National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 3005a sw-846 6020a

  1. Comparison of SW-846 method 3051 and SW-846 method 7471A for the preparation of solid waste samples for mercury determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giaquinto, J.M.; Essling, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes experimental studies to evaluate the use of EPA SW-846 method 3051 for preparation and dissolution of solid samples for Hg analysis. The study showed that the method is effective in dissolution of four sample types without significant loss of Hg. Based on results of this study, method 3051 was used for analysis of high radioactive waste samples to obtain results for a number of RCRA regulated metals without the need to utilize a separate sample preparation method (EPA SW-846 method 7471A) specific only for Hg.

  2. Microsoft Word - EPRR_procedures_060115.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Environmental Services Standard Operating Procedure for Routine Validation of Dioxin Furan Analytical Data (EPA Method 1618 and SW-846 EPA Method 8290) SOP-5171 Waste and...

  3. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skorpik, J.R.; Dodson, M.G.

    1999-05-25

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846. 8 figs.

  4. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Dodson, Michael G. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  5. SALTSTONE 1QCY14 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    2014-06-19

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2014 (1QCY14). After a 64 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  6. Saltstone 2QCY13 TCLP Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M. M.

    2013-10-29

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2013 (2QCY13). After a 49 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  7. Saltstone 3QCY13 TCLP Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.

    2013-12-20

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2013 (3QCY13). After a 63 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  8. Saltstone 3QCY12 TCLP Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R. E.

    2012-12-19

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2012 (3QCY12). After a 34 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  9. Saltstone 4QCY12 TCLP results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M. M.

    2013-03-14

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2012 (4QCY12). After a 48 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  10. Saltstone 1QCY13 TCLP Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R. E.

    2013-07-08

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2013 (1QCY13). After a 49 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  11. SALTSTONE 4QCY13 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    2014-04-23

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2013 (4QCY13). After a 62 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  12. RCRA ground-water monitoring: Draft technical guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The manual was prepared to provide guidance for implementing the ground-water monitoring regulations for regulated units contained in 40 CFR Part 264 Subpart F and the permitting standards of 40 CFR Part 270. The manual also provides guidance to owners and operators of treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) that are required to comply with the requirements of 40 CFR Part 264 Subparts J (Tank Systems), K (Surface Impoundments), L (Waste Piles), N (Landfills), and X (Miscellaneous Units). This document updates technical information contained in other sources of U.S. EPA guidance, such as chapter eleven of SW-846 (Revision O, September 1986) and the Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (TEGD).

  13. SALTSTONE 4QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-03-31

    Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2010 (4QCY10). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  14. Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Unidentified Rocky Flats Laboratory Waste Stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, J.; Kimmitt, R.

    2007-07-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) evaluated various commercially available sorbents to solidify unidentified laboratory liquids from Rocky Flats that are stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The liquids are a collection of laboratory wastes that were generated from various experiments and routine analytical laboratory activities carried out at Rocky Flats. The liquids are in bottles discovered inside of buried waste drums being exhumed from the subsurface disposal area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) by the contractor, CH2M Hill Washington International (CWI). Free liquids are unacceptable at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and some of these liquids cannot be returned to the retrieval pit. Stabilization of the liquids into a solid mass will allow these materials to be sent to an appropriate disposal location. The selected sorbent or sorbent combinations should produce a stabilized mass that is capable of withstanding conditions similar to those experienced during storage, shipping, and burial. The final wasteform should release less than 1% liquid by volume per the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The absence or presence of free liquid in the solidified waste-forms was detected when tested by SW-846, Method 9095B, Paint Filter Free Liquids, and the amount of liquid released from the wasteform was determined by SW-846, Method 9096, Liquid Release Test. Reactivity testing was also conducted on the solidified laboratory liquids. (authors)

  15. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: Semivost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final project report, August 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    The candidate methods for semivolatile organic compounds are SW-846 Sampling Method 0010 and Analytical Method 8270, which are applicable to stationary sources. Two field tests were conducted using quadruple sampling trains with dynamic spiking were performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. The first field test was performed at a site with low levels of moisture. The second test reported here was conducted at a chemical manufacturing facility where chemical wastes were burned in a coal-fired boiler. Poor recoveries obtained for the spiked analytes at the second test were attributed to wet sorbent from the sampling train, use of methanol to effect complete transfer of wet sorbent from the sampling module, and use of extraction techniques which did not effect a complete separation of methylene chloride from methanol. A procedure to address problems with preparation of samples from Method 0010 is included in the report.

  16. Sampling and analysis validates acceptable knowledge on LANL transuranic, heterogeneous, debris waste, or ``Cutting the Gordian knot that binds WIPP``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.R.; Souza, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Div.; Michael, D.I.; Black, P.K. [Neptune and Co., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Through sampling and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) analyses, LANL and the DOE validated that a LANL transuranic (TRU) waste (TA-55-43, Lot No. 01) was not a Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) hazardous waste. This paper describes the sampling and analysis project as well as the statistical assessment of the analytical results. The analyses were conducted according to the requirements and procedures in the sampling and analysis plan approved by the New Mexico Environmental Department. The plan used a statistical approach that was consistent with the stratified, random sampling requirements of SW-846. LANL adhered to the plan during sampling and chemical analysis of randomly selected items of the five major types of materials in this heterogeneous, radioactive, debris waste. To generate portions of the plan, LANL analyzed a number of non-radioactive items that were representative of the mix of items present in the waste stream. Data from these cold surrogates were used to generate means and variances needed to optimize the design. Based on statistical arguments alone, only two samples from the entire waste stream were deemed necessary, however a decision was made to analyze at least two samples of each of the five major waste types. To obtain these samples, nine TRU waste drums were opened. Sixty-six radioactively contaminated and four non-radioactive grab samples were collected. Portions of the samples were composited for chemical analyses. In addition, a radioactively contaminated sample of rust-colored powder of interest to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) was collected and qualitatively identified as rust.

  17. Analytical Characterization of the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, CH

    2003-12-30

    For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supporting the Defense Logistics Agency-Defense National Stockpile Center with stewardship of a thorium nitrate (ThN) stockpile. The effort for fiscal year 2002 was to prepare a sampling and analysis plan and to use the activities developed in the plan to characterize the ThN stockpile. The sampling was performed in June and July 2002 by RWE NUKEM with oversight by ORNL personnel. The analysis was performed by Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas, and data validation was performed by NFT, Inc., of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Of the {approx} 21,000 drums in the stockpile, 99 were sampled and 53 were analyzed for total metals composition, radiological constituents (using alpha and gamma spectrometry), and oxidizing characteristics. Each lot at the Curtis Bay Depot was sampled. Several of the samples were also analyzed for density. The average density of the domestic ThN was found to be 1.89 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3}. The oxidizer test was performed following procedures issued by the United Nations in 1999. Test results indicated that none of the samples tested was a Division 5.1 oxidizer per Department of Transportation definition. The samples were analyzed for total metals following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods SW-846-6010B and 6020 (EPA 2003) using a combination of inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma--mass spectroscopy techniques. The results were used to compare the composition of the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals present in the sample (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver) to regulatory limits. None of the samples was found to be hazardous for toxicity characteristics. The radiological analyses confirmed, when possible, the results obtained by the inductively coupled plasma analyses. These results--combined with the historical process knowledge acquired on the material and the results of previous tests--classified the ThN as low-level radioactive waste for disposal purposes. This characterization was necessary to continue the efforts associated with disposition of the material at the Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada. With the current work presented in this report, the analytical characterization phase is completed for this source material stockpile.

  18. SALTSTONE 1QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-05-16

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2011 (1QCY11). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the first quarter of the 2011 calendar year (1QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 15 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 15 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 73 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, approximately 285 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 21 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained January 5, 2011 during 1QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  19. SALTSTONE 3QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-12

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2011 (3QCY11). After the prescribed 32 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2011 calendar year (3QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 20 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 236 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 25 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained July 7, 2011 during 3QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  20. SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-09-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the inorganic species measured in the leachate do not exceed the MCL, SMCL or TW limits. (4) The inorganic waste species that exceeded the MCL by more than a factor of 10 were nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite. (5) Analyses met all quality assurance specifications of US EPA SW-846. (6) The organic species (benzene, toluene, 1-butanol, phenol) were either not detected or were less than reportable for the vault classification samples. (7) The gross alpha and radium isotopes could not be determined to the MCL because of the elevated background which raised the detection limits. (8) Most of the beta/gamma activity was from 137Cs and its daughter 137mBa. (9) The concentration of 137Cs and 90Sr were present in the leachate at concentrations 1/40th and 1/8th respectively than in the 2003 vault classification samples. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the SCHWMR R.61-79.261.24(b) RCRA metals requirements for a nonhazardous waste form. The TCLP leachate concentrations for nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite were greater than 10x the MCLs in SCDHEC Regulations R.61-107.19, Part I A, which confirms the Saltstone Disposal Facility classification as a Class 3 Landfill. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the R.61-79.268.48(a) non wastewater treatment standards.

  1. Evaluation of Invertebrate Bioaccumulation of Fly Ash Contaminants in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers, 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G

    2012-05-01

    This report provides a summary of results from studies on invertebrate bioaccumulation of potential contaminants associated with a major fly ash spill into the Emory River following the failure of a dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant (KIF) in Kingston, Tennessee, in late December 2008. Data included in this report cover samples collected in calendar years 2009 and 2010. Samples collected from most sites in 2009 were processed by two different laboratories using different approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical methods: ALS Laboratory Group in Ft. Collins, CO, processed sampling using EPA method 6010 (but method 6020 for uranium and SW7470 for mercury), and PACE Analytical in Minneapolis, MN, used EPA method 6020. A preliminary evaluation of results from both laboratories indicated that some differences exited in measured concentrations of several elements, either because of specific differences of the two methods or inter-laboratory differences. While concentration differences between the laboratories were noted for many elements, spatial trends depicted from the results of both methods appeared to be similar. However, because samples collected in the future will be analyzed by Method 6020, only the results from PACE were included in this report to reduce data variation potentially associated with inter-laboratory and analytical method differences.