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentrations. ) 73 FIGURE Page 47 Correlation between Kd and water concentration in the organic phase for the calcium acetate/water/amine system. (TEA:DEME mL:1 mL, initial calcium acetate= 1%(w/w)) 48 Correlation between Kd and water concentration... in the organic phase for the calcium acetate/water/amine system. (TEA;DEMAW mL:1 mL, initial calcium acetate= 2%(w/w)) 49 Correlation between Kd and water concentration in the organic phase for the calcium acetate/water/amine system. (TEA:DEMAW mL:1 m...

  5. Alginate-Based Edible Coating to Enhance Quality and Shelf-Life of Fresh-Cut Watermelon (Citrullus Lanatus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sipahi, Rabia

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of multilayered antimicrobial edible coating on the shelf-life of fresh-cut watermelon while keeping its original attributes for longer, without affecting its sensory properties. A set of solutions containing sodium alginate (0.5, 1, 2% w/w), beta...

  6. Kylteknik ("KYL")Kylteknik ("KYL") RefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of energy use, food, pollution, health and quality of life populationhealth and quality of life, population occurs over a tempe-rature range (see Figure); rate of freezing affects quality; velocity of cold air 7.ca/parc-cra humidity as high as possible, and avoiding high air velocities ww.sun-dried- http://res2.ag ture

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Post-processing of concentrated fermented milk: influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Post-processing of concentrated fermented milk: influence of temperature and holding of particle clusters in concentrated, fermented milk (protein content 8.2% (w/w)) during post temperature load, thus, rapid cooling reduces the Dairy Sci. & Technol. (2012) 92:91107 DOI 10.1007/s13594

  8. Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

  9. The Centre for Blood Research Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    The Centre for Blood Research Seminar Series Wednesday, July 17th, 2013 LSC 3 - Life Sciences. The latter represents challenges in regard to cost, safety, ecological friendliness, and process equipment that including >50 mM salts such as NaCitrate with 8 to 10% (w/w) solutions of PAA allowed for almost complete

  10. Copyright c 2006 by Sebastian Carron Montero All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Copyright c 2006 by Sebastian Carron Montero All rights reserved #12;MEASUREMENT OF THE tt, WW AND Z PRODUCTION CROSS SECTIONS IN pp COLLISIONS AT s = 1.96 TeV by Sebastian Carron Monterop COLLISIONS AT s = 1.96 TeV by Sebastian Carron Montero Department of Physics Duke University Date: Approved

  11. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three treatments, three rather than four pots sprouted oats, giving a total of 29 pots). All soils were sterilized. Biochar was ground and homogenized with soils at 5% w/w, with no-char pots totaling 140 g soil and biochar amended pots 147 g...

  12. Journal of Power Sources 185 (2008) 11311140 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eventually determine the overall transient response of the cell. A better understanding of the fuel cell behaviors of the DMFC by making a step change in the cell current density [35]. In response to the change model for liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao Department of Mechanical

  13. Poly (vinyl alcohol)/3-(trimethylammonium) propyl-functionalized silica hybrid membranes for alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. As a result, the overall cost of the fuel cell system can for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells E.D. Wang, T.S. Zhao*, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering Accepted 29 December 2009 Available online 8 January 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct ethanol fuel cell

  14. For Me and You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coates, Ryder [author

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of multilayered antimicrobial edible coating on the shelf-life of fresh-cut watermelon while keeping its original attributes for longer, without affecting its sensory properties. A set of solutions containing sodium alginate (0.5, 1, 2% w/w), beta...

  15. HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with lignin (15-20% w/w). The polysaccharides in lignocellulosic materials can be used for bioethanol bioethanol production. The cellulose cannot be enzymatically hydrolyzed to glucose without a physical be converted to bioethanol by thermophilic microorganisms. One of the objectives of the EU

  16. SCHOOL OF DIVINITY, HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY ACADEMIC SESSION 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Tutorials: one-hour session in each of teaching weeks 3-6, 8-11, total 8 hours. See your portal or My Russia and Soviet Russia, 1914-24: Change or Continuity? 2. Interwar Europe Stability or instability 2. Theme 1 Tsarist Russia on the eve of WW1 Week 3 1. Theme 1 Russia in War and Revolution, 1914

  17. Multiphoton Add fluorescent dye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    in toluene was prepared at 0.96 w/w. The monomer used was trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) (Aldrich in toluene; the toluene was removed by rotovapping. For fluorescence imaging in colloidal crystals the electro-optic modulator is used to regulate the power of the beam, selectively exposing the regions

  18. [1] Sasha Abramsky, Breadline USA: The Hidden Scandal of American Hunger and How to Fix it, Poli-PointPress, Sausalito, California (2009).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Bernard

    the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It, Random House, New York (2004). [14] Harvey That are Shaping Our Future, Worldwatch Institute, W.W. Norton & Company, New York 2007. [16] Svante August, Timber Wars, Common Courage Press, Monroe, Maine (1994). [27] David Barsamian, The Decline and Fall

  19. Joints and Veins Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ed) 69/12/2010 Ideal joint structure (a) Block diagram showing the various components of an ideal beds, shorter joints, smaller shadows Thus, closer spacing (a) Block diagram illustrating stress shadowJoints and Veins Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben

  20. Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauer, Nikolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

  1. 10.5 The Indeterminate Form 0/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 ... Now as a: > 0, both a, b --> 0, and the assumed continuity of f', 9' gives il-riil g' P w-w g" (b). I f' (0). 9' (0) .... then we don't know what is or if it exists.

  2. M. Oreglia, LHWG 12 April 2001 The Fermiophobic Higgs Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Background subtraction Cuts optimisation at the highest LEP energies #12;ALEPH preliminary limit 10 -2 10 -1 to more robust model checking L3 has developed WW analysis, presented 010227 general excess seen, so I'd like to get away from model dependence as much as possible Remember: turning off the fermion

  3. Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao 2011 Keywords: Fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Neat methanol Mass transport Model a b s t r a c t A mathematical model is developed to simulate the fundamental transport phenomena in a passive direct methanol

  4. Effect of the cathode gas diffusion layer on the water transport behavior and the performance of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao , W.W. Yang Department Direct methanol fuel cell Passive operation Neat methanol operation a b s t r a c t The passive operation of a direct methanol fuel cell with neat methanol requires the water that is pro- duced at the cathode

  5. Mixtures of Estrogenic Contaminants in Bile of Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    WwTWs effluents. Sexually immature rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and sexually mature roach also detected in bile of effluent- exposed roach, and the concentrations of all these steroidal with female (E2, 740 ( 197; E1, 197 ( 37; EE2, 40 ( 6; DHQ, 8 ( 2) roach. The synthetic estrogen EE2 was also

  6. 12680 Biochemistry 1992, 31, 12680-12687 Dynamic Structures of Adrenocortical Cytochrome P-450 in Proteoliposomes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawato, Suguru

    12680 Biochemistry 1992, 31, 12680-12687 Dynamic Structures of Adrenocortical Cytochrome P-450 reconstituted with and without NADPH4ytochromeP-450reductase in phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine- phosphatidylserine vesicles at a lipid to P-450 ratio of 35 (w/w) by cholate dialysis procedures. Trypsinolysis

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    states to develop more protective Clean Water Act human health water quality criteria to reduce toxics in fish and water and protect human health. ________________________________________ w:\\jr\\ww\\2013 of PAHs, copper and other metals in stormwater #12;Copper exposures have consequences for survival 0 20 40

  8. Vector Boson Fusion Higgs Production at the LHC - Mass Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Green

    2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist substantial backgrounds to the vector boson fusion production of Higgs at the LHC. Mass variables are studied which may alleviate the need to assume a spin zero WW resonance in order to achieve a sufficient signal to noise ratio in the two jet plus two lepton and missing energy final state.

  9. Measurement of ${?(H?_e\\bar{?_e})\\times BR(H\\rightarrow ZZ^\\ast)}$ and Higgs production in $ZZ$ fusion at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Milutinovi?-Dumbelovi?; I. Boovi?-Jelisav?i?; A. Robson; P. Roloff

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the potential measurement at 1.4 TeV CLIC of the cross-section (times branching ratio) of the Higgs production via $WW$ fusion with the Higgs subsequently decaying in $ZZ^\\ast$, ${\\sigma(H\

  10. AMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    , although they are difficult or impossible to fabricate like standard copper wire, HTS materials can provideAMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS Triple Resonance Probe W.W. Brey, NHMFL A and Rich Withers) and others at Conductus developed the first HTS (high temperature superconducting

  11. Sugar, water and free volume networks in concentrated sucrose solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Sugar, water and free volume networks in concentrated sucrose solutions Valeria Molinero, Tahir the sucrose hydrogen bond network (HBN) in amorphous sucrose with 050% w/w water. We find that the onset) in these mixtures shows a non-monotonic behavior with water content which is consistent with experimental

  12. Andrew K. Barrows Stanford Aeronautics and Astronautics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    choose to go to the moon in this decade..." John F. Kennedy 1958: Federal Aviation Agency/Administration in aviation accomplishments, organized research, and funding for military aviation 1915: US establishes" 1930s/1940s: Direction Finding RDF/ADF FAA predecessors formed (DoC AB, BAC, CAA, CAB) #12;WW2

  13. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , Vibrations and Waves (W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1971). First, we compute the kinetic energyPhysics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String Consider the kinetic energy and the potential energy of this string segment due to the passage of a traveling wave

  14. LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, NY: W.W. Norton. Nelson, V. (2011). Introduction to renewable energy 1 LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus, and to the integrity of the democracy we create together. --College Learning in the New Global

  15. CHAPTERS 3 AND 4:CHAPTERS 3 AND 4: Aerial PhotographyAerial Photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    . (copyright Gernsheim Collection, Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas) Camera Sensor SystemsCamera Sensor Systems Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre One of the first commercially available box of WW I trenches in Europe. Examination of stereoscopic photography revealed the location of men, gun

  16. The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A. GOLDIN, J. A. SMITH, O. M. SUN, A. A. AJA, M. N. BUI, AND T. HUGHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. Atime record. The elements of the WW system in- clude a surface buoy, a wire suspended from the buoy, a weight at the end of the wire, and the profiler itself. The wire and weight follow the surface motion of the buoy

  17. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health Issues 1 Billion people lack the demand for fossil fuels and energy US production of oil peaked 30 years ago Global production of oil electricity generation: 13 quad 5% used for W&WW: 0.6 quad 97 quad [quadrillion BTUs]= 28,400 terawatt hours

  18. *Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 814 863 7908; fax: +1 814 863 7304. E-mail address: blogan@psu.edu (B.E. Logan).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @psu.edu (B.E. Logan). SUPPORTING INFORMATION Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples/HBOD for the different refinery wastewater samples, with domestic wastewater (DW) as a positive control. #12;3 0 20 40 60 removal rate and removal efficiency of the refinery and domestic wastewaters (WW), the 50:50 refinery

  19. PARALLEL COMPUTING OF UNSATURATED SOILS USING ELEMENT-BY-ELEMENT AND DOMAIN DEOMPOSITON METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augarde, Charles

    the processors with minimum data exchanges and load balancing. The linear system of equations was solved using and primary unknowns. The mass balance of water flow leads to the following equation: ( ) 0=+ ww wr div t n as in compacted soils used as fill material. The accurate analysis of unsaturated soils by the finite element

  20. Green Pacific Biologicals Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Investors · Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae · WW exclusive license Max Planck · Algae-to-biofuels, big oil, Ag-biotech, High-margin products · Proprietary solutions for higher + no large capital investments Seed-stage algae-to-biofuels start-up #12;Green Pacific Biologicals Problem

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Phil Rockefeller Washington June 4, 2013 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Tony Grover, Fish and Wildlife Division Director SUBJECT: IEAB report on Cost-Effectiveness of Fish Tagging Technologies. ________________________________________ w:\\tg\\ww\\ieab interim fish tagging report may 2013.docx #12;IEAB Independent Economic Analysis Board

  2. Simon Fraser University TWARDS 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Statistical Association Fellowship MacEachern, James Geological Association of Canada W.W. Hutchison Medal Mann, Geoff American Political Science Association Michael Harrington Best Book Award Mc Association's Cecilia I. Johnstone Award Broun, David Simon Fraser University Faculty of Science Excellence

  3. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Electrochimica Acta 53 (2007) 853862

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -dimensional two-phase mass transport model for direct methanol fuel cells W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao, C. Xu Department methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is presented in this paper. This 3D mass transport model is formed Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC); Two-phase; Mass transport

  4. Journal of Power Sources 190 (2009) 216222 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methanol fuel cell (DMFC) Water crossover Liquid saturation Two-phase mass transport model a b s t r a c direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) with a conventional two-phase mass transport model, a current water distribution in a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao , R. Chen, C. Xu

  5. Kylteknik ("KYL")Kylteknik ("KYL") RefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ; Gas processing (O2, H2, CO2, LPG, LNG...) (3) Air conditioning, cooling towers, rg/pages/zon Air conditioning, cooling towers, food cooling and freezing (4) Heat pumps, heat pipes, special ww.sgisland.o p p ( ) "In a refigeration process, energy is converted into heat transfer." (S90) kitchen

  6. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, Gemma; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW??????? decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7??fb(?1) of pp...

  7. Particle simulation of energetic particle driven Alfvn modes TH/5-1K. Shinohara, M. Ishikawa, M. Takechi Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    Particle simulation of energetic particle driven Alfvn modes TH/5-1K. Shinohara, M. Ishikawa, M. Takechi Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193, Japan W.W. Heidbrink, A. Bierwage University-day tokamaks and comparison between simulation and experiment before ALE after ALE (experimental) relaxed

  8. P O L I T I C A L E C O N O M Y R E S E A R C H I N S T I T U T E U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A S S A C H U S E T T S A M H E R S T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/9e5107f8-a75c-11e2-9fbe-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2Qk3zV4ww. Reinhart and Rogoff are wrong about

  9. 0 Aca&mie des sciences / Elsevier, Paris Internalgeophysics (Geodesy) / GBophysique interne (G8odbie)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santerre, Rock

    0 Aca&mie des sciences / Elsevier, Paris Internalgeophysics (Geodesy) / GBophysique interne (G8 mm between the two expeditions. 0 Acadknie des sciences / Elsevier, Paris. Keywords: GPS, Height calibtipar des modeles standard d'atmosph-e (STD), d l'aide de radiomhes d vapeur d'eau (WW) et de baromhes

  10. Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of aflatoxins. Although statistically significant changes to a few parameters were noted, the differences did not appear to be NSP- or dose-dependent, suggesting that NSP at dietary inclusion levels as great as 2.0% (w/w) does not produce overt toxicity. Thus...

  11. W / Z + heavy flavor production and the standard model Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, S.Y.; /UC, Riverside

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for the Standard Model Higgs in WH and H {yields} WW channels by CDF and D0 collaborations are presented. The preliminary results are based on < 180 pb{sup -1} of data analyzed by each experiment. Important backgrounds to Higgs searches, such as heavy flavor production in association with massive vector bosons (W and Z) are studied in the process.

  12. First Report of Boscalid and Penthiopyrad-Resistant Isolates of Alternaria solani1 Causing Early Blight of Potato in Michigan2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Blight of Potato in Michigan2 3 T.D. Miles1 , K.L. Fairchild1 , A. Merlington2 , W.W., Kirk2 , N,5 Aberdeen, ID. 2 Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State6 University, East annually in Michigan. If left uncontrolled it can result in yield losses exceeding 20% and10 impact stored

  13. Diboson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nodulman, L.J.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D{null} detectors at the Tevatron Collider are being used to measure {ital WW}, {ital WZ}, and {ital ZZ} production as well as {ital W}{sub {gamma}} and {ital Z}{sub {gamma}} production in order to study Trilinear Gauge Couplings. Improved limits on nonstandard coupling parameters are given and prospects for further improvement are discussed.

  14. Au Boulot! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Christiansen, Hope; Kernen, Madeleine; Pensec, Herve

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and appropriate in this context than just argent. 23 Vocabulaire NOMS un agent de police6 un gendarme une bouchre, un boucher une boulangre, un boulanger une patronne, ww patron une infirmire, un infirmier une avocate, m/2 avocat une femme mdecin, un...

  15. The limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products in near-critical hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, James Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is used to convert synthesis gas into petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. It was developed in Germany during WW 11 as an alternative fuel source during the fuel embargo and is still used as a...

  16. Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baetge, Claire

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the efficacy of the Curves Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem Advance Select (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or markers of health and fitness...

  17. Q&CMHYPERZTM P R O C E S S P R O T E O M I C S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    and higher biomass loads. Outstanding chemical resistance. Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatog- raphy and load times. In addition, these sorbents are incompatible with high biomass loads (>10% ww/v); exceeding HyperZTM sorbents, and a stan- dard profile for an SP EBA sorbent: ~2 times higher linear flow

  18. Enhancing H2 evolution performance of an immobilised cobalt catalyst by rational ligand design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willkomm, Janina; Muresan, Nicoleta M.; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . T mesostructured Sn-doped In2O3 e electrostability of the attached Co Cite this: Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2727able SynGas Chemistry, Department of ?eld Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW, UK. ww-reisner.ch.cam.ac.uk/ (ESI) available: Additional ?gures and ntal details for NMR...

  19. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 193200, 2007 Printed in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doucette, William J.

    -LABELED NONYLPHENOL, NONYLPHENOL TETRAETHOXYLATE, AND NONYLPHENOL NONYLETHOXYLATE IN BIOSOLIDS/SOIL SYSTEMS PLANTED]nonylphenol nonylethoxylate (NPE9) in a soil/biosolids (99.5:0.5 w/w) environment planted with crested wheatgrass (Agropyron was evaluated as a more degradable reference compound. The biosolids were obtained from a municipal treatment

  20. Continuum Theory of Epitaxial Crystal Growth, I Abstract 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with appropriate boundary conditions at the continuum level to describe the growth ... epitaxial, i.e. layer by layer growth of a crystalline thin lm on a suitably ...... [13] Mullins W.W., Theory of Thermal Grooving, J. Appl. Phys., 28(1957), 333{

  1. JHEP09(2012)111 Published for SISSA by Springer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Published: September 25, 2012 Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at s = 7 TeV The CMS collaboration Abstract: Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the , WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at s = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110

  2. CIVILAND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 2012 Anal. Geom.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    & Ww Coll 4322 (3) Soils Lab 3341 (1) Geotech. 3340 (3) Concrete Design 4359 (3) Transportation 4386 (3CIVILAND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 2012 FRESHMAN FALL SP English 1157 (3) Calculus & Anal. Geom) Art Elective (3) Fluid Mech. 3318 (3) Structures 3356 (4) Project Management 3390(3) Civil Eng. Math

  3. Environmental Research 105 (2007) 2033 Synthesis of long-term nickel monitoring in San Francisco Bay$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that nickel complexes from wastewater treatment plants are not readily available for biological uptake a function of the geology of the watershed surrounding the estuary and inputs from wastewater treatment.L., Phinney, J.T., Bedsworth, W.W., 1997. Strongly complexed Cu and Ni in wastewater effluents and surface

  4. The Intel Science and Technology Center for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exceeded if we do not find a more energy efficient, scalable and cost effective way to handle this growth", analyst reports, IDC storage & networking reports, Gartner 2009 WW IT Services Forecast, BLS, Computer using online storage when sharing videos or photos, engaging in social networks, and using online

  5. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Construction and validation of two metagenomic DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    technical difficulties to DNA extraction: high clay content ([55% w/w), low pH (4.7) and high iron levels from soil have been published; how- ever, each type of soil presents specific challenges oxides (Jenne 1988) and organic matter (Davis 1984). These particles exhibit surface charges that attract

  6. Potato Research 45 (2002) 215-224 Foliar and tuber assessment of late blight (Phytophthora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potato Research 45 (2002) 215-224 Foliar and tuber assessment of late blight (Phytophthora infestans(Mont.) de Bary) reaction in cultivated potato (SolanumtuberosumL.) D.S. DOUCHES I*, W.W. KIRK2,M is an important component to the management of potato late blight, Phy- tophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary

  7. Urban Mining: Quality and quantity of recyclable and recoverable material mechanically and physically extractable from residual waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Micale, Caterina; Sordi, Alessio; Cirulli, Giuseppe; Marionni, Moreno

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Material recycling and recovery from residual waste by physical and mechanical process has been investigated. About 6% of recyclable can be extracted by NIR and 2-3Dimension selector. Another 2% of construction materials can be extracted by adopting modified soil washing process. Extracted material quality is quite high even some residual heavy metal have been detected by leaching test. - Abstract: The mechanically sorted dry fraction (MSDF) and Fines (<20 mm) arising from the mechanical biological treatment of residual municipal solid waste (RMSW) contains respectively about 11% w/w each of recyclable and recoverable materials. Processing a large sample of MSDF in an existing full-scale mechanical sorting facility equipped with near infrared and 2-3 dimensional selectors led to the extraction of about 6% w/w of recyclables with respect to the RMSW weight. Maximum selection efficiency was achieved for metals, about 98% w/w, whereas it was lower for Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), about 2% w/w. After a simulated lab scale soil washing treatment it was possible to extract about 2% w/w of inert exploitable substances recoverable as construction materials, with respect to the amount of RMSW. The passing curve showed that inert materials were mainly sand with a particle size ranging from 0.063 to 2 mm. Leaching tests showed quite low heavy metal concentrations with the exception of the particles retained by the 0.5 mm sieve. A minimum pollutant concentration was in the leachate from the 10 and 20 mm particle size fractions.

  8. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 ???± 0.7% and 8.8 ???± 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 ???± 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 ???± 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 ???± 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  9. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Phys. Inst. (Armenia)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  10. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  11. STUDY OF HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION IN BOSONIC DECAY CHANNELS AT THE LHC (INCLUDING OFF-SHELL PRODUCTION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Susumu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of the Higgs boson production in bosonic decay channels by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC are described in this paper. The Higgs boson was the last undiscovered particle in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The bosonic decay channels include $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$, $ZZ^*$, $WW^*$. In the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$ and $ZZ^*$ decay channels, the whole event topology can be reconstructed. The $Z\\gamma$ decay channel can be sensitive to exotic Higgs decay beyond the SM. Because of its large branching fraction, the $WW^*$ decay channel is adequate to study bosonic production. Off-shell production is considered to be sensitive to the total Higgs decay width. The bosonic decay channels are a key to probe the SM and beyond.

  12. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  13. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of W-Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections of the reaction e+e- --> W+W-, as measured at LEP-II at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 207 GeV are used to derive the upper limits on the parameters of CP-violating (P-odd and C-even) triple gauge-boson couplings WW\\gamma and WWZ. The 95% CL limits |\\widetilde{\\kappa}_Z|<0.13 and |\\widetilde{\\lambda}_Z|<0.31 are obtained assuming local SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance. Our results are comparable with the previous ones obtained through the analysis of the W decay products. We also discuss the upper limits on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  14. High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Penning

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

  15. Study of Higgs boson production in bosonic decay channels at the LHC (including off-shell production)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Susumu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental study of Higgs boson production in bosonic decay channels at the LHC will be presented in this presentation. The bosonic decay channels include $ZZ$, $WW$, $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $Z\\gamma$. $WW$ decay channel has a large branching fraction. $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ can construct the whole event topology. $Z\\gamma$ can be sensitive to exotic Higgs decays. Also, off-shell production is now expected to be sensitive to the Higgs decay width and additional Higgs bosons or new phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM) of the particle physics. Therefore, the bosonic decay channels are assumed to a key to probe the SM and beyond that. This presentation will show the results at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV.

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a $W$ pair in the fully leptonic final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  17. Developing New Skills And Expertise To Support Digital Scholarship And Scholarly Communication.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Brian

    2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 74th IFLA General Conference and Council: World Library and Information Congres, Qubec, Canada, August 208 htp:/ww.ifla.org/IV/ifla74/Programe208.htm> DEVELOPING NEW SKILS AND EXPERTISE TO SUPORT DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP... 1064 repositories in over 60 countries. htp:/roar.eprints.org/> 2 Karla L. Hahn. Research Library Publishing Services: New Options for University Publishing. (Asociation of Research Libraries, April 208). htp...

  18. NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ FTIR postlab -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Spectroscopy Postlab Last modified: June 17, 2014 1) Summarize your results in the following table: v/v % MTBE your value % RE 100 lit. value - = ? 4) Convert your v/v % MTBE in gasoline to units of mass % (w/w %) of oxygen in gasoline. Density of MTBE = 0.74 g/mL, Density of gasoline = 0.66 g/mL, Molar Mass of MTBE = 88

  19. Congressional responses to French atomic policies, 1958 - 1964

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Bobby Duane

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of amendments thxough 1958, much of this information was made available to friendly nations for peaoeful applications, how- ever, and oertain nuclear weapons technology was provided to Great Britain, which had assisted in the developaent of the fizst bombs.... Fzance, however, continued to be excluded from any nucl~ ww. pons assistance ~ In 1958, the Eisenhower Adainistzation atteapted negotiations iv to provide Fzance with a nuclear submarine, but Congzsss strongly opposed this venture. Neanwhile...

  20. Effects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-a and He-a line emission from nitrogen plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    to the wave- length of the light used, and hence, shorter wavelengths in the soft x-ray region provide higher are soft x-ray lasers,6,7 laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources,811 and higher har- monics from laser heatedV (2.88 nm).1 Being on the higher energy side of the WW region, Ly-a and He-a nitrogen lines are more

  1. Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of as it is transported across the cell boundaries "e" and "w", using xxdx d axax )()( The grid to be used. For the heat conductivity, use k = 2 W/(m.K). Questions 5 and 6 after J. Brnnbacka (2005, 2006). In exam 2008CFD2013 P 32 1 x 15C 0C 47C x WW W P E EE w e x x #12;Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course

  2. Section 8-1 8-4: Statistical Process Control (SPC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Section 8-1 8-4: Statistical Process Control (SPC) · Chance Causes and Assignable Causes. · WW . · Upper Control Limit (UCL): µW + kW . · Shewhart Control Chart: LCL = µW - kW Center Line = µW UCL = µW + kW . · Subgroup: A sample drawn at certain time. · Control Charts: Sample plots over different time

  3. Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work/MG 0.3 MGD average flow per facility #12;Reclaimed Algae Bacteria O2 CO2 N Organics N P CO2 P CO2 Waste

  4. Lower edge of locked Main Himalayan Thrust unzipped by the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean?Philippe; Meng, Lingsen; Wei, Shengji; Wang, Teng; Ampuero, Jean?Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )17,23. Inset: map 157 location and motion of India relative to Eurasia. 158 159 Figure 2: Seismic rupture kinematics. (a) Co-?seismic slip determined... the lowest objective function, given as: 399 Misfit= Ewf+ WI *EI +WS *S + Ww*M, 400 where Ewf is the waveform misfit, EI is the geodetic misfit, S is a normalized, second derivative 401 of slip between adjacent patches (a so-called Laplacian...

  5. Diboson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

  6. ENEA-UCI Structures of the low frequency Alfven continuous spectrum 1 Structures of the low frequency Alfven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    (KTI) gap (L. Chen 2007, NF 47 S727) Diamagnetic drift: KBM (H. Biglari, et al. 1991, PRL 67 3681) Thermal ion compress.: BAE (W.W. Heidbrink, et al. 1993, PRL 71 855) Ti and wave-part. resonances: AITG Alfv´en continuous spectrum 5 R.Nazikian,etal.06,PRL96,105006 R. Nazikian, et al. 06, PRL 96, 105006

  7. Data:Dad144e5-40c9-40b2-b659-85585665ac7e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http%3A%2F%2Fpsc.wi.gov%2Fapps40%2Ftariffs%2Fviewfile.aspx%3Ftype%3Delectric%26id%3D4660&ei99FzU6upJsGRyATMxIDwCA&usgAFQjCNGttc8kN4McdAjFopK8bpdlU32kqg&bvmbv.66699033,d.aWw...

  8. Data:0fce917a-2af4-4f39-8a5a-591a0b08e680 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http%3A%2F%2Fpsc.wi.gov%2Fapps40%2Ftariffs%2Fviewfile.aspx%3Ftype%3Delectric%26id%3D4660&ei99FzU6upJsGRyATMxIDwCA&usgAFQjCNGttc8kN4McdAjFopK8bpdlU32kqg&bvmbv.66699033,d.aWw...

  9. Data:09d263ff-64c5-45bb-ac48-d820277c93bb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http%3A%2F%2Fpsc.wi.gov%2Fapps40%2Ftariffs%2Fviewfile.aspx%3Ftype%3Delectric%26id%3D4660&ei99FzU6upJsGRyATMxIDwCA&usgAFQjCNGttc8kN4McdAjFopK8bpdlU32kqg&bvmbv.66699033,d.aWw...

  10. Data:F028a5d5-0684-4ce4-a96e-d7776e2a47db | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http%3A%2F%2Fpsc.wi.gov%2Fapps40%2Ftariffs%2Fviewfile.aspx%3Ftype%3Delectric%26id%3D5940&eidMSEU7P1FYWoyAS7j4HoAg&usgAFQjCNHQszMM37DZ2RABeDOYr8qMUj5yA&bvmbv.67720277,d.aWw...

  11. Effects of rootstocks on grapevine water use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nord, Julie Michele

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    grafted on rootstocks which have been selected for their resistance to disease, parasites and drought. Field studies have shown that some rootstocks are more resistant to drought than others, but these observations are more qualitative than quantitative.... An understanding of how water moves through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum is important for efficient water use. Water use in three grapevine rootstocks was measured using the heat balance method under well watered (WW) and two drought (DR1 and DR2) cycles...

  12. Electricity Network Investment and Regulation for a Low Carbon Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollitt, Michael G.; Bialek, Janusz

    much does it cost to get it wrong?, CMI Electricity Project Working Paper No.63. Hogan, W.W. (1998), Competitive Electricity Market Design: A Wholesale Primer. John F.Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Department... of Trade and Industry (2006) The Energy Challenge. Energy Review Report 2006, CM 6887 London: DTI. Elders, I., Ault, G, Galloway, S., McDonald, J., Kohler, J., Leach, M. and Enteric, L. (2006), Electricity network scenarios for the United Kingdom...

  13. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    from the steam turbine and the binary cycle, and the thermal efficiencies for the binary cycle from the steam turbine and the binary cycle are kW15,410 kJ/kg)7.23448.1kJ/kg)(27438.19()( 433steamT,binarynet, 98isoT, inp iso wmWW hhmW steam turbine production well reinjection well isobutane turbine heat

  14. Measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings from at {\\boldmath$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$} TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a direct measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings at gammaWW and ZWW vertices in WW and WZ events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We consider events with one electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two jets. The data were collected using the D0 detector and correspond to 1.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Considering two different relations between the couplings at the gammaWW and ZWW vertices, we measure these couplings at 68% C.L. to be kappa{sub gamma} = 1.07{sub -0.29}{sup +0.26}, lambda = 0.00{sub -0.06}{sup +0.06}, and g{sub 1}{sup Z} = 1.04{sup -0.09}{sup +0.09} in a scenario respecting SU(2){sub L}[direct-product]U(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry and kappa = 1.04{sub -0.11}{sup +0.11} and lambda=0.00{sub -0.06}{sup +0.06} in an 'equal couplings' scenario.

  15. Search for new physics using QUAERO: A general interface to D0 event data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .0 6 4.0 23 1.1 pb ZZ ! ee2j 0.12 19.7 6 4.1 19 0.8 pb t ? t ! eEH20862 T 4j 0.13 3.1 6 0.9 8 0.8 pb t ? t ! emEH20862 T 2j 0.14 0.6 6 0.2 2 0.4 pb h 175 ! WW ! eEH20862 T 2j 0.02 29.6 6 6.5 32 11.0 pb h 200 ! WW ! eEH20862 T 2j 0.07 66.0 6 13.8 69 4.4... pb h 225 ! WW ! eEH20862 T 2j 0.06 43.1 6 9.2 44 3.6 pb h 200 ! ZZ ! ee2j 0.15 17.9 6 3.7 15 0.6 pb h 225 ! ZZ ! ee2j 0.15 18.8 6 3.8 12 0.4 pb h 250 ! ZZ ! ee2j 0.17 18.1 6 3.7 18 0.6 pb W 0 200 ! WZ ! eEH20862 T 2j 0.05 27.7 6 6.3 29 3.4 pb W 0 350...

  16. Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Taffard

    2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

  17. WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 Kbenhavn (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

  18. Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

  19. Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-300 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9-5.1 inverse femtobarns. A fermiophobic Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass range 110-194 GeV, and at 99% confidence level in the mass ranges 110-124.5 GeV, 127-147.5 GeV, and 155-180 GeV.

  20. 1David Wilczynski, 6/14/10 3:41 PM -0700, Fwd: FAA Design Competition for University A Original-recipient: rfc822;mankin@usc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    DbJAantL+wwNw9sq4uotuS2n2TzWsxbDBxJzG8mN9X R0lnSpgbanYAQeNzoqnVCT+D0gGhMGVugUWL5Tl53RYDUPs8BnHlSCYXs7RwQVPh+lnm q to proceed with announcing your award to your institution and media contacts. Please send Virginia Space Design Competition for University A Mary Sandy Director Virginia Space Grant Consortium Debbie Ross

  1. COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplement au no18, Tome 51, 15 septembre 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OF BROWN COAL W.W. PLOTCZYK, A. RESZTAK and A. SZYMANSKI(') Laboratory of Plasma Chemistry, Department of the epeci-fic e n e r g y o+ t h e brown coal (10 - 35 NJ/kg) on the y i e l d and s e l e c t i v i t y the sum of gaseous products was up t o 62 w t . %. The brown coal plasma p y r o l y s i s appears

  2. An analysis of bovine lymphocyte antigens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wai-Hung David

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2, Harleco) which was used as a dif- ferential stain for nonviable lymphocytea. The entire reaction was brought to an end, 15 minutes after eosin was dropped, by introducing 2 ul of formaldehyde (pH 7. 2, 37% w/w, Fisher Scientific Company). More... was made during the course of study which included the reduction from 2 pl to I pl of each of the antiserum, cells, eosin-Y, and formaldehyde used in each well. The amount of complement used (2 pl) was not changed. This modifi- cation, having...

  3. The ultra-violet spectrum of formaldehyde vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, Sidney Edward

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ons A system 1200 1120 vk~ ?u3 0/1 - 3 l Qfl C ~o c o Cl 0 in c o ww o o O J J ?> sVw o O J > L- uuo Yis... O Jm J9|UI O oon O LLL1. (0 c Oil o c ?U) ~ o CO C iS)COil o c Yis T O s l? 9 k . 3,^d o o cvJ o ?? ? 9 ? Jt s oUJ_J c GO ?

  4. Numerical Shadowing Using Componentwise Bounds and a Sharper Fixed Point Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik

    2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of this author was supported by NSF grants DMS- 9505049 and DMS-9973393. 787 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a... numerical linear algebra techniques. Recent work on shadowing has involved extending shadowing to allow for rescaling of time, i.e., allowing for perturbations in the time step (see the work of Coomes [6], Coomes, Kocak, and Palmer [7], Palmer [22], Van...

  5. Rotordynamic performance of a rotor supported on bump-type foil bearings: experiments and predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubio Tabares, Dario

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ww P L D= ? ? , Load coefficient Wn Bearing load [N] X, Y Horizontal and vertical rotor displacements xG Distance between the rotor CG to the free end [mm] z Damping ratio ? ( ) K E T t? = ? . FB dimensionless stiffness coefficient ? 26... length [mm] m Imbalance mass [kg] zm ? z z D ? = ? ?? , Total axial flow rate [kg/s] M, MB Rotor mass and bearing mass [kg] zM ? ( )2 23 24 s a z V g P PcM R T L ? ? = ? ? ? ? , Mass flow rate per bearing circumferential length [kg/m.s] N1...

  6. Searches for Higgs Boson(s) at the Upgraded Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregorio Bernardi; for the CDF; D0 collaborations

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the status of Higgs boson searches at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron performed by the DO and CDF collaborations. We report on three categories of searches, namely 1) the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson (p\\bar{p} --> H, WH or ZH, with H --> WW* and/or H --> b\\bar{b}), 2) the search for the minimal supersymmetric Higgs boson using p\\bar{p} --> hb\\bar{b} --> b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} and p\\bar{p} --> hX --> tau tau X, 3) the search for doubly charged Higgs boson.

  7. Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ar X iv :0 90 2. 48 64 v2 [ he p- ph ] 22 Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, and Christopher G. Lester3, 1Denys Wilkinson... measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W+W?, followed by the leptonic decay of each W -boson, will be performed by fitting the shape of a distribution that is sensitive to the Higgs mass. We demonstrate that the variable most commonly used...

  8. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  9. Determination of spin and CP of the Higgs boson from WBF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buszello, C P; Marquard, P

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 06 03 20 9v 1 2 4 M ar 2 00 6 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION TTP06-10 SFB/CPP-06-11 CAVENDISH-HEP-06-10 hep-ph/0603209 Determination of Spin and CP of the Higgs Boson from WBF C.-P. Buszello Cavendish... /CP properties of the Higgs boson at the LHC. To cover the mass region below the ZZ threshold we make use of the properties of the production in Weak Boson Fusion (WBF) and the decay chain H ? W+W? ? ?+????. In particular, we study the angular correlations...

  10. Limit Domains in Several Complex Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Console, Alexander

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    sequence of automor- phisms" in [Fornss & Stensnes, 2004], both the approaches to constructing Fatou-Bieberbach domains discussed above can be seen as constructing basins of attraction. We will not pursue this viewpoint. 3.2 Push-Out Constructions... n ? N and z ??n and k > m? n. Then writing w = Gm(z) ? Dm, a) and b) 17 imply |Gk(z)?Gm(z)|= |Hk ?Hk?1 ? ?Hm+1(w)?w| ? |w?Hm+1(w)|+ |Hm+1(w)?Hm+2(Hm+1(w))| + + |Hk?1 ? ?Hm+1(w)?Hk(Hk?1 ? ?Hm+1(w))| < ?m 2m + ?m+1 2m+1...

  11. A review of commercially available cattle handling equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott E.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $485 2 I/2" HD square tubing 2 I/2 x 2 I/2 square tubing Heavy duty sheeted steel Manual Manual Head cham (nose & head) N/rl WW Livestock Systems Beefmaster Self Catch Beefmaster Scissor Beefmaster Braltman $635-$690 $375 $510 2" Sch 40... Working Chute with Priefert Manual with Priefert Model 91 55, 200 $6, 000 5/, 248 51, 799 $1, 480 51, 918 $1, 968 3 "x 2' steel iubing 12 gauge steel plate (both chutes) 2 I/2 "pipe 2 I/2 "pipe 2 pipe 2" square tubing YES YES YES YES...

  12. Kinematics in Vector Boson Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Green

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The vector boson fusion process leads to two forward/backward jets (tag jets) and the produced state, a Higgs boson in this case, moving slowly in the p-p C.M. frame at the LHC. For the case of Higgs decaying to W+W (W*) with Higgs mass below 180 GeV, the W bosons have low momentum in the Higgs C.M. For the case of W leptonic decays, this fact allows for an approximate reconstruction of the two final state neutrinos. In turn, those solutions then provide additional kinematic cuts against background.

  13. Radiative ?(1S) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30 ~ 20 LLI IO hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

  14. A survey of ideal fluid propeller theories and a study of the effects of aerodynamic propeller loading on trailing vortex induced velocity and thrust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Edward Madison

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    respectively . The resultant velocity V acting on the blade element at an angle of attack H& is VB = (W w uP) ~(X'M-4 ) W+w The blad. e angle Q?is os= ~~+ P~ where Ps= Arctan Toe lift force, L, on the blade element is associated. with the circulation, K... is , ~?(v. -, & &~& The ideal propulsion efficiency of the propeller is defined as the ratio of the useful work performed (T V ) to the total work required in turning the propeller (W Q), i. e. , Now we see that ~1 Q is T(Vo + wp), thus or in terms...

  15. The preparation and effect of structure on the reactivities and properties of the 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives of monocarbonyl and dicarbonyl compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Louis Allman

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J ffi 1 wW a) o o w ? vo 3 s Ss; o o oin o ? i !>> 4...^20 TO l I o 1 . O 1C CQ CJ CQ O ?rll O ?rl S S rQ H H H H IH ?> H ?v H H 1 0) SCb l ?P

  16. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  17. Fertilizer Statistics for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    * : .COI??b .... .m-w .+M 1.mim . -. 0. .' - .C\\lvcO. .w bb" .... ..... : : :-"2 crj c1. : ...... ..,.. 3 .... ... .... 12 BULLETIN NO. 350, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION i . ... . . .v@J .am . .O .- .. .O) .LC),+@JWCOCO ... .--I.,+ .M .a... .LID) *ma- .t. .-CD~*W~ .. .OSW@J ... .-- -b~12o~nt.m* .-(3 .. .... .G F Cl In .@I .- [-@I ,350 -2 :z %GO T* .-?b . 01 : .. .-.a .... .3 3 c" .?I - .o -om.-, .a3 ... ..... ... ..... ... ..... .. .w*w .a .~,amb .CDO .moo- . .me .mnim-a .oa...

  18. Volatile organic acids and microbial processes in the Yegua formation, east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Routh, J.; Grossman, E. L.; Ulrich, G. A.; Suflita, J. M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?171. Carothers, W.W., Kharaka, Y.K., 1978. Aliphatic acid anions in oil-field waters?implications for origin of natural gas. Bull. Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. 62, 2441?2453. Cedarstrom, D.J., 1946. Genesis of groundwaters in the coastal plain of Virginia. Econ. Geol.... Petrol. Geol., 37, pp. 127?149. Takijima, Y., 1964. Studies on organic acids in paddy field soils with reference to their inhibitory eC128ects on the growth of rice plants Part 1. Growth inhibitory action of organic acids and adsorption and decomposition...

  19. The Despatch Issue 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'm also working on a movie which, hopefully, will be made at the end of the year ? a novel of the movie which, also hopefully, is to be published early next year ? and some one-act plays of mine that are to be staged very soon here in town. The use... warheads" correspond to floating mines. The basicplot ?a duel of wits betweentwo captains ? is similar to that of "The Enemy Below," a movie about WW II submarine warfare. A few submarinic details in the earlier version were cut out: a slide of a...

  20. The effect of product formulation and homogenization on the physical properties of the milk-fat globule and acid milk gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materon, Liliana

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) or sorbitan monostearate (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) were added at 0 5'lo w/w to two of the samples containing the blend of proteins The polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20... was separated from the homogenized samples by centifugation at 10, 500 x g for 30 minutes at 20'C aAer addition of 28. 6 g of pure grade sucrose (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) per 100 grams of sample to increase the difference in the density between...

  1. Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

  2. A tale of four carp: Invasion potential and ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVaney, Shannon C.; McNyset, Kristina M.; Williams, Justin B.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Wiley, Edward O.

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    algorithm. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133: 845854. 14. McNyset KM (2005) Use of ecological niche modelling to predict distributions of freshwater fish species in Kansas. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 14: 243255. 15. Zambrano L, Mart?nez-Meyer.... Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 107: 105112. 54. Bain MB (1993) Assessing impacts of introduced aquatic species Grass carp in large systems. Environmental Management 107: 221224. 55. Stanley JG, Miley WW, Sutton DL (1978) Reproductive...

  3. W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W C -h J I Z?f;SF *W-W

  4. I.N

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon GasENERGY5ww

  5. Study of the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in HVV decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, studies of the spin, parity and Lagrangian tensor structure of the Higgs boson in the \\hZZ , \\hWW\\ and \\hgg\\ decay processes at the LHC are presented. The investigations are based on 25fb?1 of pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at s?=7~\\TeV\\ and s?=8~\\TeV. The Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson hypothesis, corresponding to the quantum numbers JP=0+, is tested against several alternative spin models. They include the non-SM spin-0 and the spin-2 model with universal and non-universal couplings to fermions and vector bosons. The analysed data allow to exclude all alternative models in favour of the SM Higgs boson hypothesis at more than 99.9%~confidence level. The tensor structure of the HVV interaction in the spin-0 hypothesis is also investigated using the \\hZZ\\ and \\hWW\\ decays. The observed distributions of the variables sensitive to the ratios of the non-SM tensor couplings to the SM ones, \\KtildeH\\ and \\KtildeA, are compatible with the SM predicted values of zero. Assumi...

  6. Search for massive resonances decaying into pairs of boosted bosons in semi-leptonic final states at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Phys. Inst. (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for new resonances decaying to WW, ZZ, or WZ is presented. Final states are considered in which one of the vector bosons decays leptonically and the other hadronically. Results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns recorded in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. Techniques aiming at identifying jet substructures are used to analyze signal events in which the hadronization products from the decay of highly boosted W or Z bosons are contained within a single reconstructed jet. Upper limits on the production of generic WW, ZZ, or WZ resonances are set as a function of the resonance mass and width. We increase the sensitivity of the analysis by statistically combining the results of this search with a complementary study of the all-hadronic final state. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are set on the bulk graviton production cross section in the range from 700 to 10 femtobarns for resonance masses between 600 and 2500 GeV, respectively. These limits on the bulk graviton model are the most stringent to date in the diboson final state.

  7. Searching for a Heavy Higgs boson in a Higgs-portal B-L Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the discovery prospects of a heavy neutral scalar arising from a $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) during the Large Hadron Collider's high luminosity runs (HL-LHC). This heavy neutral scalar mixes with the SM Higgs boson through a Higgs portal and interacts with the SM particles with an interaction strength proportional to the sine of the mixing angle. The mixing between the two Higgs bosons is constrained by direct and indirect measurements. We choose an experimentally viable mixing angle and explore in detail the $ZZ$ and $WW$ decay modes of the heavy Higgs boson. For the $ZZ$ case, we focus on the cleanest $4\\ell$ and $2\\ell 2j$ final states and find that a heavy Higgs boson of mass smaller than 500 GeV can be discovered at the HL-LHC. For the $WW$ decay mode, we analyze the $\\ell jj \\slashed{E}_T$ signature. We implement novel background reduction techniques in order to tackle the huge background by performing both cut-based and multivariate analyses. However, large backgrounds re...

  8. Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China has experienced tremendous growth in the production and sales of room air conditioners over the last decade. Although minimum room air conditioner energy efficiency standards have been in effect since 1989, no efforts were made during most of the 1990's to update the standard to be more reflective of current market conditions. In 1999, China's State Bureau of Technical Supervision (SBTS) included in their annual plan the development and revision of the 1989 room air conditioner standard, and experts from SBTS worked together with LBNL to analyze the new standards. Based on the engineering and life cycle-cost analyses performed, the most predominant type of room air conditioner in the Chinese market (split-type with a cooling capacity between 2500 and 4500 W (8500 Btu/h and 15,300Btu/h)) can have its efficiency increased cost-effectively to an energy efficiency ratio (EER) of 2.92 W/W (9.9 Btu/hr/W). If an EER standard of 2.92 W/W became effective in 2001, Chinese consumers would be estimated to save over 3.5 billion Yuan (420 million U.S. dollars) over the period of 2001-2020. Carbon emissions over the same period would be reduced by approximately 12 million metric tonnes.

  9. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  10. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Sante Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  11. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  12. Probe Higgs boson pair production via the $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qiang; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiaoran

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed hadron-level study on the sensitivity of Higgs boson pair production via the $WW^{*}WW^{*}$ channel with the final state $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ at the LHC with the collision energy $\\sqrt{S} = 14$ TeV and a future 100 TeV collider. To avoid the huge background from $pp \\to Z W + \\textrm{jets}$ processes, we confine to consider the four lepton patterns: $e^\\pm e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp $ and $\\mu^\\pm \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$. We propose a partial reconstruction method to determine the most reliable combination. After that, we examine a few crucial observables which can discriminate efficiently signal and background events, especially we notice that the observable $m_{\\rm T2}$ is very efficient. For the LHC 14 TeV collisions, with an accumulated 3000 fb$^{-1}$ dataset, we find that the sensitivity of this mode can reach up to 1.5 $\\sigma$ for the Standard Model and the triple coupling of Higgs boson $\\lambda_3$ in the simplest effective theory can be constrained into the range [-1, 8] at $95\\%$ confidence...

  13. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into $WW$, $WZ$, or $ZZ$ boson pairs using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted $W$ or $Z$ boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the $WZ$ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the $WZ$ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, $W'$, and for the $WW$ and $ZZ$ final states of Kaluza--Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall--Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. $W'$ bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  14. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  15. Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

  16. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  17. Multiscale numerical methods for partial differential equations using limited global information and their applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Lijian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    form div(?(S)k?p) = f, (2.2) where the total mobility?(S) is given by?(S) = ?w(S)+?o(S) andf is a source term. The saturation dynamics affects the flow equations. One can derive the equation 8 describing the dynamics of the saturation ?S ?t +div(F) = 0..., (2.3) where F = ufw(S), with fw(S), the fractional flow of water, given by fw = ?w/(?w + ?o), and the total velocity u by: u = uw +uo = ??(S)k?p. (2.4) In the presence of capillary effects, an additional diffusion term is present in (2.3). If krw = S...

  18. Search for associated Higgs boson production WH ---> WWW* ---> l+- nu l-prime+- nu-prime + X in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process p{bar p} {yields} WH {yields} WWW* {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu} {ell}{prime}{sup {+-}} {nu}{prime} + X in final states containing two like-sign isolated electrons or muons (e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}, e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}, or {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}). The search is based on D0 Run II data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of 360-380 pb{sup -1}. No excess is observed over the predicted standard model background. They set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x Br(H {yields} WW*) between 3.2 and 2.8 pb for Higgs masses from 115 to 175 GeV.

  19. Geometrical Scaling and the Dependence of the Average Transverse Momentum on the Multiplicity and Energy for the ALICE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larry McLerran; Michal Praszalowicz

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the recent ALICE data on charged particle multiplicity in p-p collisions, and show that it exhibits Geometrical Scaling (GS) with energy dependence given with characteristic exponent $\\lambda=0.22$. Next, starting from the GS hypothesis and using results of the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, we calculate $$ as a function $N_{\\rm ch}$ including dependence on the scattering energy $W$. We show that $$ both in p-p and p-Pb collisions scales in terms of scaling variable $(W/W_{0})^{\\lambda/(2+\\lambda)}% \\sqrt{N_{\\mathrm{ch}}/S_{\\bot}}$ where $S_{\\bot}$ is multiplicity dependent interaction area in the transverse plane. Furthermore, we discuss how the behavior of the interaction radius $R$ at large multiplicities affects the mean $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ dependence on $N_{\\rm ch}$, and make a prediction that $$ at high multiplicity should reach an energy independent limit.

  20. An analysis of the egg marketing practices of Texas producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Quevedo Martin

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aaoolho ia Cbo yotat, llew hba tee 641 toothbo geoao yoo4wwK 34$ yaaetoth Ijp ~4N Sl~ A tt IX CWLEGE C 0 TIXAs t I 1 I l J. jgLlDdad $H&NIA Jaa. ' 291 O, t Sdae, SOO Oel lhte, SOS Sea SOFA SO% l 1800 NaJ' SSO, ' 1800 SN 10, 0 "e y 1%4' Oel... MF 'ILX S j- - 'ao L. et yeaIshgr %sy' geese, i e4e eheea 4aa bae e ~ seger et ~ yyeOWNm ea44ee4 ebbb twH ~ qaALly ehaaaei~ee lbwjygegy ~ 4e~eee Ne4 1' ~p S a ?e1?eNm et beeeN~ yheg be 'wg@ ha 4aa eheae ?baaeebael?lk4g aNgeQN? ewOCkwehl? awyea...

  1. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb^{-1} of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H -> tau tau decays or H -> WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  2. The reemergence of medium scale gasifications technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, W.J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of solid material is a well proven field, but the introduction of abundant and cheap petroleum fuels after WW II caused the technology to be neglected. There are three types of reactors: the fixed fuel bed, the fluidized bed, and the entrained fuel reactor. The advantages, but more to the point, the drawbacks of each system are reviewed. In order for gasification to fill modern industrial needs the advantages of the three types must be combined without their drawbacks. A reactor needs to be tar-free, have a high volume gas output relative to reactor size, accept a wide range of fuels, and have a comparable Btu production level of fuel gas. These specifications are met by the Series 8000 gas generator manufactured by Enerdyne Corporation.

  3. Lyapunov Spectral Intervals: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2002-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exponents in stability theory. Important results on stability of Lyapunov exponents that we use are due to Bylov [6], Bylov et al. [5], Bylov and Izobov [7], and Millionshchikov [24, 25]. An alternative to the spectrum of Lyapunov is based upon defining a... School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (evanvlec@mines.edu). 516 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  4. Malate dehydrogenase in bovine spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hozong Robert

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Ir1 0 M 8 ~ W 8 5 r I & Sl 8 ld 8 4 0 8 4 . rl 08 ~WW X SW X ON SW 4 8 OO 0 g W 8 0 Sl 8W A 0 Or 8 III A NW Ol OW 8 8 0 OO g SOP ~~8 8 N Or 8 ( W/I gO I ) NOIJ. b'BJ. N30NOO/3lflNIA =6/I 50 ;(Fig. 16). A few granules were also...MALATE DEHYDROGENASE IN BOVINE SPERMATOZOA A Thesis HOZONG POBERT LIN Submitted to the Graduate College Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for MASTER OF SCIENCE of the degree of 1 August 1973 Major Subject...

  5. A new jet algorithm based on the k-means clustering for the reconstruction of heavy states from jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Chekanov

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A jet algorithm based on the k-means clustering procedure is proposed which can be used for the invariant-mass reconstruction of heavy states decaying to hadronic jets. The proposed algorithm was tested by reconstructing E+ E- to ttbar to 6 jets and E+ E- to W+W- to 4 jets processes at \\sqrt{s}=500 GeV using a Monte Carlo simulation. It was shown that the algorithm has a reconstruction efficiency similar to traditional jet-finding algorithms, and leads to 25% and 40% reduction of reconstruction width for top quarks and W bosons, respectively, compared to the kT (Durham) algorithm. In addition, it is expected that the peak positions measured with the new algorithm have smaller systematical uncertainty.

  6. LHC limits on the top-Higgs in models with strong top-quark dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Theoretical Physics Department, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LHC searches for the standard model Higgs boson in WW or ZZ decay modes place strong constraints on the top-Higgs state predicted in many models with new dynamics preferentially affecting top quarks. Such a state couples strongly to top quarks, and is therefore produced through gluon fusion at a rate enhanced relative to the rate for the standard model Higgs boson. A top-Higgs state with mass less than 300 GeV is excluded at 95% C.L. if the associated top-pion has a mass of 150 GeV, and the constraint is even stronger if the mass of the top-pion state exceeds the top-quark mass or if the top-pion decay constant is a substantial fraction of the weak scale. These results have significant implications for theories with strong top dynamics, such as topcolor-assisted technicolor, top-seesaw models, and certain Higgsless models.

  7. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of compliance conditions and activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  8. A simple adaptive grid method in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weizhang; Sloan, David M.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp A TWO-DIMENSIONAL ADAPTIVE GRID METHOD 783 T Xi,j Xi-l,JXi,j Xi-l,j )/Ii_1/2,j Yi,j Yi-1... j Yi,j Yi-l,j Xi+lJ XiJ ][i+,j Xi+lJ Xij 0, Yi+l,j Yi,j Yi+l,j Yi,j (26) {IXi,jXi,j_I]T I

  9. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metals. Progress report, February 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year we have completed our characterization of the factors that control the structure of fully oxidized W and Mo on silica and have established that support hydroxyl groups play a central role in dispersing and attaching cations to the support oxide. Work with M{sub 2}(CO){sub 4}Cp{sub 2}(M{sub 2}=MoMo, WW, MoW) system has been very encouraging and continues to support the notion that it may be possible to control the structure of adsorbed catalysts (in this case generate metal dimers) by use of organometallic precursors. Techniques are being developed necessary to employ XPS as a means to characterize the attachment process and the oxidation state of the cations after various thermal and photolytic reduction steps.

  10. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year we have completed our characterization of the factors that control the structure of fully oxidized W and Mo on silica and have established that support hydroxyl groups play a central role in dispersing and attaching cations to the support oxide. Work with M[sub 2](CO)[sub 4]Cp[sub 2](M[sub 2]=MoMo, WW, MoW) system has been very encouraging and continues to support the notion that it may be possible to control the structure of adsorbed catalysts (in this case generate metal dimers) by use of organometallic precursors. Techniques are being developed necessary to employ XPS as a means to characterize the attachment process and the oxidation state of the cations after various thermal and photolytic reduction steps.

  11. Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

  12. Reducible Poly(amido ethylenimine)s for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Lane

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    is reduced 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 -50 -25 0 25 50 EDA/CBA DETA/CBA TETA/CBA n = 5 ? SEM w/DTT w/w Z e t a P o t e n t i a l ( m V ) Bioconjugate Chemistry (2006) 17; 1233-1240. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14... in fluorescence #1; Due to reducible disulfide bonds? 12 0 50 250 500 1.0?10 07 1.0?10 08 1.0?10 09 1.0?10 10 SS-PAED bPEI mM BSO R L U / m g P r o t e i n Effect on the Presence of GSH Inhibitor DL -Buthionine Sulfoxamine (BSO) ? BSO decreases intracellular GSH...

  13. CFD evaluation of pipeline gas stratification at low fluid flow due to temperature effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brar, Pardeep Singh

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    *A*?T On simplifying the above equation, applying forward difference and integrating both sides from west (W) to east (E), we get the following form of equation: ()() 2*( )* WW P WEE E P P EW kA T TkA T T rh T T x xx ? ?? ? ?? ? =?? 18 This is the general equation... and how much it differs from the CFD Analysis results. 41 0 2040608010 Z/D -1 0 1 2 P e rcen t D i fferen c e Single Elbow Upstream Simulated USM Compared To CFD Results, ?T Constant 5.5 o K (10 o F), 0.15 m/s (0.5 ft/s) 13.8 o K (25 o F), 0.15 m/s (0...

  14. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` (Co-P.I.`s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,`` (Co-P.I.`s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  15. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  16. Nonlinear Stability of Viscous Roll Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Mathew A.; Zumbrun, Kevin; Noble, Pascal

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be a Hopf bifurcation as c approaches some minimum speed for which periodics exist; see [18, section 4.1 and Figure 1, section 4.2.3]. It follows then that periodic solutions of (1.5) correspond to values (X, c, q, b) ? R 5, where X , c, and q denote...(), we obtain (1.11) vt = Lv := (?xB?x ? ?xA+ C)v, D ow nl oa de d 09 /1 6/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  17. Measurement of the Mass of the W Boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions using the Fully Leptonic Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; kesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Bsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Cohen, I; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Frtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Gruw, M; Gnther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hauschildt, J; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Horvth, D; Howard, R; Hntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kowalewski, R V; Krmer, T; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krop, D; Khl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yal; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; L, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mttig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Mndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Psztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schrder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, Randall J; Sldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Span, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Strhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trefzger, T M; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I; Trcsnyi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvri, B; Vachon, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method of determining the mass of the W boson in the W+W- -> lnu lnu channel is presented and applied to 667pb^-1 of data recorded at the center-of- mass energies in the range 183-207 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The Measured energies of charged leptons and the results of a new procedure based on an approximate kinematic reconstruction of the events are combined to give: Mw=80.41+-0.41+-0.13 GeV, when the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the lepton energy, which is calibrated using data, and the parameterization of the variables used in the fitting, which is obtained using Monte Carlo events. Both of these are limited by statistics.

  18. Measurement of the properties of the Higgs boson at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bristow, Timothy [SUPA - School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An update on the Higgs boson search in the decay channels H???, H?ZZ{sup (*)}?4l, H?WW{sup (*)}?lvlv, H??{sup +}?{sup ?} and H?bb{sup } at the ATLAS detector is presented. Proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 25/fb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are used for these results. The latest combined and individual channel measurements of the mass, signal strength, spin and parity, coupling constants and Higgs boson production are reported. Results on the measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson are all consistent with the Standard Model.

  19. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration,

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H???, H?ZZ{sup ?}?4? and H?WW{sup ?}?????. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup ?1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  20. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; et al.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  1. Low Frequency Modulation of Extreme Temperature Regimes in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Robert X.

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The project examines long-term changes in extreme temperature episodes (ETE) associated with planetary climate modes (PCMs) in both the real atmospheric and climate model simulations. The focus is on cold air outbreaks (CAOs) and warm waves (WWs) occurring over the continental US during the past 60 winters. No significant long-term trends in either WWs or CAOs are observed over the US. The annual frequency of CAOs is affected by the (i) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the Southeast US and (ii) PacificNorth American (PNA) pattern over the Northwest US. WW frequency is influenced by the (i) NAO over the eastern US and (ii) combined influence of PNA, Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and ENSO over the southern US. The collective influence of PCMs accounts for as much as 50% of the regional variability in ETE frequency. During CAO (WW) events occurring over the southeast US, there are low (high) pressure anomalies at higher atmospheric levels over the southeast US with oppositely-signed pressure anomalies in the lower atmosphere over the central US. These patterns lead to anomalous northerly (for CAOs) or southerly (for WWs) flow into the southeast leading to cold or warm surface air temperature anomalies, respectively. One distinction is that CAOs involve substantial air mass transport while WW formation is more local in nature. The primary differences among event categories are in the origin and nature of the pressure anomaly features linked to ETE onset. In some cases, PCMs help to provide a favorable environment for event onset. Heat budget analyses indicate that latitudinal transport in the lower atmosphere is the main contributor to regional cooling during CAO onset. This is partly offset by adiabatic warming associated with subsiding air. Additional diagnoses reveal that this latitudinal transport is partly due to the remote physical influence of a shallow cold pool of air trapped along the east side of the Rocky Mountains. ETE and PCM behavior is also studied in (CMIP5) climate model simulations. Although the climate models considered are able to represent the overall behavior of ETEs, the frequency of WWs (CAOs) is too high (low) in many models. While all models qualitatively replicate the overall structure of the PNA pattern, a small minority of models fails to properly simulate the NAO pattern. Model shortcomings in representing the NAO and PNA patterns have important consequences for simulating associated regional variability in surface air temperature and storm track behavior. The influence of PCMs on ETEs is underestimated in most CMIP5 models. In particular, none of the models are able to accurately simulate observed linkages between ETEs and the PDO, due to a gross misrepresentation of the PDO pattern in most models. Our results indicate that predictions of future CAO and WW behavior are currently limited by the ability of climate models to accurately represent PCM characteristics. Our study also considers the behavior of PCMs known as annular modes. It is determined that north-south movements in the stratospheric jet stream (related to the Polar Annular Mode) result in long-lasting impacts upon surface weather conditions including regional air temperature anomalies. The structure and dynamics of the stratospheric northern annular mode (or SNAM, related to changes in the strength of the stratospheric jet stream) was studied in CMIP5 models. In models with poorly-resolved stratospheres, the amplitude of SNAM at stratospheric altitudes is typically too weak, consistent with weaker stratospheric jet variability. However, this distinction does not carry over to the associated tropospheric signature of SNAM. A regional analysis illustrates that most CMIP5 models (regardless of whether the stratosphere is well-resolved) have anomalously weak and eastward shifted (compared to observed SNAM events) storm track and sea level pressure anomaly patterns during SNAM events. Analyses of stratospheretroposphere coupling reveal that large-scale wave activity in the stratosphere is anomalously weak in CMIP5 model

  2. Measurement of the W + gamma Production in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Michael H

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a measurement of the {bar p}p {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} e{nu}{gamma} + X production cross section using data form the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The p{bar p} collisions were provided by the Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Electroweak theory includes the trilinear vector boson coupling, WW{gamma}, which contributes to the e{nu}{gamma} final state. The electron decay channel of the W provides a clean sample to study the production of diboson pairs. The measurement of the production cross section tests the structure of the non-Abelian character of Electroweak theory.

  3. Decay b{yields}s{gamma} in the presence of a constant antisymmetric tensor field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuatzin, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, Zona Centro, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78000 (Mexico); Bautista, I. [IGFAE and Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hernandez-Lopez, J. A.; Toscano, J. J. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal 1152, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Ramirez-Zavaleta, F. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Avenida Francisco J. Mujica S/N, 58060, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A constant antisymmetric 2-tensor can arise in general relativity with spontaneous symmetry breaking or in field theories formulated in a noncommutative space-time. In this work, the one-loop contribution of a nonstandard WW{gamma} vertex on the flavor violating quark transition q{sub i}{yields}q{sub j}{gamma} is studied in the context of the electroweak Yang-Mills sector extended with a Lorentz-violating constant 2-tensor. An exact analytical expression for the on-shell case is presented. It is found that the loop amplitude is gauge independent, electromagnetic gauge invariant, and free of ultraviolet divergences. The dipolar contribution to the b{yields}s{gamma} transition together with the experimental data on the B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} decay is used to derive the constraint {Lambda}{sub LV}>1.96 TeV on the Lorentz-violating scale.

  4. Search for Beyond the Standard Model Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, James

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics has been remarkably successful at predicting the outcomes of particle physics experiments, but there are reasons to expect new physics at the electroweak scale. Over the last several years, there have been a number of searches for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics at D0. Here, we limit our focus to three: searches for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy (E{sub T}), searches for leptonic jets and E{sub T}, and searches for single vector-like quarks. We have discussed three recent searches at D0. There are many more, including limits on heavy neutral gauge boson in the ee channel, a search for scalar top quarks, a search for quirks, and limits on a new resonance decaying to WW or WZ.

  5. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  6. On the calculation of mutual information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Tyrone E.

    1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as follows: (1) d Yt Zt dt + dBt, where the n-dimensional process Z is independent of the n-dimensional standard Brownian motion B, [0, 1], Yo =- 0 and (2) f,f ZTt Zt dP dr< where the superscript T denotes transpose. We wish to calculate the amount... was supported by the United States Air Force under Grant AF-AFOSR 814-66. 215 D ow nl oa de d 09 /1 0/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a...

  7. Scattering lengths in SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Arthur; V. Drach; M. Hansen; A. Hietanen; C. Pica; F. Sannino

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate non perturbatively scattering properties of Goldstone Bosons in an SU(2) gauge theory with two Wilson fermions in the fundamental representation. Such a theory can be used to build extensions of the Standard Model that unifies Technicolor and pseudo Goldstone composite Higgs models. The leading order contribution to the scattering amplitude of Goldstone bosons at low energy is given by the scattering lengths. In the context of technicolor extensions of the Standard Model the scattering lengths are constrained by WW scattering measurements. We first describe our setup and in particular the expected chiral symmetry breaking pattern. We then discuss how to compute them on the lattice and give preliminary results using finite size methods.

  8. Probe Higgs boson pair production via the $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Li; Zhao Li; Qi-Shu Yan; Xiaoran Zhao

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed hadron-level study on the sensitivity of Higgs boson pair production via the $WW^{*}WW^{*}$ channel with the final state $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ at the LHC with the collision energy $\\sqrt{S} = 14$ TeV and a future 100 TeV collider. To avoid the huge background from $pp \\to Z W + \\textrm{jets}$ processes, we confine to consider the four lepton patterns: $e^\\pm e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp $ and $\\mu^\\pm \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$. We propose a partial reconstruction method to determine the most reliable combination. After that, we examine a few crucial observables which can discriminate efficiently signal and background events, especially we notice that the observable $m_{\\rm T2}$ is very efficient. For the LHC 14 TeV collisions, with an accumulated 3000 fb$^{-1}$ dataset, we find that the sensitivity of this mode can reach up to 1.5 $\\sigma$ for the Standard Model and the triple coupling of Higgs boson $\\lambda_3$ in the simplest effective theory can be constrained into the range [-1, 8] at $95\\%$ confidence level; at a 100 TeV collider with the integrated luminosity 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the sensitivity can reach up to 13 $\\sigma$ for the Standard Model and we find that all values of $\\lambda_3$ in the effective theory can be covered up to 3$\\sigma$ even without optimising signals. To precisely measure the triple coupling of Higgs boson $\\lambda_3=1$ of the Standard Model at a 100 TeV collider, by using the invariant mass of three leptons which is robust to against the contamination of underlying events and pileup effects and by performing a $\\chi^2$ analysis, we find that it can be determined into a range [0.8, 1.5] at $95\\%$ confidence level.

  9. Charged Higgs Search via $AW^\\pm/HW^\\pm$ Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baradhwaj Coleppa; Felix Kling; Shufang Su

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on models with a low energy spectrum containing a pair of charged scalars $H^\\pm$, as well as a light scalar H and/or a pseudoscalar A. We study the $H^\\pm tb$ associated production with $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain the exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process $pp \\to H^\\pm tb \\to AWtb/HWtb \\to \\tau\\tau bbWW, bbbbWW$. We find that for a daughter particle mass of 50 GeV, the 95% C.L. exclusion reach in $\\sigma$xBR varies from about 70 fb to 25 fb, for $m_{H^\\pm}$ ranging from 150 GeV to 500 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity in the $\\tau\\tau$ mode. We further interpret these bounds in the context of Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model. We find that large regions of parameter space in $\\tan\\beta$ versus $\\sin(\\beta-\\alpha)$ can be covered when the daughter Higgs mass is relatively light, in particular, for small and large $\\tan\\beta$. The exclusion region in the $m_{H^\\pm}-\\tan\\beta$ plane can be extended to $m_{H^\\pm}=$ 600 GeV, while discovery is possible for $m_{H^\\pm}\\lesssim$ 280 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. The exotic decay mode $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$ offers a complementary channel to the conventional mode $H^\\pm \\to \\tau\

  10. Energy conservation standards for room air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenquist, G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) of 1987 established minimum energy-efficiency standards for room air conditioners, which became effective on January 1, 1990. The 1990 minimum energy-efficiency ratios (EER) range from 8.0 to 9.0 (Btu/h)/W (2.34 to 2.64 W/W). As required by NAECA, the Department of Energy (DOE) must also consider amending the room air conditioner standards that went into effect in 1990. As a result, the DOE issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) in March 1994 proposing new energy-efficiency standards for several products including room air conditioners. DOE received an extensive number of comments in response to the updated standards that were proposed. A reanalysis was conducted incorporating these comments, resulting in revised estimates of the cost and efficiency increases for more efficient room air conditioner designs. This paper describes the cost-efficiency analysis of design options carried out in support of DOE`s effort to revise the energy-efficiency standards that were proposed for room air conditioners in March 1994. The analysis shows that for the most popular classes of room air conditioners (classes without reverse cycle, with louvered sides, and with capacities ranging from less than 5000 to 20,000 Btu/h [1758 to 5860 W]) EERs of approximately 10.0 (Btu/h)/W (2.93 W/W) can be achieved by incorporating commonly used technologies, such as high-efficiency rotary compressors, grooved refrigerant tubing, slit-type fins, subcoolers, and permanent split capacitor fan motors. Even greater increases in efficiency can be realized with brushless permanent magnet fan motors, enlarged heat exchanger coils, and variable-speed compressors.

  11. ZnO Nanorod Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposites: Morphology and Shape Memory Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, H.; Kelley, J; George, J; Drummy, L; Mirau, P; Bell, N; Hsu, J; Vaia, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of dispersed alkylthiol-modified ZnO nanorods, as a function of rod aspect ratio and concentration, on the shape memory character of a thermoplastic polyurethane with low hard-segment density (LHS-TPU) is examined relative to the enhanced performance occurring for carbon nanofiber (CNF) dispersion. Solution blending resulted in uniform dispersion within the LHS-TPU of the ZnO nanorods at low volume (weight) fractions (<2.9% v/v (17.75% w/w)). Tensile modulus enhancements were modest though, comparable to values observed for spherical nanofillers. Shape memory characteristics, which in this LHS-TPU result when strain-induced crystallites retard the entropic recovery of the deformed chains, were unchanged for these low volume fraction ZnO nanocomposites. Higher ZnO loadings (12% v/v (50% w/w)) exhibited clustering of ZnO nanorods into a mesh-like structure. Here, tensile modulus and shape recovery characteristics were improved, although not as great as seen for comparable CNF addition. Wide angle X-ray diffraction and NMR revealed that the addition of ZnO nanorods did not impact the inherent strain induced crystallization of the LHS-TPU, which is in contrast to the impact of CNFs and emphasizes the impact of interactions at the polymer-nanoparticle interface. Overall, these findings reinforce the hypothesis that the shape memory properties of polymer nanocomposites are governed by the extent to which nanoparticle addition, via nanoparticle aspect ratio, hierarchical morphology, and interfacial interactions, impacts the molecular mechanism responsible for trapping elastic strain.

  12. Dispersion and combustion of a bitumen-based emulsion in bubbling fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miccio, F.; Miccio, M.; Repetto, L.; Gradassi, A.T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was carried out with ORIMULSION{reg{underscore}sign} as a part of an R and D project aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of contemporary combustion and desulfurization in atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. ORIMULSION is a bitumen-based emulsion that is produced in Venezuela's Orinoco region with 30% w/w water and about 3% w/w sulfur content (on a dry basis). Two atmospheric, pre-pilot, bubbling bed units were used: a 140 mm ID reactor and a 370 mm ID combustor. The first one provides qualitative and quantitative information on dispersion and in-bed retention of ORIMULSION: to this end the bed is operated batchwise in hot tests without combustion and the fuel can be injected into the bed with or without a gaseous atomization stream. With the second one, steady-state combustion tests are carried out under typical conditions of bubbling FBC. The outcome of the experiments and significance of the results are fully discussed in the paper with reference to the ORIMULSION combustion mechanism. Among the other findings, the following ones appear particularly relevant. (1) A carbon condensed phase is actually formed with the structure of tiny carbon deposits on bed particles, but at a very low rate, as a consequence, combustion (and pollutant formation) is dominated by homogeneous mechanisms. (2) Combustion efficiency is always very high, with values approaching 100% in those tests with higher excess air. (3) The in-bed combustion efficiency is enhanced by those fuel injection conditions that lead to dispersion into fine droplets and to effective mixing within the bed; therefore, contrarily to the case of water suspensions of solid fuels, intense atomization of ORIMULSION is recommended.

  13. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

  14. Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most selective for CO{sub 2} due to the strong interaction of the zeolites with CO{sub 2}. For example, at 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity increased from 34.7 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 56.4. The large increase in selectivity was the result of the increase in CO{sub 2} permeability from 7.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 14.6 Barrers. At 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation was also improved from 83.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 136.7 with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability from 17.5 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 35.3 Barrers. The 10% carbon aerogel-zeolite A and -zeolite Y composite/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation from 34.7 to 71.5 (zeolite A composite) and to 57.4 (zeolite Y composite); in addition, the membrane exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation from 33.1 to 50 (zeolite A composite) and to 49.4 (zeolite Y composite), indicating that these type of materials have affinity for CO{sub 2}. The inclusion of mesoporosity enhanced the dispersion of the additive allowing loadings of up to 30% (w/w) without the formation of non-selective voids.

  15. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

  16. Polyamide desalination membrane characterization and surface modification to enhance fouling resistance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Mukul M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Freeman, Benny D. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Van Wagner, Elizabeth M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Hickner, Michael A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for polyamide desalination membranes is expected to continue to grow during the coming decades. Purification of alternative water sources will also be necessary to meet growing water demands. Purification of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, is of interest due to its dual potential to provide water for beneficial use as well as to reduce wastewater disposal costs. However, current polyamide membranes are prone to fouling, which decreases water flux and shortens membrane lifetime. This research explored surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE) to improve the fouling resistance of commercial polyamide membranes. Characterization of commercial polyamide membrane performance was a necessary first step before undertaking surface modification studies. Membrane performance was found to be sensitive to crossflow testing conditions. Concentration polarization and feed pH strongly influenced NaCl rejection, and the use of continuous feed filtration led to higher water flux and lower NaCl rejection than was observed for similar tests performed using unfiltered feed. Two commercial polyamide membranes, including one reverse osmosis and one nanofiltration membrane, were modified by grafting PEGDE to their surfaces. Two different PEG molecular weights (200 and 1000) and treatment concentrations (1% (w/w) and 15% (w/w)) were studied. Water flux decreased and NaCl rejection increased with PEGDE graft density ({micro}g/cm{sup 2}), although the largest changes were observed for low PEGDE graft densities. Surface properties including hydrophilicity, roughness and charge were minimally affected by surface modification. The fouling resistance of modified and unmodified membranes was compared in crossflow filtration studies using model foulant solutions consisting of either a charged surfactant or an oil in water emulsion containing n-decane and a charged surfactant. Several PEGDE-modified membranes demonstrated improved fouling resistance compared to unmodified membranes of similar initial water flux, possibly due to steric hindrance imparted by the PEG chains. Fouling resistance was higher for membranes modified with higher molecular weight PEG. Fouling was more extensive for feeds containing the cationic surfactant, potentially due to electrostatic attraction with the negatively charged membranes. However, fouling was also observed in the presence of the anionic surfactant, indicating hydrodynamic forces are also responsible for fouling.

  17. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  18. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

  19. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes on JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Y. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Koslowski, R. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Thomas, P. [DRFC CEA-Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Nardon, E. [DRFC CEA-Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Jachmich, S. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Alper, B. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Andrew, P. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Andrew, Y. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Arnoux, G. [DRFC CEA-Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Baranov, Y. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Becoulet, M. [DRFC CEA-Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Beurskens, M. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Bigi, M. [RFX, Padova, Italy; Crombe, K. [Ghent University, Belgium; de la Luna, E. [EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain; De Vries, P. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham, UK; Eich, T. [EFDA, Garching, Germany; Esser, H. G. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Fundamenski, W. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Gerasimov, S. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Giroud, C. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Gryaznevich, M. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Harting, D. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Hawkes, N. C. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Hotchin, S. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Howell, D. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Huber, A. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Jakubowski, M. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Kiptily, V. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Kreter, A. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Moreira, L. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Parail, V. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Pinches, S. D. [Culham Science Center, Abington, UK; Rachlew, Elisabeth G [ORNL; Schmitz, O. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Zimmermann, O. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational domain for active control of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) with an n = 1 external magnetic perturbation field induced by the ex-vessel error field correction coils on JET has been developed towards more ITER-relevant regimes with high plasma triangularity, up to 0.45, high normalized beta, up to 3.0, plasma current up to 2.0 MA and q95 varied between 3.0 and 4.8. The results of ELM mitigation in high triangularity plasmas show that the frequency of type-I ELMs increased by a factor of 4 during the application of the n = 1 fields, while the energy loss per ELM, W/W, decreased from 6% to below the noise level of the diamagnetic measurement (<2%). No reduction of confinement quality (H98Y) during the ELM mitigation phase has been observed. The minimum n = 1 perturbation field amplitude above which the ELMs were mitigated increased with a lower q95 but always remained below the n = 1 locked mode threshold. The first results of ELM mitigation with n = 2 magnetic perturbations on JET demonstrate that the frequency of ELMs increased from 10 to 35 Hz and a wide operational window of q95 from 4.5 to 3.1 has been found.

  20. Automated NNLL+NLO Resummation for Jet-Veto Cross Sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Becher; Rikkert Frederix; Matthias Neubert; Lorena Rothen

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In electroweak-boson production processes with a jet veto, higher-order corrections are enhanced by logarithms of the veto scale over the invariant mass of the boson system. In this paper, we resum these Sudakov logarithms at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy and match our predictions to next-to-leading order (NLO) fixed-order results. We perform the calculation in an automated way, for arbitrary electroweak final states and in the presence of kinematic cuts on the leptons produced in the decays of the electroweak bosons. The resummation is based on a factorization theorem for the cross sections into hard functions, which encode the virtual corrections to the boson production process, and beam functions, which describe the low-p_T emissions collinear to the beams. The one-loop hard functions for arbitrary processes are calculated using the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework, while the beam functions are process independent. We perform the resummation for a variety of processes, in particular for W+W- pair production followed by leptonic decays of the W bosons.

  1. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  2. Unveiling Surface Redox Charge Storage of Interacting Two-Dimensional Hetero-Nanosheets in Hierarchical Architectures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahmood, Qasim [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University (Republic of Korea); Bak, Seong-Min [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Min G. [Beamline Research Division, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Republic of Korea); Yun, Sol [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon (Republic of Korea); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shin, Hyeon S. [Department of Energy Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Low Dimensional Carbon Materials Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST) (Republic of Korea); Kim, Woo S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University (Republic of Korea); Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Materials Research Laboratory and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana?Champaign, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Park, Ho S. [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon (Republic of Korea)

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional (2D) heteronanosheets are currently the focus of intense study due to the unique properties that emerge from the interplay between two low-dimensional nanomaterials with different properties. However, the properties and new phenomena based on the two 2D heteronanosheets interacting in a 3D hierarchical architecture have yet to be explored. Here, we unveil the surface redox charge storage mechanism of surface-exposed WS2 nanosheets assembled in a 3D hierarchical heterostructure using in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic methods. The surface dominating redox charge storage of WS2 is manifested in a highly reversible and ultrafast capacitive fashion due to the interaction of heteronanosheets and the 3D connectivity of the hierarchical structure. In contrast, compositionally identical 2D WS2 structures fail to provide a fast and high capacitance with different modes of lattice vibration. The distinctive surface capacitive behavior of 3D hierarchically structured heteronanosheets is associated with rapid proton accommodation into the in-plane WS lattice (with the softening of the E2g bands), the reversible redox transition of the surface-exposed intralayers residing in the electrochemically active 1T phase of WS2 (with the reversible change in the interatomic distance and peak intensity of WW bonds), and the change in the oxidation state during the proton insertion/deinsertion process. This proposed mechanism agrees with the dramatic improvement in the capacitive performance of the two heteronanosheets coupled in the hierarchical structure.

  3. Observation of a new boson at a mass of 125 GeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hoch, Michael; Hrmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knnz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krtschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Majerotto, Walter; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Szoncs, Fritz; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Emeliantchik, Igor; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Solin, Alexander; Stefanovitch, Roman; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Fedorov, Andrey; Korzhik, Mikhail; Missevitch, Oleg; Zuyeuski, Raman; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Beaumont, Willem; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Druzhkin, Dmitry; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Goorens, Robert; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Dewulf, Jean-Paul; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Lonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Rugovac, Shkelzen; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jrmie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grgoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Ald Jnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custdio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Iope, Rogerio Luiz; Lagana, Caio; Lietti, Sergio M; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Vutova, Mariana; Roumenin, Chavdar; Uzunova, Daniela; Zahariev, Roman; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; He, Kang-Lin; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Li, Wei-Guo; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Han-Sheng; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenxia; Zhao, Wei-Ren; Zhu, Zian; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Cai, Jianxin; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Ye, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 and 8 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 inverse femtobarns at 7 TeV and 5.3 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. The search is performed in five decay modes: $\\gamma\\gamma$, ZZ, WW, $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$, and $b\\bar{b}$. An excess of events is observed above the expected background, a local significance of 5.0 standard deviations, at a mass near 125 GeV, signalling the production of a new particle. The expected significance for a standard model Higgs boson of that mass is 5.8 standard deviations. The excess is most significant in the two decay modes with the best mass resolution, $\\gamma\\gamma$ and ZZ; a fit to these signals gives a mass of 125.3 $\\pm$ 0.4 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.5 (syst.) GeV. The decay to two photons indicates that the new particle is a boson with spin different from one.

  4. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multi-lepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multi-lepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charged light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without an additional hadronically decaying tau; three light leptons; two same-charged light leptons with an additional hadronically decaying tau; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying taus. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value for comp...

  5. Search for a massive resonance decaying into a Higgs boson and a W or Z boson in hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a massive resonance decaying into a standard model Higgs boson (H) and a W or Z boson is reported. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7~fb$^{-1}$, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8~TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Signal events in which the decay products of Higgs, W or Z bosons at high Lorentz boost are contained within a single reconstructed jet are identified using jet substructure techniques, including the tagging of b hadrons. This is the first search for heavy resonances decaying into HW or HZ resulting in an all-jets final state, as well as the first application of jet substructure techniques to identify ${\\rm H\\to WW^*\\to 4q}$ decays at high Lorentz boost. No significant signal is observed and limits are set at the 95\\% confidence level on the production cross section of W' and Z' in a model with mass-degenerate charged and neutral spin-1 resonances. Resonance masses are excluded for W' in [1....

  6. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at ?s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as of its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. Included in the combinations are the results of the decay modes H ? ??, ZZ?, WW?, Z?, bb ?, ?? and ??, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb?1 at ?s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb?1 at ?s = 8 ??TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18 0.10 0.070.08, where the first error reflects the statistical uncertainty and 0.07 the second and third errors reflect respectively the experimental and theoretical systematic uncertainties. Strong evidence is found for the vector boson fusion process with a signifi...

  7. Ecological factors affecting growth and formation of sclerotia in Sclerotium rolfsii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flados, Norman D.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ! 8ww 5pg Jprvi GHp 0p!230 3dp! K*d w?x7 5pg Jprv d3Jgldp fz*5p? 0p!230 Jlrv*02r*vp! *d !pdJg2op! *olup_ vs6Jp-2*- mglKvH K*d gpJlg!p! *d -prmvHd 2r 02--20pvpgd0 lI vHp -lrmpdv g*!23d lI p*JH 06Jp-2*- 0*vW S30opgd lI Jl-lr2pd lI Jlrv*02r*v2rm lgm*r2...*rmp lI bVw vl Q$7$ o3v Il3r! mglK vl op gpv*g!p! *v 5; y#w *r! *olup> *r! Jl05-pvp-6 d355gpddp! *v 5; 2 ;2mm2rd j)? Jlrvgl--p! opJ?glv lI dKppv 5lv*vl d-25dP !3p vl Ti gl-I9 o6 *55-62rm 6 vl o vlrd lI -20p 5pg *Jgpd o3v K2vH vHp *!!2v2lr lI Jlvvlr...

  8. Elements of Greek tragedy in three Eugene O'Neill plays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koinm, Albert Julius

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QbCVM b6 ~QQWuQQp CC" le&-'t CM p ttf G teQL ~~6& t'~AXE't;&69"; QC)IQXQZ'6 Gtt'6 QTi2. l 693~'IP~ W'&GC "9 "3ALDCe . '4 f Dp G 886'JSZGCP&t&Xg Ct'&tt t. G"lGCi~' @if tee&6 'I e ~AX'XG&et&bt, 6p ~3~p CZ'Gr&8e "Ie & e tl'IICf:6& (:. C&&P . :&Z't. p... ~ ~@~ ~e~ mke2@ eS OLL ~?? ZC W~Q 43 ~CM~ 446 SCQ~~ GZ Okig ~ QQ gQ ~~p~~ imev vw3ezn peg~~~ trna 9, e 9. a pea'@i~~ ce m~~ Q~ww. A'ZQ~?~S ~w"'SGKJ 69 . ;~aQ FCQ~ CQ~FMB XZ GGFiCQXQQB Qf 4Kt QL'ACBGCLGQS ~~~ QS Q ZGSVQ M&849 3g 9. QC18pB~M~j' af @he 3...

  9. An analysis of Utah State Park visitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (IF(OCIIWIAcFWt I (O F(F Ol (A CV dP CV I Pl CO R (A CII O ( (A IA IA CV IA IO (0PIAf OIP)I IAcFICF cur CACO(FFOCdFCF(Ae I CII WWW WW I A S C N 0 Id '(F 0 S CF CI dl g Id C Id W V A N 0 FI dl C 0 g . R S N dl C (3 O' I FA&(AF 'Pl COCOCICI... disproportionate share of the out-of-state visitors. 27 '0 e g W td 0 0 CA I CA tO I dP I H I I CtttA I I NCVD+ dP DtttcP I 'OPIA I OIDCCIAIA D dP cl' F) Ctl Cd ~ I IO IA CO CO W W tO CV tA I tO CO CO LA W l tA tA IA M IA dP CO ct' IA OI 'cf' lA tA D...

  10. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  11. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senturia, R.; Faller, M.; Yin, S.; Loo, J.A.; Cascio, D.; Sawaya, M.R.; Hwang, D.; Clubb, R.T.; Guo, F. (UCLA)

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, {approx}22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  12. Optimization of esterification of oleic acid and trimethylolpropane (TMP) and pentaerythritol (PE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmud, Hamizah Ammarah; Salimon, Jumat [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable oil (VO) is the most potential alternative to replace mineral oil for lubricant due to better lubricating properties and great physicochemical properties. Chemical modification has to be done to overcome low temperature performance and low oxidation instability due to the presence of ?-hydrogen atoms of glycerol molecule. The optimization of esterification of oleic acid and polyhydric alcohol with sulfuric acid catalyst was carried out to find the optimum conditions with the highest yield. Reeaction variables such as; molar ratio, temperature, duration and catalyst concentration. Two types of polyhydric alcohol have been used; TMP and PE. The optimum results showed oleic acid successfully converted 91.2% ester TMP and 92.7% ester PE at duration: 5 hours (Ester TMP), 6 hours (Ester PE); temperature: 150C (ester TMP), 180C (Ester PE); catalyst concentration: 1.5% (w/w); and mol ratio: 3.9:1 (ester TMP), 4.9:1 (ester PE). From the data obtained, mole ratio showed most influenced factors to the increasing yields of ester conversions.. The TMP/PE ester was confirmed using gas chromatography (GC-FID), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

  13. Measurements of W? and Z? production in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated and differential fiducial cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with a high-energy photon are measured using pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV . The analyses use a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb? collected by the ATLAS detector during the 2011 LHC data-taking period. Events are selected using leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons [W(e?, ??) and Z(e? e? ,?? ??,??) ] with the requirement of an associated isolated photon. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for newmorephenomena. The measurements are used to probe the anomalous WW? , ZZ? , and Z?? triple-gauge-boson couplings and to search for the production of vector resonances decaying to Z? and W? . No deviations from Standard Model predictions are observed and limits are placed on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings and on the production of new vector meson resonances.less

  14. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemazanyy, Ivan [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)]. E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Breus, Oksana [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Zhyvoloup, Alexander [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Filonenko, Valeriy [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Gout, Ivan T. [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine) and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  15. Evidence for the direct decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hrmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knnz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krtschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Ccile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Lonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perni, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jrmie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Ald Jnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custdio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson Jos; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Mntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Hrknen, Jaakko; Karimki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampn, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindn, Tomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a new boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has heralded a new era in understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and possibly completing the standard model of particle physics. Since the first observation in decays to gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ boson pairs, an extensive set of measurements of the mass and couplings to W and Z bosons, as well as multiple tests of the spin-parity quantum numbers, have revealed that the properties of the new boson are consistent with those of the long-sought agent responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. An important open question is whether the new particle also couples to fermions, and in particular to down-type fermions, since the current measurements mainly constrain the couplings to the up-type top quark. Determination of the couplings to down-type fermions requires direct measurement of the corresponding Higgs boson decays, as recently reported by the CMS experiment in the study of Higgs decays to bottom quarks and...

  16. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 ???? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 ???? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  17. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  18. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to W+? production with leptonic W-boson decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner; Stefan Dittmaier; Markus Hecht; Christian Pasold

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W+\\gamma\\ production, including the leptonic decay of the W boson and taking into account all off-shell effects of the W boson, where the finite width of the W boson is implemented using the complex-mass scheme. Corrections induced by incoming photons are fully included and find particular emphasis in the discussion of phenomenological predictions for the LHC. The corresponding next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced as well. In order to separate hard photons from jets, a quark-to-photon fragmentation function a la Glover and Morgan is employed. Our results are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. We present integrated cross sections for the LHC at 7TeV, 8TeV, and 14TeV as well as differential distributions at 14TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we discuss the impact of anomalous WW\\gamma\\ couplings.

  19. Chlorophyll a sensitized redox processes in microemulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiwi, J.; Gratzel, M.

    1980-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A chlorophyll-containing microemulsion was prepared on 80% water w/w and sodium hexadecyl sulfate, hexadecane, 1-pentanol, and chlorophyll a. The droplet radius as determined by autocorrelated Rayleigh scattering is 130 angstroms. Using a pulsed ruby laser the chl-a triplet spectrum was measured. It peaks at approximately 465 nm and shows minima due to ground-state bleaching at 430 and 420 nm. Chl-a reduces methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) with a specific rate of 4 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ sec./sup -1/. At 5 x 10/sup -3/ M MV/sup 2 +/ concentration the efficiency of this process is unity. The cation radical Chl-a/sup +/ reacts with both ascorbate and NADh. In the latter case Chl-a can sensitize irreversible electron transfer from NADh to MV/sup 2 +/. If this system is coupled with a suitable hydrogenation catalyst, hydrogen evolution from water is observed. 34 references.

  20. Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

  1. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include ??, ZZ, WW, ??, bb, and ?? pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. From the high-resolution ?? and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02\\,+0.26-0.27(stat)+0.14-0.15(syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtainedmorein the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 0.09 (stat), +0.08 -0.07 (theo) 0.07 (syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.less

  2. Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica] [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C. [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas] [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

  3. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  4. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [CNRSINSERMUdS, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Universit Henri Poincar, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-ls-Nancy (France); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods.

  5. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  6. Effect of annealing on graphene incorporated poly-(3-hexylthiophene):CuInS{sub 2} photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumari, Anita, E-mail: anita.20188@gmail.com; Dixit, Shiv Kumar [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Singh, Inderpreet [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021, India and SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of thermal annealing on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):CuInS{sub 2} quantum dot:graphene photovoltaic device has been studied by analyzing optical characteristics of composite films and electrical characteristics of the device with structure indium tin oxide/poly[ethylene dioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (ITO/PEDOT:PSS)/P3HT:CIS:graphene/LiF/aluminum. It was observed that after annealing at 120C for 15 min a typical device containing 0.005 % w/w of graphene shows the best performance with a PCE of 1.3%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.44V, a short-circuit current density of 7.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, and a fill factor of 0.39. It is observed that the thermal annealing considerably enhances the efficiency of solar cells. However, an annealing at higher temperature such as at 140C results in a decrease in the device efficiency.

  7. Evidence for the direct decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a new boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has heralded a new era in understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and possibly completing the standard model of particle physics. Since the first observation in decays to gamma gamma, WW, and ZZ boson pairs, an extensive set of measurements of the mass and couplings to W and Z bosons, as well as multiple tests of the spin-parity quantum numbers, have revealed that the properties of the new boson are consistent with those of the long-sought agent responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. An important open question is whether the new particle also couples to fermions, and in particular to down-type fermions, since the current measurements mainly constrain the couplings to the up-type top quark. Determination of the couplings to down-type fermions requires direct measurement of the corresponding Higgs boson decays, as recently reported by the CMS experiment in the study of Higgs decays to bottom quarks and tau leptons. In this paper we report the combination of these two channels which results, for the first time, in strong evidence for the direct coupling of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to down-type fermions, with an observed significance of 3.8 standard deviations, when 4.4 are expected.

  8. Search for a dijet resonance in events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.,

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for a dijet resonance in events with only two or three jets and large imbalance in the total event transverse momentum. This search is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W or Z boson, where the boson decays leptonically with one or more neutrinos in the final state. We use the full data set collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider at a proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb^{-1}. We study the invariant mass distribution of the two jets with highest transverse energy. We find good agreement between data and standard model background expectations and measure the combined cross section for WW, WZ, and ZZ production to be 13.8^{+3.0}_{-2.7} pb. No significant anomalies are observed in the mass spectrum and 95% credibility level upper limits are set on the production rates of a potential new particle in association with a W or Z boson.

  9. Measurements of W? and Z? production in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated and differential fiducial cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with a high-energy photon are measured using pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV . The analyses use a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb? collected by the ATLAS detector during the 2011 LHC data-taking period. Events are selected using leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons [W(e?, ??) and Z(e? e? ,?? ??,??) ] with the requirement of an associated isolated photon. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The measurements are used to probe the anomalous WW? , ZZ? , and Z?? triple-gauge-boson couplings and to search for the production of vector resonances decaying to Z? and W? . No deviations from Standard Model predictions are observed and limits are placed on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings and on the production of new vector meson resonances.

  10. SAPPHiRE: a Small Gamma-Gamma Higgs Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Bogacz; J. Ellis; L. Lusito; D. Schulte; T. Takahashi; M. Velasco; M. Zanetti; F. Zimmermann

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new particle with mass ~ 125 GeV that resembles the Higgs boson has recently been discovered by ATLAS and CMS. We propose a low-energy gamma-gamma collider as a cost- and time-efficient option for a Higgs factory capable of studying this particle in detail. In the past, this option has been suggested as a possible application of the CLIC two-beam accelerator technology (the CLIC Higgs Experiment, CLICHE) or as an option for the ILC. Here we propose a design based on a pair of \\sim 10 GeV recirculating Linacs (Small Accelerator for Photon-Photon Higgs production using Recirculating Electrons, SAPPHiRE) similar in design to those proposed for the LHeC. We present parameters for the e- beams and sketch a laser backscattering system capable of producing a gamma-gamma peak luminosity of 0.36 \\times 10^34/cm2/s with E_CM (gamma-gamma) \\sim 125 GeV. A gamma-gamma collider with such a luminosity could be used to measure accurately the mass, bbar, WW\\ast, and gamma-gamma decays of the Higgs boson. We also comment on possible synergies with other projects such as LHeC, the ILC or CLIC, and on other physics prospects in gamma-gamma and e-gamma collisions.

  11. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

  12. Measurements of the Higgs Boson in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jacob

    The generation of vector boson mass via the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model has been confirmed by the 2012 discovery of a candidate Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow{WW}$, $H\\rightarrow{ZZ}$, and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channels. In contrast, the Yukawa couplings hypothesized to provide the mass of fermions in the Standard Model have yet to be observed. The $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel currently provides the best opportunity for observing these couplings. This thesis describes two separate but related searches for Higgs boson decays in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel using proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The first analysis is a general search for all Higgs boson production mechanisms leading to a $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay using 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collision data. A deviation from the background-only hypothesis is observed with a significance of $4.5\\sigma$ for a hypothetical Higgs boson mass of ${m_{H} ...

  13. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multilepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multilepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charge light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; three light leptons; two same-charge light leptons with a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value f...

  14. The structure of the carbon black flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, W. Kermi

    1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wbyo. a1y dWoAmv AcWdp PcWgy nS bomfHdyf AB AHovnvE W QyR mP EWS nSSHnvE Pomg W cWuW Rnb nv W oySRondRy6f SHbbcB mP Wno. a1y EWS AHovS lnR1 vm boy6gnqRHoy mP Wno Wvf R1y PcWgy AmHvfWonyS Woy fyRyognvyf AB R1y bmnvRS WR l1nd1 nvRyofnPPHSnmv mP EWS Wvf... RygbyoWRHoy gyWSHoygyvRS AHR. EnuyS vm nvPmogWRnmv WS Rm R1y SmHody mP R1y fWRW HSyf * mo R1y6 gyR1mf AB l1nd1 R1yB lyoy mARWnvyf. aygbyoWRHoyS oWvEnvE Pomg 0'wJN. Rm U'wwJN. lyoy oydmofyf. Iv EyvyoWc, nR gWB Ay SRWRyf R1WR R1mHE1 R1y inRh yo...

  15. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the full 2011 data sample, from an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Higgs boson decay modes to tau tau and WW are explored by selecting events with three or four leptons in the final state. No excess above background expectations is observed, resulting in exclusion limits on the product of Higgs associated production cross section and decay branching fraction for Higgs boson masses between 110 and 200 GeV in these channels. Combining these results with other CMS associated production searches using the same dataset in the H to gamma gamma and H to b b-bar decay modes, the cross section for associated Higgs boson production 3.3 times the standard model expectation or larger is ruled out at the 95% confidence level for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

  16. Electroweak Measurements in Electron-Positron Collisions at W-Boson-Pair Energies at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schael, S; Bruneliere, R; Buskulic, D; De Bonis, I; Decamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jezequel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocme, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernandez, E; Fernandez-Bosman, M; Garrido, Ll; Grauges, E; Juste, A; Martinez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, Ll. M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sanchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Buchmuller, O; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, I; Lazeyras, P; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepe-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, L; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Z; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Mollerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Waananen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rouge, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; Have, I. ten; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S; Buchmuller, O; Cavanaugh, R; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R.W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaitre, V; Bauerdick, L.A T; Blumenschein, U; van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Holldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Muller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, J J; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Tilquin, A; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Buscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Huttmann, K; Lutjens, G; Mannert, C; Manner, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, Ph; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F; Lefrancois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foa, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciaba, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; Garcia-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, D R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, W; Lancon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Perez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from $130~GeV$ to $209~GeV$. Combining the published results of the four LEP experiments, the measurements include total and differential cross-sections in photon-pair, fermion-pair and four-fermion production, the latter resulting from both double-resonant WW and ZZ production as well as singly resonant production. Total and differential cross-sections are measured precisely, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model at centre-of-mass energies never explored before in electron-positron collisions. Final-state interaction effects in four-fermion production, such as those arising from colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations between the two W decay systems arising ...

  17. Development of Highly Durable and Reactive Regenerable Magnesium-Based Sorbents for CO2 Separation in Coal Gasification Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Javad Abbasian; Armin Hassanzadeh Khayyat; Rachid B. Slimane

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific objective of this project was to develop physically durable and chemically regenerable MgO-based sorbents that can remove carbon dioxide from raw coal gas at operating condition prevailing in IGCC processes. A total of sixty two (62) different sorbents were prepared in this project. The sorbents were prepared either by various sol-gel techniques (22 formulations) or modification of dolomite (40 formulations). The sorbents were prepared in the form of pellets and in granular forms. The solgel based sorbents had very high physical strength, relatively high surface area, and very low average pore diameter. The magnesium content of the sorbents was estimated to be 4-6 % w/w. To improve the reactivity of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2}, The sorbents were impregnated with potassium salts. The potassium content of the sorbents was about 5%. The dolomite-based sorbents were prepared by calcination of dolomite at various temperature and calcination environment (CO{sub 2} partial pressure and moisture). Potassium carbonate was added to the half-calcined dolomite through wet impregnation method. The estimated potassium content of the impregnated sorbents was in the range of 1-6% w/w. In general, the modified dolomite sorbents have significantly higher magnesium content, larger pore diameter and lower surface area, resulting in significantly higher reactivity compared to the sol-gel sorbents. The reactivities of a number of sorbents toward CO{sub 2} were determined in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit. The results indicated that at the low CO{sub 2} partial pressures (i.e., 1 atm), the reactivities of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2} are very low. At elevated pressures (i.e., CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 10 bar) the maximum conversion of MgO obtained with the sol-gel based sorbents was about 5%, which corresponds to a maximum CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of less than 1%. The overall capacity of modified dolomite sorbents were at least one order of magnitude higher than those of the sol-gel based sorbents. The results of the tests conducted with various dolomite-based sorbent indicate that the reactivity of the modified dolomite sorbent increases with increasing potassium concentration, while higher calcination temperature adversely affects the sorbent reactivity. Furthermore, the results indicate that as long as the absorption temperature is well below the equilibrium temperature, the reactivity of the sorbent improves with increasing temperature (350-425 C). As the temperature approaches the equilibrium temperature, because of the significant increase in the rate of reverse (i.e., regeneration) reaction, the rate of CO{sub 2} absorption decreases. The results of cyclic tests show that the reactivity of the sorbent gradually decreases in the cyclic process. To improve long-term durability (i.e., reactivity and capacity) of the sorbent, the sorbent was periodically re-impregnated with potassium additive and calcined. The results indicate that, in general, re-treatment improves the performance of the sorbent, and that, the extent of improvement gradually decreases in the cyclic process. The presence of steam significantly enhances the sorbent reactivity and significantly decreases the rate of decline in sorbent deactivation in the cyclic process.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of organic pro-degradant concentration in polypropylene exposed to the natural ageing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagna, L. S., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Catto, A. L., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Rossini, K., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Forte, M. M. C., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Santana, R. M. C., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br [Engineering School/Laboratory of Polymeric Materials, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production and consumption of plastics in the last decade has recorded a remarkable increase in the scientific and industrial interest in environmentally degradable polymer (EDPs). Polymers wastes are deposited improperly, such as dumps, landfills, rivers and seas, causing a serious problem by the accumulation in the environment. The abiotic processes, like the photodegradation, are the most efficient occurring in the open environmental, where the polymers undergo degradation from the action of sunlight that result from direct exposure to solar radiation, however depend of the type of chemical ageing, which is the principal component of climatic ageing. The subject of this work is to study the influence of concentration of organic pro-degradant (1, 2 and 3 % w/w) in the polypropylene (PP) exposed in natural ageing. PP samples with and without the additive were processed in plates square form, obtained by thermal compression molding (TCM) using a press at 200C under 2 tons for 5 min, and then were exposed at natural ageing during 120 days. The presence of organic additive influenced on PP degradability, this fact was assessed by changes in the thermal and morphology properties of the samples after 120 days of natural ageing. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) results of the morphological surface of the modified PP samples showed greater degradation photochemical oxidative when compared to neat PP, due to increase of rugosity and formation of microvoids. PP samples with different pro-degradant concentration under natural ageing presented a degree of crystallinity, obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) increases in comparing the neat PP.

  19. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  20. The synthesis and characterization of 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin and the investigation of the fluorescence properties of its 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-chitosan films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahyuningrum, Deana, E-mail: deana@chem.itb.ac.id [Organic Chemistry Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Zulqarnaen, Muhammad [Chemistry Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Suendo, Veinardi [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Chitosan fluorescent films containing 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin (7H4MC) have been successfully prepared. Used chitosan was obtained from chitin isolated from skin of tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) through the deproteination, demineralization, and deacetylation process. The yields of chitin and chitosan are 10.66% and 23.83%, respectively. The chitosan has 55.00% degree of deacetylation based on FTIR spectroscopy. Average molecular mass of chitosan which was determined by Ostwald viscometry method is 8.55 10{sup 6} g/mol. The 7H4MC was synthesized from resorcinol and ethyl acetoacetate using amberlyst-15 as catalyst based on Pechmann reaction with chemical yields of 90.01% and the melting point of 189190C. The FTIR, {sup 1}HNMR, and {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopies confirmed the structure which corresponds to the structure of 7H4MC. The films of chitosan containing 7H4MC were prepared by solvent evaporation method in 2% (v/v) acetic acid. The 7H4MC content in each film was 0% (blank), 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% (w/w). The UV-Vis spectrum of 7H4MC in methanol showed ?{sub max} at 235 and 337 nm. The observed fluorescence is the fluorescence color of cyan. The excitation wavelengths are 200, 235, 275, 337, and 365 nm. The highest intensity of cyan color fluorescence of chitosan containing 7H4MC films was obtained at the concentration of 0.2% of 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin at the excitation wavelength of 275 nm.

  1. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E. [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Redondo Beach, Ca, 90278 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  2. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.rutkowski@pwr.wroc.pl

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. Optimization of process temperature was done. Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 montmorillonite K10, KSF montmorillonite KSF, B Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 C with heating rate of 100 C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.379.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  3. Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmore, B.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.

  4. Unveiling Surface Redox Charge Storage of Interacting Two-Dimensional Hetero-Nanosheets in Hierarchical Architectures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahmood, Qasim; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Sol; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Shin, Hyeon S.; Kim, Woo S.; Braun, Paul V.; Park, Ho S.

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional (2D) heteronanosheets are currently the focus of intense study due to the unique properties that emerge from the interplay between two low-dimensional nanomaterials with different properties. However, the properties and new phenomena based on the two 2D heteronanosheets interacting in a 3D hierarchical architecture have yet to be explored. Here, we unveil the surface redox charge storage mechanism of surface-exposed WS2 nanosheets assembled in a 3D hierarchical heterostructure using in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic methods. The surface dominating redox charge storage of WS2 is manifested in a highly reversible and ultrafast capacitive fashion due to themoreinteraction of heteronanosheets and the 3D connectivity of the hierarchical structure. In contrast, compositionally identical 2D WS2 structures fail to provide a fast and high capacitance with different modes of lattice vibration. The distinctive surface capacitive behavior of 3D hierarchically structured heteronanosheets is associated with rapid proton accommodation into the in-plane WS lattice (with the softening of the E2g bands), the reversible redox transition of the surface-exposed intralayers residing in the electrochemically active 1T phase of WS2 (with the reversible change in the interatomic distance and peak intensity of WW bonds), and the change in the oxidation state during the proton insertion/deinsertion process. This proposed mechanism agrees with the dramatic improvement in the capacitive performance of the two heteronanosheets coupled in the hierarchical structure.less

  5. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  6. Spin structure measurements from E143 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements have been made of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions, g{sub 1}{sup p} at beam energies of 29.1, 16.2, and 9.7 GeV, and g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} at a beam energy of 29.1 GeV. The integrals {Gamma}{sub p} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2})dx and {Gamma}{sub d} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2})dx have been evaluated at fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the 29.1 GeV data to yield {Gamma}{sub p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.) and {Gamma}{sub d} = 0.041 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004. The Q{sup 2} dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} has been studied and is found to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Within experimental precision, the g{sub 2} data are well-described by the twist-2 contribution, g{sub 2}{sup ww}. Twist-3 matrix elements have been extracted and are compared to theoretical predictions. The asymmetry A{sub 2} has also been measured and is found to be significantly smaller than the positivity limit {radical}R for both targets A{sub 2}{sup p} is found to be positive and inconsistent with zero.

  7. Total and Inorganic Arsenic in Mid-Atlantic Marine Fish and Shellfish and Implications for Fish Advisories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Richard; Crecelius, Eric A.

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 33.3 metric tons of arsenic trioxide were spilled off the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States in January of 1992 during a shipping accident. Historical fish tissue data for samples collected in the Delaware Inland Bays before and after the spill reveal a prominent spike in total arsenic in summer flounder following the spill and a gradual decline ever since. In 2002, a small study was conducted to determine whether summer flounder migrating into the Delaware Inland Bays from the Continental Shelf in the spring contain higher body burdens of arsenic than summer flounder migrating out of the Inland Bays in the fall. Total arsenic was significantly higher in the incoming fish. Considering that summer flounder overwinter at the spill site, that arsenic trioxide is a dense powder of limited solubility that would tend to incorporate into the sediments, and that summer flounder are demersal fish, we conclude that summer flounder accumulate arsenic offshore and that the likely source of their extra body burden is the spilled arsenic. Speciation of arsenic in the summer flounder, as well as in Atlantic croaker, striped bass, and hard clam reveal low concentrations (0.5 ? 20 ug/kg ww) of toxic inorganic arsenic. DMA was more than an order of magnitude greater in hard clam meats than in the other species tested, a finding attributed to arsenic uptake by phytoplankton and subsequent dietary uptake by the clam. Risk assessment using the inorganic arsenic concentrations was used to conclude that a fish advisory is not warranted.

  8. Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

  9. ! #"%$&! '()$0!1 32546! 879!)$@A BDC0EGFIH3PRQTSVUWC0X`Ybadc@egfhSiC0prqtsvuTC0UwYxy0da5c5cVdefhgdjie&g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¤?Ái£V ¢Á5R£ª?r?£w ?R? Á5RÁV¢££ª?%£i¦9ªÍR £ªwª ¢l¯¢Í5 wwª´i£?´di?i`²³ ¢¤I´dªi±n£i¦?ª? ?W ¢ªG²³¦¤w«¹ ¢?rºdw²³ w¤35¯ ¢hw¡¢¢£R?º5¦¿VÏ´5lRV («¿ ¤´d¥²ªw£ª?¶wªR¢` (¡¢R¢Vi±¤·é¬¢¤3RV?«V¦¤ê¶¢¯ÁVº »¼¢¼¢ë¾?i¬i ¯wi±) ¢²hG±V¦iº`¯Rº¬?Ái¤´d5¦vw ¢¤w¿ ¢wi»¢» wÁi´©z¢±?v𬣪£ª («i±llw?W¤w l£ª?wi¶wÁi´©R?5?W ¢ªw£ª?)ª&´dV?5¯ª¢£ª?wi0¯Rº?@j0£ªª

  10. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  11. Optical instrument for measurement of vaginal coating thickness by drug delivery formulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Marcus H.; Peters, Jennifer J.; Walmer, David K.; Couchman, Grace M.; Katz, David F. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical device has been developed for imaging the human vaginal epithelial surfaces, and quantitatively measuring distributions of coating thickness of drug delivery formulations - such as gels - applied for prophylaxis, contraception or therapy. The device consists of a rigid endoscope contained within a 27-mm-diam hollow, polished-transparent polycarbonate tube (150 mm long) with a hemispherical cap. Illumination is from a xenon arc. The device is inserted into, and remains stationary within the vagina. A custom gearing mechanism moves the endoscope relative to the tube, so that it views epithelial surfaces immediately apposing its outer surface (i.e., 150 mm long by 360 deg. azimuthal angle). Thus, with the tube fixed relative to the vagina, the endoscope sites local regions at distinct and measurable locations that span the vaginal epithelium. The returning light path is split between a video camera and photomultiplier. Excitation and emission filters in the light path enable measurement of fluorescence of the sited region. Thus, the instrument captures video images simultaneously with photometric measurement of fluorescence of each video field [{approx}10 mm diameter; formulations are labeled with 0.1% w/w United States Pharmacoepia (USP) injectable sodium fluorescein]. Position, time and fluorescence measurements are continuously displayed (on video) and recorded (to a computer database). The photomultiplier output is digitized to quantify fluorescence of the endoscope field of view. Quantification of the thickness of formulation coating of a surface sited by the device is achieved due to the linear relationship between thickness and fluorescence intensity for biologically relevant thin layers (of the order of 0.5 mm). Summary measures of coating have been developed, focusing upon extent, location and uniformity. The device has begun to be applied in human studies of model formulations for prophylaxis against infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens.

  12. Electroless Ni coatings used in 4% NaCl corrosion control of mild steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, M.A.; Zambrano, J.A.; Perez, O. [Univ. del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela). Centro de Estudios de Corrosion; Podesta, J.J. [Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to study the behavior of electroless Ni coatings on SAE 1020 steel in aqueous 4% NaCl solution. An aqueous solution with NiSO{sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O (Nickel Sulfate), NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O (Sodium Hypophosphite), C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 3} (Lactic Acid), C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2} (Propionic Acid) and Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Lead Nitrate) as the basic ingredients of the bath was selected for the autocatalytic deposition of Ni, with an average deposit rate of c.a. 19 {micro}m/h. Steel coupons were immersed in the bath for 1, 2, 3 h in the original solution, renewing with fresh solution every hour. Once coated with nickel, the coupons were subjected to heat treatment for 1, 2, and 3 h at 400 C, measuring hardness to determine how it is affected by thermal treatment. Salt-spray tests were carried out at 30 C in line with ASTM B117-75 and DIN 50907 standards. The corrosion rate was determined by potentiodynamic polarizing curves (0.28.10{sup {minus}3} V/s), using a 4.0% w/w NaCl solution. Corrosion resistance was higher in the coupons that underwent 2--3 h of heat treatment and 2--3 h plating time. Corrosion rate varied between 2.41 and 3.40 {micro}m/y. The surface of the coupons in the salt spray chamber had a good appearance at the end of the 568-hour test.

  13. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  14. Electrodeposition of nickel-aluminum alloys from the aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, W.R.; Hussey, C.L. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stafford, G.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Al alloys on glassy carbon was investigated in the 66.7--33.3 mole percent (m/o) Al chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing electrogenerated Ni(II) at 40 C. The electrodeposition of Ni on glassy carbon involves 3-D progressive nucleation on a finite number of active sites with hemispherical diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei. At potentials slightly more negative than those needed to induce the reduction of Ni(II) to the metal, Al is codeposited with Ni to produce Ni-Al alloys. Controlled-potential and controlled-current experiments revealed that it is possible to produce alloy deposits containing up to approximately 40 atomic percent (a/o) Al under conditions that circumvent the bulk deposition of Al. The Al content of the Ni-Al deposit was found to vary linearly with the deposition potential but nonlinearly with the current density. The electrodeposited Ni-Al alloys are thermodynamically unstable with respect to Ni(II), i.e., immersion of the alloy deposit in melt containing Ni(II) under open-circuit conditions leads to a reduction in the Al content of the alloy. The mechanism of alloy formation appears to involve underpotential deposition of Al on the developing Ni deposit; however, alloy formation must be kinetically hindered because the Al content is always less than predicted from theoretical considerations. Ni-Al alloys produced at 0.30 V in melt containing Ni(II) and 20% (w/w) benzene as a cosolvent contained about 15 a/o Ni and were of high quality with a disordered fcc structure, but alloys produced at more negative potentials had the visual appearance of a loosely adherent, finely divided, black powder and were heavily contaminated with chloride, probably as a result of the occlusion of the molten salt solvent by the dendritic alloy deposit during deposit growth.

  15. Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world`s largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1280], 1{sup {plus}{plus}} [1280], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1420], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1470], 1{sup {plus_minus}} [1415]. The Fermilab fixed target experiment E711, dihadron production in pN interactions at 800 GeV, completed data reduction and analysis. The atomic weight dependence, when parameterized as {sigma}(A) = {sigma}{sub o}A{sup {alpha}}, yielded a value of {alpha} = 1.043 {plus_minus} 0.011 {plus_minus} .012. The cross section per nucleon and angular distributions was also measured as a function of two particle mass and agrees very well with QCD calculations. The D0 Fermilab Collider Experiment E740 began its first data taking run in April 1992. The CERN collider experiment ALEPH at LEP is presently taking more data. The Z mass and width, the couplings to the upper and lower components of the hadronic isospin doublet, forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic events, and measurements of the fragmentation process have been made. The effort of detector development for the SSC has substantially increased with particular emphasis on scintillators, both in fibers and plates. Work has continued on higher-order QCD calculations using the Monte Carlo technique developed previously. This year results for WW, ZZ, WZ, and {sub {gamma}{gamma}} production have been published. A method for incorporating parton showering in such calculations was developed and applied to W production. The multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm has stood up to the promises anticipated; it was used in multicanonical simulations of first-order phase transitions and for spin glass systems.

  16. High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting of metabolites from cecum and distal colon contents of rats fed resistant starch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Timothy J. [Ames Laboratory; Jones, Roger W. [Ames Laboratory; Ai, Yongfeng [Iowa State University; Houk, Robert S. [Ames Laboratory; Jane, Jay-lin [Iowa State University; Zhao, Yinsheng [Iowa State University; Birt, Diane F. [Iowa State University; McClelland, John F. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55 % (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the 8-week study, cecal and distal colon content samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic-treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  17. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  18. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  19. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innocenzi, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of LAquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 LAquila (Italy); De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of LAquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 LAquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [SAT, Austrian Society for Systems Engineering and Automation, Gurkasse 43/2, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Vegli, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of LAquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 LAquila (Italy)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 22.5% and 1012% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 1520%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 7580%.

  20. Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel cellulose, filter paper and cottonwere hydrolyzed 2 10 times faster than the respective untreated celluloses. A complete hydrolysis of Avicel cellulose could be achieved in 6 h given the Trichoderma reesei cellulase/substrate ratio (w/w) of 3:20 at 50 C. In addition,we observed that cellulase is more thermally stable (up to 60 C) in the presence of regenerated cellulose. Furthermore, our systematic studies suggest that the presence of various ILs during the hydrolysis induced different degrees of cellulase inactivation. Therefore, a thorough removal of IL residues after cellulose regeneration is highly recommended, and a systematic investigation on this subject is much needed.

  1. Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (<260 C boiling point). Carboxylic acid content of all of the high oxygen content fractions was likely too high for these materials to be considered as fuel blendstocks although potential for blending with crude oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

  2. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  3. Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes Having an N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand to Give the Isolable 17-Electron Tungsten Radical, CpW(CO)2(IMes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, John A.; Franz, James A.; van der Eide, Edwin F.; Walter, Eric D.; Petersen, Jeffrey L.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A series consisting of a tungsten anion, radical and cation, supported by the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and spanning formal oxidation states W(0), W(I) and W(II), has been synthesized, isolated, and characterized. Reaction of the hydride CpW(CO)2(IMes)H with KH and 18 crown 6 gives the tungsten anion [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]-[K(18 crown 6)]+. The crystal structure of this complex shows that the K+ interacts not only with the oxygen atoms in the crown ether, but also with the carbonyl oxygens. The electrochemical oxidation of [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- in acetonitrile is fully reversible (E = ?1.65 V vs Cp2Fe+/0) at all scan rates, indicating that CpW(CO)2(IMes) is a persistent radical. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph3C+PF6 affords [cis-CpW(CO)2(IMes)(MeCN)]+PF6 . Comproportionation of [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- with [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(MeCN)]+ gives the 17-electron tungsten radical CpW(CO)2(IMes). This complex shows paramagnetically shifted resonances in 1H NMR spectra and has been characterized by IR spectroscopy, low-temperature EPR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. CpW(CO)2(IMes) is very stable with respect to disproportionation and dimerization. NMR studies of degenerate electron transfer between CpW(CO)2(IMes) and [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- are reported. DFT calculations were carried out on CpW(CO)2(IMes)H, as well as on related complexes bearing NHC ligands with N,N substituents Me [CpW(CO)2(IMe)H] or H [CpW(CO)2(IH)H] to compare to the experimentally studied IMes complexes with mesityl substituents. These calculations reveal W H homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) to decrease with increasing steric bulk of the NHC ligand, from 67 for CpW(CO)2(IH)H to 64 for CpW(CO)2(IMe)H to 63 kcal/mol for CpW(CO)2(IMes)H. The calculated spin density at W for CpW(CO)2(IMes) is 0.63. The W radicals CpW(CO)2(IMe) and CpW(CO)2(IH) are calculated to form weak W W bonds. The weakly bonded complexes [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2 and [CpW(CO)2(IH)]2, are predicted to have W-W BDEs of 6 and 18 kcal/mol, respectively, and to dissociate readily to the W-centered radicals CpW(CO)2(IMe) and CpW(CO)2(IH). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  4. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  5. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  6. Search for $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow WZ \\rightarrow l\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pani, Priscilla; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy physics has made huge steps forward the comprehension of the inner most nature of our universe and the matter we are composed of. The experimental discoveries, and the theories of the last 50 years that the experimental discoveries had confirmed or inspired, made possible to build a theory of the interactions. Weak interactions have been discovered and unified with the Electromagnetic ones in the Standard Model, which is the most widely experimentally tested and confirmed model of this century. The only prediction which is still unconfirmed is the existence of a particle, the Higgs boson, which provides particles with mass, interacting with them, in a spontaneous symmetry breakdown that doesn't violate the natural gauge symmetry of the Lagrangian of the system. One of the ways in which the Standard Model has been tested during the last 20 years is by accelerating e{sup +}e{sup -} (LEP) or p{bar p} (Tevatron) particles in a circular ring and colliding them inside a detector which is designed to reveal the final reaction products. We now have two operating hadron colliders in the world. The Tevatron at Fermilab laboratory of Chicago, collides protons against anti-protons since 1989 and has reached its maximum energy in the mass center of 1.96 TeV since 2001. It has collected approximately 7 fb{sup -1} of data so far, that allowed important discoveries, as the top quark one, B{sub s} mixing, precision measurements of some of the Standard Model free parameters, e.g. the W mass, and search for New Phenomena. The LHC at CERN in Geneva is a proton proton collider and has started the data acquisition in March 2010, at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, thus beating the world record of the Tevatron. LHC however has not yet either the integrated luminosity nor the detailed understanding of the detectors to start investigating Higgs or di-boson production. The purpose of this work is to analyse the data of the CDF experiment at Tevatron to search for the associate production of a W{sup {+-}} and Z gauge boson, looking for them in the lepton, neutrino plus jets final state, This process is predicted by the Standard Model but not revealed yet in this particular channel, both for its small cross section ({sigma}{sub WW/WZ} {approx} 16 pb{sup -1}) and for the huge backgrounds we have to deal with. The W{sup +}W{sup -} or W{sup {+-}}Z in l {bar {nu}}{sub l} j j process has been measured for the first time in [4] and represents the starting point of this work. Our aim is to discriminate W{sup {+-}}Z process from W{sup +}W{sup -} one requiring the decay of the Z boson in two b-quarks. The evidence of a peak on the invariant mass distribution will allow a tuning of the invariant mass resolution of b-jets. In addition, one of the main motivations for this quest is the similarity of this exactly predicted process with the W{sup {+-}}H associate production signature, for which it represents a test of the searching tools and techniques, as long as an irreducible background that must be understood before such Higgs search is performed.

  7. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a ?-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 ?C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 ?C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 ?C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 ?C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were 92-95 wt% gibbsite. Only a minor portion (≈4.

  8. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < m{sub H} < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(m{sub Pl}). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < m{sub H} < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.