National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 30-degree azimuth intervals

  1. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  2. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  5. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  6. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  7. Azimuthal reflectivity inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mshepher

    2012-10-30

    simultaneous isotropic elastic inversion of Coulon et al. (2006). ... focus on unconventional reservoirs. ... fracture parameters and velocities based on azimuthal.

  8. The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the l = 30 degree field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, T J T; Thompson, M A; Parsons, H; Urquhart, J S; Eden, D J; Dempsey, J T; Morgan, L K; Thomas, H S; Buckle, J; Brunt, C M; Butner, H; Carretero, D; Chrysostomou, A; deVilliers, H M; Fich, M; Hoare, M G; Manser, G; Mottram, J C; Natario, C; Olguin, F; Peretto, N; Polychroni, D; Redman, R O; Rigby, A J; Salji, C; Summers, L J; Berry, D; Currie, M J; Jenness, T; Pestalozzi, M; Traficante, A; Bastien, P; diFrancesco, J; Davis, C J; Evans, A; Friberg, P; Fuller, G A; Gibb, A G; Gibson, S J; Hill, T; Johnstone, D; Joncas, G; Longmore, S N; Lumsden, S L; Martin, P G; Luong, Q Nguyen; Pineda, J E; Purcell, C; Richer, J S; Schieven, G H; Shipman, R; Spaans, M; Taylor, A R; Viti, S; Weferling, B; White, G J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    We present early results from the JCMT Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes l=7 and l=63 degrees in the 850-{\\mu}m continuum with SCUBA-2, as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey programme. Data from the l=30 degree survey region, which contains the massive star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40% of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy/beam, after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy/beam. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FellWalker method resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5-{\\sigma} surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy/beam (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relativ...

  9. CLIMATE NETWORKS The Azimuth Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    CLIMATE NETWORKS The Azimuth Project John Baez, Jan Galkowski, Graham Jones, Nadja Kutz, Daniel: The network of global corporate control #12;In Complex Networks in Climate Dynamics, Donges et al took daily Networks in Climate Dynamics, Donges et al took daily surface air temperatures on a grid and computed

  10. Interval Linear Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2010-12-08

    In this book we use only special types of intervals and introduce the notion of different types of interval linear algebras and interval vector spaces using the intervals of the form [0, a] where the intervals are from Zn or Z+ \\cup {0} or Q+ \\cup {0} or R+ \\cup {0}. A systematic development is made starting from set interval vector spaces to group interval vector spaces. Vector spaces are taken as interval polynomials or interval matrices or just intervals over suitable sets or semigroups or groups. Main feature of this book is the authors have given over 350 examples. This book has six chapters. Chapter one is introductory in nature. Chapter two introduces the notion of set interval linear algebras of type one and two. Set fuzzy interval linear algebras and their algebras and their properties are discussed in chapter three. Chapter four introduces several types of interval linear bialgebras and bivector spaces and studies them. The possible applications are given in chapter five. Chapter six suggests nearly 110 problems of all levels.

  11. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore »the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  12. Spontaneous azimuthal breakout and instability at the circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Arnab K; Basu, Abhik; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a shallow, two-dimensional flow of a liquid in which the radial and the azimuthal dynamics are coupled to each other. The steady and radial background flow of this system creates an axially symmetric circular hydraulic jump. On this background we apply time-dependent perturbations of the matter flow rate and the azimuthal flow velocity, with the latter strongly localized at the hydraulic jump. The perturbed variables depend spatially on both the radial and azimuthal coordinates. Linearization of the perturbations gives a coupled system of wave equations. The characteristic equations extracted from these wave equations show that under a marginally stable condition a spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry occurs at the position of the hydraulic jump. Departure from the marginal stability shows further that a linear instability develops in the azimuthal direction, resulting in an azimuthal transport of liquid at the hydraulic jump. The time for the growth of azimuthal instability is scaled by viscosi...

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  14. Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-02-14

    A generic jet-energy loss model that is coupled to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic fields and interpolates between a wide class of running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired models is compared to recent data on the azimuthal and transverse momentum dependence of high-pT pion nuclear modification factors and high-pT elliptic flow measured at RHIC and LHC. We find that RHIC data are surprisingly consistent with various scenarios considered. However, extrapolations to LHC energies favor running coupling pQCD-based models of jet-energy loss. While conformal holographic models are shown to be inconsistent with data, recent non-conformal generalizations of AdS holography may provide an alternative description.

  15. Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and Jürgen Jahns A conventional Fresnel zone plate (FZP) consists of concentric rings with an alternating binary transmission of zero and one. In an azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate (aFZP), the light transmission

  16. Surveillance test interval optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cepin, M.; Mavko, B. [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljublijana (Slovenia)

    1995-12-31

    Technical specifications have been developed on the bases of deterministic analyses, engineering judgment, and expert opinion. This paper introduces our risk-based approach to surveillance test interval (STI) optimization. This approach consists of three main levels. The first level is the component level, which serves as a rough estimation of the optimal STI and can be calculated analytically by a differentiating equation for mean unavailability. The second and third levels give more representative results. They take into account the results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculated by a personal computer (PC) based code and are based on system unavailability at the system level and on core damage frequency at the plant level.

  17. Analysis of azimuthal mode dynamics of mesoscale eddies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalpin, John David

    1984-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF AZIMUTHAL MODE DYNAMICS OF MESOSCALE EDDIES A Thesis by UOHN DAVID MCCALPIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984... Major Subject: Oceanography ANALYSIS OF AZIMUTHAL MODE DYNAMICS OF MESOSCALE EDDIES A Thesis by JOHN DAVID MCCALPIN Approved as to style and content by: rew . as ano (Chairman of Committee) o ert . ei (Member) uy . rancesc &ni (Member) Robert...

  18. Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n is investigated. Introduction Thermoacoustic instabilities result from the coupling between unstationary low CPU time cost. A thermoacoustic model is used to solve the wave equation in reactive media

  19. Low-frequency azimuthal stability analysis of Hall Diego Escobar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    -neutral collision frequency w, we particle and energy wall-loss frequencies i energy loss per actual ionization i,e ion and electron cyclotron Larmor frequencies frequency of perturbation k azimuthal wave number and development of Hall thrusters. Nowadays, there are several companies manufacturing modern Hall thrusters

  20. Numerical analysis of high-frequency azimuthal oscillations in Hall thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    Numerical analysis of high-frequency azimuthal oscillations in Hall thrusters IEPC-2015-371/ISTS of the Hall thruster discharge is analysed against axial-azimuthal perturbations in the high frequency range covers high frequency azimuthal oscillations, usually known as electron-drift waves. The influence

  1. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  2. Rossby Wave Green's Functions in an Azimuthal Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, G M; Hu, Q

    2015-01-01

    Green's functions for Rossby waves in an azimuthal wind are obtained, in which the stream-function $\\psi$ depends on $r$, $\\phi$ and $t$, where $r$ is cylindrical radius and $\\phi$ is the azimuthal angle in the $\\beta$-plane relative to the easterly direction, in which the $x$-axis points east and the $y$-axis points north. The Rossby wave Green's function with no wind is obtained using Fourier transform methods, and is related to the previously known Green's function obtained for this case, which has a different but equivalent form to the Green's function obtained in the present paper. We emphasize the role of the wave eikonal solution, which plays an important role in the form of the solution. The corresponding Green's function for a rotating wind with azimuthal wind velocity ${\\bf u}=\\Omega r{\\bf e}_\\phi$ ($\\Omega=$const.) is also obtained by Fourier methods, in which the advective rotation operator in position space is transformed to a rotation operator in ${\\bf k}$ transform space. The finite Rossby defo...

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy and fundamental symmetries in QCD matter at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov

    2008-09-18

    A study of collective behavior in heavy ion collisions provides one of the most sensitive and promising probes for investigation of possible formation of new extreme state of strong interacting matter and elucidating its properties. Systematic of experimental results for final state azimuthal anisotropy is presented for heavy ion interactions at RHIC. Experimental data for azimuthal anisotropy indicate that the final state strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions behaves as near-ideal liquid rather, than ideal gas of quarks and gluons. The strong quenching of jets and the dramatic modification of jet-like azimuthal correlations, observed in ${Au+Au}$ collisions, are evidences of the extreme energy loss of partons traversing matter which contains a large density of color charges. For the first time, dependence of the jet suppression on orientation of a jet with respect to the reaction plane is found at RHIC experimentally. The model of compound collective flow and corresponding analytic approach are discussed. The possible violations of $\\cal{P}$ and $\\cal{CP}$ symmetries of strong interactions in heavy ion collisions at different initial energies are considered. Thus, now the fact is established firmly, that extremely hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC differs dramatically from everything that was observed and investigated before.

  4. Transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakur Parsamyan

    2015-04-08

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized $^{6}LiD$ (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and $NH_{3}$ (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twsit-2" set of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions COMPASS data triggers constant theoretical interest and is being widely used in phenomenological analyses and global data fits. In this review main focus is given to the very recent results obtained by the COMPASS collaboration from first ever multi-dimensional extraction of transverse spin asymmetries.

  5. INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING: RELIABLE SUB­DIVISION OF GEOLOGICAL AREAS David D. Coblentz, G of the locations which weren't that thoroughly analyzed. 1 #12; 2 The subdivision of a geological zone TOPOGRAPHIC INFORMATION One reason for subjectivity of the geological subdivision is the fact

  6. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR

  7. BasaltBasalt Cased interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BasaltBasalt Rock units Cased interval Well completion Slotted casing Submersible pump Water level bls. Submersible pump intake near 262 ft bls; depth to water is 245.24 taken October 2, 2014. #12;GAM. Submersible pump intake near 604 ft bls. Depth to water is 600.32 taken October 9, 2014. #12;GAM(NAT) 0 75API

  8. Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Interval Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Topic 16 Interval Estimation Additional Topics 1 / 9 #12;Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Outline Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval 2 / 9 #12

  9. SIDIS transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakur Parsamyan

    2015-12-22

    Exploration of transverse spin structure of the nucleon via study of the spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) reactions is one of the main aspects of the broad physics program of the COMPASS experiment (CERN, Switzerland). In past decade COMPASS has collected a considerable amount of polarized deuteron and proton SIDIS data, while recent 2014 and 2015 runs were dedicated to the Drell-Yan measurements. Results on SIDIS azimuthal effects provided so far by COMPASS play an important role in general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twist-2" set of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions (PDFs) and fragmentation functions (FFs) COMPASS data are being widely used in phenomenological analyses and experimental data fits. Recent unique and first ever x-$Q^{2}$-z-pT multidimensional results for transverse spin asymmetries obtained by COMPASS serve as a direct and unprecedented input for one of the hottest topics in the field of spin-physics: the TMD $Q^{2}$-evolution related studies. In addition, extraction of the Sivers and all other azimuthal effects from first ever polarized Drell-Yan data collected recently by COMPASS will reveal another side of the spin-puzzle clarifying the link between SIDIS and Drell-Yan branches. This will be a unique possibility to test predicted universality and key-features of TMD PDFs using essentially the same experimental setup and exploring the same kinematical domain. In this review main focus will be given to the very recent results from COMPASS multi-dimensional analysis of transverse spin asymmetries and to the physics aspects of COMPASS polarized Drell-Yan program.

  10. Azimuthal angle dependence of dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2008-08-01

    We study the azimuthal angular dependence of back-to-back dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering H{sub A}+H{sub B}{yields}J{sub 1}+J{sub 2}+X, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that when the dijet is of two identical quarks (J{sub q}+J{sub q}) or a quark-antiquark pair (J{sub q}+J{sub q}), there is a cos{delta}{phi} angular dependence of the dijet, with {delta}{phi}={phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2}, and {phi}{sub 1} and {phi}{sub 2} are the azimuthal angles of the two individual jets. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross section, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos{delta}{phi} asymmetry of dijet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the angular dependence of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  11. SIDIS transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsamyan, Bakur

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of transverse spin structure of the nucleon via study of the spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) reactions is one of the main aspects of the broad physics program of the COMPASS experiment (CERN, Switzerland). In past decade COMPASS has collected a considerable amount of polarized deuteron and proton SIDIS data while 2014 and 2015 runs were dedicated to the Drell-Yan measurements. Results on SIDIS azimuthal effects provided so far by COMPASS play an important role in general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twist-2" set of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions (PDFs) and fragmentation functions (FFs) COMPASS data are being widely used in phenomenological analyses and experimental data fits. Recent unique and first ever x-$Q^{2}$-z-pT multidimensional results for transverse spin asymmetries obtained by COMPASS serve as a direct and unprece...

  12. Non-azimuthal linear polarization in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canovas, H; de Boer, J; Pinte, C; Avenhaus, H; Schreiber, M R

    2015-01-01

    Several studies discussing imaging polarimetry observations of protoplanetary disks use the so-called radial Stokes parameters Q_phi and U_phi to discuss the results. This approach has the advantage of providing a direct measure of the noise in the polarized images under the assumption that the polarization is azimuthal only, i.e., perpendicular to the direction towards the illuminating source. However, a detailed study of the validity of this assumption is currently missing. We aim to test whether departures from azimuthal polarization can naturally be produced by scattering processes in optically thick protoplanetary disks at near infrared wavelengths. We use the radiative transfer code MCFOST to create a generic model of a transition disk using different grain size distributions and dust masses. From these models we generate synthetic polarized images at 2.2\\mum. We find that even for moderate inclinations (e.g., i = 40degr), multiple scattering alone can produce significant (up to ~4.5% of the Q_phi image...

  13. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  14. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  15. Algebraic Structures Using Super Interval Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2011-10-01

    In this book super interval matrices using the special type of intervals of the form [0, a] are introduced. Several algebraic structures like semigroups, groups, semirings, rings, semivector spaces and vector spaces are introduced. Special fuzzy linear algebras are introduced using the concept of super fuzzy interval matrices.

  16. Feedback control of an azimuthal oscillation in the E 3 B discharge of Hall thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    azimuthal variation in density, electron temperature, and potential that rotates at about 10% of the local E, although it causes a rotating azimuthal variation in the current density to the anode, it does not show up to decrease in proportion to the current through that segment. The feedback resulted in the disappearance

  17. A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    combustion insta- bilities which can occur in annular combustors is proposed in this work. A thermoacoustic or rotating azimuthal eigenmodes depending on parameters n and . 1 INTRODUCTION Although thermo-acoustic thermoacoustic model tool to compute azimuthal thermoacoustic instabilities, which can oc- cur in annular

  18. On the dynamic nature of azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular gas turbine combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    On the dynamic nature of azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular gas turbine combustion chambers with the dynamics of standing and rotating azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular combustion chambers source intensity, the asymmetry in the system and the strength of the thermo-acoustic interaction

  19. Azimuthal asymmetry in transverse energy flow in nuclear collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Leonidov; Dmitry Ostrovsky

    2000-05-01

    The azimuthal pattern of transverse energy flow in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC energies is considered. We show that the probability distribution of the event-by-event azimuthal disbalance in transverse energy flow is essentially sensitive to the presence of the semihard minijet component.

  20. URTeC: 1922505 Comparison of Marcellus Fracturing Using Azimuthal Seismic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    URTeC: 1922505 Comparison of Marcellus Fracturing Using Azimuthal Seismic Attributes Versus of URTeC is prohibited. Summary Fracture analysis using seismic velocity volumes has been pushed from in these fracture systems, in the subsurface, are less well understood. Analysis of wide-azimuth p- wave seismic

  1. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and ofmore »the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.« less

  2. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and of the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  3. Algebraic Structures using Natural Class of Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2011-07-02

    This book has eleven chapters. Chapter one describes all types of natural class of intervals and the arithmetic operations on them. Chapter two introduces the semigroup of natural class of intervals using R or Zn and study the properties associated with them. Chapter three studies the notion of rings constructed using the natural class of intervals. Matrix theory using the special class of intervals is analyzed in chapter four of this book. Chapter five deals with polynomials using interval coefficients. New types of rings of natural intervals are introduced and studied in chapter six. The notion of vector space using natural class of intervals is built in chapter seven. In chapter eight fuzzy natural class of intervals are introduced and algebraic structures on them is built and described. Algebraic structures using natural class of neutrosophic intervals are developed in chapter nine.Chapter ten suggests some possible applications. The final chapter proposes over 200 problems of which some are at research level and some difficult and others are simple.

  4. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at ?sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at ?sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  6. Fracture Spacing and Orientation Estimation from Spectral Analyses of Azimuth Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Discrete, vertically aligned fracture systems impart one or more notches in the spectral ratios of stacked reflected seismic traces. This apparent attenuation is due to the azimuth dependant scattering introduced by the ...

  7. High performance path following for marine vehicles using azimuthing podded propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greytak, Matthew B. (Matthew Bardeen)

    2006-01-01

    Podded propulsion systems offer greater maneuvering possibilities for marine vehicles than conventional shaft and rudder systems. As the propulsion unit rotates about its vertical axis to a specified azimuth angle, the ...

  8. Measurement of Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at [sqrt]s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Azimuthal decorrelations between the two central jets with the largest transverse momenta are sensitive to the dynamics of events with multiple jets. We present a measurement of the normalized differential cross section ...

  9. Steady and unsteady dynamics of an azimuthing podded propulsor related to vehicle maneuvering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stettler, Jeffrey W. (Jeffrey Wayne)

    2004-01-01

    While the implementation of azimuthing propulsors powered by internal electric motors (often called "podded propulsors") into the commercial ship market has been swift, the understanding of their hydrodynamics through ...

  10. Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weining

    2014-11-27

    Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

  11. Comparison of Discrete Fracture and Effective Media Representation of Fractures on Azimuthal AVO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    2005-01-01

    In fractured reservoir development, azimuthal AVO (AVOaz) properties of reflected PP waves from reservoir tops are often used to infer fracture properties. The fracture parameter inversion is based on either an effective ...

  12. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation.

  13. Neuropsychological mechanisms of interval timing behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    perceiving a beat in a musical composition to returning to the stove just prior to the tea kettle whistling to expecting a traffic light to change from red to green. Furthermore, interval timing is exhibited in a wide

  14. Boolean lattices as intervals in clone lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krokhin, Andrei

    Boolean lattices as intervals in clone lattices A.A.Krokhin Ural State University, Dept. of Algebra and Discrete Mathematics, Lenin av. 51, 620083, Ekaterinburg, Russia e-mail: Andrei.Krokhin@usu.ru Abstract All

  15. Frequency domain design of interval controller 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Wunyong

    1993-01-01

    Subject: Electrical Engineering FREQUENCY DOMAIN DFSIGN OF INTERVAL CONTROLLER A Thesis by WUNYONG PARK Approved as to style and content by: S. P. Bhattacharyyd (Chair of Committee) C. N. Georghiades (Member) A. Datta (Member) S. Jayasuriya... (Member) . H. Keel (Member) A. Patton (Head of Department) May 1993 111 ABSTRACT Frequency Domain Design of Interval Controller. (May 1993) Wunyong Park, B. S. , Yon Sei University; M. S. , Yon Sei University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S...

  16. Feedback Control Of An Azimuthal Oscillation In The ExB Discharge of Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Martin E.; Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-04-06

    Feedback control of a low-frequency azimuthal wave known as a "rotating spoke" in the ExB discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster was demonstrated. The rotating spoke is an m=1 azimuthal variation in density, electron temperature, and potential that rotates at about 10% of the local E x B electron rotation speed. It causes increased electron transport across the magnetic field and is suspected to be an ionization wave. Feedback control of this wave required special consideration because, although it causes a rotating azimuthal variation in the current density to the anode, it does not show up as a signal in the total thruster discharge current. Therefore, an extra source of information was needed to track the oscillation, which was addressed by using a special anode that was split azimuthally into four segments. The current to each segment oscillates as the rotating spoke passes over it, and feedback is accomplished by resistors connected in series with each anode segment which cause the voltage on a segment to decrease in proportion to the current through that segment. The feedback resulted in the disappearance of a coherent azimuthal wave and a decrease in the time-averaged total discharge current by up to 13.2%.

  17. hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals Real Estate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate The STAT menu Confidence Intervals Practice finding confidence intervals ­ Real Estate #12;hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate hp calculators - 2 - HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate The STAT menu The Statistics menu

  18. Tracing the origin of azimuthal gluon correlations in the color glass condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lappi, T; Schlichting, S; Venugopalan, R

    2015-01-01

    We examine the origins of azimuthal correlations observed in high energy proton-nucleus collisions by considering the simple example of the scattering of uncorrelated partons off color fields in a large nucleus. We demonstrate how the physics of fluctuating color fields in the color glass condensate (CGC) effective theory generates these azimuthal multiparticle correlations and compute the corresponding Fourier coefficients v_n within different CGC approximation schemes. We discuss in detail the qualitative and quantitative differences between the different schemes. We will show how a recently introduced color field domain model that captures key features of the observed azimuthal correlations can be understood in the CGC effective theory as a model of non-Gaussian correlations in the target nucleus.

  19. $D\\overline{D}$ momentum correlations versus relative azimuth as a sensitive probe for thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Tsiledakis; K. Schweda

    2009-02-02

    In high-energy nuclear collisions at LHC, where a QGP might be created, the degree of thermalization at the partonic level is a key issue. Due to their large mass, heavy quarks are a powerful tool to probe thermalization. We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-quark hadrons and their decay products. Changes or even the complete absence of these initially existing azimuthal correlations in $Pb-Pb$ collisions might indicate thermalization at the partonic level. We present studies with PYTHIA for $p-p$ collisions at 14 TeV using the two-particle transverse momentum correlator ${}$ as a sensitive measure of potential changes in these azimuthal correlations. Contributions from transverse radial flow are estimated.

  20. Distributed Intersection Join of Complex Interval Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriegel, Hans-Peter

    Introduction After two decades of temporal and spatial index research, the efficient management of one be aggregated to an interval sequence, such as periods of "high" stock prices for technical chart analysis (cf simulations in virtual product environ- ments [8] or engineering data management can be supported

  1. Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

  2. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST, 1999); P. 11391142 Special section on azimuthal dependence of P-wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    , and the possibilitytousestraightforwardmodificationsofconventional processing algorithms. Unfortunately, standard 3-D processing procedures typically stack all of this special issue is to encourage acquisition of wide-azimuth 3-D data and development of processing methods.) that at the right scale length could be highly visible in properly processed wide-azimuth 3-D data. The most common

  3. P-133 / C.-Y. Lee P-133: Variable Liquid Crystal Pretilt and Azimuth Angle using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pretilt and azimuth angles for the liquid crystal. It is based on stacking both photo-aligned polymer alignment surface based on stacked alignment layers. The stacked alignment layers comprise of both photo.-Y. Lee The onset of the convection is determined by the critical Marangoni Number Mc. Mc is equal

  4. 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta -Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 32 Center of mass angle hadron decay plane Center of mass direction in lab frame Center of mass frame R #12;2 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta

  5. Anisotropic geometrical-spreading correction for wide-azimuth P-wave reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    anisotropy in the overburden, which should cause distortions in the azimuthal AVO attributes. This case study . To estimate the moveout parameters, we apply a 3D nonhyperbolic semblance algorithm of Vasconcelos and Ts for characterization of fractured reservoirs and li- thology discrimination Mallick et al., 1998; Grechka and Tsvankin

  6. Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and Jurgen Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and J¨urgen Jahns on the classical Fresnel zone plate (FZP) [1]. A simple FZP consists of alternating opaque and transparent rings Fresnel zone plate but to add bridges that hold the zones in place [4], see Fig. 1 right. We refer

  7. Azimuthal correlations of transverse energy for Pb on Pb at 158 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wienold, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Huang, I. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); The NA49 Collaboration

    1996-02-03

    Azimuthal correlations have been studied in heavy ion reactions over a wide range of beam energies. At low incident energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon where collective effects like the directed sidewards flow are generally small, azimuthal correlations provide a useful tool to determine the reaction plane event by event. In the energy regime of the BEVALAC (up to 1 GeV/nucleon for heavy ions) particular emission patterns, i.e. azimuthal correlations of nucleons and light nuclei with respect to the reaction plane, have been associated with the so called squeeze out and sidesplash effects. These effects are of particular interest because of their sensitivity to the equation of state at the high baryon density which is build up during the collision process. Angular distributions similar to the squeeze out have been observed for pions at the SIS in Darmstadt as well as from the EOS - collaboration. Recently also the sideward flow was measured for pions and kaons. However, the origin of the signal in the case of produced mesons is thought to be of a different nature than that for the nucleon flow. At the AGS, azimuthally anisotropic event shapes have been reported from the E877 collaboration for the highest available heavy ion beam energy (11.4 GeV/nucleon). Using a Fourier analysis of the transverse energy distribution measured in calorimeters, it was concluded that sideward flow is still of significant magnitude. Here we will report a first analysis of azimuthal correlations found in the transverse energy distribution from Pb on Pb collisions at the CERN SPS (158 GeV/nucleon).

  8. DIMACS Technical Report 200337 Perfect interval filament graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIMACS Technical Report 2003­37 Perfect interval filament graphs by Fanica GAVRIL 1 DIMACS, Rutgers are disjoint, their curves do not intersect; FI={ f i | iÎI} is a family of interval filaments and its intersection graph is an interval filament graph. The interval filament graphs contain the polygon

  9. Interval Data Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13Renewable PowerMismatch | Open EnergyInterval Data

  10. Sun-relative pointing for dual-axis solar trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-04-01

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  11. Two particle rapidity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal correlations in relativistic nuclear collisions and transverse radial expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Voloshin

    2004-10-05

    At the very first stage of an ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision new particles are produced in individual nucleon-nucleon collisions. In the transverse plane, all particles from a single $NN$ collision are initially located at the same position. The subsequent transverse radial expansion of the system creates strong position-momentum correlations and leads to characteristic rapidity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal correlations among the produced particles.

  12. Azimuthal angle dependence of di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-08-04

    We study the azimuthal asymmetry of back-to-back di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that there is a cos {delta}{phi} angular dependence of the di-jet, with {delta}{phi} the difference of the azimuthal angle of tow jets respectively. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross-section due to the multiple initial-/final-state interactions, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos {delta}{phi} asymmetry of the total di-jet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the azimuthal asymmetric cross section of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  13. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. I. Local analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2014-04-15

    Results based on a local linear stability analysis of the Hall thruster discharge are presented. A one-dimensional azimuthal framework is used including three species: neutrals, singly charged ions, and electrons. A simplified linear model is developed with the aim of deriving analytical expressions to characterize the stability of the ionization region. The results from the local analysis presented here indicate the existence of an instability that gives rise to an azimuthal oscillation in the +E?×?B direction with a long wavelength. According to the model, the instability seems to appear only in regions where the ionization and the electric field make it possible to have positive gradients of plasma density and ion velocity at the same time. A more complex model is also solved numerically to validate the analytical results. Additionally, parametric variations are carried out with respect to the main parameters of the model to identify the trends of the instability. As the temperature increases and the neutral-to-plasma density ratio decreases, the growth rate of the instability decreases down to a limit where azimuthal perturbations are no longer unstable.

  14. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at ?s=7? [square root of s=7]?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding ...

  15. The distribution of linearly polarized gluons and elliptic azimuthal anisotropy in DIS dijet production at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Dumitru; Tuomas Lappi; Vladimir Skokov

    2015-08-18

    We determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small $x$ by solving the B-JIMWLK rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions we estimate the amplitude of $\\sim \\cos 2\\phi$ azimuthal asymmetries in DIS dijet production at high energies. We find sizeable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of $v_2=\\langle\\cos 2\\phi\\rangle \\sim 10\\%$.

  16. The distribution of linearly polarized gluons and elliptic azimuthal anisotropy in DIS dijet production at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small $x$ by solving the B-JIMWLK rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions we estimate the amplitude of $\\sim \\cos 2\\phi$ azimuthal asymmetries in DIS dijet production at high energies. We find sizeable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of $v_2=\\langle\\cos 2\\phi\\rangle \\sim 10\\%$.

  17. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  18. Preliminaries Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Outline Preliminaries Results Conclusion Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes.Rizzi@unitn.it August the 16th Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12 Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12;Outline

  19. Volatility return intervals analysis of the Japanese market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Havlin, Shlomo; Kaizoji, Taisei; Moon, Hie-Tae; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-01-01

    We investigate scaling and memory effects in return intervals between price volatilities above a certain threshold $q$ for the Japanese stock market using daily and intraday data sets. We find that the distribution of return intervals can be approximated by a scaling function that depends only on the ratio between the return interval $\\tau$ and its mean $$. We also find memory effects such that a large (or small) return interval follows a large (or small) interval by investigating the conditional distribution and mean return interval. The results are similar to previous studies of other markets and indicate that similar statistical features appear in different financial markets. We also compare our results between the period before and after the big crash at the end of 1989. We find that scaling and memory effects of the return intervals show similar features although the statistical properties of the returns are different.

  20. A phenomenological analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barone; M. Boglione; J. O. Gonzalez Hernandez; S. Melis

    2015-04-03

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the cos-phi and cos-2phi asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, based on the recent multidimensional data released by the COMPASS and HERMES Collaborations. In the TMD framework, valid at relatively low transverse momenta, these asymmetries arise from intrinsic transverse momentum and transverse spin effects, and from their correlations. The role of the Cahn and Boer-Mulders effects in both azimuthal moments is explored up to order 1/Q. As the kinematics of the present experiments is dominated by the low-Q^2 region, higher-twist contributions turn out to be important, affecting the results of our fits.

  1. A phenomenological analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barone, V; Hernandez, J O Gonzalez; Melis, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the cos-phi and cos-2phi asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, based on the recent multidimensional data released by the COMPASS and HERMES Collaborations. In the TMD framework, valid at relatively low transverse momenta, these asymmetries arise from intrinsic transverse momentum and transverse spin effects, and from their correlations. The role of the Cahn and Boer-Mulders effects in both azimuthal moments is explored up to order 1/Q. As the kinematics of the present experiments is dominated by the low-Q^2 region, higher-twist contributions turn out to be important, affecting the results of our fits.

  2. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the unpolarized cross section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, Francesca [INFN and Universita degli studi di Ferrara (Italy); Lamb, Rebecca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-08-04

    A multi-dimensional (x, y, z, P{sub hperpendicular}) extraction of cos {phi}{sub h} and cos 2{phi}{sub h} azimuthal asymmetries of unpolarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERMES is discussed. The use of data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets and the separation of positive and negative hadrons allow to access flavor-dependent information about quark intrinsic transverse momenta and spin-orbit correlations. This flavor sensitivity allows for a discrimination between theoretical models in the HERMES kinematic regime.

  3. Flow Study in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions by Fourier Expansion of Azimuthal Particle Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Voloshin; Y. Zhang

    1994-07-12

    We propose a new method to study transverse flow effects in relativistic nuclear collisions by Fourier analysis of the azimuthal distribution on an event-by-event basis in relatively narrow rapidity windows. The distributions of Fourier coefficients provide direct information on the magnitude and type of flow. Directivity and two dimensional sphericity tensor, widely used to analyze flow, emerge naturally in our approach, since they correspond to the distributions of the first and second harmonic coefficients, respectively. The role of finite particle fluctuations and particle correlations is discussed.

  4. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of pions in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brill, D.; Ahner, W.; Baltes, P.; Barth, R.; Bormann, C.; Cieslak, M.; Debowski, M.; Grosse, E.; Henning, W.; Koczon, P.; Kohlmeyer, B.; Miskowiec, D.; Muentz, C.; Oeschler, H.; Poeppl, H.; Puehlhofer, F.; Sartorius, S.; Schicker, R.; Senger, P.; Shin, Y.; Speer, J.; Stein, J.; Stiebing, K.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Voelkel, K.; Wagner, A.; Walus, W. (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, D-6000 Frankfurt/Main (Germany) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Philipps-Universitaet, D-3550 Marburg (Germany) Jagiellonian University, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1993-07-19

    Triple differential cross sections [ital d][sup 3][sigma]/[ital dp][sup 3] for charged pions produced in symmetric heavy-ion collisions were measured with the KaoS magnetic spectrometer at the heavy-ion synchrotron facility SIS at GSI. The correlations between the momentum vectors of charged pions and the reaction plane in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at an incident energy of 1 GeV/nucleon were determined. We observe, for the first time, an azimuthally anisotropic distribution of pions, with enhanced emission perpendicular to the reaction plane. The anisotropy is most pronounced for pions of high transverse momentum in semicentral collisions.

  5. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  6. CASL-U-2015-0178-000 An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-based Transverse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares1-000 SMR8-000 An Azimuthal,

  7. Non-Abelian Bremsstrahlung and Azimuthal Asymmetries in High Energy p+A Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M; Vitev, I; Biro, T

    2014-01-01

    We apply the GLV reaction operator solution to the Vitev-Gunion-Bertsch (VGB) boundary conditions to compute the all-order in nuclear opacity non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung of event-by-event fluctuating beam jets in nuclear collisions. We evaluate analytically azimuthal Fourier moments of single gluon, $v_n^M\\{1\\}$, and even number $2\\ell$ gluon, $v_n^M\\{2\\ell\\}$ inclusive distributions in high energy p+A reactions as a function of harmonic $n$, %independent target recoil cluster number, $M$, and gluon number, $2\\ell$, at RHIC and LHC. Multiple resolved clusters of recoiling target beam jets together with the projectile beam jet form Color Scintillation Antenna (CSA) arrays that lead to characteristic boost non-invariant trapezoidal rapidity distributions in asymmetric $B+A$ nuclear collisions. The scaling of intrinsically azimuthally anisotropic and long range in $\\eta$ nature of the non-abelian \\br leads to $v_n$ moments that are similar to results from hydrodynamic models, but due entirely to non-abelian...

  8. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian [Baruch College, New York, NY (United States); The City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); China Central Normal Univ., Wuhan (China); Skokov, Vladimir [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions from genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)

  9. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Moosavi Nejad

    2015-06-29

    In our previous work, we studied the polar distribution of the scaled energy of bottom-flavored hadrons from polarized top quark decays $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow W^++b(\\rightarrow X_b)$, using two different helicity coordinate systems. Basically, the energy distributions are governed by the unpolarized, polar and azimuthal rate functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow W^++b$. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s)$ radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow b+W^+(+g)$ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the B-hadron produced in polarized top quark decays. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to determine the polarization states of top quarks.

  10. Scaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets, we study the return intervals between the daily volatilities of the price changes that are above.federal- reserve.gov releases H10 hist. We choose to study daily data records because there are intraday trendsScaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets Kazuko Yamasaki* , Lev

  11. Anisotropic particle production and azimuthal correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We summarize some recent ideas relating to anisotropic particle production in high-energy collisions. Anisotropic gluon distributions lead to anisotropies of the single-particle azimuthal distribution and hence to disconnected contributions to multi-particle cumulants. When these dominate, the four-particle elliptic anisotropy $c_2\\{4\\}$ changes sign. On the other hand, connected diagrams for $m$-particle cumulants are found to quickly saturate with increasing $m$, a ``coherence'' quite unlike conventional ``non-flow'' contributions such as decays. Finally, we perform a first exploratory phenomenological analysis in order to estimate the amplitude ${\\cal A}$ of the $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ anisotropy of the gluon distribution at small $x$, and we provide a qualitative prediction for the elliptic asymmetry from three-particle correlations, $c_2\\{3\\}$.

  12. A phenomenological study on the $\\cos\\phi_h$ azimuthal asymmetry in double longitudinally Polarized SIDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Wenjuan; Du, Xiaozhen; Lu, Zhun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We study the $\\cos{\\phi_h}$ azimuthal asymmetry in double polarized semi-inclusive pion production by considering dynamical twist-3 effects. In particular, we evaluate the role of the transverse momentum dependent distributions $e_L(x, k_T^2)$ and $g_L^\\perp(x, k_T^2)$ on the asymmetry. Using two different sets of spectator model results for these distributions, we predict the $\\cos{\\phi_h}$ asymmetry of $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$, and $\\pi^0$ at the kinematic configuration available at CLAS, HERMES and COMPASS. Our estimates show that the asymmetries are positive for all the pions and could be accessed by CLAS and HERMES. We also find that $g_L^\\perp$ gives the dominant contribution to the $\\cos\\phi_h$ asymmetry, while the contribution of $e_L$ is almost negligible.

  13. In situ stress azimuth and magnitude from well log measurements. Final report, May 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walls, J.D.; Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of Part 1 is to: (1) theoretically relate static to dynamic moduli in rocks with clays; (2) give a theoretical method for calculating horizontal from vertical stress in rocks with stress-induced anisotropy; and (3) give a theoretical method for accounting for velocity-frequency dispersion in saturated rocks. The new theory of cementation is used to describe stress-strain laws and dynamic moduli in high-porosity granular rocks with clay. The objective of Part 2 is to prove the feasibility of determining maximum and minimum in situ stress azimuth and magnitude from dipole velocity data. The conclusion is that a flexural wave splits into two flexural waves, a slow one and a fast one, that are polarized along the minimum and maximum horizontal stress directions, respectively.

  14. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chkhaidze, L. V. Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L.; Kladnitskaya, E. N.

    2012-07-15

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  15. Optimal modeling of 1D azimuth correlations in the context of Bayesian inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiel B. De Kock; Hans C. Eggers; Thomas A. Trainor

    2015-02-16

    Analysis and interpretation of spectrum and correlation data from high-energy nuclear collisions is currently controversial because two opposing physics narratives derive contradictory implications from the same data-one narrative claiming collision dynamics is dominated by dijet production and projectile-nucleon fragmentation, the other claiming collision dynamics is dominated by a dense, flowing QCD medium. Opposing interpretations seem to be supported by alternative data models, and current model-comparison schemes are unable to distinguish between them. There is clearly need for a convincing new methodology to break the deadlock. In this study we introduce Bayesian Inference (BI) methods applied to angular correlation data as a basis to evaluate competing data models. For simplicity the data considered are projections of 2D angular correlations onto 1D azimuth from three centrality classes of 200 GeV Au-Au collisions. We consider several data models typical of current model choices, including Fourier series (FS) and a Gaussian plus various combinations of individual cosine components. We evaluate model performance with BI methods and with power-spectrum (PS) analysis. We find that the FS-only model is rejected in all cases by Bayesian analysis which always prefers a Gaussian. A cylindrical quadrupole cos(2\\phi) is required in some cases but rejected for most-central Au-Au collisions. Given a Gaussian centered at the azimuth origin "higher harmonics" cos(m\\phi) for m > 2 are rejected. A model consisting of Gaussian + dipole cos(\\phi) + quadrupole cos(2\\phi) provides good 1D data descriptions in all cases.

  16. Azimuthal Correlations between Non-Photonic Electrons and Charged Hadrons in p+p Collisions from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoyan Lin

    2006-09-21

    We present the preliminary measurement of azimuthal correlations between non-photonic electrons and charged hadrons in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV from STAR. The results are compared to PYTHIA simulations to estimate the relative contributions of $D$ and $B$ meson semi-leptonic decays to the non-photonic electrons.

  17. Experimental studies of high-frequency azimuthal waves in Hall thrusters Andrei A. Litvak, Yevgeny Raitses, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental studies of high-frequency azimuthal waves in Hall thrusters Andrei A. Litvak, Yevgeny 08543 Received 3 April 2003; accepted 23 October 2003; published online 5 April 2004 High-frequency impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency

  18. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ? = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. On performance bounds for interval Time Petri Nets Simona Bernardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Simona

    Ingenier´ia de Sistemas Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain jcampos@unizar.es Abstract Interval time Petri Nets and Technol- ogy and the project PERF of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. tivities

  20. Experimental uncertainty estimation and statistics for data having interval uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreinovich, Vladik; Oberkampf, William Louis; Ginzburg, Lev; Ferson, Scott; Hajagos, Janos

    2007-05-01

    This report addresses the characterization of measurements that include epistemic uncertainties in the form of intervals. It reviews the application of basic descriptive statistics to data sets which contain intervals rather than exclusively point estimates. It describes algorithms to compute various means, the median and other percentiles, variance, interquartile range, moments, confidence limits, and other important statistics and summarizes the computability of these statistics as a function of sample size and characteristics of the intervals in the data (degree of overlap, size and regularity of widths, etc.). It also reviews the prospects for analyzing such data sets with the methods of inferential statistics such as outlier detection and regressions. The report explores the tradeoff between measurement precision and sample size in statistical results that are sensitive to both. It also argues that an approach based on interval statistics could be a reasonable alternative to current standard methods for evaluating, expressing and propagating measurement uncertainties.

  1. Interval-valued Soft Constraint Problems , M. S. Pini1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    preference intervals can be useful or necessary are energy trading and network traffic analysis [15], where the data information is usually incomplete or erroneous. In energy trading, costs may be im- precise since

  2. Honest Confidence Intervals for the Error Variance in Stepwise Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Robert A.

    Honest Confidence Intervals for the Error Variance in Stepwise Regression Dean P. Foster and Robert alternatives are used. These simpler algorithms (e.g., forward or backward stepwise regression) obtain

  3. Trace formulas for fourth order operators on unit interval, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Badanin; Evgeny Korotyaev

    2014-12-16

    We consider self-adjoint fourth order operators on the unit interval with the Dirichlet type boundary conditions. For such operators we determine few trace formulas, similar to the case of Gelfand--Levitan formulas for second order operators.

  4. On time-interval transformations in special relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Gopala Rao; K. S. Mallesh; K. N. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-06-24

    We revisit the problem of the Lorentz transformation of time-intervals in special relativity. We base our discussion on the time-interval transformation formula $ c\\Delta t' = \\gamma (c\\Delta t - \\vec{\\beta} \\cdot \\Delta \\vec{r}) $ in which $ \\Delta t'$ and $ \\Delta t $ are the time-intervals between a given pair of events, in two inertial frames $ S $ and $ S'$ connected by an general boost. We observe that the Einstein time-dilation-formula, the Doppler formula and the relativity of simultaneity, all follow when one the frames in the time-interval transformation formula is chosen as the canonical frame of the underlying event-pair. We also discuss the interesting special case $ \\Delta t' = \\gamma \\Delta t $ of the time-interval transformation formula obtained by setting $ \\vec{\\beta} \\cdot \\Delta \\vec{r}=0 $ in it and argue why it is really \\textbf{not} the Einstein time-dilation formula. Finally, we present some examples which involve material particles instead of light rays, and highlight the utility of time-interval transformation formula as a calculational tool in the class room.

  5. Non-Abelian Bremsstrahlung and Azimuthal Asymmetries in High Energy p+A Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gyulassy; P. Levai; I. Vitev; T. Biro

    2014-05-30

    We apply the GLV reaction operator solution to the Vitev-Gunion-Bertsch (VGB) boundary conditions to compute the all-order in nuclear opacity non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung of event-by-event fluctuating beam jets in nuclear collisions. We evaluate analytically azimuthal Fourier moments of single gluon, $v_n^M\\{1\\}$, and even number $2\\ell$ gluon, $v_n^M\\{2\\ell\\}$ inclusive distributions in high energy p+A reactions as a function of harmonic $n$, %independent target recoil cluster number, $M$, and gluon number, $2\\ell$, at RHIC and LHC. Multiple resolved clusters of recoiling target beam jets together with the projectile beam jet form Color Scintillation Antenna (CSA) arrays that lead to characteristic boost non-invariant trapezoidal rapidity distributions in asymmetric $B+A$ nuclear collisions. The scaling of intrinsically azimuthally anisotropic and long range in $\\eta$ nature of the non-abelian \\br leads to $v_n$ moments that are similar to results from hydrodynamic models, but due entirely to non-abelian wave interference phenomena sourced by the fluctuating CSA. Our analytic non-flow solutions are similar to recent numerical saturation model predictions but differ by predicting a simple power-law hierarchy of both even and odd $v_n$ without invoking $k_T$ factorization. A test of CSA mechanism is the predicted nearly linear $\\eta$ rapidity dependence of the $v_n(k_T,\\eta)$. Non-abelian beam jet \\br may thus provide a simple analytic solution to Beam Energy Scan (BES) puzzle of the near $\\sqrt{s}$ independence of $v_n(p_T)$ moments observed down to 10 AGeV where large $x$ valence quark beam jets dominate inelastic dynamics. Recoil \\br from multiple independent CSA clusters could also provide a partial explanation for the unexpected similarity of $v_n$ in $p(D)+A$ and non-central $A+A$ at same $dN/d\\eta$ multiplicity as observed at RHIC and LHC.

  6. Exploration of jet energy loss via direct $?$-charged particle azimuthal correlation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Hamed

    2009-09-25

    The multiplicities of charged particles azimuthally associated with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ have been measured for Au+Au, p+p, and d+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment. Charged particles with transverse momentum 0.5 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for p+p and d+Au, and 3 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for Au+Au and pseudorapidity $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 1.5 in coincidence with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ of high transverse momentum 8 $<$ $p_T^{\\gamma,\\pi^{0}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c at $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 0.9 have been used for this analysis. Within the considered range of kinematics, the observed suppressions of the associated yields per direct $\\gamma$ in central Au+Au relative to p+p and d+Au are similar and constant with direct photon fractional energy $z_{T}$ ($z_{T}=p_{T}^{h^{\\pm}}/p_{T}^{\\gamma}$). The measured suppressions of the associated yields with direct $\\gamma$ are comparable to those with $\\pi^{0}$. The data are compared to theoretical predictions.

  7. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, W; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, X; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, $v_2\\{2\\}$ and $v_2\\{4\\}$, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the amount of energy deposited by spectators in the STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of $v_2\\{2\\}$ on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. An initial-state model with gluon saturation describes the slope of $v_2\\{2\\}$ as a function of multiplicity in central collisions better than one based on Glauber with a two-component multiplicity model.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; V. Bairathi; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; W. Li; X. Li; C. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; R. Ma; Y. G. Ma; L. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; D. Mishra; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; X. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; Z. Tang; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Y. F. Xu; Q. H. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. Yang; C. Yang; S. Yang; Y. Yang; Q. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-05-28

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, $v_2\\{2\\}$ and $v_2\\{4\\}$, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the amount of energy deposited by spectators in the STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of $v_2\\{2\\}$ on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. An initial-state model with gluon saturation describes the slope of $v_2\\{2\\}$ as a function of multiplicity in central collisions better than one based on Glauber with a two-component multiplicity model.

  9. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-12-01

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Challenging the utility of third-order azimuth harmonics in the description of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Ray; D. J. Prindle; T. A. Trainor

    2013-08-20

    In recent years it has become conventional practice to include higher-order cylindrical harmonics in the phenomenological description of two-particle angular correlations from ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These model elements, whose dependence on relative azimuth angle has the form $\\cos[m(\\phi_1-\\phi_2)]$ where $m > 2$, were introduced to support a hydrodynamic flow interpretation of the same-side ($|\\phi_1-\\phi_2| 2$ harmonics are not required by the data, that they destabilize the fitting models, and that their net effect is to decompose the same-side peak into two components, one being dependent on and the other being independent of relative pseudorapidity. Thus we are lead to question whether descriptions of angular correlation data including higher-order harmonics inform our understanding of the same-side peak or heavy-ion collisions in general. Results from analysis of two-dimensional angular correlation data from the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) show that the RHIC data do not exclude a single-Gaussian hypothesis for the same-side peak. We find that the net effect of including the $m = 3$ harmonic or azimuth sextupole in the fitting model is the inclusion of small non-Gaussian dependence in the mathematical description of the same-side peak. Those non-Gaussian effects are systematically insignificant and can be accommodated by minor perturbations to the same-side 2D Gaussian peak model, which act locally at small relative azimuth. We also demonstrate that the 0-1% 2D angular correlation data for 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions from ATLAS, which display an away-side double peak on azimuth, do not require a sextupole and exclude a positive same-side sextupole.

  12. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  13. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  14. Propulsive performance of a finite-temperature plasma flow in a magnetic nozzle with applied azimuthal current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrario, Lorenzo; Little, Justin M. Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2014-11-15

    The plasma flow in a finite-electron-temperature magnetic nozzle, under the influence of an applied azimuthal current at the throat, is modeled analytically to assess its propulsive performance. A correction to the nozzle throat boundary conditions is derived by modifying the radial equilibrium of a magnetized infinite two-population cylindrical plasma column with the insertion of an external azimuthal body force for the electrons. Inclusion of finite-temperature effects, which leads to a modification of the radial density profile, is necessary for calculating the propulsive performance, which is represented by nozzle divergence efficiency and thrust coefficient. The solutions show that the application of the azimuthal current enhances all the calculated performance parameters through the narrowing of the radial density profile at the throat, and that investing power in this beam focusing effect is more effective than using the same power to pre-heat the electrons. The results open the possibility for the design of a focusing stage between the plasma source and the nozzle that can significantly enhance the propulsive performance of electron-driven magnetic nozzles.

  15. Azimuthal quadrupole correlation from gluon interference in 200 GeV and 7 TeV p+p collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Ray

    2014-08-28

    The Balitskii-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) multi-Pomeron model of Levin and Rezaeian, with extension to the gluon saturation region, is applied to long-range pseudorapidity correlations on relative azimuth for low momentum final-state hadrons produced in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200~GeV and 7~TeV p+p collisions. The multi-Pomeron exchange probabilities in the model were estimated by fitting the minimum-bias p+p multiplicity frequency distributions. The multi-Pomeron model prediction for the amplitude of the minimum-bias average quadrupole correlation, proportional to $\\cos 2(\\phi_1 - \\phi_2)$, is consistent with the 200~GeV data when theoretically expected gluon saturation momentum scales are used. Correlation predictions for the high multiplicity 7~TeV p+p collision data are also consistent with the long-range pseudorapidity correlations at small relative azimuth observed in the data. The results presented here show that the present application of a multiple parton-shower, gluon interference mechanism for generating the long-range pseudorapidity, azimuthal quadrupole correlation is not excluded by the data.

  16. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian; McLerran, Larry; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions frommore »genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)« less

  17. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashida, Misa [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6H 2E1 (Canada); Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  18. Measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy for charged particle production in ?s[subscript NN]=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Differential measurements of charged particle azimuthal anisotropy are presented for lead-lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, based on an integrated luminosity of approximately ...

  19. Fracture Detection using Amplitude versus Offset and Azimuth Analysis of a 3D P-wave Seismic Dataset and Synthetic Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsley, Burke J.

    2004-05-26

    Amplitude versus offset (AVO) analysis of seismic reflection data has been a successful tool in describing changes in rock properties along a reflector. This method is extended to azimuthal AVO (AVOA) in order to characterize ...

  20. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at [sqrt]sNN=9.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surrow, Bernd

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) ...

  1. Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

    1983-01-01

    measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

  2. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  3. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  4. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  5. Interval methods for computing various refinements of Nash equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    Interval methods for computing various refinements of Nash equilibria Bartlomiej Jacek Kubica, assumptions on their knowledge, ... Concepts: Dominant strategy equilibrium. The Nash equilibrium. The core of a game (for cooperative games). ... #12;Nash equilibrium Let the game (X1 ,...,Xn ;q1 ,...,qn

  6. Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic Francisco Ganacim, Luiz Henrique, Brazil Abstract--We present a GPU-based beam-casting method for rendering implicit surfaces in real time. INTRODUCTION Rendering surfaces with ray casting is perhaps the clearest example of a potentially

  7. Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A are generated because of a cyclotron instability of the anisotropic distribution of ring current ions. Proton precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed

  8. Inferring Positional Homologs with Common Intervals of Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    genes is an important problem in whole genomes comparisons, both for functional or evolu- tionary between genomes, also called po- sitional homologs, based on the conservation of the genomic context. We consider genomes represented by their gene order ­ i.e. sequences of signed integers ­ and common intervals

  9. CIGAL: Common Intervals Global ALigner Guillaume Blin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    alignment [5]. We recycle this idea to align gene orders. Our data consist in two genomes represented by two sequences of signed identifiers. Those identifiers can be genes, gene families, or any other kind of genomic two genomes [3]. The problem of finding a maximal cover with a minimal num- ber of common intervals

  10. Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fertin, Guillaume

    Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

  11. A multi-interval MBSC theory for active correlations technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is the development of the formalism for the treatment of rare events especially, when one applies active correlation method to suppress background products in the heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. This formalism in fact is an extension of classical background signal combinations formalism for the case of time multi intervals.

  12. Reverse Auction Bidding-Bid Time Intervals Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Mengyan

    2015-05-11

    the computer is bidding during the segment 1 of each section, it shall randomly select from 2 seconds to 23 seconds as its time-intervals. Rule 2, when the computer is bidding during the segment 2 of each section, it shall randomly select from 2 seconds to 9...

  13. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian

    2010-01-22

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studiedfor hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  14. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland); STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  15. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 054908 (2010) Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,46 A. V. Alakhverdyants,16 B. D. Anderson,17 D. Arkhipkin,3... G. S. Averichev,16 J. Balewski,21 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,51 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,49 F. Benedosso,26 M. J. Betancourt,21 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,15 A. K. Bhati,29 H. Bichsel,48 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L...

  16. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 82, 034909 (2010) Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev...,17 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,15 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C...

  17. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  18. Characterizing minimal interval completions: Towards better understanding of profile and pathwidth #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todinca, Ioan

    Characterizing minimal interval completions: Towards better understanding of profile and pathwidth # Pinar Heggernes + Karol Suchan #§ Ioan Todinca # Yngve Villanger + Abstract Minimal interval completions. An interval completion of a given graph is an interval supergraph of it on the same vertex set, obtained

  19. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Motomura, T.

    2014-09-15

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, ±1, and ±2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density n{sub e} were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n{sub e} up to ?5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup ?3} was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and ±1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma.

  20. Holographic Calculation for Large Interval Rényi Entropy at High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we study the holographic R\\'enyi entropy of a large interval on a circle at high temperature for the two-dimensional CFT dual to pure AdS$_3$ gravity. In the field theory, the R\\'enyi entropy is encoded in the CFT partition function on $n$-sheeted torus connected with each other by a large branch cut. As proposed in 1412.0763, the effective way to read the entropy in the large interval limit is to insert a complete set of state bases of the twist sector at the branch cut. Then the calculation transforms into an expansion of four-point functions in the twist sector with respect to $e^{-\\frac{2\\pi TR}{n}}$. By using the operator product expansion of the twist operators at the branch points, we read the first few terms of the R\\'enyi entropy, including the leading and next-leading contributions in the large central charge limit. Moreover, we show that the leading contribution is actually captured by the twist vacuum module. In this case by the Ward identity the four-point functions can be derived from the correlation function of four twist operators, which is related to double interval entanglement entropy. Holographically, we apply the recipe in 1303.7221 and 1306.4682 to compute the classical R\\'enyi entropy and its 1-loop quantum correction, after imposing a new set of monodromy conditions. The holographic classical result matches exactly with the leading contribution in the field theory up to $e^{-4\\pi TR}$ and $l^6$, while the holographical 1-loop contribution is in exact agreement with next-leading results in field theory up to $e^{-\\frac{6\\pi TR}{n}}$ and $l^4$ as well.

  1. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  2. Event shapes and azimuthal correlations in Z + jets events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Tikvica, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of event shapes and azimuthal correlations are presented for events where a Z boson is produced in association with jets in proton-proton collisions. The data collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. The analysis provides a test of predictions from perturbative QCD for a process that represents a substantial background to many physics channels. Results are presented as a function of jet multiplicity, for inclusive Z boson production and for Z bosons with transverse momenta greater than 150 GeV, and compared to predictions from Monte Carlo event generators that include leading-order multiparton matrix-element (with up to four hard partons in the final state) and next-to-leading-order simulations of Z + 1-jet events. The experimental results are corrected for detector effects, and can be compared directly with other QCD models.

  3. Setting confidence intervals for bounded parameters a different perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, D A S; Wong, A C M

    2003-01-01

    The estimation of signal frequency count in the presence of background noise has had much recent discussion in the physics literature, and Mandelkern [1] brings the core issues to the statistical community, in turn leading to extensive discussion by statisticians. The primary focus in [1] and in the discussion rests on confidence interval procedures. We discuss various anomalies and misleading features in this use of confidence theory, and argue that the usage is essentially decision theoretic and is being applied in a context that invites an inferential approach. We then extract what we view as the inference elements, the fundamental information available from the model and the data. This is illustrated using some simple data and some recent data from the physics literature.

  4. Coronal inflows during the interval 1996-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Wang, Y.-M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We extend our previous counts of coronal inflows from the 5 yr interval 1996-2001 to the 18 yr interval 1996-2014. By comparing stackplots of these counts with similar stackplots of the source-surface magnetic field and its longitudinal gradient, we find that the inflows occur in long-lived streams with counting rates in excess of 18 inflows per day at sector boundaries where the gradient exceeds 0.22 G rad{sup –1}. These streams are responsible for the high (86%) correlation between the inflow rate and the longitudinal field gradient. The overall inflow rate was several times larger in sunspot cycle 23 than it has been so far in cycle 24, reflecting the relatively weak source-surface fields during this cycle. By comparison, in cycles 21-22, the source-surface field and its gradient had bursts of great strength, as if large numbers of inflows occurred during those cycles. We find no obvious relation between inflows and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on timescales of days to weeks, regardless of the speeds of the CMEs, and only a 60% correlation on timescales of months, provided the CMEs are fast (V > 600 km s{sup –1}). We conclude that most of the flux carried out by CMEs is returned to the Sun via field line reconnection well below the 2.0 R {sub ?} inner limit of the LASCO field of view, and that the remainder accumulates in the outer corona for an eventual return at sector boundaries.

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in Pb-Pb collisions at ?s NN=2.76TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pT) range up to approximately 60??GeV/c. The data cover ...

  6. A scheme for fast exploratory simulation of azimuthal asymmetries in Drell-Yan experiments at intermediate energies. The DY_AB Monte Carlo event generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Bianconi

    2008-06-05

    In this note I report and discuss the physical scheme and the main approximations used by the event generator code DY\\_AB. This Monte Carlo code is aimed at preliminary simulation, during the stage of apparatus planning, of Drell-Yan events characterized by azimuthal asymmetries, in experiments with moderate center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ $<<$ 100 GeV.

  7. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST, 1999); P. 11811192, 10 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Azimuthal variation in P-wave signatures due to fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    the overburden using vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) (Horne and MacBeth, 1997) and in the labora- Published for attenuation in the upper crust at seismic frequencies is intracrack fluid flow. In cracked media period of the workshop on Azimuthal Variations in Seismic Signature (held in conjunction with the 1997

  8. Azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments in collisions between gold nuclei of energy 10.6 GeV per nucleon and emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdurakhmanov, U. U.; Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. Sh. Chudakov, V. M.

    2008-03-15

    Intra-and intergroup azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments are found in collisions between gold and emulsion nuclei. The statistical significance of these correlations is high. The methodological distortions associated with the measurement errors are investigated in detail and are taken into account.

  9. DIMACS Technical Report 2004-30 k-Interval-filament graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIMACS Technical Report 2004-30 June 2004 k-Interval-filament graphs by Fanica GAVRIL1 DIMACS segment. In PL, above L, construct to each interval i(v)I a filament v connecting its two endpoints, such that for every two filaments u,v having uv and disjoint intervals i(u)filaments w with i

  10. Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2012-11-15

    Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  11. Transits of planets with small intervals in circumbinary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Gen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Transit times around single stars can be described well by a linear ephemeris. However, transit times in circumbinary systems are influenced both by the gravitational perturbations and the orbital phase variations of the central binary star. Adopting a coplanar analog of Kepler-16 as an example, we find that circumbinary planets can transit the same star more than once during a single planetary orbit, a phenomenon we call 'tight transits.' In certain geometric architecture, the projected orbital velocity of the planet and the secondary star can approach zero and change sign, resulting in very long transits and/or 2-3 transits during a single binary orbit. Whether tight transits are possible for a particular system depends primarily on the binary mass ratio and the orbital architecture of both the binary and the planet. We derive a time-dependent criterion to judge when tight transits are possible for any circumbinary system. These results are verified with full dynamical integrations that also reveal other tight transit characteristics, i.e., the transit durations and the intervals between tight transits. For the seven currently known circumbinary systems, we estimate these critical parameters both analytically and numerically. Due to the mutual inclination between the planet and the binary, tight transits can only occur across the less massive star B in Kepler-16, -34, -35, and -47 (for both planets). The long-term average frequency of tight transits (compared to typical transits) for Kepler-16, -34, and -35 are estimated to be several percent. Using full numerical integrations, the next tight transit for each system is predicted and the soonest example appears to be Kepler-47b and -47c, which are likely to have tight transits before 2025. These unique and valuable events often deserve special observational scrutiny.

  12. Elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV measured with ALICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALICE Collaboration, Denise Moreira de Godoy for the

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, we present the ALICE results on the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in 20-40% central Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV. Heavy quarks are produced in the early stages of the collision and they interact with the hot and dense color-deconfined medium created in heavy-ion collisions at high energies, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measurements of the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in non-central collisions can be used to investigate the degree of thermalization and energy loss of heavy quarks within the QGP. Theoretical predictions of heavy-quark transport in the medium are compared with the measurement.

  13. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of low-momentum direct photons in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z

    2015-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured 2nd and 3rd order Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distributions of direct photons emitted at midrapidity in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV for various collision centralities. Combining two different analysis techniques, results were obtained in the transverse momentum range of $0.4azimuthal anisotropies.

  14. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2003 2081 On Optimizing the Backoff Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Zygmunt J.

    scheme out-performs other backoff schemes, such as binary exponential backoff (BEB) and multiplicative Terms--Backoff algorithm, backoff interval, binary ex- ponential backoff (BEB), multiplicative increase

  16. Measurement of the Azimuthal Angle Dependence of Inclusive Jet Yields in Pb + Pb Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76??TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, ??, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has ...

  17. Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval GARY L. THORNE Abstract Inhibition of the startle eyeblink response at long lead intervals has been hypothesized to occur the lead and startle stimuli are in different modalities under conditions of high perceptual load

  18. Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems and experiment for the thermal subprocess of a high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell system. Keywords: Interval analysis, model-predictive control, sensitivity analysis, tracking control, solid oxide fuel cells AMS

  19. Regression Models with Interval Censoring Jian Huang and Jon A. Wellner 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellner, Jon A.

    Regression Models with Interval Censoring Jian Huang and Jon A. Wellner 1 University of Washington October 6, 1993 Abstract In this paper we discuss estimation in semiparametric regression models with interval censoring, with emphasis on estimation of the regression parameter . The first section surveys

  20. Approximate and Fiducial Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Binomial Proportions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    Approximate and Fiducial Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Binomial Proportions K of estimating the difference between two binomial proportions is considered. Closed-form approximate confidence intervals (CIs), and a fiducial CI for the difference between proportions are proposed. The approximate CIs

  1. LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK Abstract­ the Lyapunov spectral intervals. Since any bounded and continuous coeficient matrix function can be smoothly/or continuous Lyapunov spectrum. Key words. Exponential dichotomy, Sacker-Sell spectrum, Lyapunov exponents

  2. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1 Kazuko interval between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold q for 31 intraday data sets Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  3. 286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Using Denumerable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericola, Bruno

    286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Gerard0 Rubino and Bruno Sericola Abstiact-Interval availability is a dependability measure de- fined availability level is high enough. The system is assumed to be modeled as a Markov process with countable state

  4. Azimuthal reflectivity inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mshepher

    2012-10-30

    22nd International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 - Brisbane, ... to a potentially complex relation between crack density and.

  5. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN,

    2004-12-01

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  6. Transverse-rapidity $\\bf y_t$ dependence of the nonjet azimuth quadrupole from 62 and 200 GeV Au-Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David T. Kettler; Duncan J. Prindle; Thomas A. Trainor

    2015-04-10

    Previous measurements of a quadrupole component of azimuth correlations denoted by symbol $v_2$ have been interpreted to represent elliptic flow, a hydrodynamic phenomenon conjectured to play a major role in noncentral nucleus-nucleus collisions. $v_2$ measurements provide the main support for conclusions that a ``perfect liquid'' is formed in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). However, conventional $v_2$ methods based on one-dimensional (1D) azimuth correlations give inconsistent results and may include a jet contribution. In some cases the data trends appear to be inconsistent with hydrodynamic interpretations. In this study we distinguish several components of 2D angular correlations and isolate a nonjet (NJ) azimuth quadrupole denoted by $v_2\\{\\text{2D}\\}$. We establish systematic variations of the NJ quadrupole on $y_t$, centrality and collision energy. We adopt transverse rapidity $y_t$ as both a velocity measure and as a logarithmic alternative to transverse momentum $p_t$. Based on NJ quadrupole trends we derive a completely factorized universal parametrization of quantity $v_2\\{\\text{2D}\\}(y_t,b,\\sqrt{s_{NN}})$ which describes the centrality, $y_t$ and energy dependence. From $y_t$-differential $v_2(y_t)$ data we isolate a quadrupole spectrum and infer a quadrupole source boost having unexpected properties. NJ quadrupole $v_2$ trends obtained with 2D model fits are remarkably simple. The centrality trend appear to be uncorrelated with a sharp transition in jet-related structure that may indicate rapid change of Au-Au medium properties. The lack of correspondence suggests that the NJ quadrupole may be insensitive to such a medium. Several quadrupole trends have interesting implications for hydro interpretations.

  7. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d plus Au and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 82, 024912 (2010) Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d + Au and Au+Au collisions at ?sN N = 200 GeV measured at the STAR detector M. M. Aggarwal,31 Z. Ahammed,22 A. V. Alakhverdyants,18 I. Alekseev,16 J. Alford,19 B. D. Anderson,19 D.... Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,18 J. Balewski,23 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,53 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,51 M. J. Betancourt,23 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,31 H. Bichsel,50 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 B. E. Bonner,37 J...

  8. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=9.2 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 024911 (2010) Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at ?sN N = 9.2 GeV B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D.... Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz...

  9. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  10. Case Studies in Using Interval Data Energy Models for Savings Verification: Lessons from the Grocery Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of whole building utility interval data for verifying energy savings from energy efficiency projects has become an attractive option as this data is increasingly available. Formal protocols, such as IPMVP Option C and ASHRAE Guideline 14...

  11. Computing Best Possible Pseudo-Solutions to Interval Linear Systems of Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    . Panyukov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia a_panyukov@mail.ru Valentin A. Golodov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia avaksa@gmail.com Abstract In the paper, we consider interval

  12. Monitoring molecular interactions using photon arrival-time interval distribution analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA); Weiss, Shimon (Los Angels, CA)

    2009-10-06

    A method for analyzing/monitoring the properties of species that are labeled with fluorophores. A detector is used to detect photons emitted from species that are labeled with one or more fluorophores and located in a confocal detection volume. The arrival time of each of the photons is determined. The interval of time between various photon pairs is then determined to provide photon pair intervals. The number of photons that have arrival times within the photon pair intervals is also determined. The photon pair intervals are then used in combination with the corresponding counts of intervening photons to analyze properties and interactions of the molecules including brightness, concentration, coincidence and transit time. The method can be used for analyzing single photon streams and multiple photon streams.

  13. A Recipe for Construction of the Critical Vertices for Left-Sector Stability of Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Recipe for Construction of the Critical Vertices for Left-Sector Stability of Interval polynomials. This paper provides a recipe for construction of these critical vertices. Illustrative examples

  14. Interval Computations as an Important Part of Granular Computing: An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    interval techniques, and we list a few typical applications of these techniques. 2 Why Computations the best way to change this flow (e.g., by building dams or levees) is a problem of engineering

  15. Robust stabilizer synthesis for interval plants using H-Infinity methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Saikat

    1993-01-01

    OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ROBUST STABILIZER SYNTHESIS FOR INTERVAL PLANTS USING H-INFINITY METHODS A Thesis by SAIKAT BHATTACHARYA Approved as to style and content by: S. P. Bhattacharyya (Chair of Committee) J. W.... (Hons. ), Indian Institute of Technology, Khsragpur, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S. P. Bhattacharyya The aim of this research has been to develop a synthesis method for the robust stabilization of interval plants. First, the biggest...

  16. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-04-01

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions. Expressed in terms of the Fourier components of the azimuthal distribution, the n = 3-6 harmonic coefficients are presented for charged particles as a function of their transverse momentum (0.3 < pt < 8.0 GeV), collision centrality (0-70%), and pseudorapidity (abs(eta) < 2.0). The data are analyzed using the event plane, multiparticle cumulant, and Lee-Yang zeros methods, which provide different sensitivities to initial-state fluctuations. Taken together with earlier LHC measurements of elliptic flow (n = 2), the results on higher-order harmonic coefficients develop a more complete picture of the collective motion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and shed light on the properties of the produced medium.

  17. Towards the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of "Chelyabinsk" meteorite fall according to the data from coherent radar, GPS and seismic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berngardt, O I; Kutelev, K A; Zherebtsov, G A; Dobrynina, A A; Shestakov, N V; Zagretdinov, R V; Bakhtiyarov, V F; Kusonsky, O A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of the meteorite 'Chelyabinsk', based on the data from the network of GPS receivers, coherent decameter radar EKB SuperDARN and network of seismic stations. It is shown, that 6-14 minutes after the bolide explosion, GPS network observed the cone-shaped wavefront of TIDs that is interpreted as a ballistic acoustic wave. The typical TIDs propagation velocity were observed 661+/-256m/s, which corresponds to the expected acoustic wave speed for 240km height. 14 minutes after the bolide explosion, at distances of 200km we observed the emergence and propagation of a TID with spherical wavefront, that is interpreted as gravitational mode of internal acoustic waves. The propagation velocity of this TID was 337+/-89m/s which corresponds to the propagation velocity of these waves in similar situations. At EKB SuperDARN radar, we observed TIDs in the sector of azimuthal angles close to the perpendicular to the meteorite...

  18. Development and testing of FIDELE: a computer code for finite-difference solution to harmonic magnetic-dipole excitation of an azimuthally symmetric horizontally and radially layered earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1981-04-01

    The FORTRAN IV computer code FIDELE simulates the high-frequency electrical logging of a well in which induction and receiving coils are mounted in an instrument sonde immersed in a drilling fluid. The fluid invades layers of surrounding rock in an azimuthally symmetric pattern, superimposing radial layering upon the horizonally layered earth. Maxwell's equations are reduced to a second-order elliptic differential equation for the azimuthal electric-field intensity. The equation is solved at each spatial position where the complex dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and electrical conductivity have been assigned. Receiver response is given as the complex open-circuit voltage on receiver coils. The logging operation is simulated by a succession of such solutions as the sonde traverses the borehole. Test problems verify consistency with available results for simple geometries. The code's main advantage is its treatment of a two-dimensional earth; its chief disadvantage is the large computer time required for typical problems. Possible code improvements are noted. Use of the computer code is outlined, and tests of most code features are presented.

  19. Measurement of Azimuthal Modulations in the Cross-Section of Di-Pion Pairs in Di-Jet Production from Electron-Positron Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; K. Arinstein; Y. Arita; D. M. Asner; T. Aso; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; T. Aziz; V. Babu; I. Badhrees; S. Bahinipati; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; Y. Ban; V. Bansal; E. Barberio; M. Barrett; W. Bartel; A. Bay; I. Bedny; P. Behera; M. Belhorn; K. Belous; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; M. Bischofberger; J. Biswal; T. Bloomfield; S. Blyth; A. Bobrov; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; C. Bookwalter; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; F. Breibeck; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; D. ?ervenkov; M. -C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; K. -F. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Crnkovic; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; S. Di Carlo; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; S. Dubey; D. Dutta; K. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; T. Ferber; A. Frey; O. Frost; M. Fujikawa; B. G. Fulsom; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; A. Garmash; D. Getzkow; R. Gillard; F. Giordano; R. Glattauer; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; M. Grosse Perdekamp; J. Grygier; O. Grzymkowska; H. Guo; J. Haba; P. Hamer; Y. L. Han; K. Hara; T. Hara; Y. Hasegawa; J. Hasenbusch; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; M. Heck; M. Hedges; D. Heffernan; M. Heider; A. Heller; T. Higuchi; S. Himori; T. Horiguchi; Y. Hoshi; K. Hoshina; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; C. -L. Hsu; M. Huschle; H. J. Hyun; Y. Igarashi; T. Iijima; M. Imamura; K. Inami; G. Inguglia; A. Ishikawa; K. Itagaki; R. Itoh; M. Iwabuchi; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; S. Iwata; W. W. Jacobs; I. Jaegle; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; H. Kakuno; J. H. Kang; K. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; E. Kato; Y. Kato; P. Katrenko; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; B. H. Kim; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. H. Kim; S. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; C. Kleinwort; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; N. Kobayashi; S. Koblitz; P. Kodyš; Y. Koga; S. Korpar; R. T. Kouzes; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; B. Kronenbitter; T. Kuhr; R. Kumar; T. Kumita; E. Kurihara; Y. Kuroki; A. Kuzmin; P. Kvasni?ka; Y. -J. Kwon; Y. -T. Lai; J. S. Lange; D. H. Lee; I. S. Lee; S. -H. Lee; M. Leitgab; R. Leitner; P. Lewis; H. Li; J. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; A. Limosani; C. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; A. Loos; R. Louvot; P. Lukin; J. MacNaughton; M. Masuda; D. Matvienko; A. Matyja; S. McOnie; Y. Mikami; K. Miyabayashi; Y. Miyachi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; S. Mohanty; D. Mohapatra; A. Moll; H. K. Moon; T. Mori; H. -G. Moser; T. Müller; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nakahama; I. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; E. Nakano; H. Nakano; T. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakayama; H. Nakazawa; T. Nanut; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; K. Negishi; K. Neichi; C. Ng; C. Niebuhr; M. Niiyama; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; K. Nishimura; O. Nitoh; T. Nozaki; A. Ogawa; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Ono; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; C. Oswald; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; B. Pal; H. Palka; E. Panzenböck; C. -S. Park; C. W. Park; H. Park; H. K. Park; K. S. Park; L. S. Peak; T. K. Pedlar; T. Peng; L. Pesantez; R. Pestotnik; M. Peters; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; K. Prasanth; M. Prim; K. Prothmann; C. Pulvermacher; M. Purohit; B. Reisert; E. Ribežl; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; J. Rorie; A. Rostomyan; M. Rozanska; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; N. Sasao; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; P. Schönmeier; M. Schram; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; B. Schwenker; R. Seidl; A. Sekiya; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; I. S. Seong; M. E. Sevior; L. Shang; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; H. Shibuya; S. Shinomiya; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; J. B. Singh; R. Sinha; P. Smerkol; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; Y. Soloviev; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; J. Stypula; S. Sugihara; A. Sugiyama; M. Sumihama; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Z. Suzuki; H. Takeichi; U. Tamponi; M. Tanaka; S. Tanaka; K. Tanida; N. Taniguchi; G. Tatishvili; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; I. Tikhomirov; K. Trabelsi; V. Trusov; Y. F. Tse; T. Tsuboyama; M. Uchida; T. Uchida; Y. Uchida; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; K. Vervink; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; J. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; R. Wedd; S. Wehle; E. White; J. Wiechczynski; K. M. Williams; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; S. Yamada; H. Yamamoto; J. Yamaoka; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; S. Yashchenko; H. Ye; J. Yelton; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yusa; C. C. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; L. Zhao; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov

    2015-05-29

    We present an extraction of azimuthal correlations between two pairs of charged pions detected in opposite jets from electron-positron annihilation. These correlations may arise from the dependence of the di-pion fragmentation on the polarization of the parent quark in the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow q \\bar{q}$. Due to the correlation of the quark polarizations, the cross-section of di-pion pair production, in which the pion pairs are detected in opposite jets in a dijet event, exhibits a modulation in the azimuthal angles of the planes containing the hadron pairs with respect to the production plane. The measurement of this modulation allows access to combinations of fragmentation functions that are sensitive to the quark's transverse polarization and helicity. Within our uncertainties we do not observe a significant signal from the previously unmeasured helicity dependent fragmentation function $G_1^\\perp$. This measurement uses a dataset of 938~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the Belle experiment at or near $\\sqrt{s}\\approx10.58$ GeV.

  20. Azimuthal Correlations with High-pT Multi-Hadron Cluster Triggers in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Haag; for the STAR Collaboration

    2008-08-12

    Di-hadron correlation measurements have been used to probe di-jet production in collisions at RHIC. A strong suppression of the away-side high-pT yield in these measurements is direct evidence that high-pT partons lose energy as they traverse the strongly interacting medium. However, since the momentum of the trigger particle is not a good measure of the jet energy, azimuthal di-hadron correlations have limited sensitivity to the shape of the fragmentation function. We explore the possibility to better constrain the initial parton energy by using clusters of multiple high-pT hadrons in a narrow cone as the 'trigger particle' in the azimuthal correlation analysis. We present first results from this analysis of multi-hadron triggered correlated yields in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV from STAR. The results are compared to Pythia calculations, and the implications for energy loss and jet fragmentation are discussed.

  1. Time interval and lattice vibration in Raman effect, photoelectric effect and plane mirror reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kumar; S. Sahoo

    2012-07-02

    Time interval between the incident and scattered photon in Raman effect and absorption of photon and emission of electron in photoelectric effect has not been determined till now. This is because there is no such high level instrument discovered till now to detect time interval to such a small level. But this can be calculated theoretically by applying a basic principle of physics like impulse is equal to the change in momentum. Considering the collision between electron and photon as perfect inelastic collision in photoelectric effect, elastic and inelastic collision in Raman effect and elastic collision in plane mirror reflection and the interaction between electron and photon as strong gravitational interaction we calculate the required time interval. During these phenomena there is lattice vibration which can be quantized as phonon particles.

  2. Distribution of Primes and of Interval Prime Pairs Based on $?$ Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Fan; Zhiyu Li

    2010-04-19

    $\\Theta$ function is defined based upon Kronecher symbol. In light of the principle of inclusion-exclusion, $\\Theta$ function of sine function is used to denote the distribution of composites and primes. The structure of Goldbach Conjecture has been analyzed, and $\\Xi$ function is brought forward by the linear diophantine equation; by relating to $\\Theta$ function, the interval distribution of composite pairs and prime pairs (i.e. the Goldbach Conjecture) is thus obtained. In the end, Abel's Theorem (Multiplication of Series) is used to discuss the lower limit of the distribution of the interval prime pairs.

  3. Recent Measurements of the cos(n{phi}{sub h}) Azimuthal Modulations of the Unpolarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Giordano, Francesca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-12-17

    The cross section for hadron production in deep-inelastic lepton scattering contains azimuthal modulations which can be related to transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. The former provide a picture of how the quarks are moving within nucleons. Specifically, the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} modulations of the unpolarized cross section relate quark spin and quark transverse momentum. These moments have been carefully measured at the HERMES experiment in a fully differential way, as a function of x, y, z, and P{sub hperpendicular} for positive and negative hadrons produced from hydrogen and deuterium targets. These measurements give new access to the flavor dependent TMDs via their charge and target dependence. These data must be compared to comprehensive models to determine which terms contribute significantly to the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} moments and allow access to the underlying structure functions.

  4. Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas David D. Coblentz, G. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often a controversial issue, with different evidence of the geological subdivision is the fact that the existing subdivision is often based on the chemical and physical

  5. Estimation of shear-wave interval attenuation from mode-converted data Bharath Shekar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    Tsvankin1 ABSTRACT Interval attenuation measurements provide valuable infor- mation for reservoir characterization and lithology discrimi- nation. We extend the attenuation layer-stripping method of Behura of the material (Prasad and Nur, 2003), the pre- sence of aligned fluid-filled fractures (Chapman, 2003; Batzle et

  6. Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 17171722 Serial interval statistics of spontaneous activity in cortical neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    2007-01-01

    Stationary spiking of single neurons is often modelled by a renewal point process. Here, we tested are frequently used as models for neuronal spiking. Renewal processes are a simple and well-studied class (i.i.d.) according to a fixed interval distribution [10]. Renewal models may be defined in abstract

  7. Estimating Prediction Intervals for Arti cial Neural Lyle H. Ungar Richard D. De Veaux Evelyn Rosengarten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungar, Lyle H.

    prediction lim- its for ANN's: a frequentist approach, based on stan- dard non-linear regression theory for estimating the prediction uncertainties of non- linear regressionseee.g Seberand Wild, 1989, based on localEstimating Prediction Intervals for Arti cial Neural Networks Lyle H. Ungar Richard D. De Veaux

  8. Estimating Prediction Intervals for Artificial Neural Lyle H. Ungar Richard D. De Veaux Evelyn Rosengarten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungar, Lyle H.

    to obtaining prediction lim­ its for ANN's: a frequentist approach, based on stan­ dard non­linear regression of the prediction intervals, their computational costs and practical implementa­ tion issues of the two approaches of as doing nonlinear regression. Standard methods ex­ ist for estimating the prediction uncertainties of non

  9. Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 26922700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barranco, Bernabe Linares

    2007-01-01

    Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 2692­2700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator Sevilla, Spain Available online 10 May 2007 Abstract Address­Event­Representation (AER) is a communication). In developing AER-based systems it is very convenient to have available some means of generating AER streams

  10. Original Research Article First Birth Interval, An Indicator of Energetic Status, Is a Predictor of Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    by a shorter waiting time to the first birth (first birth interval, FBI), are able to afford higher costs was divided into tertiles based on the length of FBI. Results: Women with the shortest FBI had a higher number.06). Women who had ever given birth to twins had shorter FBI than women of singletons (20.1 and 26.1 months

  11. Uncertainty in Risk Analysis: Towards a General SecondOrder Approach Combining Interval,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Uncertainty in Risk Analysis: Towards a General Second­Order Approach Combining Interval important in risk analysis. A natural way to describe this uncer­ tainty is to describe a set of possible methods of handling such partial information in risk analysis. Several such techniques have been presented

  12. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  13. Weak -nets and interval chains Noga Alon, Haim Kaplan, Gabriel Nivasch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    Weak -nets and interval chains Noga Alon, Haim Kaplan, Gabriel Nivasch1 , Micha Sharir, Shakhar@post.tau.ac.il, gnivasch@post.tau.ac.il, michas@post.tau.ac.il, shakhar@courant.nyu.edu. Noga Alon, Haim Kaplan, Gabriel­MINERVA Center for Geometry at Tel Aviv University. Work by Haim Kaplan was partially supported by ISF Grant 975

  14. Statistical properties of heartbeat intervals during atrial fibrillation Wanzhen Zeng and Leon Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Leon

    Statistical properties of heartbeat intervals during atrial fibrillation Wanzhen Zeng and Leon node which provides an electrical pathway between the atria and the main pumping chambers of the heart in cardiology that docu- ments the statistical properties of the ventricular activity dur- ing atrial

  15. TSAR: A Two Tier Sensor Storage Architecture Using Interval Skip Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Deepak

    metadata by employing local archiving at the sensors and distributed indexing at the proxies. At the proxyTSAR: A Two Tier Sensor Storage Architecture Using Interval Skip Graphs Peter Desnoyers, Deepak pjd@cs.umass.edu, dganesan@cs.umass.edu, shenoy@cs.umass.edu ABSTRACT Archival storage of sensor data

  16. PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval tests for gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jinghua; Xue, Fuzhong

    2010-01-26

    confidence interval test (PCA-BCIT), which directly uses the PC scores to assess gene-disease association, was developed and evaluated for three ways of extracting PCs, i.e., cases only(CAES), controls only(COES) and cases and controls combined...

  17. Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth Bridget by stress that has accumulated in the upper locked portion of the crust. The present-day stress accumulation rate on any given fault segment is fairly well resolved by current geodetic measurements. Model stress

  18. LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION #3; LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z dichotomy of Sacker and Sell and the spectrum de#12;ned in terms of upper and lower Lyapunov exponents information. Finally, we discuss the algorithms we have used to approximate the Lyapunov and Sacker

  19. Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval-parameter-programming-based approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval A sophisticated biodiesel manufacturing study demonstrated methodological efficacy. a r t i c l e i n f o Article Simulation Uncertainty a b s t r a c t Biodiesel, a clean-burning alternative fuel, can be produced using

  20. Two intervals R\\'enyi entanglement entropy of compact free boson on torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feihu

    2015-01-01

    We compute the $N=2$ R\\'enyi entanglement entropy of two intervals at equal time in a circle, for the theory of a 2d compact complex free scalar at finite temperature. This is carried out by performing functional integral on a genus 3 ramified cover of the torus, wherein the quantum part of the integral is captured by the four point function of twist fields on the worldsheet torus, and the classical piece is given by summing over winding modes of the genus 3 surface onto the target space torus. The final result is given in terms of a product of theta function and certain multi-dimensional theta function. We demonstrate the T-duality invariance of the result. We also study its low temperature limit. In the case in which the size of the intervals and of their separation are much smaller than the whole system, our result is in exact agreement with the known result for two intervals on an infinite system at zero temperature \\cite{eeoftwo}. In the case in which the separation between the two intervals is much smal...

  1. Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Elizabeth anne

    1998-01-01

    approaching fatigue on d 2 and 5. On interval work days, 'ton-board'' heart rate monitors were used to record heart rates through a series of anaerobic maneuver repetitions with 1 min of recovery in between repetitions. When peak and recovery heart rates...

  2. A Genealogy for Finite Kneading Sequences of Bimodal Maps on the Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ringland; Charles Tresser

    1993-07-20

    We generate all the finite kneading sequences of one of the two kinds of bimodal map on the interval, building each sequence uniquely from a pair of shorter ones. There is a single pair at generation 0, with members of length 1. Concomitant with this genealogy of kneading sequences is a unified genealogy of all the periodic orbits. (6/93)

  3. VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola Department of Physics ra- diation. This article examines at the variability of beam and global solar radiation over short solar radiation values with ground-based data. 1. INTRODUCTION It is difficult to evaluate solar

  4. Interval Data Analysis with the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Koran, William

    2011-07-07

    Analyzing whole building interval data is an inexpensive but effective way to identify and improve building operations, and ultimately save money. Utilizing the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM) add-in for Microsoft Excel, building operators and managers can begin implementing changes to their Building Automation System (BAS) after trending the interval data. The two data components needed for full analyses are whole building electricity consumption (kW or kWh) and outdoor air temperature (OAT). Using these two pieces of information, a series of plots and charts and be created in ECAM to monitor the buildings performance over time, gain knowledge of how the building is operating, and make adjustments to the BAS to improve efficiency and start saving money.

  5. CP(N-1) model on finite interval in the large N limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Milekhin

    2012-07-02

    The CP(N-1) \\sigma\\ model on finite interval of length R with Dirichlet boundary conditions is analysed in the 1/N expansion. The theory has two phases, separated by a phase transition at R ~ 1/\\Lambda, \\Lambda\\ is dynamical scale of the CP(N-1) model. The vacuum energy dependence of R, and especially Casimir-type scaling 1/R, is discussed.

  6. Multi-Level Interval Estimation for Locating damage in Structures by Using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Danguang; Gao Yanhua; Song Junlei [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2010-05-21

    A new analysis technique, called multi-level interval estimation method, is developed for locating damage in structures. In this method, the artificial neural networks (ANN) analysis method is combined with the statistics theory to estimate the range of damage location. The ANN is multilayer perceptron trained by back-propagation. Natural frequencies and modal shape at a few selected points are used as input to identify the location and severity of damage. Considering the large-scale structures which have lots of elements, multi-level interval estimation method is developed to reduce the estimation range of damage location step-by-step. Every step, estimation range of damage location is obtained from the output of ANN by using the method of interval estimation. The next ANN training cases are selected from the estimation range after linear transform, and the output of new ANN estimation range of damage location will gained a reduced estimation range. Two numerical example analyses on 10-bar truss and 100-bar truss are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  8. Z .International Journal of Psychophysiology 32 1999 239 250 Attentional modulation of short-and long-lead-interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and long-lead-interval modification of the acoustic startle eyeblink response: comparing auditory that modification of startle by lead stimuli with short- and long-lead-intervals is modulated by stimulus significance. The significant stimulus in a tone duration judgement task generates enhanced short-lead

  9. Weak Unit Disk and Interval Representation of Graphs M. J. Alam, S. G. Kobourov, S. Pupyrev, and J. Toeniskoetter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    Weak Unit Disk and Interval Representation of Graphs M. J. Alam, S. G. Kobourov, S. Pupyrev, and J of intersection representations with unit balls: unit disks in the plane and unit intervals on the line. Given is to represent the vertices of the graph by unit-size balls so that the balls for two adjacent vertices intersect

  10. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore »number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (?) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq2/(nq???N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  11. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-07-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pt) range up to approximately 60 GeV. The data cover both the low-pt region associated with hydrodynamic flow phenomena and the high-pt region where the anisotropies may reflect the path-length dependence of parton energy loss in the created medium. The anisotropy parameter (v2) of the particles is extracted by correlating charged tracks with respect to the event-plane reconstructed by using the energy deposited in forward-angle calorimeters. For the six bins of collision centrality studied, spanning the range of 0-60% most-central events, the observed v2 values are found to first increase with pt, reaching a maximum around pt = 3 GeV, and then to gradually decrease to almost zero, with the decline persisting up to at least pt = 40 GeV over the full centrality range measured.

  12. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; Daniel Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

    2010-08-10

    Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta \\pt{} of charged particles associated with intermediate to high-\\pt{} trigger particles ($2.5 < \\pt < 10$ \\GeVc) in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\snn=200$ GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher $\\pt \\gtrsim 2.5$ \\GeVc, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+Au and Au+Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle $\\pt < 2$ \\GeVc, a large enhancement of the near- ($\\dphi \\sim 0$) and away-side ($\\dphi \\sim \\pi$) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au+Au collisions compared to d+Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at $\\dphi \\sim \\pi$ in central Au+Au collisions.

  13. Azimuthal correlations between charged hadrons and direct photons at high-p$_{t}$ in $p+p$ and $Au+Au$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Hamed

    2008-11-11

    Recent results at STAR for direct $\\gamma$-charged hadron azimuthal correlations in heavy-ion collisions are presented. These correlations are used to study the color charge density of the medium through the medium-induced modification of high-p$_T$ parton fragmentation. Azimuthal correlations of direct photons at high transverse energy 8 $<$ E$_T$ $<$ 16 GeV with away-side charged hadrons of transverse momentum 3 $<$ p$_T$ $<$ 6 GeV/c have been measured over a broad range of centrality for $Au+Au$ collisions and $p+p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment. The per-trigger away-side yield of direct $\\gamma$ is smaller than from $\\pi^{0}$ triggers in the same centrality class.

  14. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberska 57, 182 51 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2007-09-15

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3 ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9 ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5 ps/K, and the long term stability is better than {+-}0.2 ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  15. The Entanglement Renyi Entropies of Disjoint Intervals in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Faulkner

    2013-03-28

    We study entanglement Renyi entropies (EREs) of 1+1 dimensional CFTs with classical gravity duals. Using the replica trick the EREs can be related to a partition function of n copies of the CFT glued together in a particular way along the intervals. In the case of two intervals this procedure defines a genus n-1 surface and our goal is to find smooth three dimensional gravitational solutions with this surface living at the boundary. We find two families of handlebody solutions labelled by the replica index n. These particular bulk solutions are distinguished by the fact that they do not spontaneously break the replica symmetries of the boundary surface. We show that the regularized classical action of these solutions is given in terms of a simple numerical prescription. If we assume that they give the dominant contribution to the gravity partition function we can relate this classical action to the EREs at leading order in G_N. We argue that the prescription can be formulated for non-integer n. Upon taking the limit n -> 1 the classical action reproduces the predictions of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for the entanglement entropy.

  16. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, K; Havlin, Shlomo; Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko

    2006-01-01

    We study the return interval $\\tau$ between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold $q$ for 31 intraday datasets, including the Standard & Poor's 500 index and the 30 stocks that form the Dow Jones Industrial index. For different threshold $q$, the probability density function $P_q(\\tau)$ scales with the mean interval $\\bar{\\tau}$ as $P_q(\\tau)={\\bar{\\tau}}^{-1}f(\\tau/\\bar{\\tau})$, similar to that found in daily volatilities. Since the intraday records have significantly more data points compared to the daily records, we could probe for much higher thresholds $q$ and still obtain good statistics. We find that the scaling function $f(x)$ is consistent for all 31 intraday datasets in various time resolutions, and the function is well approximated by the stretched exponential, $f(x)\\sim e^{-a x^\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma=0.38\\pm 0.05$ and $a=3.9\\pm 0.5$, which indicates the existence of correlations. We analyze the conditional probability distribution $P_q(\\tau|\\tau_0)$ for $\\tau$ following a certa...

  17. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

    2015-09-18

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1

  18. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

    2014-12-02

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1

  19. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM), Martin; Grant D. (Marlborough, MA), Holzrichter; Michael W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  20. Quality characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef as affected by postmortem chill, storage temperature and storage interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, Sammy Denzil

    1975-01-01

    QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the deoree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Animal Science QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE...

  1. In-flight Receptivity Experiments on a 30-degree Swept-wing using Micron-sized Discrete Roughness Elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Andrew L.

    2010-01-16

    One of the last remaining challenges preventing the laminarization of sweptwings is the control of unstable crossflow vortices. In low-disturbance environments the transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the swept-wing ...

  2. Oscillating HBT radii and the time evolution of the source - sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au data analyzed with azimuthally sensitive Buda-Lund hydro model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ster; M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad; B. Tomasik

    2011-04-06

    Identified particle spectra of pions, kaons and (anti)protons, and elliptic flow and azimuthal dependence of Bose-Einstein or HBT correlations of identified pions in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is analyzed simultaneously using an ellipsoidally symmetric generalization of the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model. The transverse flow is found to be faster in the reaction plane than out of plane, which results in a reaction zone that gets slightly more elongated in-plane than out of plane.

  3. Oscillating HBT radii and the time evolution of the source - sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au data analyzed with azimuthally sensitive Buda-Lund hydro model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ster, A; Csorgo, T; Lorstad, B; Tomasik, B

    2011-01-01

    Identified particle spectra of pions, kaons and (anti)protons, and elliptic flow and azimuthal dependence of Bose-Einstein or HBT correlations of identified pions in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is analyzed simultaneously using an ellipsoidally symmetric generalization of the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model. The transverse flow is found to be faster in the reaction plane than out of plane, which results in a reaction zone that gets slightly more elongated in-plane than out of plane.

  4. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)

  5. Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderóndela Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-06

    A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

  6. Azimuthal decorrelations and multiple parton interactions in y +2 jet and y +3 jet events in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.

    2011-03-23

    in the #1;þ 2 jet events are measured in three pjet2T bins: 15–20, 20–25, and 25–30 GeV. The #2;S-dependent cross section is measured in #1;þ 3 jet events (a subsample of the inclusive #1;þ 2 jet sample) in a single pjet2T interval, 15–30 GeV. Such a... of normalized differential cross sections, ð1=#2;#1;3jÞd#2;#1;3j= d#2;S in a single pjet2T bin (15–30 GeV) for #1;þ 3 jet events and ð1=#2;#1;2jÞd#2;#1;2j=d#2;#3; in three p jet2 T bins (15–20, 20–25, and 25–30 GeV) for #1;þ 2 jet events. The results...

  7. A comparison study of modal parameter confidence intervals computed using the Monte Carlo and Bootstrap techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cornwell, P.J. [Rose Hulman Inst. of Tech., Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two techniques used to estimate the statistical confidence intervals on modal parameters identified from measured vibration data. The first technique is Monte Carlo simulation, which involves the repeated simulation of random data sets based on the statistics of the measured data and an assumed distribution of the variability in the measured data. A standard modal identification procedure is repeatedly applied to the randomly perturbed data sets to form a statistical distribution on the identified modal parameters. The second technique is the Bootstrap approach, where individual Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements are randomly selected with replacement to form an ensemble average. This procedure, in effect, randomly weights the various FRF measurements. These weighted averages of the FRFs are then put through the modal identification procedure. The modal parameters identified from each randomly weighted data set are then used to define a statistical distribution for these parameters. The basic difference in the two techniques is that the Monte Carlo technique requires the assumption on the form of the distribution of the variability in the measured data, while the bootstrap technique does not. Also, the Monte Carlo technique can only estimate random errors, while the bootstrap statistics represent both random and bias (systematic) variability such as that arising from changing environmental conditions. However, the bootstrap technique requires that every frequency response function be saved for each average during the data acquisition process. Neither method can account for bias introduced during the estimation of the FRFs. This study has been motivated by a program to develop vibration-based damage identification procedures.

  8. Integrate-and-fire neurons with threshold noise: A tractable model of how interspike interval correlations affect neuronal signal transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chacron, Maurice

    transmission properties. For this purpose, we employ two simple firing models, one of which generates a renewal exclusively at high frequencies, the renewal model can transfer more information than the nonrenewal modelIntegrate-and-fire neurons with threshold noise: A tractable model of how interspike interval

  9. On Mathematical Functions for Theoretical and Experimental Distributions for Shrutis (Micro Tonal Intervals) and Their Application in Hindustani Music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishal Midya

    2015-02-06

    In this work, exact mathematical functions have been formulated for three important theoretical Shruti (micro tonal interval) distributions, i.e. for Western Compilation, Deval, and Nagoji Row in Hindustani music. A generalized mathematical function for Shrutis has also been formulated. This generalized function shows a very high order of conformity with the experimentally derived Shruti distribution, than those of the theoretical Shruti distributions.

  10. Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based on the Properties of Rough Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based, 121 35 Prague 2, Czech Republic Abstract Web usage mining involves application of data mining techniques to discover usage patterns from the web data. Clustering is one of the important functions in web

  11. Interrelationship of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins with uterine involution and postpartum interval in beef cows and heifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolleson, Douglas Ray

    1986-01-01

    Interrelationship of Endogenous and Exogenous Prostaglandins with Uterine Involution and Postpartum Interval in Beef Cows and Heifers (August 1986) Douglas Ray Tolleson, B. S. , Texas ALM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ronald D. Randel A review... ALPHA PRODUCTION BY THE INVOLUTING BOVINE UTERUS AT 14 AND 35 DAYS POSTPARTUM: PATTERN OF RELEASE AND RESPONSE TO PHYSICAL MANIPULATION. 26 28 33 44 47 Introduction. . . . . . . . . Materia1s and Methods. Resu1ts. Discussion. CHAPTER V...

  12. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.

    2015-04-21

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed tomore »nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)« less

  13. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  14. Sub-coloring and Hypo-coloring Interval Graphs Rajiv Gandhi1, Bradford Greening, Jr.1, Sriram Pemmaraju2, and Rajiv Raman3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Rajiv C.

    Sub-coloring and Hypo-coloring Interval Graphs Rajiv Gandhi1, Bradford Greening, Jr.1, Sriram, Iowa 52242. E-mail: sriram@cs.uiowa.edu. 3 Max-Planck Institute for Informatik, Saarbr¨ucken, Germany

  15. Results from SKM-200-GIBS on multiparticle azimuthal correlations in C-Ne and C-Cu collisions at energy of 3.7 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chkhaidze; T. Djobava; L. Kharkhelauri

    2000-08-03

    The transverse momentum technique is used to analyse charged-particle exclusive data in central C-Ne and C-Cu interactions at energy of 3.7 GeV per nucleon. Clear evidence of in-plane and out-of-plane (squeeze-out) flow effects for protons and pi^{-} mesons have been obtained. In C-Ne interactions in-plane flow of pi^{-} mesons is in the same direction as for the protons, while in C-Cu collisions pions show antuflow behaviour. From the transverse momentum and azimuthal distributions of protons and pi^{-} mesons with respect to the reaction plane, the flow (the measure of the amount of collective transverse momentum transfer in the reaction plane) and the parameter a_{2} (the measure of the anisotropic emission strength) have been extracted. The flow effects increase with the mass of the particle and the mass number of target A_{T}. The comparison of our in-plane flow results with flow data for various projectile/target configurations was made using the scaled flow F_{S}=F/(A_{P} ^{1/3}+A_{T}^{1/3}). F_{S} demonstrates a common scaling behaviour for flow values from different systems. The Quark Gluon String Model (QGSM) was used for the comparison with the experimental data. The QGSM yields a signature of in-plane and out-of-plane flow effects in C-ne and C-Cu collisions for protons.

  16. Power law burst and inter-burst interval distributions in the solar wind: turbulence or dissipative SOC ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Freeman; N. W. Watkins; D. J. Riley

    2000-06-28

    We calculate for the first time the probability density functions (PDFs) P of burst energy e, duration T and inter-burst interval tau for a known turbulent system in nature. Bursts in the earth-sun component of the Poynting flux at 1 AU in the solar wind were measured using the MFI and SWE experiments on the NASA WIND spacecraft. We find P(e) and P(T) to be power laws, consistent with self-organised criticality (SOC). We find also a power law form for P(tau) that distinguishes this turbulent cascade from the exponential P(tau) of ideal SOC, but not from some other SOC-like sandpile models. We discuss the implications for the relation between SOC and turbulence.

  17. Azimuthal Anisotropy Relative to the Participant Plane from AMPT in Central p+Au, d+Au, and $^{3}$He+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Orjuela Koop; A. Adare; D. McGlinchey; J. L. Nagle

    2015-07-28

    Recent data from p+p and p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and d+Au and $^3$He+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) reveal patterns that---when observed in the collision of heavy nuclei---are commonly interpreted as indicators of a locally equilibrated system in collective motion. The comparison of these data sets, including the forthcoming results from p+Au and p+Al collisions at RHIC, will help to elucidate the geometric dependence of such patterns. It has recently been shown that A-Multi-Phase-Transport-Model (AMPT) can describe some of these features in LHC data with a parton-parton scattering cross section comparable to that required to describe A+A data. In this paper, we extend these studies by incorporating a full wave function description of the $^3$He nucleus to calculate elliptical and triangular anisotropy moments $v_2$ and $v_3$ for p+Au, d+Au and $^3$He+Au collisions at the RHIC top energy of 200 GeV. We find reasonable agreement with the measured $v_2$ in d+Au and $^3$He+Au and $v_3$ in $^3$He+Au for transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) $\\lesssim$ 1 GeV/c, but underestimate these measurements for higher values of \\pt. We predict a pattern of coefficients ($v_{2}$, $v_{3}$) for \\pau, dominated by differences in the number of induced local hot spots (i.e. one, two, or three) arising from intrinsic geometry. Additionally, we examine how this substantial azimuthal anisotropy accrues during each individual evolutionary phase of the collision in the AMPT model. The possibility of a simultaneous description of RHIC- and LHC-energy data, the suite of different geometries, and high multiplicity p+p data is an exciting possibility for understanding the underlying physics in these systems.

  18. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file and roughlymore »proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file ofannotationsthat may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  19. 10a- Azimuthal modesNEW.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPO Retirees withEnergyLi Ground-Stateand

  20. Interval to Biochemical Failure Highly Prognostic for Distant Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Few biochemical parameters have been related to mortality. The present study examined the clinical utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) as a prognostic factor for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 211 T1c-T3Nx-N0M0 patients who had experienced BF among 1,174 men treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy alone. Biochemical failure was defined as a post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of at, or greater than, the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify independent predictors of DM and PCSM on multivariate analysis. Results: An IBF of <18 months was independently predictive for DM (p = 0.008), as was a Gleason score of 7-10 (p = 0.0005), PSA nadir {>=}2 ng/mL (p = 0.04), and decreasing radiation dose (p = 0.02) on multivariate analysis, including increasing pretreatment PSA level, PSA nadir {>=}2.5 ng/mL, PSA doubling time of <3 months, and Stage T3 disease. An IBF of <18 months was the only predictor of PCSM (p = 0.0003) in the same model. The actuarial 5-year DM rate for an IBF of <18 vs. {>=}18 months was 52% vs. 20% (p < 0.0001), and the actuarial PCSM rate was 36% vs. 6%, respectively (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The IBF is an important descriptor of the PSA kinetics after radiotherapy to identify men at high risk of clinical failure and death. A IBF of <18 months could aid in selecting men for early, aggressive salvage therapy or participation in a clinical trial.

  1. Solutions to Dr. Z.'s Math 421(1), (Fall 2014, RU) REAL Quiz #4 1. Show that the given functions are orthogonal on the given interval.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    nx}, n = 1, 2, . . . is orthogonal over the interval [0, ]. Also find the norm of each function. Sol. We need to take two different, typical members of this family, so let's call them cos nx and cos mx, where n = m. We have to show that (cos mx, cos nx) = 0. (cos mx, cos nx) = 0 cos mx cos nx dx . We now

  2. Medical Physiology Online (MPO) http://www.medicalphysiologyonline.org Wilson BJ, Hart GLW, Parcell AC. Cardiac Inter-Beat Interval Complexity is Influenced by Physical; Activity. Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Medical Physiology Online (MPO) http://www.medicalphysiologyonline.org Wilson BJ, Hart GLW, Parcell. Wilson 1 , Gus L. W. Hart 2 , and Allen C. Parcell 3 1 Department of Recreation Management and Youth://www.medicalphysiologyonline.org Wilson BJ, Hart GLW, Parcell AC. Cardiac Inter-Beat Interval Complexity is Influenced by Physical

  3. Distributions of the Hardness Ratio of short and Long Gamma-Ray Bursts in Different Time Intervals within the First 2 Seconds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Ming Dong; Yi-Ping Qin

    2005-03-16

    In the present paper, we investigated the distribution of hardness ratio (HR) for short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different time scales for the first two seconds. After including and subtracting the background count, we performed a Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K-S) test to the HR distributions of the two classes of GRBs in each time interval. Our analysis shows that the probabilities of the KS test to the distributions are very small, suggesting that the two classes of bursts are unlikely to arise from the same HR distributions, and indicating that they probably originate from the different physical processes and central engine. In addition, we found that the hardness ratio of short bursts within the time interval of 0$-$0.96 seconds changes hard-to-soft, on the other hand long bursts do not. The two kinds of bursts have different characteristics in the first 2 seconds which might be associated with different physical mechanisms.

  4. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01

    . 1, dpwo 0. 3, 6pog 0 6 24 Figure 4 Effect of re/rw on Critical Rate for Two Phase Problem. rDe 10, xD 0. 1, dpwo 0. 3, &pog 0. 6 . . . 26 Figure 5 Critical Oil Rate as a Function of Completion Interval Location and Length for the Three Phase... 9 Effect of re/rw on Critical Rate for Three Phase Problem. (Water Influenced Zone). rDe = 5, e = 0. 1, dpwo 3 &Pog 32 xi i Page Figure 10 - Two Phase Critical Rate Correlation. qDc predicted vs. qDc actual. 38 Figure 11 - Three Phase Critical...

  5. 23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    ) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz co2 day of year 2006 licormotionmodel.m, licormotionmodel) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hzco2 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 10 4 -2 -1 0 accx 0.5 1 1.5 2 2 x 10 4 445 450 455 460 (24) concatenated (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hzco

  6. INTERVALS OF RADIAL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS AT 1 AU, THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RAREFACTION REGIONS, AND THEIR APPARENT MAGNETIC FOOT POINTS AT THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlove, Steven T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zhao Liang E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2013-09-01

    We have examined 226 intervals of nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientations at 1 AU lasting in excess of 6 hr. They are found within rarefaction regions as are the previously reported high-latitude observations. We show that these rarefactions typically do not involve high-speed wind such as that seen by Ulysses at high latitudes during solar minimum. We have examined both the wind speeds and the thermal ion composition before, during and after the rarefaction in an effort to establish the source of the flow that leads to the formation of the rarefaction. We find that the bulk of the measurements, both fast- and slow-wind intervals, possess both wind speeds and thermal ion compositions that suggest they come from typical low-latitude sources that are nominally considered slow-wind sources. In other words, we find relatively little evidence of polar coronal hole sources even when we examine the faster wind ahead of the rarefaction regions. While this is in contrast to high-latitude observations, we argue that this is to be expected of low-latitude observations where polar coronal hole sources are less prevalent. As with the previous high-latitude observations, we contend that the best explanation for these periods of radial magnetic field is interchange reconnection between two sources of different wind speed.

  7. EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

    2011-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

  8. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    site characterization. Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior... detailed stratigraphy small-strain velocity measurements large-strain non-seismic measurements...

  9. Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Conclusion Comparing genomes Genomes evolved from a common ancestor tend to share the same varieties of gene clusters used in genomes comparison. . . . seeking for gene clusters between their genomes. A gene cluster = a set of genes appearing, in spatial proximity along the chromosome, in at least two genomes. G. Blin

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  11. Azimuthal modulational instability of vortices in the nonlinear Schrdinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carretero, Ricardo

    . We formulate predictions of growth rates of individual modes and find that vor- tices are unstable is an ultra-cold (on the order of 10À8 K) gas of, typically, 103 ­106 atoms which have predominantly condensed W þ VextðrÞW; ð1Þ where h is the reduced Planck constant, ma is the mass of one of the atoms

  12. Vacuum Calculations in Azimuthally Symmetric Geometry M. S. Chance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy in the vacuum region or through the continuity requirements for the normal component. The method is based upon using Green's second identity and the method of collocation. As useful byproducts symmetric gap in the Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073. #12;shell

  13. Vacuum Calculations in Azimuthally Symmetric Geometry \\Lambda M. S. Chance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the volume integrated perturbed magnetic energy in the vacuum region or through the continuity requirements plasma­vacuum boundary. The method is based upon using Green's second identity and the method.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE­AC02­76­CHO­3073. #12; shell since most tokamak devices need to have

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Li; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    2015-03-01

    Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the spatial anisotropy of the initial density profile. A long-standing problem in the interpretation of flow data is that uncertainties in the initial anisotropy are mingled with uncertainties in the response. We argue that the non-Gaussianity of flow fluctuations in small systems with large fluctuations can be used to disentangle the initial state from the response. We apply this method to recent measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC, assuming linear response to the initial anisotropy. The response coefficient is found to decreasemore »as the system becomes smaller and is consistent with a low value of the ratio of viscosity over entropy of ?/s 0.19. Deviations from linear response are studied. While they significantly change the value of the response coefficient they do not change the rate of decrease with centrality. Thus, we argue that the estimate of ?/s is robust against non-linear effects.« less

  15. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech ConnectPatent:(n,3n) reactionArticle) |

  16. Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect PulseSummary (Program Document) |(Journalatdependence

  17. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS AND THE q-TRIPLET IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 2 OBSERVATIONS FROM 91.0 TO 94.2 AU AT LATITUDE 30 Degree-Sign S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) was in the heliosheath during 2010, at (91.0-94.2) AU from the Sun and at the latitudes (28. Degree-Sign 8-29. Degree-Sign 3 S) AU, observing solar wind that left the Sun during 2009, when solar activity was very low. There was no feature in B(t) associated with the changes in the plasma parameters observed near 2010.4. The CR-B relation was satisfied. The fluctuations of daily averages of B showed (1) a Gaussian distribution of B, (2) a q-Gaussian of the daily increments of B with q = 1.6, (3) a power-law correlation of B on scales from 1 to 16 days, (4) multifractal structure of B on scales from 1 to 8 days, and (5) a 1/f spectrum of B on scales from 1 to 100 days. The amplitude of the compressive microscale fluctuations of B during several hours on each day is described by the standard deviation (SD) of the 48 s averages of B during the day. Items 2, 3, and 4 determine a 'q-triplet' in the heliosheath. Large-scale fluctuations of SD show (1) a lognormal distribution of SD; (2) an average value of SD = 0.19, 20% of the average B; (3) a q-Gaussian distribution of the increments of SD with q = 1.4; (4) a power-law correlation on scales from 1 to 16 days; and (5) a 1/f spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days. The heliosheath was in a quasi-stationary, metastable equilibrium state with well-defined structure over a wide range of scales near V2 during 2010.

  18. Extracting the geometry of an obstacle and a zeroth-order coefficient of a boundary condition via the enclosure method using a single reflected wave over a finite time interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaru Ikehata

    2013-10-30

    This paper considers an inverse problem for the classical wave equation in an exterior domain. It is a mathematical interpretation of an inverse obstacle problem which employs the dynamical scattering data of acoustic wave over a finite time interval. It is assumed that the wave satisfies a Robin type boundary condition with an unknown variable coefficient. The wave is generated by the initial data localized outside the obstacle and observed over a finite time interval at the same place as the support of the initial data. It is already known that, using the enclosure method, one can extract the maximum sphere whose exterior encloses the obstacle, from the data. In this paper, it is shown that the enclosure method enables us to extract also: (i) a quantity which indicates the deviation of the geometry between the maximum sphere and the boundary of the obstacle at the first reflection points of the wave; (ii) the value of the coefficient of the boundary condition at an arbitrary first reflection point of the wave provided, for example, the surface of the obstacle is known in a neighbourhood of the point. Another new obtained knowledge is that: the enclosure method can cover the case when the data are taken over a sphere whose centre coincides with that of the support of an initial data and yields corresponding results to (i) and (ii).

  19. THRA1 and D17S183 flank an interval of <4 cM for the breast-ovarian cancer gene (BRCA1) on chromosome 17q21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Osborne-Lawrence, S. ); Anderson, L.A.; Friedman, L.S.; Rowell, S.E.; Hall, J.M.; King, M.C. ); Black, D.M.; Solomon, E. )

    1993-04-01

    In order to pinpoint the locale of the gene for early-onset familial breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1), polymorphisms were developed within the locus for thyroid hormone receptor alpha (THRA1) and for several anonymous sequences at chromosome 17q12-q21. The THRA1 polymorphism is a dinucleotide repeat with 10 alleles and heterozygosity .79. Gene mapping in extended families with inherited, early-onset breast and ovarian cancer indicates that BRCA1 is distal to THRA1 and proximal to D17S183 (SCG43), an interval of <4 cM. This locale excludes HER2, THRA1, WNT3, HOX2, NGFR, PHB, COLIA1, NME1, and NME2 as candidates for BRCA1 but does not exclude RARA or EDH17B. Resolving the remaining recombination events in these families by new polymorphisms in the THRA1-D17S183 interval will facilitate positional cloning of the breast-ovarian cancer gene on chromosome 17q12-q21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. From Interval-Valued Probabilities to Interval-Valued Possibilities: Case Studies of Interval Computation under Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    , Mariana Pe~na1 , Mathew J. Rister1 , Abraham Salda~na1 , John Vasquez1 , Janelle Ybarra1 , and Salem

  1. Eliminating Duplicates Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    and Mexico and parts of Africa. The geophysical use of gravity database compiled at UTEP is illustrated records. Why duplicates are a problem. Duplicate values can corrupt the results of statistical data

  2. OPTIMAL INTERVAL ENCLOSURES FOR FRACTIONALLYLINEAR FUNCTIONS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    El Paso TX 79968, USA, email vladik@cs.ep.utexas.edu 3 Sistemas de Informacion, Division de Ingeneria y Ciencias, ITESM (Instituto Technologico de Monterrey), Campus Estado de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 2

  3. Interval Analysis for Unknown Dependencies and Genetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Power Systems Engineering Research Center Cornell University 428 Phillips Hall Ithaca, New York 14853 given to MidAmerican Energy for its support of this project. Thanks are also given to our industry advisors: · O. Dale Stevens, II, MidAmerican Energy Co. · John Thomas Chatelain, MidAmerican Energy Co. #12

  4. Lyapunov Spectral Intervals: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2002-05-05

    exponents in stability theory. Important results on stability of Lyapunov exponents that we use are due to Bylov [6], Bylov et al. [5], Bylov and Izobov [7], and Millionshchikov [24, 25]. An alternative to the spectrum of Lyapunov is based upon defining a... School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (evanvlec@mines.edu). 516 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  5. On the representation of even numbers as the sum and difference of two primes and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime and an even semiprime and the distribution of primes in short intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan-Guang Tan

    2015-06-15

    The representation of even numbers as the sum of two primes and the distribution of primes in short intervals were investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n-q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be an odd prime number greater than $2n-\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 1, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ which are symmetrical about the number $n$ so that even numbers greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes. Hence, the Goldbach's conjecture was proved. Also theorems of the distribution of primes in short intervals were given out and proved. By these theorems, the Legendre's conjecture, the Oppermann's conjecture, the Hanssner's conjecture, the Brocard's conjecture, the Andrica's conjecture, the Sierpinski's conjecture and the Sierpinski's conjecture of triangular numbers were proved and the Mills' constant can be determined. The representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime was investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n+1-2q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any odd prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be a prime number greater than $2n+1-2\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 2, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ so that all odd integers greater than 5 can be represented as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime. Hence, the Lemoine's conjecture was proved.

  6. On a Deterministic Property of the Category of $k$-almost Primes: A Deterministic Structure Based on a Linear Function for Redefining the $k$-almost Primes ($\\exists n\\in {\\rm N} $, $1{\\le} k {\\le}n$) in Certain Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramin Zahedi

    2014-12-28

    In this paper based on a sort of linear function, a deterministic and simple algorithm with an algebraic structure is presented for calculating all (and only) $k$-almost primes ($where$ $\\exists n\\in {\\rm N} $, $1{\\le} k {\\le}n$) in certain interval. A theorem has been proven showing a new deterministic property of the category of $k$-almost primes. Through a linear function that we obtain, an equivalent redefinition of the $k$-almost primes with an algebraic characteristic is identified. Moreover, as an outcome of our function's property some relations which contain new information about the $k$-almost primes (including primes) are presented.

  7. Azimuthal Offset-Dependent Attributes (AVO And FVO) Applied To Fracture Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Feng

    1999-01-01

    Using the amplitude versus offset (AVO) and the frequency versus offset (FVO) information, the diagnostic ability of P-wave seismic data in fracture detection is investigated. The offset-dependent attributes (AVO and FVO) ...

  8. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized Drell-Yan processes and the Boer-Mulders distributions of antiquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Barone,S. Melis,A. Prokudin

    2010-12-01

    Using a previous extraction of the quark Boer-Mulders distributions from semiinclusive deep inelastic scattering data, we fit the unpolarized Drell-Yan data on the $\\cos 2 \\phi$ asymmetry, determining the antiquark Boer-Mulders distributions. A good agreement with the data is found in the region of low $q_T$, where the transverse-momentum factorization approach applies.

  9. Polar-azimuthal angle dependent efficiency of different infrared superconducting nanowire single-photon detector designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csete, Maria

    The illumination-angle-dependent absorptance was determined for three types of superconducting-nanowire singlephoton detector (SNSPD) designs: 1. periodic bare niobium-nitride (NbN) stripes with dimensions of conventional ...

  10. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device. © 2007

  11. User's Guide for New ABCI Version 6.2 (Azimuthal Beam Cavity Interaction)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    SIG/II- 2.000£-02 1IRO'l- 0 DDR- 2.000£-03 DDZ- 2.000£-03BOUN IZL=3, IZR=3 &END &MESH DDR=.005, DDZ=.005 &END ##=.T. &END CONTINUE &MESH DDR-=.005, 0.0075, 0.005, 0.0075,

  12. Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal anisotropy in transport models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang He; Terrence Edmonds; Zi-Wei Lin; Feng Liu; Denes Molnar; Fuqiang Wang

    2015-07-02

    We trace the development of elliptic anisotropy ($v_2$) via parton-parton collision history in two transport models. The parton $v_2$ is studied as a function of the number of collisions of each parton in Au+Au and $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}=200$~GeV. It is found that the majority of $v_2$ comes from the anisotropic escape probability of partons, with no fundamental difference at low and high transverse momenta. The contribution to $v_2$ from hydrodynamic-type collective flow is found to be small. Only when the parton-parton cross-section is set unrealistically large does this contribution start to take over. Our findings challenge the current paradigm emerged from hydrodynamic comparisons to anisotropy data.

  13. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    . It is based on a one-dimensional zero Mach number formulation where N burners are connected to a single) a single burner connected to an annular chamber (N = 1), (2) two burners connected to the chamber (N = 2), (3) four burners (N = 4). In this case, the tool also allows to study passive control methods where

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    , and M is the multiplicity of particles contributing to the sum, which in this article is performed over particles in the region 0.15 < pt < 2.0GeV/c and |?| < 1.0. 80706050403020100 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 k=1 k=2 k=3... central and peripheral bins. Therefore, with these caveats, the sign of v2 is confirmed to be positive: in- plane elliptic flow. B. Elliptic flow, v2 There have been many elliptic flow results from RHIC. STAR has extensive systematics that we present...

  15. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  16. Liquid Crystal Pretilt and Azimuth Angle Study of Stacked Alignment Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    angles for the liquid crystal. It is based on stacking both photo- aligned polymer and rubbed polyimide comprise of both photo-aligned horizontal polymer and rubbed vertical polyimide. The advantage alignment polyimide JALS2021 form JSR Corporation is spin coated on the substrate. Then it is baked inside

  17. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature Distribution Impact on Hydride Distribution Christopher Dances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    , thermal and irradiation creep, fracture and fission gas production [1]. Of high importance in fuel element based fuel performance code that can model temperatures, fission product swelling, densification, the zirconium in the cladding tends to corrode, and in the process hydrogen is released. Some of this hydrogen

  18. Fracture studies from amplitude versus offset and azimuth and vertical seismic profile data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gutierrez, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis I address the problem of determining fracture properties of subsurface rocks from geophysical surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data. In the first part of this thesis I perform multi-attribute ...

  19. arXiv:hepex/0409040 Measurement of Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations at Central Rapidities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Gutierrez, 47 P. Gutierrez, 70 A. Haas, 65 N.J. Hadley, 57 H. Haggerty, 47 S. Hagopian, 46 I. Hall, 70 R

  20. Azimuthal seismic anisotropy constrains net rotation of the lithosphere T. W. Becker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    ]. [3] NRs are important for several tectonic problems that rely on kinematic analysis. For example data. NR amplitude is also relevant for tests of its excitation mechanisms. Lateral viscosity

  1. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Robert P.

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along ...

  2. Study of the azimuthal magnetic fields and scaling laws at the KPF-4-Phoenix facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz@nfi.kiae.ru; Mitrofanov, K. N. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Voitenko, D. A.; Matveev, Yu. V.; Astapenko, G. I. [Sukhum Institute of Physics and Technology, Abkhazia (Country Unknown)] [Sukhum Institute of Physics and Technology, Abkhazia (Country Unknown)

    2013-11-15

    Results are presented from magnetic probe measurements in the pinching region formed during the compression of the plasma current sheath (PCS) in a discharge in deuterium at the KPF-4-Phoenix plasma focus facility. The fine structure (shock front-magnetic piston) of the PCS and its time evolution in the course of plasma compression toward the facility axis was studied by means of magnetic probes. It is shown that the fraction of the current transported into the axial region by the PCS does not exceed 65% of the total discharge current. The integral neutron yield Y{sub n} is well described by the formula Y{sub n} ? (1.5–3) × 10{sup 10}I{sub p}{sup 4}, where I{sub p} (in MA) is the pinch current flowing in the region r ? 22 mm.

  3. An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-Based Axial SN Solver for the 2D/1D Scheme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools to someone by E-mailat aBrønsted Acid

  4. Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientificEnergy EfficiencyFeed-Pump HydraulicMartin

  5. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy­to­access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  6. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy-to-access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  7. Application-Motivated Combinations of Fuzzy, Interval, and Probability Approaches,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to Geoinformatics, Bioinformatics, and Engineering Vladik Kreinovich Department of Computer Science University

  8. ApplicationMotivated Combinations of Fuzzy, Interval, and Probability Approaches,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to Geoinformatics, Bioinformatics, and Engineering Vladik Kreinovich Department of Computer Science University

  9. Tolerance Intervals for Exponentiated Scale Family of Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    & D. KUNDU Ã Department of Statistics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, India; ÃÃ Department of Statistics, Kisan Veer Mahavidyalaya, Wai Satara, India; Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute Correspondence Address: D.T. Shirke, Department of Statistics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, India, 416004. Email

  10. ON CONFIDENCE INTERVALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USUAL AND ADJUSTED LIKELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Institute of Management Post Box No 16757 Calcutta 700 027, India N. Reid Department of Statistics by like­ lihood ratio statistics arising from the usual profile likelihood and various adjustments thereof statistic; parameter orthogonality; point estimation. 1. Introduction In recent years, there has been

  11. Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

    2004-01-01

    breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

  12. Intelligent Control in Space Exploration: Interval Computations are Needed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    missions, but also in the chemical industry, in metallurgy, in business). These experts usually cannot

  13. Rigorous investigations of Ikeda map by means of interval arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galias, Zbigniew

    of Electrical Engineering, University of Mining and Metallurgy al. Mickiewicza 30, 30­059 Krak´ow, Poland e

  14. Rigorous investigations of Ikeda map by means of interval arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galias, Zbigniew

    of Electrical Engineering, University of Mining and Metallurgy al. Mickiewicza 30, 30--059 Krakâ??ow, Poland e

  15. OPTIMAL INTERVAL COMPUTATION TECHNIQUES: OPTIMIZATION OF NUMERICAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Paso, TX 79968, USA, email vladik@cs.utep.edu 2 Sistemas de Informacion, Division de Ingeneria y Ciencias, ITESM (Instituto Technologico de Monterrey) Campus Estado de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 2, Modulo de

  16. Unstable AMOC during glacial intervals and millennial variability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: NEK0059281; AGS-1405272; SC0007037; MESO-CLIP Type: Published Article Journal Name: Earth and Planetary Science Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal...

  17. Unstable AMOC during glacial intervals and millennial variability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Florian; Fedorov, Alexey V. Elsevier None USDOE Netherlands 2015-11-01 English Journal Article Journal Name: Earth and Planetary Science Letters; Journal Volume: 429;...

  18. Interval operations in rounding to nearest Siegfried M. Rump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rump, Siegfried M.

    -point arithmetic, rounding to nearest, predecessor, successor, directed rounding AMS subject classification (2000 rounding mode, to nearest "ties to even" and the rounding to nearest "ties to away" (away from zero-1074 Let be the radix used in this floating-point format. We require to be even and greater than one

  19. Use of Utility Interval Meters in an Industrial Energy Audit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, M.

    2007-01-01

    4 :00 A M 5: 00 A M 6: 00 AM 7: 00 AM 8: 00 AM 9 :00 AM 10: 0 0 A M 1 1: 00 A M 12 :00 P M 1: 0 0 P M 2: 00 P M 3: 00 P M 4: 00 PM 5: 0 0 P M 6: 0 0 P M 7 :00 PM 8: 00 P M 9: 00 P M 10 :00 P M 11: 00 P M KW Max Min Ave Max Count Figure 2... M 10:0 0 AM 11:0 0 A M 12:0 0 PM 1:00 P M 2:00 P M 3:00 P M 4:00 P M 5:00 P M 6:00 P M 7:00 P M 8:00 P M 9:00 P M 10:0 0 PM 11:0 0 P M KW -2000 -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 Del t a- KW Demand Delta Demand -665 +682 -1273 -1221 -913...

  20. Interval Approach to Identification of Catalytic Process Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    . Mikushina Institute of Organic Synthesis, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg, Russia of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Ural Federal University, Institute of Radio-Electronics and Informational Technologies, Ekaterinburg, Russia kumkov@imm.uran.ru Yuliya V

  1. Real-Time Correction of Heart Interbeat Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, Adam

    Heartrate variability (HRV) is traditionally ana- lyzed while a subject is in a controlled environment, such as at rest in a clinic, where it can be used as a medical indicator. This paper concerns analyzing HRV heartbeats. Heartrate variability (HRV) analysis studies cyclical variations in a heartbeat series related

  2. QT-interval adaptation to changes in autonomic balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nosakhare, Ehimwenma

    2013-01-01

    ECG variability, as it relates to the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart, is primarily studied via frequency-domain and time-domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). HRV studies the variability ...

  3. Guaranteed state estimation by zonotopes for systems with interval uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    . Stoica T. Alamo E.F. Camacho D. Dumur This talk focuses on guaranteed state estimation by zonotopes [1 example. References [1] T. Alamo, J.M. Bravo, and E.F. Camacho. Guaranteed state estimation by zonotopes. Automatica, 41:1035­1043, 2005. [2] V.T.H. Le, T. Alamo, E.F. Camacho, C. Stoica, and D. Dumur. A new

  4. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases, for the selected fossil, we

  5. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake the fossils that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases

  6. Computing minimum geodetic sets in proper interval graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heggernes, Pinar

    , denoted by NG(v), is the set of vertices of G that are adjacent to v. For a set S of vertices of G, G

  7. Revealing Hidden Interval Graph Structure in STSContent Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonner, Anthony

    accom­ plishments of the Human Genome Project to date. In genome parlance, a map is a collection of spa with examples of its application to current STS data from human genome centers. Availability: Freely available­complete contig map of the human genome. Eventually they joined forces with each other, with several other groups

  8. Interval Krawczyk and Newton method February 20, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zgliczynski, Piotr

    on X, which implies assertion 0 and the uniqueness part in assertion 1. We have for any x0, x1 X f(x1 the uniqueness it is enough show that Nm is a contraction on U. Observe that it is impossible to verify the middle value form of Nm can cure this deficiency. If x0 [x], then Nm([x]) Nm(x0) + [dNm([x])]I · ([x

  9. Exact Bounds for Interval and Fuzzy Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    of fossil species in samples recovered from a well that penetrates an undisturbed sequence of sedimentary the environment in which rocks have accumulated: for example, a coral is an unambiguous indication of a warm ocean that in a normal sequence the age increases with the depth in the well that penetrates that sequence. So

  10. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabamaAbout EIA.gov ScreenResidential

  11. Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science DMTCS vol. (subm.), by the authors, 11 Probe interval graphs and probe unit interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonomo, Flavia

    ´on, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Depto. de Matem´atica and Instituto de C´alculo

  12. Nonhyperbolic reflection moveout for orthorhombic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, A.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection moveout in azimuthally anisotropic media is not only azimuthally dependent but it is also

  13. Optimized polar-azimuthal orientations for polarized light illumination of different superconducting nanowire single-photon detector designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csete, Maria

    The optimum orientations were determined for polarized light illumination of three superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) designs consisting of niobium-nitride (NbN) stripes with dimensions according to ...

  14. Numerical method to optimize the polar-azimuthal orientation of infrared superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csete, Maria

    A finite-element method for calculating the illumination-dependence of absorption in three-dimensional nanostructures is presented based on the radio frequency module of the Comsol Multiphysics software package (Comsol ...

  15. Dihadron azimuthal correlations in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chai, J. -S; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. -L; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Cianciolo, V.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Dahms, T.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durum, A.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. -Y; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -A; Hachiya, T.; Henni, A. Hadj; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, Y. -S; Kinney, E.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kral, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. -S; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Lim, H.; Liska, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Masek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Miake, Y.; Mikes, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, H.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Omiwade, O. O.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T. -A; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fusion-evaporation reactions induced by 110 MeV B-11 and radioactive C-11 on Rb-87 targets have been studied by measuring evaporation residue-light particle coincidences. The proton to alpha particle ratio in each reaction ...

  16. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  17. IDS120j: NO RESISTIVE MAGNETS / NEW Hg MODULE AZIMUTHAL DEPOSITED POWER STUDIES FOR SC#10-SC#12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SECTIONS WITH DETAILS OF Hg POOL MODULE FROM VAN GRAVE'S PRESENTATION ( 8 / 9 / 2012 ). THE DESIGN REQUIRES A 2.5 cm ! GAP BETWEEN SH#1 INNER VESSEL AND Hg POOL MODULE OUTER VESSEL. AN EVEN LARGER SPACE APPEARS TO BE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER VESSEL OF THE Hg POOL MODULE FOR THE FLOW OF He GAS FOR COOLING THE POOL

  18. Within-orchard edge effects of the azimuth of the sun on Diaphorina citri adults in mature orchards.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anco, D J; Gottwald, T R

    2015-01-01

    P = 0.22) from autumnal equinox to winter solstice, N and Isolstice to autumnal equinox. Sampling area significantlyexception was during autumnal equinox when interior sampling

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 43, NO. 1, JANUARY 2015 149 Global Stability Analysis of Azimuthal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 43, NO. 1, JANUARY 2015 149 Global Stability Analysis.ahedo@uc3m.es). Color versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee

  20. Within-orchard edge effects of the azimuth of the sun on Diaphorina citri adults in mature orchards.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anco, D J; Gottwald, T R

    2015-01-01

    0.42, P = 0.22) from autumnal equinox to winter solstice, Nas from summer solstice to autumnal equinox. Sampling areaexception was during autumnal equinox when interior sampling

  1. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (?dir) and pi0 are measured in p+p and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A ...

  2. Observation of long-range elliptic anisotropies in $\\sqrt{s}=$13 and 2.76 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS has measured two-particle correlations as a function of relative azimuthal-angle, ??, and pseudo rapidity, ??, in $\\sqrt{s}$=13 and 2.76 TeV $pp$ collisions at the LHC using charged particles measured in the pseudo rapidity interval |?|cos(2??). The fitted Fourier coefficient, $v_{2,2}$, exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos(2?) modulation of the single-partic...

  3. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  4. The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

    2014-09-17

    includes a minimisa- tion algorithm to ensure that key prognostic characteris- tics are balanced across the trial arms at baseline (for example, new/repeat donor status, weight and age, as shown in Table 2). Randomisation was stratified by do- nation centre... -axial accelerometer AX3 (Axivity, York, UK) to measure the impact of more frequent blood donations Serious adverse events, diagnosed/ Heart problems including heart charge of a vehicle) New illness Diagnoses of low iron Diagnosis of low haemoglobin by NHSBT Diagnosis...

  5. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate resources such as the oil: A Brief Descrip- tion In evaluations of natural resources and in the search for natural resources from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need

  6. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate resources such as the oil: A Brief Descrip­ tion In evaluations of natural resources and in the search for natural resources from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need

  7. Reliable Computing 1 (2) (1995), pp. 141-172 Applications of interval computations to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    1995-01-01

    HKI!Ilfl B. KPElaHOBW-I, A- HEMI/IP, E. FYTr/I~PPEC Ontm H30CHOBHtaXtlCTOqHHKOBpa3pymeHHfl npH 3e~KeT 6blTb nprlMeHerla, "-r'rorbl npeaoTBpa'rnTs Brt6paurtoHHoepa3pymeHrle B 6oat,mHx a3po

  8. Timing analysis of logic=level digital circuits using uncertainty intervals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Joshua Asher

    1996-01-01

    Timing Analysis of Logic-Level Digital Circuits Using Competitive design of modem digital circuits requires high performance at reduced cost and time-to-market. Timing analysis is increasingly used to deal with the more aggressive timing constraints...

  9. Noise Shaping by Interval Correlations Increases Information Transfer Maurice J. Chacron, Benjamin Lindner, and Andre Longtin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chacron, Maurice

    through the comparison of two simple firing models, one of which is a renewal process while the other all second and higher order ISI correla- tions are zero are called renewal processes [6]. However information transfer is presently unknown due to the LIFDT model's complexity and to the memory carried

  10. COLREGS-compliant autonomous collision avoidance using multi-objective optimization with interval programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woerner, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    High contact density environments are becoming ubiquitous in autonomous marine vehicle (AMV) operations. Safely managing these environments and their mission greatly taxes platforms. AMV collisions will likely increase as ...

  11. RIGOROUS INVESTIGATIONS OF PERIODIC ORBITS IN AN ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT BY MEANS OF INTERVAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galias, Zbigniew

    Zbigniew Galias Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Mining and Metallurgy al. Mickiewicza

  12. Proving the existence of long periodic orbits in 1D maps using interval Newton method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galias, Zbigniew

    shooting Zbigniew Galias Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Mining and Metallurgy, al

  13. PROVING THE EXISTENCE OF PERIODIC SOLUTIONS USING GLOBAL INTERVAL NEWTON METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galias, Zbigniew

    Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Mining and Metallurgy al. Mickiewicza 30, 30­059 Krak of Scientific Research KBN, grant no. 0449/P3/94/06 and by University of Mining and Metallurgy, grant no. 10

  14. Detecting Duplicates in Geoinformatics: from Intervals and Fuzzy Numbers to General MultiD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    ,raraiza,vladik}@utep.edu Hung T. Nguyen Department of Mathematical Sciences New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003 gravity measurements collected throughout the United States and Mexico and parts of Africa records. Why duplicates are a problem. Duplicate values can corrupt the results of statistical data

  15. Detecting Duplicates in Geoinformatics: from Intervals and Fuzzy Numbers to General Multi-D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    ,raraiza,vladik}@utep.edu Hung T. Nguyen Department of Mathematical Sciences New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003 throughout the United States and Mexico and parts of Africa. The geophysical use of gravity database compiled values can corrupt the results of statistical data processing and analysis. For example, when instead

  16. Fluctuation studies in the infinite interval matrix representations of operator products and their decompositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baykara, N. A.; Guervit, Ercan; Demiralp, Metin

    2012-12-10

    In this work a study on finite dimensional matrix approximations to products of quantum mechanical operators is conducted. It is emphasized that the matrix representation of the product of two operators is equal to the product of the matrix representation of each of the operators when all the fluctuation terms are ignored. The calculation of the elements of the matrices corresponding to the matrix representation of various operators, based on three terms recursive relation is defined. Finally it is shown that the approximation quality depends on the choice of higher values of n, namely the dimension of Hilbert space.

  17. Optimal Sojourn Time Control within an Interval1 Jianghai Hu and Shankar Sastry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 the following scenario. Suppose that there are three consecutive cars driving in the same direction on a road, numbered 1, 2, and 3 from front to end. The body length of each car is 1This material is based upon work

  18. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    magnetization. In the weak-noise limit, noise-activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula "!$#&% ')(1032547698 . Here 6 is the noise strength, 0 study a spatially extended model of noise-induced magne- tization reversal: a classical Ginzburg

  19. Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-10-09

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  20. Pattern Graphs: Combining Multivariate Time Series and Labelled Interval Sequences for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, Michael R.

    .500) gear down [1,*] ? ? [1,*] [1,*] [1,*] [1,*] low revolutions [1,*] [1,*] ? [1,50] [1,*] gear up ? [1,50] ? [1,50] [1,*] ? [1,*] [1,*] [1,*]? [1,*] middle revolutions ¬gear up ¬gear down ¬gear up ¬gear down [1,*] gear up Fig. 1 Example of a pattern graph describing a driving cycle (learned from data, see [10

  1. INDEX TO VOLUME 190/196 560-mbsf Fractured Interval, structures, 196A4:21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 196 of the Pro- ceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program (published as separate leg-specific books was prepared by Earth Systems, under subcontract to the Ocean Drilling Program. The index contains two:74 Antarctic Bottom Water, clay, 190/196B4:8 Antarctic Intermediate Water, clay, 190/196B4:8 Ashizuri Transect

  2. Supplementary Material AMS Data Processing. AMS data were saved in 150-s intervals in alternating medium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the signals at unit resolution. C3H3 + at m/z 39, which made up about 5% of the total organic signal]. In this comparison, a factor (OM:OC 1.7 [Fuzzi et al., 2007]) is used by us for the conversion of OC reported-folding conversion of 1.2 days from hydrophobic to hydrophilic [Cooke et al., 1999]. Organic particle mass loading

  3. Normal-Based Methods for a Gamma Distribution: Prediction and Tolerance Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    of contamination (e.g., landfill by a waste management facility, hazardous material storage facility, or factory found a number of applications in occupational and industrial hygiene. In a recent article, Maxim et al

  4. Finding limiting flows of batch extractive distillation with interval Erika R. Fritsa,b*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csendes, Tibor

    ., Hungary, e-mail: ufo@mail.bme.hu b HAS ­ BUTE Research Group of Technical Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest, P

  5. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

  6. Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrin, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    the types of data acquisition equipment and systems available and the different components of a data. Lastly, actual graphs of data will be presented to demonstrate how to dissect and analyze a data set and then implement measures that will optimize...

  7. The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Ji Won

    2005-11-01

    sec. 40 sec. 60 sec 3 min. 5 min. 10 min. E-B1 10.42% 11.47% 13.08% 17.00% 18.78% 18.75% 32.50% 47.03% 49.67% E-B2 5.36% 6.58% 12.14% 16.19% 12.69% 30.17% 27.97% 44.81% 35.97% E-H1 6.83% 12.08% 16.28% 19.92% 31.33% 25.22% 30.50% 39.64% 20.81% E-H2...

  8. On the Estimation of Confidence Intervals for Binomial Population Proportions in Astronomy: The Simplicity and Superiority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    of the beta distribution using modern mathematical software packages (e.g. R, MATLAB, MATHEMATICA, IDL, PYTHON

  9. How to Estimate Expected Shortfall When Probabilities Are Known with Interval or Fuzzy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    the hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, why in 2011, Fukushima nuclear power station in Japan the record of historic floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and other natural disasters to estimate was destroyed by an unusually high tsunami, etc. Since we cannot have a threshold s0 that would guarantee

  10. Structural and functional characterization of the polled interval on bovine chromosome 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderlich, Kris Rakowitz

    2008-10-10

    quantity) and SE for expresion in samples from 5 to 6 mo old calves................................................ 63 4.3 Means (relative quantity) and SE for expresion in samples from 1 to 8 d old calves by sex that difered (P < 0..., whereas high levels of BMP2 and BMP4 induce a chondrogenic fate. Diferentiation into chondrocyte-like osteoblasts is regulated by both IH and PTHrP activities. (Abzhanov et al., 207) 4 4 Figure 1.2. Sequence of events of chondrogenesis...

  11. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Cekanova, Maria; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Nichols, Trent L; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Donnell, Robert; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.

  12. How to Test Hypotheses When Exact Values are Replaced by Intervals to Protect Privacy: Case of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    .g., [6]. All versions of the t-test are based on sample means X = 1 nx · nx i=1 xi and Y = 1 ny · ny i=1 yi and sample variances s2 X = 1 nx - 1 · nx i=1 (xi - X)2 and s2 Y = 1 ny - 1 · ny i=1 (yi - Y )2 : · For testing that the actual mean µ is µ0, we use t = X - µ0 sX/ nx . · For testing that the means are equal

  13. followed by an additional 10 hours with a 120-s switch interval at 2C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spies, Thomas

    was isolated and assayed essentially as de- scribed (33). The orc5-1 cultures were grown to A600 0.1 and either ) were harvested and lysed for each hourly time point. 25. The orc5 ts alleles were created by in vitro mutagen- esis of the cloned ORC5 gene by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR-mutagenized DNA pools

  14. Convergence Properties of an Interval Probabilistic Approach to System Reliability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    reactor, the list of such characteristics include neutron flux, temperature, etc. We assume. For example, a reactor shell can come from three different manufacturing plants, and we know the frequencies with which they come from different plants, i.e., the probabilities that a randomly selected shell is from

  15. Convergence Properties of an Interval Probabilistic Approach to System Reliability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    certain characteristics y = D y (1) ; y (2) ; : : : ; y (m) E ; e.g., for a nuclear reactor, the list of each such situation. For example, a reactor shell can come from three different manufacturing plants, and we know the frequencies with which they come from different plants, i.e., the probabilities

  16. Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visel, Axel

    2010-01-01

    2588bp Suppl. Table 4 – Primer sequences and coordinates of17 Suppl. Table 4 – Primer sequences and coordinates of

  17. Decision Making under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Towards an Operational Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    State Oil Academy, Baku, Azerbaijan raliev@asoa.edu.az, oleg huseynov@yahoo.com 2 Azerbaijan Association assumption that for each two alterna- tives, a user can always meaningfully decide which of them. Traditional decision theory is based on a simplifying assumption that for each two alternatives, a user can

  18. Confidence intervals for the encircled energy fraction and the half energy width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacanti, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The Encircled Energy Fraction and its quantiles, notably the Half Energy Width, are routinely used to characterize the quality of X-ray optical systems. They are however always quoted without a statistical error. We show how non-parametric statistical methods can be used to redress this situation, and we discuss how the knowledge of the statistical error can be used to speed up the characterization efforts for future X-ray observatories.

  19. Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

    2009-01-01

    % to 114% when compared to the measured method results. INTRODUCTION The use of whole building data to develop energy models as a method to ascertain energy savings has been researched for many years. This method has been detailed in the IPMVP... adoption of Option C is the length of monitoring time required to develop reliable regression models. To be IPMVP adherent, both pre- and post-implementation data must be collected over a period that covers the full reporting period (IPMVP, 2007...

  20. Indication of multiscaling in the volatility return intervals of stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    of financial markets has long been a focus of economics and econophysics research 1­9 . Study- ing recently, some related studies on financial markets, such as escape time 30 , exit time 31,32 , first and nonlinear features 36 . Recent studies 37­39 of stock markets show that the distribution of activ- ity

  1. Multifactor analysis of multiscaling in volatility return intervals Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets 17­21 show the following, for both daily and intraday data. i The distribution of the scaled and earthquakes 13­15 . Also there are some related studies on financial markets, such as first passage time 25 Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  2. Computing confidence intervals on solution costs for stochastic grid generation expansion problems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, David L..; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2010-12-01

    A range of core operations and planning problems for the national electrical grid are naturally formulated and solved as stochastic programming problems, which minimize expected costs subject to a range of uncertain outcomes relating to, for example, uncertain demands or generator output. A critical decision issue relating to such stochastic programs is: How many scenarios are required to ensure a specific error bound on the solution cost? Scenarios are the key mechanism used to sample from the uncertainty space, and the number of scenarios drives computational difficultly. We explore this question in the context of a long-term grid generation expansion problem, using a bounding procedure introduced by Mak, Morton, and Wood. We discuss experimental results using problem formulations independently minimizing expected cost and down-side risk. Our results indicate that we can use a surprisingly small number of scenarios to yield tight error bounds in the case of expected cost minimization, which has key practical implications. In contrast, error bounds in the case of risk minimization are significantly larger, suggesting more research is required in this area in order to achieve rigorous solutions for decision makers.

  3. THE SIZE OF EXPONENTIAL SUMS ON INTERVALS OF THE REAL LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdélyi, Tamás

    | Mjµ , |a0| = 1 , n N , where the exponents j R satisfy 0 = 0 , j j > 0 , j = 1, 2's conjecture, Konyagin's conjecture, Uhrig protocol, decoupling methods, quantum coherence, multi-pulse control

  4. Reliable Computing 2 (1) (1996), pp. 47-62 interval arithmeticVariable-precision,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    1996-01-01

    'rttKy llepeMeHHo/'t pa3p~anoc'rtt. 1. Introduction Roundoff error and catastrophic cancelation in scientific

  5. File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto ElectricMonasterwindCAESRAPID Toolkit Flyer.pdfSkystreamTable for

  6. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotesShale natural2)An Assessment

  7. Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 62 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. de Souza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-06-13

    We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations on relative pseudorapidity $\\eta$ and azimuth $\\phi$ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV with transverse momentum $p_t \\geq 0.15$ GeV/$c$, $|\\eta| \\leq 1$ and $2\\pi$ azimuth. Observed correlations include a {same-side} (relative azimuth $< \\pi/2$) 2D peak, a closely-related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until mid-centrality where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within a small centrality interval. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly {relative to} binary-collision scaling, the $\\eta$ width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly ($\\eta$ elongation) and the $\\phi$ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are more remarkable when contrasted with expectations of jet quenching in a dense medium. Observed centrality trends are compared to {\\sc hijing} predictions and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy ion collision scenarios which invoke rapid parton thermalization. On the other hand, if the collision system is effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the observations reported here would be inconsistent with a minijet picture.

  8. AIMR (Azimuth and Inclination Modeling in Realtime): A Method for Prediction of Dog-Leg Severity based on Mechanical Specific Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noynaert, Samuel F

    2013-08-13

    response can result in a significant economic impact. There exist many measured parameters or system inputs which have been proven to affect the directional response of a drilling system. One parameter whose effect has not been investigated is mechanical...

  9. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1999); P. 11261138, 7 FIGS. Coarse-layer stripping of vertically variable azimuthal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    . Here we present a tensor generaliza- tion of the conventional convolutional model of scalar wave of stress and hence for prescriptions of well drilling plans which mini- mize borehole stability problems

  10. Detailed study of high-p(T) neutral pion suppression and azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN) =200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babinstev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berndnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, J. -S; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; d'Enterria, D.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S. -Y; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H. -A; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, J. H.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G. -B; Kim, H. J.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, Y.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Muhlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, J. -C; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shibata, T. -A; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarjan, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Veszpremi, V.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, S. J.; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2007-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A, VOLUME 11, NUMBER 3 MARCH 1975 Magnetic quadrupole decay of the (ls2s2p) &s,~-(1s) 2s S?~ transition of the lithium isoelectronic sequence J. S. Onello Center fox Astrophysics, Harvard College Observatory and Smithsonian... for the (1s2s2P) P&y2 state of the lithium isoelectronic sequence. The magnetic quadrupole (M2) decay rates for the (1s2s2p) P5y2 ?(1s) 2s S~y2 transition are computed for the series from Li t through Ar xvl. It is explicitly demonstrated that, for high...

  11. Neutrino signatures and the neutrino-driven wind in Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Dessart; Christian Ott; Adam Burrows; Stefan Rosswog; Eli Livne

    2008-06-26

    We present VULCAN/2D multi-group flux-limited-diffusion radiation hydrodynamics simulations of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers, using the Shen equation of state, covering ~100 ms, and starting from azimuthal-averaged 2D slices obtained from 3D SPH simulations of Rosswog & Price for 1.4 Msun (baryonic) neutron stars with no initial spins, co-rotating spins, and counter-rotating spins. Snapshots are post-processed at 10 ms intervals with a multi-angle neutrino-transport solver. We find polar-enhanced neutrino luminosities, dominated by $\\bar{\

  12. Anisotropic flow in 4.2A GeV/c C+Ta collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lj. Simic; J. Milosevic

    2002-12-16

    Anisotropic flow of protons and negative pions in 4.2A GeV/c C+Ta collisions is studied using the Fourier analysis of azimuthal distributions. The protons exhibit pronounced directed flow. Directed flow of pions is positive in the entire rapidity interval and indicates that the pions are preferentially emitted in the reaction plane from the target to the projectile. The elliptic flow of protons and negative pions is close to zero. Comparison with the quark-gluon-string model (QGSM) and relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) show that they both yield a flow signature similar to the experimental data.

  13. The musical representation of Asian characters in the musicals of Richard Rodgers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponti, Carla M.

    2010-01-01

    drones ..characterization. Intervals and drones. Certain intervals,these intervals, accompaniment drones on these intervals (

  14. Imputing unobserved values with the EM algorithm under left and right-truncation, and interval censoring for estimating the size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehning, Dankmar

    by Mosley et al., which focussed on a cholera outbreak in East Pakistan. To demonstrate the wider range of a cholera outbreak in East Pakistan (East Pakistan was a former province of Pakistan which existed between developments, we will keep the name East Pakistan for the context of this publication since it refers

  15. A study of the sensitivity of topological dynamical systems and the Fourier spectrum of chaotic interval maps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roque Sol, Marco A.

    2009-06-02

    length. Two common tasks in a signal analysis are: Elimination of high frequency noise: this can be done expressing f as a trigonometric series f(t) = a0 + summationdisplay k akcos(kt)+bksin(kt) 4 and then set the high frequency-coefficients ( the ak... and bk for large k ) equal to zero. Second, datacompression: the idea is tosend asignal in away thatit requires minimal data transmission, which can be done by expressing f as a trigonometric series, as above, and then send only those coefficients ak...

  16. Nonlinear regression technique to estimate kinetic parameters and confidence intervals in unsteady-state conduction-heated foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be heated in a pressure vessel or oil bath, and some temperature-measuring device (e.g., a thermocouple, there is no standard method to estimate kinetic parameters in low-moisture, conduction-heated foods subject and maintain pressure. As temperatures and pressure increase, measuring sample temperature may become

  17. The NART as an index of prior intellectual functioning: a retrospective validity study covering a 66-year interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2001-01-01

    Background. The National Adult Reading Test (NART) is widely used in research and clinical practice as an estimate of pre-morbid or prior ability. However, most of the evidence on the NART's validity as a measure of prior ...

  18. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01

    time can be known so that its energy consumption can be estimated accurately. In order to verify the simulation accuracy, an actual room equipped with a gas-engine heat pump (GHP) air-conditioning system is studied by both simulation and measurement...

  19. Self-Tuning PI TCP Flow Controller for AQM Routers With Interval Gain and Phase Margin Assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Changcheng

    -tuning proportional-integral (PI) controller for Active Queue Management (AQM) in the Internet. Classical control to achieve good AQM performance while adapting the AQM control system to great traffic load changes very well Queue Management, PI Control, Gain Margin, Phase Margin, Self-Tune 1. INTRODUCTION Congestion control

  20. Design and prototype of dual loop lubricant system to improve engine fuel economy, emissions, and oil drain interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Regulations aimed at improving fuel economy and reducing harmful emissions from internal combustion engines place constraints on lubricant formulations necessary for controlling wear and reducing friction. Viscosity reduction ...

  1. Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jonathan

    2012-10-19

    .5 +/- 4.5yrs training) were matched according to baseline characteristics and randomly assigned to a STD or ALT 12 week hypertrophic training protocol. Body composition, strength (1RM bench and squat); power (60% 1RM bench and squat); and vertical jump...

  2. Shape and location effects on filled- and empty-intervals as indicators of an independent temporal code in working memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Alexia

    2011-05-27

    Objectives Using the filled-duration illusion, this study investigated the existence of an independent temporal code operating in working memory. Extending research suggesting the principle distinction between filled- and ...

  3. SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO: IEEE COMPUTER, 2002, JANUARY 28, 2002 1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Web Users with Rough K-means Pawan Lingras Chad West Abstract Data collection and analysis in web mining faces certain unique challenges. Due to a variety of reasons inherent in web browsing and web techniques in web mining need to accommodate such data. Fuzzy and rough sets provide the ability to deal

  4. Integration of omics data to investigate common intervals Sbastien Angibaud, Philippe Bordron, Damien Eveillard, Guillaume Fertin, Irena Rusu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fertin, Guillaume

    .rusu}@univ-nantes.fr Abstract--During the last decade, we witnessed the huge impact of the comparative genomics for understanding genomes (from the genome organization to their annotation). However, those genomic approaches genome context. Such limitation may be overcome thanks to recent high-throughput experimental progresses

  5. On the origin of a phosphate enriched interval in the Chattanooga Shale (Upper Devonian) of Tennessee--A combined sedimentologic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieber, Juergen

    ) of Tennessee--A combined sedimentologic, petrographic, and geochemical study Yifan Li a,b, , Juergen Schieber b

  6. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    annual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined withtracking solar panel. 44and azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for a

  7. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    tracking solar panel. 44and azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for aannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined with

  8. Epson Original LCD Prism technology Front / rear / ceiling mount

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    ) Lens Shift N/A Keystone Correction Electronic +/-30 degrees Brightness (typical) 3000 ANSI lumens, USB, Input Terminal: Remote Control: Stereo mini jack Remote Control Features Keystone, picture

  9. Erratum: Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e?e? annihilation at ?s=10.58 GeV [Phys. Rev. D 78, 032011 (2008)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bartel, W.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; et al

    2012-08-09

    In the original article, it was found in Monte Carlo simulations that the reconstructed A? results are roughly consistent with the generated asymmetries, while the A?? results systematically underestimate the generated asymmetries. This underestimation can be attributed to the difference between the reconstructed thrust axis and the original quark-antiquark axis. The corresponding correction factors are 1.6 ± 0.04 for the A?? results and 1.11 ± 0.05 for the A? results. Because of a flaw in the original analysis program, these correction factors were not applied to the AUC-type asymmetries in Table V as well as in some figures. In addition,more »a small mistake in the error propagation in the charm correction resulted in slightly underestimated statistical uncertainties. These omissions affect all but the charm asymmetry results. The correct central values are therefore given in Tables IV and V of this Erratum. The systematic uncertainties of the original publication remain unchanged.« less

  10. Derivation of the Viscous Moore-Greitzer Equation for Aeroengine Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Hou, Songming; Wellander, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    longitudinal and azimuthal thermoacoustic instabilities inincluding control of thermoacoustic instabilities in the

  11. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-11 CONVERSION FROM FILM TO MAGNETIC CASSETTE RECORDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for current speed (savonius rotor), meter azimuth, current direction, and meter tilt. The modifications

  12. Observation of polarised hard X-ray emission from the Crab by the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Iyudin, A; Arimoto, M; Fukazawa, Y; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Mizuno, T; Ryde, F; Tajima, H; Takahashi, T; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear polarisation of hard X-ray emission from the Crab in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The introduction of two new observational parameters, the polarisation fraction and angle stands to disentangle geometrical and physical effects, thereby providing information on the pulsar wind geometry and magnetic field environment. Measurements are conducted using the PoGOLite Pathfinder - a balloon-borne polarimeter. Polarisation is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an anticoincidence well. The polarimetric response has been characterised prior to flight using both polarised and unpolarised calibration sources. We address possible systematic effects through observations of a background field. The measured polarisation fraction for the integrated Crab light-curve is ($18.4^{+9.8}_{-10.6}$)%, corresponding to an upper limit (99% credibility) of 42.4%, for a polarisation angle of ($...

  13. Understanding the Impact of Open-Framework Conglomerates on Water-Oil Displacements: Victor Interval of the Ivishak Reservoir, Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

    2014-01-01

    The Victor Unit of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is characterized by high net-to-gross fluvial sandstones and conglomerates. The highest permeability is found within sets of cross-strata of open-framework conglomerate (OFC). They are preserved within unit bar deposits and assemblages of unit bar deposits within compound (braid) bar deposits. They are thief zones limiting enhanced oil recovery. We incorporate recent research that has quantified important attributes of their sedimentary architecture within preserved deposits. We use high-resolution models to demonstrate the fundamental aspects of their control on oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. We found that when the pressure gradient is oriented perpendicular to the paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller, than when it is oriented parallel to paleoflow. The pressure differe...

  14. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier 1;2 and D. L. Stein 2;1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    and negative magnetization. In the weak­noise limit, noise­activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula \\Gamma ¸ \\Gamma 0 exp], who worked out a `large deviation theory' of its magnetization reversals, but did not compute

  15. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30

    In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

  16. Sympathetic nerve stimulation, not circulating norepinephrine, modulates T-peak to T-end interval by increasing global dispersion of repolarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    stimulation and norepinephrine infusion. LV endocardial andOf note, norepinephrine infusion did not increase DOR or Tp-to continuous intravenous infusion of ?-chloralose (10 mg/

  17. The DAFT/FADA survey. I.Photometric redshifts along lines of sight to clusters in the z=[0.4,0.9] interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Ulmer, M.P.; LeBrun, V.; Durret, F.; Johnston, D.; Ilbert, O.; Clowe, D.; Gavazzi, R.; Murphy, K.; Schrabback, T.; /Leiden Observ. /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    As a contribution to the understanding of the dark energy concept, the Dark energy American French Team (DAFT, in French FADA) has started a large project to characterize statistically high redshift galaxy clusters, infer cosmological constraints from Weak Lensing Tomography, and understand biases relevant for constraining dark energy and cluster physics in future cluster and cosmological experiments. Aims. The purpose of this paper is to establish the basis of reference for the photo-z determination used in all our subsequent papers, including weak lensing tomography studies. This project is based on a sample of 91 high redshift (z {ge} 0.4), massive ({approx}> 3 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}}) clusters with existing HST imaging, for which we are presently performing complementary multi-wavelength imaging. This allows us in particular to estimate spectral types and determine accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies along the lines of sight to the first ten clusters for which all the required data are available down to a limit of I{sub AB} = 24./24.5 with the LePhare software. The accuracy in redshift is of the order of 0.05 for the range 0.2 {le} z {le} 1.5. We verified that the technique applied to obtain photometric redshifts works well by comparing our results to with previous works. In clusters, photo-z accuracy is degraded for bright absolute magnitudes and for the latest and earliest type galaxies. The photo-z accuracy also only slightly varies as a function of the spectral type for field galaxies. As a consequence, we find evidence for an environmental dependence of the photo-z accuracy, interpreted as the standard used Spectral Energy Distributions being not very well suited to cluster galaxies. Finally, we modeled the LCDCS 0504 mass with the strong arcs detected along this line of sight.

  18. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Wood

    2009-10-08

    Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  19. Unscented Filtering for Interval-Constrained Nonlinear Systems Bruno O. S. Teixeira, Leonardo A. B. T^orres, Luis A. Aguirre, and Dennis S. Bernstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Dennis S.

    examples of systems with inequality-constrained states arise in aeronautics [9]. The equality and an inequality-constrained state vector are mutually exclusive assumptions even for linear systems [5, 6 algorithms have been developed for inequality-constrained linear state estimation. One of the most popular

  20. Complex facies relationships and regional stratigraphy of the Mississippian Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases Formations, Illinois basin: A major hydrocarbon-producing interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.; Nelson, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    The Mississippian Ste. Genevieve and Paoli Limestones and sandstones of the Aux Vases Formation are lateral facies of one another. This interpretation is based on comprehensive investigations of outcrops, and selected cores, samples of well cuttings, and geophysical logs conducted over a period of four years. Both units exhibit similar sedimentological characteristics and represent open marine, shallow subtidal, and intertidal environments. The presence of low-angle cross-laminae, ripple- and plane-laminae, climbing ripples, and ooid shoals suggest most deposition occurred under low energy conditions. Lenticular, channel-like scour and fill structures that contain both fine-grained quartz sand and abraded, disarticulated fossil fragments indicate localized higher energy deposition. The authors studies indicate that siliciclastic vs. carbonate deposition was controlled strictly by available sediment, and not by regressive (siliciclastic) and transgressive (carbonate) events, as inferred by previous workers. This conclusion is based on lateral facies relationships, and the supplanting of carbonates by clastics occurring in the upper part of the Ste. Genevieve through the middle part of the Paoli. The Aux Vases is thickest, coarsest, and least mature in the northwestern part of the Illinois Basin, and pinches out to the southeast. This implies a northwesterly source for clastics, perhaps the Transcontinental Arch. After early Chesterian time, the Transcontinental Arch apparently supplied little or no sediment to any flanking basin. The Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases are major oil-producing units in the Illinois Basin. New understanding of regional relationships should enhance exploratory success and improve recovery from established fields.

  1. Determination of Near-Surface Anisotropy From Surface Electromagnetic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, AbdulFattah

    2001-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) signatures, such as reflection moveout, are sensitive to the presence of azimuthal anisotropy. Azimuthal anisotropy can occur as an intrinsic property of the medium and/or due to the presence ...

  2. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined withand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for a

  3. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for aannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined with

  4. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 8)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    This is the fifth of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at -30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  5. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    This is the third of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at +30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  6. Iraq War Veteran Finds New Career in Weatherization | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    that standpoint." Over a third of the population in San Luis Valley lives below the poverty line. Temperatures range from 90 degrees in the summer to 30 degrees below zero in...

  7. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Mexico, and along the Pacific Coastline. A due south azimuth would suggest that equal amounts of solar

  8. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Mexico, and along the Pacific Coastline. A due south azimuth would suggest that equal amounts of solar

  9. On Mechanical Transitions in Biologically Motivated Soft Matter Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogle, Craig Alton

    2015-01-01

    2.C Total Bending Energy . . . . . . . .Energy dependence on azimuthalFigure 3.2 Model force and energy

  10. IOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 41 (2009) 051405 (16pp) doi:10.1088/0169-5983/41/5/051405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    2009-01-01

    -uniform breakdown of the azimuthal waves. Glezer and Coles (1990) inferred that secondary vortex tubes of a vortex tube in an external strain field. From such studies emerged the idea that the azimuthal ring.1088/0169-5983/41/5/051405 INVITED PAPER Azimuthal instability of a vortex ring computed by a vortex sheet panel method Hualong Feng1

  11. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 69, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2004); P. 699707, 15 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1759456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    coefficient for a dipping azimuthally anisotropic layer Andr´es Pech and Ilya Tsvankin ABSTRACT Interpretation on the azimuthally varying coefficient A4 suggests that non- hyperbolic moveout recorded in wide-azimuth surveys can. In particular, the technology of ocean-bottom cable is well suited for recording reflected waves for a wide

  12. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  13. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26{degree}C and downshifted 30-26-30{degree}C) and females (constant 30{degree}C and upshifted 26-30-26{degree}C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26{degree}C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30{degree}C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26{degree}C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30{degree}C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25{degree}C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30{degree}C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  14. Drilling and early testing of a sidetrack from the slant hole completion test well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.; Branagan, P.T.

    1992-06-01

    During the winter of 1990 to 1991, the Department of Energy evaluated several options to completing the originally-planned slant hole production tests. A decision was made to sidetrack the original hole and to redrill the 60 and 90{degrees} sections. The objectives for drilling the sidetrack to the original slant hole wellbore are as follows: (1) Test high angle and horizontal drilling and completion technologies as an alternative to vertical wells and hydraulic fracture treatments in tight, naturally-fractured reservoirs. (2) Production test the Cozzette open-hole interval into the pipeline to determine long-term gas productivity. (3) Production test selected paludal sandstones in the 60{degrees} section of the wellbore to determine long term gas productivity. A complex well path was designed to parallel the optimum northerly azimuth and the high angle-horizontal inclination program, but to directionally drill the lower wellbore 1000 ft to the east of the old hole. The hole displacement was planned to avoid formation damage from over 1500 barrels of drilling mud lost in the first well. Figure 1 presents the Mesaverde geologic column near the wellsite.

  15. Drilling and early testing of a sidetrack from the slant hole completion test well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.; Branagan, P.T.

    1992-01-01

    During the winter of 1990 to 1991, the Department of Energy evaluated several options to completing the originally-planned slant hole production tests. A decision was made to sidetrack the original hole and to redrill the 60 and 90{degrees} sections. The objectives for drilling the sidetrack to the original slant hole wellbore are as follows: (1) Test high angle and horizontal drilling and completion technologies as an alternative to vertical wells and hydraulic fracture treatments in tight, naturally-fractured reservoirs. (2) Production test the Cozzette open-hole interval into the pipeline to determine long-term gas productivity. (3) Production test selected paludal sandstones in the 60{degrees} section of the wellbore to determine long term gas productivity. A complex well path was designed to parallel the optimum northerly azimuth and the high angle-horizontal inclination program, but to directionally drill the lower wellbore 1000 ft to the east of the old hole. The hole displacement was planned to avoid formation damage from over 1500 barrels of drilling mud lost in the first well. Figure 1 presents the Mesaverde geologic column near the wellsite.

  16. Optimized Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors to Maximize Absorptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Banhelyi, Balazs; Csendes, Tibor; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of four types of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors, nano-cavity-array- (NCA-), nano-cavity-deflector-array- (NCDA-), nano-cavity-double-deflector-array- (NCDDA-) and nano-cavity-trench-array- (NCTA-) integrated (I-A-SNSPDs) devices was optimized in three periodicity intervals commensurate with half-, three-quarter- and one SPP wavelength. The optimal configurations capable of maximizing NbN absorptance correspond to periodicity dependent tilting in S-orientation (90{\\deg} azimuthal orientation). In NCAI-A-SNSPDs absorptance maxima are reached at the plasmonic Brewster angle (PBA) due to light tunneling. The absorptance maximum is attained in a wide plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_1/2*lambda-A, inside a flat-plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_3/4*lambda-A and inside a narrow plasmonic-band in NCDAI_lambda-A. In NCDDAI_1/2*lambda-A bands of strongly-coupled cavity and plasmonic modes cross, in NCDDAI_3/4*lambda-A an inverted-plasmonic-band-gap develops, while in NCDDAI_lambda-A ...

  17. The time-rescaling interval model: extending conditional-intensity based models of neural spike trains Jonathan W. Pillow Depts. of Psychology & Neurobiology, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    . Acknowledgments 9. Conclusions · Conditional renewal (CR) process model incorporates real-time and rescaled dependencies between ISIs can also be modeled using conditional renewal densities 4. Time-rescaling theorem of conditional renewal model 8. Application to retinal data 7. Removing serial dependencies 2. Incorporating

  18. Ovid: Yang: J Vasc Interv Radiol, Volume 9(6).November/December 1998.953-959 Copyright 1998 Society of Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Volume 9(6), November/December 1998, pp 953-959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    of view, RF = radiofrequency, SPGR = spoiled gradient echo, TE = echo time, TR = repetition time, 3D cancer, laser or radio-frequency (RF) ablation of head and neck tumors, monitoring of prostate cancer agent needed, and no risk of ionizing radiation, MR-guided cardiovascular interventions are still

  19. Low-Resolution STELab IPS 3D Reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval and Comparison with in-Ecliptic Solar Wind Measurements from STEREO and Wind Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Tokumaru, M.

    2009-01-01

    structure of the fast solar wind. J. Geophys. Res. 112,observations of the solar wind. Proc. SPIE 6689, 668911-1.W.A. , Maagoe, S. : 1972, Solar wind velocity from ips

  20. We placed 102 seed traps at 12 levels along a 45-m high tower, with the three upper levels above the tallest trees (33 m). Traps were checked at weekly or biweekly intervals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauwereyns, Jan

    . We calculated statistics of wind velocities (vertical, longitudinal and lateral) inside the canopy at the study site), for at least 100 seeds per species. We incorporated temporal variation in wind conditions by running the model for all 1,271 half-hour averages of u* and wind direction recorded by the upper

  1. Numerical experiments of fractureinduced velocity and attenuation ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph

    2012-10-18

    hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs are mainly composed of fractured rocks ... For instance, aligned vertical fractures can lead to an azimuthal anisotropy.

  2. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spatial Reference Information (Beg) ***** Projection Parameters Coordinate System: LambertAzimuthalEqualArea FalseEasting: 0.000000 FalseNorthing: 0.000000...

  3. Seismic anisotropy changes across upper mantle phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, K; Beghein, C

    2013-01-01

    P. , 2000. Upper mantle seismic discontinuities. In: Karato,2005. Global azimuthal seismic anisotropy and the unique2255–2258. Karato, S. , 1998. Seismic anisotropy in the deep

  4. To link to this article : doi: 10.1016/j.proci.2014.05.053 URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2014.05.053

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    modes appearing in annu- lar chambers: (1) Using two different burner types distributed along when the annular cham- ber is weakly coupled to the burners. Results show that symmetry breaking, either by mixing burners types or with a mean azimuthal flow, splits the azimuthal modes into two waves

  5. AIAA JOURNAL Vol. 43, No. 3, March 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsch, Heinz

    mechanical applications, the physical range of flow phenomena that can be modeled can be extended in axial, radial, and azimuthal direction x,r, = coordinates in axial, radial, and azimuthal direction x0 complex problem. As an example, the flow through a gas turbine can be considered. In the compressor

  6. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1999); P. 146161, 9 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Joint inversion of P-and PS-waves in orthorhombic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    , Stephen Theophanis, and Ilya Tsvankin ABSTRACT Reflection traveltimes recorded over azimuthally ani Laboratory, 15 Ward Street, Somerville, MA 01243. c 1999 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights interpretation of azimuthal moveout anomalies is provided by Grechka and Tsvankin (1998), who show that the NMO

  7. 30-meter cabin refurbishment for a large Field Of View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclercq, Samuel

    . Number of optical elements as small as possible. 5. M3 rotating system efficient an simple. 6. Bolometer cabin walls M4 Line symbolizing the position of the cabin roof beams new M3 M4h Elevation axis wall at cabins interface Azimuth cabin limit Azimuth cabin - roof bar - tilted bar M3 M4 bolometer M5 bolometer

  8. Design of Stripline-Fed Dual Polarization Aperture-Coupled Stacked Microstrip Patch Phased Array Antenna for Wideband Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David G.

    2010-10-12

    in order to accomplish beam scan angle of /- 30 degrees by /- 15 degrees. Binomial power distribution of 3x2 array structure was used in order to reduce grating lobes, and changing length of feed lines was implemented for phase shifting. Bowtie cross...

  9. np-elastic analyzing power A(N0) at 485 and 788 MeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNaughton, M. W.; McNaughton, K. H.; Glass, G.; Riley, P. J.; Auer, KH; Davis, CA; Gulmez, E.; Hiebert, John C.; Jeppersen, R. H.; Ransome, R. D.; Spinka, H.; Sum, V.; Supek, I.; Tripard, G. E.; Woolverton, H.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements are reported for the np-elastic analyzing power from 30 degrees to 128 degrees c.m., at 485 and 788 MeV, with a typical precision of 0.005 and absolute accuracy of 2%. Results strengthen the isospin-0 phase-shift analysis, and clarify...

  10. Production of alcohol from apple pomace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hang, Y.D.; Lee, C.Y.; Woodams, E.E.; Cooley, H.J.

    1981-12-01

    Production of ethyl alcohol from apple pomace with a Montrachet strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described. More than 43 grams of the ethyl alcohol could be produced per kg of apple pomace fermented at 30 degrees Celcius in 24 hours. The fermentation efficiency of this process was approximately 89%. (Refs. 9).

  11. Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-12-02

    Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

  12. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL CONDITIONING ON THIN-LAYER DRYING OF ENERGY SORGHUM (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney

    2012-10-01

    Cellulosic energy varieties of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench show promise as a bioenergy feedstock, however, high moisture content at the time of harvest results in unacceptable levels of degradation when stored in aerobic conditions. To safely store sorghum biomass for extended periods in baled format, the material must be dried to inhibit microbial growth. One possible solution is allowing the material to dry under natural in-field conditions. This study examines the differences in thin-layer drying rates of intact and conditioned sorghum under laboratory-controlled temperatures and relative humidity levels (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C from 40% to 85% relative humidity), and models experimental data using the Page’s Modified equation. The results demonstrate that conditioning drastically accelerates drying times. Relative humidity had a large impact on the time required to reach a safe storage moisture content for intact material (approximately 200 hours at 30 degrees C and 40% relative humidity and 400 hours at 30 degrees C and 70% relative humidity), but little to no impact on the thin-layer drying times of conditioned material (approximately 50 hours for all humidity levels < 70% at 30 degrees C). The drying equation parameters were influenced by temperature, relative humidity, initial moisture content, and material damage, allowing drying curves to be empirically predicted. The results of this study provide valuable information applicable to the agricultural community and to future research on drying simulation and management of energy sorghum.

  13. Spring Constants for Hockey Dan Russell and Linda Hunt, Kettering University, Flint, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Daniel A.

    through the static bending of a hockey stick and extract values for Young's modulus from measurements there are many other systems that exhibit simple har- monic oscillation. 1,2 In this paper we explore Hooke's Law of force and displacement. A hockey stick can bend an amazing amount (up to 30 degrees) during slap shots

  14. Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

  15. Harmonic decomposition of two-particle angular correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2012-01-24

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 pT^a. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval |\\eta| 0.8, and are referred to as "long-range correlations". Fourier components V_{n\\Delta} \\equiv are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies v_n(pT) as V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) = v_n(pT^t) v_n(pT^a). This expectation is tested for 1 \\leq n \\leq 5 by applying a global fit of all V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) to obtain the best values v_n{GF}(pT). It is found that for 2 \\leq n \\leq 5, the fit agrees well with data up to pT^a \\sim 3-4 GeV/c, with a trend of increasing deviation as pT^t and pT^a are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25 harmonic, however, a single v_1(pT) curve is not obtained even within the reduced range pT^a < 4 GeV/c.

  16. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  17. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, S. C., E-mail: S.C.Chapman@warwick.ac.uk [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Watkins, N. W. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Centre for the Analysis of Time Series, London School of Economics, London (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering and Innovation, Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); Calderon, F. A. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  18. Light pollution at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pedani

    2004-07-06

    Sky spectra were obtained from archival science frames taken with DoLoRes at the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo with a wavelength range ~3800 - 8000Ang and resolution of 2.8Ang/pix and 3.6Ang/pix. Our spectra include all the important Sodium and Mercury light pollution lines and span a wide interval of azimuth and observing conditions, essential to disentangle environmental and seasonal effects. New sodium and mercury lines were also detected for the first time at the observatory. Light pollution from NaD_{5892-8} emitted by the LPS lamps increased by a factor of 1.5 - 2 with respect to the average values of 1998. At the same time, light pollution from Hg lines decreased by ~40% and reaches the 1998 levels only when observing toward the towns. The contribution of NaD_{5892-8} from LPS lamps to sky background is 0.05-0.10mag at V-band and 0.07-0.12mag at R-band. Synthetic sky brightness measures calculated from our spectra at V, B and R bands are in good agreement with those of Benn & Ellison(1998) if we take into account that our observations were done during 2003, seven years after the last sunspot minimum. The effects of the application of the Canary Sky Law are directly visible in the spectra as a 50% dimming of the Hg light-polluting lines in the spectra taken after local midnight.

  19. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, Apr 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-08-31

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near-horizontal well has been drilled and completion operations are in progress. Upon initial review of log data, two hydraulic fracture treatments were planned. However, the probability of the lower frac growing into thick sands previously swept by waterflood has called for additional information to be obtained prior to proceeding with hydraulic fracture treatments. Should permeabilities prove to be as favorable as some data indicate, produced water volumes could be excessively high. Prior to pumping the first frac, the well will be perforated and produced from lower pay intervals. These perfs will not impact future frac work. Rate data and pressure transient analysis will dictate the need for the lower frac.

  20. The in vivo study on the radiobiologic effect of prolonged delivery time to tumor control in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    with 60 min interval group and the seven subfractions withwith 30 min interval group, the seven subfractions with 5

  1. Can one use Mueller-Navelet jets at LHC as a clean test of QCD resummation effects at high energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ducloué; L. Szymanowski; S. Wallon

    2013-12-09

    The measurement of azimuthal correlations of Mueller-Navelet jets is generally considered as a decisive test to reveal the effect of BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders. The first experimental study of these correlations at the LHC has been recently performed by the CMS collaboration. We show that the ratios of cosine moments of the azimuthal distribution are successfully described within our next-to-leading logarithmic BFKL treatment. The whole set of CMS data for the azimuthal correlations can also be consistently described provided that one uses a larger renormalization/factorization scale than its natural value.

  2. Negative Gaussian curvature from induced metric changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl D. Modes; Mark Warner

    2015-06-22

    We revisit the light or heat-induced changes in topography of initially flat sheets of solid that elongate or contract along patterned, in-plane director fields. For radial or azimuthal directors, negative Gaussian curvature is generated -- so-called "anti-cones". We show that azimuthal material displacements are required for the distorted state to be stretch-free and bend-minimising. The resultant shapes are smooth and aster-like and can become re-entrant in the azimuthal coordinate for large deformations. We show that care is needed when considering elastomers rather than glasses, though the former offer huge deformations.

  3. Collective flow effects on charge balance correlations and local parity-violation observables in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Hori; T. Gunji; H. Hamagaki; S. Schlichting

    2012-08-02

    We study the effects of collective flow on charge dependent azimuthal correlations at LHC energies. We propose a series of correlations as a signature of the combined effects of azimuthal collective flow and local charge conservation and perform an analysis within a statistical freeze-out model. We find that present LHC measurements of charge dependent azimuthal correlations are consistent with local charge conservation on the kinetic freeze-out surface. In view of experimental searches for signatures of the chiral-magnetic effect, we provide an alternative explanation of the charge dependence of the observed signal and propose additional measurements to disentangle the effects.

  4. Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Kilauea have very high resistivities at shallow depths that result in low geologic noise levels and relatively deep depths of investigation (100 m); and (3) the azimuths to...

  5. Ferrofluid spin-up flows from uniform and non-uniform rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khushrushahi, Shahriar Rohinton

    2010-01-01

    When ferrofluid in a cylindrical container is subjected to a rotating azimuthally directed magnetic field, the fluid "spins up" into an almost rigid-body rotation where ferrofluid nanoparticles have both a linear and an ...

  6. Characterization of dipping fractures in transversely isotropic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    Characterization of dipping fractures in transversely isotropic background Vladimir Grechka incidence becomes dependent on fracture infill (saturation). A complete medium-characterization procedure for the vertical and NMO velocities. Keywords.--fracture characterization, azimuthal anisotropy, multicomponent

  7. Design and manufacture of a modular cylindrical apparatus for ferrofluid experimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoen, Katrina Leigh

    2011-01-01

    Ferrofluids, colloidal suspensions of coated magnetic nanoparticles inside a carrier fluid, respond to externally applied magnetic fields. This thesis addresses the behavior of these fluids when subjected to an azimuthally ...

  8. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with the BICEP Telescope at the South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Yuki David

    2010-01-01

    scans (50 min) Elevation nod (1 min) => Azimuth (deg) Figurescans, a ±0.6 ? elevation “nod” was performed to measuresight airmass (“ elevation nods”), described in §4.2.2. An

  9. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 4, 231254, 2004 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/4/231/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and type, solar zenith and azimuth angles) are investigated. In addition we give a brief description to several examples of recent MAX- DOAS field experiments and an outlook for future possible applications

  10. Solar Central Receiver with an Irising Aperture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Abuzaid, M.

    2010-01-01

    Variable sun elevation, azimuthal and declination angles with the time of day, and seasons of the year respectively, give variable projected image size defects produced by field site concave mirrors on the central cavity ...

  11. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: multiplicities and Phenomenology - part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, Mauro [TURIN; Boglione, Mariaelena [TURIN; Gonzalez H., J.O. [TORINO; Melis, Stefano [TURIN; Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2015-01-01

    We present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  12. Measurements of dynamics in an orientationally anisotropic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borthwick, Matthew A. (Matthew Alan), 1973-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) coefficients, and these were compared to the "effective" coefficients yielded by the former. Because scattering from a nematic domain is limited to a narrow azimuthal range, while an isotropic domain scatters ...

  13. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmelev, Alexey A.

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of ...

  14. Remote Sensing & GIS -Spring Semester 2010 Lab 1 -Preprocessing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    as 16-bit). Read in the metadata file at least the acquisition date and time and sensor and sun azimuth to preprocessing, exec where the programs and the panchromatic image data are. The full data incl. metadata

  15. Observation of Associated Near-Side and Away-Side Long-Range Correlations in ?[subscript NN]=5.02??TeV Proton-Lead Collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Two-particle correlations in relative azimuthal angle (??) and pseudorapidity (??) are measured in ?s[subscript NN]=5.02??TeV p+Pb collisions using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are performed using ...

  16. Measurement of single electron event anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, SS; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, NN; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, SH; Averbeck, R.; Awes, TC; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, KN; Barnes, PD; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, JG; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, ML; Brown, DS; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, JM; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, JS; Chand, P.; Chang, WC; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, CY; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, IJ; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, BA; Constantin, P.; d'Enterria, D.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, EJ; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, KA; du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, YV; Chenawi, KE; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, DE; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, SL; Fox, BD; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, JE; Franz, A.; Frawley, AD; Fung, SY; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, TK; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, RG; Grau, N.; Greene, SV; Perdekamp, MG; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, HA; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, JS; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, AG; Hartouni, EP; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, TK; Heuser, JM; Hibino, M.; Hill, JC; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, VV; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, BV; Jang, WY; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, BM; Johnson, SC; Joo, KS; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, JH; Kapoor, SS; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, DH; Kim, DJ; Kim, DW; Kim, E.; Kim, GB; Kim, HJ; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, PJ; Kuberg, CH; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, MJ; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, GS; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, JG; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, DM; Lee, S.; Leitch, MJ; Li, XH; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, MX; Liu, Y.; Maguire, CF; Makdisi, YI; Malakhov, A.; Manko, VI; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, MD; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, PL; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, TE; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, RE; Mishra, GC; Mitchell, JT; Mohanty, AK; Morrison, DP; Moss, JM; Muhlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, JL; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, BK; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, AS; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, CA; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, ID; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, APT; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, SF; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, JC; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, RP; Plasil, F.; Purschke, ML; Purwar, AK; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, KF; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, SS; Sadler, ME; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, HD; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, MR; Shea, TK; Shibata, TA; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, CL; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, KS; Singh, CP; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, RA; Sondheim, WE; Sorensen, SP; Sourikova, IV; Staley, F.; Stankus, PW; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, SP; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, EM; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, KH; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, MJ; Tarjan, P.; Tepe, JD; Thomas, TL; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, RS; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, SK; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, HW; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Veszpremi, V.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, AA; Volkov, MA; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, XR; Watanabe, Y.; White, SN; Wohn, FK; Woody, CL; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, GR; Yushmanov, IE; Zajc, WA; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, SJ; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    Using a relativistic transport model, we study the azimuthal momentum asymmetry of kaons with fixed transverse momentum, i.e., the differential flow, in heavy-ion collisions at beam momentum of 6 GeV/c per nucleon, available ...

  17. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: Multiplicities and phenomenology - part II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Gonzalez H., J. O.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.

    2015-01-23

    In this study, we present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  18. Cosmic Ray Measurements with the KASCADE-Grande Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    by Paul Doll 13. Restoring Azimuthal Symmetry of Lateral Density Distributions of EAS Particles KASCADE,xii , F. Di Pierro, P. Doll, R. Engel, J. Engler, M. Finger, D. Fuhrmann, P.L. Ghia , H.J. Gils, R

  19. Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pipe drill. Core samples were oriented by azimuth and hade using a magnetic compass and sun dial, then marked before being removed from the host rock. The core samples were then...

  20. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    2013-01-01

    of 108.5 m. Local magnetic bearing, roll, pitch, and yaw inbearings to true azimuth of arrival was implemented using 10-sec averages of the declination-corrected magnetic

  1. Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV p + p and Central Au + Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Justin

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au + Au and p + p collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population ...

  2. Non-uniform emission studies of a magnetron injection gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchewka, Chad D. (Chad Daniel)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the experimental measurement and theoretical simulation of the effects of azimuthal emission non-uniformity of a 96 kV, 40 amp magnetron injection gun (MIG) used in a gyrotron. The accomplishments ...

  3. Three-Particle Coincidence of the Long Range Pseudorapidity Correlation in High Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    We report the first three-particle coincidence measurement in pseudorapidity (delta eta) between a high transverse momentum (p?) trigger particle and two lower p? associated particles within azimuth |deltaphi|<0.7 in ...

  4. BookOfAbstracts_REUConference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at a center of mass energy S NN 200 GeV using the PYTHIA 8.185 event generator. Jets are studied via two-particle azimuthal correlations, with the recoil jet analyzed via...

  5. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This report describes progress in the following tasks: high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the southern Piceance Basin of western Colorado; field performance site selection of Rulison Field for seismic acquisition which covers technical work to be performed; seismic acquisition processing and associated costs;theoretical background concerning P-wave multi-azimuth 3D seismic; field data examples of P-wave multi-azimuth data; and 3D basin modeling.

  6. & The degree of commonality between the perceptual mech-when the car and face stimuli were separated by a 200-msec anisms involved in processing faces and objects of expertise is blank interval. With and without this delay, there was a strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Tim

    & The degree of commonality between the perceptual mech- when the car and face stimuli were to faces when con- and the subject's level of car expertise as measured in an inde- currently processing visual objects of expertise. In car experts pendent behavioral task. Together, these results show

  7. Jefferson County State of the Community Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xi; Lee, Kanghyun; Aldalbahi, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    of metropolitan Denver. The county itself covers 774 square miles of total land. With a current overall population of approximately 551,798, it is the fourth populous county in Colorado. Lakewood is the largest city in the county. Motherland of the famous... of Incorporation 1861 Square Miles 773 Square Miles Unincorporated Je?erson County Area 653 Miles Percentage days of Sunshine 70% sunshine Hottest Month July (74 degree average) Coldest Month January (30 degrees average) Annual Precipitation 15.4 inches...

  8. Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01

    Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

  9. Elasticity-mediated self-organization and colloidal interactions of solid spheres with tangential anchoring in a nematic liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. I. Smalyukh; O. D. Lavrentovich; A. N. Kuzmin; A. V. Kachynski; P. N. Prasad

    2005-08-13

    Using laser tweezers and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we study colloidal interactions of solid microspheres in the nematic bulk caused by elastic distortions around the particles with strong tangential surface anchoring. The particles aggregate into chains directed at about 30 degrees to the far field director and, at higher concentrations, form complex kinetically trapped structures. We characterize the distance and angular dependencies of the colloidal interaction forces.

  10. Formation of manganese {delta}-doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Meng; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang Kangkang; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Liu Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the formation of a {delta}-doped manganese layer embedded within c-plane wurtzite gallium nitride using a special molecular beam epitaxy growth process. Manganese is first deposited on the gallium-poor GaN (0001) surface, forming a {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstructed phase. This well-defined surface reconstruction is then nitrided using plasma nitridation, and gallium nitride is overgrown. The manganese content of the {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign phase, namely one Mn per each {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign unit cell, implies that the MnGaN alloy layer has a Mn concentration of up to 33%. The structure and chemical content of the surface are monitored beginning from the initial growth stage up through the overgrowth of 20 additional monolayers (MLs) of GaN. An exponential-like drop-off of the Mn signal with increasing GaN monolayers, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates that the highly concentrated Mn layer remains at the {delta}-doped interface. A model of the resultant {delta}-doped structure is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications are discussed.

  11. STUDIES OF WALL FLAME QUENCHING AND HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS IN A MODEL SPARK IGNITION ENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    ignition timing at 10 msec BTC, time interval 5 msec. flatignition, ignition timing at 12 BTC, time interval 5 msec .ignition timing at 25 msec BTC, time interval 5 msec . . . .

  12. Measurements of Dihadron Correlations Relative to the Event Plane in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; Oh; Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; Tribedy; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2013-05-16

    Dihadron azimuthal correlations containing a high transverse momentum ($\\pt$) trigger particle are sensitive to the properties of the nuclear medium created at RHIC through the strong interactions occurring between the traversing parton and the medium, i.e. jet-quenching. Previous measurements revealed a strong modification to dihadron azimuthal correlations in Au+Au collisions with respect to \\pp\\ and \\dAu\\ collisions. The modification increases with the collision centrality, suggesting a path-length dependence to the jet-quenching effect. This paper reports STAR measurements of dihadron azimuthal correlations in mid-central (20-60\\%) Au+Au collisions at $\\snn=200$~GeV as a function of the trigger particle's azimuthal angle relative to the event plane, $\\phis=|\\phit-\\psiEP|$. The azimuthal correlation is studied as a function of both the trigger and associated particle $\\pt$. The subtractions of the combinatorial background and anisotropic flow, assuming Zero Yield At Minimum (\\zyam), are described. The away-side correlation is strongly modified, and the modification varies with $\\phis$, which is expected to be related to the path-length that the away-side parton traverses. The pseudo-rapidity ($\\deta$) dependence of the near-side correlation, sensitive to long range $\\deta$ correlations (the ridge), is also investigated. The ridge and jet-like components of the near-side correlation are studied as a function of $\\phis$. The ridge appears to drop with increasing $\\phis$ while the jet-like component remains approximately constant. ...

  13. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-28

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  14. Unified approach to the classical statistical analysis of small signals Gary J. Feldman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Gary

    -sided intervals leads to intervals which are not confidence intervals if the choice is based on the data. We apply and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 Received 21 November 1997; published 6 led the Particle Data Group PDG 2 to describe procedures for Bayesian interval construction

  15. JOURNAL. OF THERMOPHYSICSA N D H E A T TRANSFER Vol. 9. No. 2. April-June 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    , which was developed by Provotorov and Ria- bov." The previous analysis" has covered the time interval

  16. Health Over the Life Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, John; Thomas, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    health assessments: Anthropometry Anthropometric measures,solid food intakes, and anthropometry at intervals which

  17. SIAM J. ScI. STAT. COMPUT. Vol. 7, No. 2, April 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Mathematics OO9 CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR INEQUALITY-CONSTRAINED LEAST SQUARES PROBLEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS

  18. Gluon distribution functions and Higgs boson production at moderate transverse momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun P.; Yuan F.; Xiao, B.W.

    2011-11-04

    We investigate the gluon distribution functions and their contributions to the Higgs boson production in pp collisions in the transverse momentum-dependent factorization formalism. In addition to the usual azimuthal symmetric transverse momentum-dependent gluon distribution, we find that the azimuthal correlated gluon distribution also contributes to the Higgs boson production. This explains recent findings on the additional contribution in the transverse momentum resummation for the Higgs boson production as compared to that for electroweak boson production processes. We further examine the small-x naive kt-factorization in the dilute region and find that the azimuthal correlated gluon distribution contribution is consistently taken into account. The result agrees with the transverse momentum-dependent factorization formalism. We comment on the possible breakdown of the naive kt-factorization in the dense medium region, due to the unique behaviors for the gluon distributions.

  19. Two-dimensional single-stream electron motion in a coaxial diode with magnetic insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuks, Mikhail I.; Schamiloglu, Edl [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSC01 1100, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSC01 1100, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    One of the most widespread models of electrons drifting around the cathode in magnetrons is the single-stream state, which is the Brillouin stream with purely azimuthal motion. We describe a single-stream state in which electrons not only move in the azimuthal direction, but also along the axial direction, which is useful for consideration, for example, of relativistic magnetrons, MILOs, and coaxial transmission lines. Relations are given for the conditions of magnetic insulation for 2D electron motion, for 1D azimuthal and axial motion, and for synchronism of these streams with the operating waves of M-type microwave sources. Relations are also provided for the threshold of generation in magnetrons with 2D electron motion.

  20. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  1. Heavy--quark momentum correlations as a sensitive probe of thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; G. Tsiledakis

    2009-03-02

    In high-energy nuclear collisions the degree of thermalization at the partonic level is a key issue. Due to their large mass, heavy-quarks and their participation in the collective flow of the QCD medium constitute a powerful tool to probe thermalization. We propose measuring azimuthal correlations of heavy-quark hadrons and products from their semi-leptonic decay. Modifications or even the complete absence of initially, e.g. in p-p collisions, existing azimuthal correlations in Pb-Pb collisions might indicate thermalization at the partonic level. We present studies with PYTHIA for p-p collisions at the top LHC energy using the two-particle transverse momentum correlator ${}$ as a sensitive measure of azimuthal correlations.

  2. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  3. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  4. Forward Physics at STAR: Status of analysis on forward and mid rapidity correlation measurements in p+p and d+Au

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ogawa; for the STAR collaboration

    2004-08-05

    Measurements of the production of high energy pi0 mesons at large pseudorapidity, coincident with charged hadrons at mid-rapidity, for proton+proton and deuteron+gold collisions at sqrt(s)_NN=200 GeV are reported. The p+p cross section for inclusive pi0 production follows expectations from next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. Both the inclusive cross section and the di-hadron azimuthal correlations are consistent with a model where parton showers supplement leading-order pQCD. A suppression of the back-to-back azimuthal correlations was observed in d+Au, qualitatively consistent with the gluon saturation picture.

  5. Fast switchable electro-optic radial polarization retarder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Lim; P. B. Phua; W. J. Lai; M. H. Hong

    2008-01-21

    A fast, switchable electro-optic radial polarization retarder (EO-RPR) fabricated using the electro-optic ceramic PMN-PT is presented. This EO-RPR is useful for fast, switchable generation of pure cylindrical vector beam. When used together with a pair of half-wave plates, the EO-RPR can change circularly polarized light into any cylindrical vector beam of interest such as radially or azimuthally polarized light. Radially and azimuthally polarized light with purities greater than 95% are generated experimentally. The advantages of using EO-RPR include fast response times, low driving voltage and transparency in a wide spectral range (500 -7000 nm).

  6. Mach number correlation for a two-dimensional helicopter rotor-blade analysis in the tip region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schillings, John Joseph

    1983-01-01

    -'7. The value of corrected Mach number (Hc) is defined as Mc =M+5M The delta Mach number required is shown as a function of blade 31 Table 4 Summary of Parameters for Flight Condition Azimuth MTTP r/R Mc Cn 90 . 846 . 750 . 682 . 846 . 757 . 910 . 787... . 955 . 8'16 . 970 . 826 . 990 . 839 . 0 . 0 -. 020 -. 040 -. 050 ? . 110 . 682 . 321 . 757 . 195 , 767 . 155 . 776 . 166 . 776 . 099 . 729 ~ 077 Table 5 Summary of Parameters for Flight Condition Azimuth MTip r/R Mc Cn 30 60 90 120...

  7. Snakes and Their Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2008-04-15

    wide, with the bottom edge buried at least 6 inches in the ground. For best results, the fence should be slanted outward at a 30-degree angle. (stakes inside) fence 4-6? underground 30? Figure 5. A funnel trap can be placed by the side of a build- ing... speciesofsnakesandshouldbeusedaccordingto the label. Shooting Wherelegal,snakescanbeshotusingeithera rifle or shotgun. Since most of the snakes found in Texas are non-poisonous and cause little dam- age, they should not be indiscriminately killed. Other Methods It is sometimes possible...

  8. Low frequency eddy current benchmark study for model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mooers, R. D.; Boehnlein, T. R. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Structural Integrity Division, Dayton, OH, 45469 (United States); Cherry, M. R.; Knopp, J. S. [Air Force Research Lab, NDE Division, Wright Patterson, OH 45433 (United States); Aldrin, J. C. [Computational Tools, Gurnee, IL 60031 (United States); Sabbagh, H. A. [Victor Technologies LLC, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

    2011-06-23

    This paper presents results of an eddy current model validation study. Precise measurements were made using an impedance analyzer to investigate changes in impedance due to Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) notches in aluminum plates. Each plate contained one EDM notch at an angle of 0, 10, 20, or 30 degrees from the normal of the plate surface. Measurements were made with the eddy current probe both scanning parallel and perpendicular to the notch length. The experimental response from the vertical and oblique notches will be reported and compared to results from different numerical simulation codes.

  9. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, David B. (Fremont, CA); Fares, Stephen J. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Kim L. (Livermore, CA); Langham, Mary E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2012-04-17

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  10. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, David B; Fares, Stephen J; Tran, Kim L; Langham, Mary E

    2014-04-15

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  11. Far-ultraviolet Observations of the North Ecliptic Pole with SPEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric J. Korpela; Jerry Edelstein; Julia Kregenow; Kaori Nishikida; Kyoung-Wook Min; Dae-Hee Lee; Kwangsun Ryu; Wonyong Han; Uk-Won Nam; Jang-Hyun Park

    2006-01-26

    We present SPEAR/FIMS far-ultraviolet observations near the North Ecliptic Pole. This area, at b~30 degrees and with intermediate HI column, seems to be a fairly typical line of sight that is representative of general processes in the diffuse ISM. We detect a surprising number of emission lines of many elements at various ionization states representing gas phases from the warm neutral medium (WNM) to the hot ionized medium (HIM). We also detect fluorescence bands of H2, which may be due to the ubiquitous diffuse H2 previously observed in absorption.

  12. SPEAR far UV spectral imaging of highly ionized emission from the North Galactic Pole Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Y. Welsh; J. Edelstein; E. Korpela

    2007-06-06

    We present far ultraviolet (FUV: 912 - 1750AA) spectral imaging observations recorded with the SPEAR satellite of the interstellar OVI (1032AA), CIV (1550AA), SiIV (1394AA), SiII* (1533AA) and AlII (1671AA) emission lines originating in a 60 x 30 degree rectangular region lying close to the North Galactic Pole. These data represent the first large area, moderate spatial resolution maps of the distribution of UV spectral-line emission originating the both the highly ionized medium (HIM) and the warm ionized medium (WIM) recorded at high galactic latitudes.

  13. The first measurement of $B$ meson semi-leptonic decay contribution to non-photonic electrons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoyan Lin

    2007-01-30

    We present the first measurement for the $B$ meson semi-leptonic decay contribution to non-photonic electrons at RHIC using non-photonic electron azimuthal correlations with charged hadrons in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV from STAR.

  14. Title Name Date A Method For Investigating Stresses In Fillets Of Spur Gear Teeth When Subjected To Dynamic Loading Anthony K. Chargin Aug-67

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Mustafa Y. Demiroz Dec-82 Component Modeling and Synthesis of an Azimuth Rate Fire Control System John R Spring-98 Application of Focused Ion Beam Technology in High Density Magnetic Recording Heads Rasool Elmorsy Oct-00 Adjustable Fan/Heat Sink Thermal Test Fixture Michael P. Willink Dec-00 Eyecam Projecto

  15. Simulations of Ion Beam-Alfven Wave Dynamics in the Cornell Ion Ring Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    for creating a compact fusion reactor, represented by a magnetically field-reversed plasma configuration (FRC to be free of many magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities that plasma FRC is subject to [1,2,5]. A more complex, hybrid reactor might consist of a plasma FRC carrying most of the azimuthal current

  16. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component rotating magnetic fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and L. C. Steinhauer Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory in field reversed configurations FRC . A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up

  17. Toroidal field stabilization of the rotational instability in field-reversed configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    . Milroy1,2,a and L. C. Steinhauer2 1 Plasma Science and Innovation Center, Box 32250, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250, USA 2 Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington in dynamically formed field-reversed configurations FRC . It generally appears as an m=2 mode azimuthal mode

  18. Supplementary materials of "High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti M7.0 earthquake and comparisons with finite source studies"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    of the synthetic seismograms of the mainshock filtered from 0.2 to 0.7 Hz, assuming a point source with mechanism given by the CMT solution. Fig. S2 Fit of the teleseismic P and SH waveforms for the kinematic slip joint kinematic slip model. The P and SH waveforms are sorted with increasing azimuth angle (number

  19. The excitation of spiral density waves through turbulent fluctuations in accretion discs I: WKBJ theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Heinemann; J. C. B. Papaloizou

    2009-04-30

    We study and elucidate the mechanism of spiral density wave excitation in a differentially rotating turbulent flow. We formulate a set of wave equations with sources that are only non-zero in the presence of turbulent fluctuations. We solve these in a shearing box domain using a WKBJ method. It is found that, for a particular azimuthal wave length, the wave excitation occurs through a sequence of regularly spaced swings during which the wave changes from leading to trailing form. This is a generic process that is expected to occur in shearing discs with turbulence. Trailing waves of equal amplitude propagating in opposite directions are produced, both of which produce an outward angular momentum flux that we give expressions for as functions of the disc parameters and azimuthal wave length. By solving the wave amplitude equations numerically we justify the WKBJ approach for a Keplerian rotation law for all parameter regimes of interest. In order to quantify the wave excitation completely the important wave source terms need to be specified. Assuming conditions of weak nonlinearity, these can be identified and are associated with a quantity related to the potential vorticity, being the only survivors in the linear regime. Under the additional assumption that the source has a flat power spectrum at long azimuthal wave lengths, the optimal azimuthal wave length produced is found to be determined solely by the WKBJ response and is estimated to be 2 pi H, with H being the nominal disc scale height.

  20. Geophys. J. Int. () , 1?? Cross-section electrical resistance tomography of La Soufri`ere of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Geophys. J. Int. () , 1­?? Cross-section electrical resistance tomography of La Soufri spanning the whole range of azimuths, and the electrical potential is measured along a cable covering`ere lava dome is located in the horseshoe-shaped Amic crater formed 3100 B.P. by a Now at: PRP