Sample records for 30-degree azimuth intervals

  1. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  2. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. The azimuthal decorrelation of jets widely separated in rapidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to six units. The data were accumulated using the D0 detector during the 1994-1995 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The data are compared to two parton shower Monte Carlos (HERWIG and PYTHIA) and an analytical prediction using the leading logarithmic BFKL resummation. The final state jets as predicted by the parton showering Monte Carlos describe the data over the entire pseudorapidity range studied. The prediction based on the leading logarithmic BFKL resummation shows more decorrelation than the data as the rapidity interval increases.

  5. Measurements of Unpolarized Azimuthal Asymmetries at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Käfer; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal Asymmetries in unpolarized SIDIS can be used to probe the transverse momentum of quarks inside the nucleon. Furthermore, they give access to the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. We report on the first measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the SIDIS cross section from scattering of muons off a deuteron target.

  6. Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on TiO2(110): Anisotropy and the Hydrogen-Bonding Network. Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on...

  7. AZIMUTHAL VARIATION OF RADIATION OF SEISMIC ENERGY FROM CAST BLASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Blasting Research, International Society of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;AZIMUTHAL

  8. Interval Linear Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this book we use only special types of intervals and introduce the notion of different types of interval linear algebras and interval vector spaces using the intervals of the form [0, a] where the intervals are from Zn or Z+ \\cup {0} or Q+ \\cup {0} or R+ \\cup {0}. A systematic development is made starting from set interval vector spaces to group interval vector spaces. Vector spaces are taken as interval polynomials or interval matrices or just intervals over suitable sets or semigroups or groups. Main feature of this book is the authors have given over 350 examples. This book has six chapters. Chapter one is introductory in nature. Chapter two introduces the notion of set interval linear algebras of type one and two. Set fuzzy interval linear algebras and their algebras and their properties are discussed in chapter three. Chapter four introduces several types of interval linear bialgebras and bivector spaces and studies them. The possible applications are given in chapter five. Chapter six suggests nearly 110 problems of all levels.

  9. Azimuthal asymmetries from unpolarized data at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schill; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of transverse spin and transverse momentum effects in the nucleon is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. COMPASS investigates these effects scattering 160 GeV/c muons off a fixed NH3 or 6LiD target. The azimuthal asymmetries which appear in the cross-section of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on an unpolarized target have been measured. These asymmetries give insight into the intrinsic transverse momentum of the quarks in the nucleon by the Cahn effect and into a possible correlation between transverse momentum and transverse spin. New results for azimuthal asymmetries of single hadrons produced in scattering muons off an unpolarized 6LiD target are presented.

  10. Measurements of unpolarised azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Sbrizzai; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized SIDIS can be used to probe the transverse momentum of the quarks inside the nucleon. Furthermore they give access to the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. We report on the extraction of these asymmetries from the COMPASS data taken with a 160 GeV/c $\\mu ^+$ beam impinging on a deuteron target. This asymmetries have been extracted separately for positive and negative hadrons, and the results have been compared with theoretical predictions.

  11. Estimation of interval anisotropy parameters using velocity-independent layer stripping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    by VILS in the shale layer above the reservoir are more plausible and less influenced by noise than those Wang1 and Ilya Tsvankin1 ABSTRACT Moveout analysis of long-spread P-wave data is widely used it to interval parameter estimation in orthorhombic media using wide-azimuth, long- spread data

  12. Transverse spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakur Parsamyan

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on a transversely polarized target eight target transverse spin-dependent azimuthal modulations are allowed. In the QCD parton model half of these asymmetries can be interpreted within the leading order approach and the other four are twist-three contributions. The first two leading twist asymmetries extracted by HERMES and COMPASS experiments are related: one to the transversity distribution and the Collins effect, the other to the Sivers distribution function. These results triggered a lot of interest in the past few years and allowed the first extractions of the transversity and the Sivers distribution functions of nucleon. The remaining six asymmetries were obtained by the COMPASS experiment using a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized deuteron and proton targets. Here we review preliminary results from COMPASS proton data of 2007.

  13. Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic jet-energy loss model that is coupled to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic fields and interpolates between a wide class of running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired models is compared to recent data on the azimuthal and transverse momentum dependence of high-pT pion nuclear modification factors and high-pT elliptic flow measured at RHIC and LHC. We find that RHIC data are surprisingly consistent with various scenarios considered. However, extrapolations to LHC energies favor running coupling pQCD-based models of jet-energy loss. While conformal holographic models are shown to be inconsistent with data, recent non-conformal generalizations of AdS holography may provide an alternative description.

  14. Super Fast and Quality Azimuth Disambiguation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudenko, G V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the possibility of fast and quality azimuth disambiguation of vector magnetogram data regardless of location on the solar disc. The new Super Fast and Quality (SFQ) code of disambiguation is tried out on well-known models of Metcalf et al. (2006), Leka et al. (2009) and artificial model of fixed configuration AR 10930 (Rudenko et al., 2010). We make comparison of Hinode SOT SP vector magnetograms of AR 10930 disambiguated with three codes: SFQ, NPFC (Georgoulis, 2005), and SME (Rudenko et al., 2010). We exemplify the SFQ disambiguation of SDO/HMI measurements of the full disc. The preliminary examination indicates that the SFQ algorithm provides better quality than NPFC and is comparable to SME. In contrast to other codes, SFQ supports relatively high quality of results regardless of the magnetogram proximity to the limb (when being very close to the limb, it is efficient unlike all other algorithms).

  15. Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

  16. Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet Ivan S. Ashcraft and David backscatter measurements are becoming an important tool for monitoring the dynamic behavior of the Greenland ice sheet. However, most Greenland studies assume constant backscatter for varying azimuth angles

  17. Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and Jürgen Jahns A conventional Fresnel zone plate (FZP) consists of concentric rings with an alternating binary transmission of zero and one. In an azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate (aFZP), the light transmission

  18. Azimuthal asymmetry in lepton-proton scattering at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chay, J.; Ellis, S.D.; Stirling, W.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the azimuthal angular dependence of the distribution of final-state hadrons in high-energy lepton-proton scattering. The distribution displays an azimuthal asymmetry due to both perturbative and nonperturbative effects. At the large momentum transfers attainable, for example, at the DESY {ital ep} collider HERA we expect the perturbative effects to dominate and constitute a clear test of QCD.

  19. Resource Allocation with Time Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: resource allocation, proper intervals, unsplittable flow ... be positioned within a larger time interval) and call admission control, see [4] and [8] for ...

  20. Linearized Hovering Control With One or More Azimuthing Thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hover, Franz S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple method of control system design for marine vehicles with one or more azimuthing propulsors, and specifically for the case where the speed of the actuator is on the same time scale as the plant dynamic ...

  1. Analysis of azimuthal mode dynamics of mesoscale eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalpin, John David

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF AZIMUTHAL MODE DYNAMICS OF MESOSCALE EDDIES A Thesis by UOHN DAVID MCCALPIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984... Major Subject: Oceanography ANALYSIS OF AZIMUTHAL MODE DYNAMICS OF MESOSCALE EDDIES A Thesis by JOHN DAVID MCCALPIN Approved as to style and content by: rew . as ano (Chairman of Committee) o ert . ei (Member) uy . rancesc &ni (Member) Robert...

  2. Surveillance test interval optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cepin, M.; Mavko, B. [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljublijana (Slovenia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical specifications have been developed on the bases of deterministic analyses, engineering judgment, and expert opinion. This paper introduces our risk-based approach to surveillance test interval (STI) optimization. This approach consists of three main levels. The first level is the component level, which serves as a rough estimation of the optimal STI and can be calculated analytically by a differentiating equation for mean unavailability. The second and third levels give more representative results. They take into account the results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculated by a personal computer (PC) based code and are based on system unavailability at the system level and on core damage frequency at the plant level.

  3. Prediction Intervals in Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Cheng-Hsueh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1. BLP Based Prediction Intervals………………………………………..……3.2. BP Based Prediction Intervals………………..………………………..……4.1.1. BLP Based Prediction Interval………………………………………. 4.1.2.

  4. Dependence of Ridge Formation on Trigger Azimuth: Correlated Emission Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles B. Chiu; Rudolph C. Hwa

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ridge formation in near-side correlation in heavy-ion collisions is studied in the framework of a phenomenological model, called Correlated Emission Model (CEM). Successive soft emissions due to jet-medium interaction lead to the enhancement of thermal partons which follow the local flow directions. The correlation between the flow direction and the semihard parton direction is the major factor that causes the ridge formation to depend on the trigger direction relative to the reaction plane. With the use of a few parameters we have been able to reproduce the data on the ridge yields as functions of the trigger azimuthal angle for different centralities. An inside-outside asymmetry function is proposed to further probe the characteristics of the azimuthal correlation function. Insights are provided for the understanding of some detailed aspects of the centrality dependence.

  5. Azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS off unpolarized targets at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Bressan; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal asymmetries measured in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering bring important information on the inner structure of the nucleons, and can be used both to estimate the average quark transverse momentum k_T and to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders functions. COMPASS results using part of the 2004 data collected with a 6LiD target and a 160 GeV positive muon beam are presented separately for positive and negative hadrons.

  6. Tsunami response at Wake Island: azimuthal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creswell, Wiltie Austin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occur at certain resonant frequencies. In fact, the response versus frequency for selected azimuthal modes re- sembles, in many respects, that of a psraboloidal island, which is known to partially trap wave energy incident upon it. The implication... near a small Pacific atoll where the bathymetric effects would be minimized at least for the longer period waves. With this rationale in mind, Van Dorn (1960) installed specially designed long period recording gauges near several small Pacific...

  7. Transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsamyan, Bakur

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized 6LiD (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and NH3 (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twsit-2" set of transv...

  8. Transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakur Parsamyan

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized $^{6}LiD$ (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and $NH_{3}$ (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twsit-2" set of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions COMPASS data triggers constant theoretical interest and is being widely used in phenomenological analyses and global data fits. In this review main focus is given to the very recent results obtained by the COMPASS collaboration from first ever multi-dimensional extraction of transverse spin asymmetries.

  9. Azimuthal Dependence of Pion Interferometry at the AGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E895 Collaboration; M. A. Lisa; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; M. Anderson; D. Best; F. P. Brady; T. Case; W. Caskey; D. Cebra; J. L. Chance; P. Chung; B. Cole; K. Crowe; A. C. Das; J. E. Draper; M. L. Gilkes; S. Gushue; M. Heffner; A. S. Hirsch; E. L. Hjort; L. Huo; M. Justice; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. C. Kintner; J. Klay; D. Krofcheck; R. A. Lacey; J. Lauret; H. Liu; Y. M. Liu; R. McGrath; Z. Milosevich; G. Odyniec; D. L. Olson; S. Y. Panitkin; C. Pinkenburg; N. T. Porile; G. Rai; H. G. Ritter; J. L. Romero; R. Scharenberg; L. Schroeder; B. Srivastava; N. T. B. Stone; T. J. M. Symons; R. Wells; J. Whitfield; T. Wienold; R. Witt; L. Wood; W. N. Zhang

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-pion correlation functions, measured as a function of azimuthal emission angle with respect to the reaction plane, provide novel information on the anisotropic shape and orientation of the pion-emitting zone formed in heavy ion collisions. We present the first experimental determination of this information, for semi-central Au+Au collisions at 2-6 AGeV. The source extension perpendicular to the reaction plane is greater than the extension in the plane, and tilt of the pion source in coordinate space is found to be opposite its tilt in momentum space.

  10. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  11. Interval Computations Interval-Valued Inference in Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    CLINAID Ladislav J. Kohout and Isabel Stabile In a series of papers and a monograph [21], we have] - Clinaid. Clinaid - . c L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile, 1993 #12;Interval-Valued Inference substra- #12;90 L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile tum): 1. Diagnostic Unit (comprised of several parallel

  12. Bootstrap Prediction Intervals for Time Series /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.5 Joint Prediction intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6 Generalized Bootstrap prediction1.8.1 Bootstrap Prediction Intervals Based on Studentized

  13. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County Population Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayer, Stefan; Smith, Stanley K.; Tayman, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the determination and prediction of population forecastperformance of empirical prediction intervals? Table 5 shows26, 163–184. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County

  14. INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING: RELIABLE SUB­DIVISION OF GEOLOGICAL AREAS David D. Coblentz, G of the locations which weren't that thoroughly analyzed. 1 #12; 2 The subdivision of a geological zone TOPOGRAPHIC INFORMATION One reason for subjectivity of the geological subdivision is the fact

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - azimuthally symmetric theory Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by natural fracture networks. Summary: moveout inversion in azimuthally anisotropic media with lateral velocity variation: Theory and a case... inversion methods that operate...

  16. Azimuthal asymmetries in the unpolarized SIDIS cross section at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Sbrizzai for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the effects rising from the quarks transverse momentum are part of the scientific program of COMPASS, a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS. The azimuthal asymmetries which appear in the cross-section of SIDIS off unpolarized targets can give insights on the intrinsic momentum structure of the nucleon and on the possible correlation between transverse spin and transverse momentum of the quarks. Here we present the new results for these asymmetries obtained from the COMPASS data collected with a 160 GeV/c positive muon beam impinging on a $^6LiD$ target. The asymmetries are measured for both positive and negative hadrons, and their dependence on several kinematical variable has been studied

  17. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion analytical method to compute the azimuthal modes appearing in annular combustion chambers and help analyzing exper- imental, acoustic and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) data obtained in these combustion chambers

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 35, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 1997 1201 Azimuthal Modulation of C-Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    seasonal sea ice pack are evaluated for azimuthal modulation. When appropriate, the incidence angle results show that over the ice pack, azimuthal modulation is less than 1 dB at the scale of observation, given the dynamic nature of the Antarctic sea ice pack, we do not expect significant azimuth modulation

  19. Transformation of vector beams with radial and azimuthal polarizations in biaxial crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turpin, Alex; Lizana, Angel; Torres-Ruiz, Fabián; Estévez, Irene; Moreno, Ignacio; Campos, Juan; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present both experimentally and theoretically the transformation of radially and azimuthally polarized vector beams when they propagate through a biaxial crystal and are transformed by the conical refraction phenomenon. We show that, at the focal plane, the transverse pattern is formed by a ring-like light structure with an azimuthal node, being this node found at diametrically opposite points of the ring for radial/azimuthal polarizations. We also prove that the state of polarization of the transformed beams is conical refraction-like, i.e. that every two diametrically opposite points of the light ring are linearly orthogonally polarized.

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at ?sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at ?sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  2. High performance path following for marine vehicles using azimuthing podded propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greytak, Matthew B. (Matthew Bardeen)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Podded propulsion systems offer greater maneuvering possibilities for marine vehicles than conventional shaft and rudder systems. As the propulsion unit rotates about its vertical axis to a specified azimuth angle, the ...

  3. Steady and unsteady dynamics of an azimuthing podded propulsor related to vehicle maneuvering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stettler, Jeffrey W. (Jeffrey Wayne)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the implementation of azimuthing propulsors powered by internal electric motors (often called "podded propulsors") into the commercial ship market has been swift, the understanding of their hydrodynamics through ...

  4. Fracture Spacing and Orientation Estimation from Spectral Analyses of Azimuth Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete, vertically aligned fracture systems impart one or more notches in the spectral ratios of stacked reflected seismic traces. This apparent attenuation is due to the azimuth dependant scattering introduced by the ...

  5. Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weining

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

  6. Revisiting Interval Graphs for Network Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loe, Chuan Wen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertices of an interval graph represent intervals over a real line where overlapping intervals denote that their corresponding vertices are adjacent. This implies that the vertices are measurable by a metric and there exists a linear structure in the system. The generalization is an embedding of a graph onto a multi-dimensional Euclidean space and it was used by scientists to study the multi-relational complexity of ecology. However the research went out of fashion in the 1980s and was not revisited when Network Science recently expressed interests with multi-relational networks known as multiplexes. This paper studies interval graphs from the perspective of Network Science.

  7. Expression equivalence checking using interval analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghodrat, Mohammad Ali; Givargis, Tony; Nicolau, Alex

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z. Zhou and W. Burleson, “Equivalence checking of datapathsusing combinational equivalence for extensible processor,”et al. : EXPRESSION EQUIVALENCE CHECKING USING INTERVAL

  8. Bootstrap prediction intervals for Markov processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li; Politis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and William R Schucany. Bootstrap prediction intervals forWolf and Dan Wunderli. Bootstrap joint prediction regions.intuitive to construct bootstrap procedures that run forward

  9. Interval Arithmetic Kalman Filtering Steven Reece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    Interval Arithmetic Kalman Filtering Steven Reece Abstract The problem of robust estimation. The Kalman filter, which is probably the most popular model­based data fusion method, is extended filter (BDF), is proposed which combines interval arithmetic with statistical Kalman filter estimation

  10. Feedback Control Of An Azimuthal Oscillation In The ExB Discharge of Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Martin E.; Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback control of a low-frequency azimuthal wave known as a "rotating spoke" in the ExB discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster was demonstrated. The rotating spoke is an m=1 azimuthal variation in density, electron temperature, and potential that rotates at about 10% of the local E x B electron rotation speed. It causes increased electron transport across the magnetic field and is suspected to be an ionization wave. Feedback control of this wave required special consideration because, although it causes a rotating azimuthal variation in the current density to the anode, it does not show up as a signal in the total thruster discharge current. Therefore, an extra source of information was needed to track the oscillation, which was addressed by using a special anode that was split azimuthally into four segments. The current to each segment oscillates as the rotating spoke passes over it, and feedback is accomplished by resistors connected in series with each anode segment which cause the voltage on a segment to decrease in proportion to the current through that segment. The feedback resulted in the disappearance of a coherent azimuthal wave and a decrease in the time-averaged total discharge current by up to 13.2%.

  11. Challenging claims of "elliptic flow" by comparing azimuth quadrupole and jet-related angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 62 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Trainor; David T. Kettler; Duncan J. Prindle; R. L. Ray

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: A component of azimuth correlations from high-energy heavy ion collisions varying as $\\cos(2\\phi)$ and denoted by symbol $v_2$ is conventionally interpreted to represent "elliptic flow," a hydrodynamic manifestation of the initial-state \\aa overlap geometry. Several numerical methods are used to estimate $v_2$, resulting in various combinations of "flow" and "nonflow" that reveal systematic biases in the $v_2$ estimates. QCD jets contribute strongly to azimuth correlations and specifically to the $\\cos(2\\phi)$ component. Purpose: We question the extent of jet-related ("nonflow") bias in and hydrodynamic "flow" interpretations of $v_2$ measurements. Method: We introduce two-dimensional (2D) model fits to angular correlation data that distinguish accurately between jet-related correlation components and a {\\em nonjet azimuth quadrupole} that might represent "elliptic flow" if that were relevant. We compare measured jet-related and "flow"-related data systematics and determine the jet-related contribution to $v_2$ measurements. Results: Jet structure does introduce substantial bias to conventional $v_2$ measurements, making interpretation difficult. The nonjet quadrupole exhibits very simple systematics on centrality and collision energy---the two variables factorize. Within a \\auau centrality interval where jets show no indication of rescattering or medium effects the nonjet quadrupole amplitude rises to 60% of its maximum value. Conclusions: Disagreements between nonjet quadrupole systematics and hydro theory expectations, the large quadrupole amplitudes observed in more-peripheral \\auau collisions and a significant nonzero value in \

  12. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  13. Two Particle Azimuthal Correlations in C+Ta Collisions at 4.2A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Jotanovic, O. [Faculty of natural science, Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we present study of two particle azimuthal correlations for protons and negative pions in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions. Obtained results are compared with the analysis of azimuthal distribution of particles with respect to the reaction plane.

  14. Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

  15. 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta -Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 32 Center of mass angle hadron decay plane Center of mass direction in lab frame Center of mass frame R #12;2 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta

  16. A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors C. Sensiau CERFACS combustion insta- bilities which can occur in annular combustors is proposed in this work. A thermoacoustic in Annular Combustor (ISAAC) which states that the heat release fluctuations in a given sector are driven

  17. Nuclear modification and azimuthal anisotropy of D mesons produced in relativistic heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younus, Mohammed

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a phenomenological treatment of charm quark energy loss before fragmenting into D mesons and calculate nuclear modification factor, '$R_{AA}$' and azimuthal anisotropy, '$v_2$' of D mesons for lead on lead collision at LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s}$=2.76 A TeV.

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v(1)), elliptic flow (v(2)), and the fourth harmonic (v(4)) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV are summarized and compared...

  19. Simulation of vortex sheet roll-up: chaos, azimuthal waves, ring merger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    Simulation of vortex sheet roll-up: chaos, azimuthal waves, ring merger Robert KRASNY1 , Keith-1109 USA krasny@umich.edu National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate andGlobal Dynamics Boulder, axisymmetric, and three- dimensional flow Krasny &Nitsche 2001; Lindsay & Krasny 2001. Vor- tex sheet

  20. Longitudinal Target-Spin Azimuthal Asymmetry in Deeply-Virtual Compton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to as the longitudinal target-spin asymmetry (LTSA), gives access mainly to the polarized GPD H. The kinematic de- pendences of the LTSA on t, xB and Q2 are measured and compared with the corresponding measurements: DVCS, LTSA, azimuthal, HELIX #12;Zusammenfassung Als eine Verallgemeinerung der gewöhnlichen

  1. Relating Microwave Backscatter Azimuth Modulation to Surface Properties of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Relating Microwave Backscatter Azimuth Modulation to Surface Properties of the Greenland Ice Sheet modulation of the normalized radar cross- section in satellite data sets over Greenland is investigated. Data sastrugi are estimated. I. INTRODUCTION The Greenland ice sheet is a critical area of study in esti- mating

  2. Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and Jurgen Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and J¨urgen Jahns on the classical Fresnel zone plate (FZP) [1]. A simple FZP consists of alternating opaque and transparent rings Fresnel zone plate but to add bridges that hold the zones in place [4], see Fig. 1 right. We refer

  3. Reaction plane angle dependence of dihadron azimuthal correlations from a multiphase transport model calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Li; S. Zhang; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; J. H. Chen; H. Z. Huang; G. L. Ma; C. Zhong

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dihadron azimuthal angle correlations relative to the reaction plane have been investigated in Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT). Such reaction plane azimuthal angle dependent correlations can shed light on path-length effect of energy loss of high transverse momentum particles propagating through the hot dense medium. The correlations vary with the trigger particle azimuthal angle with respect to the reaction plane direction, $\\phi_{s}=\\phi_{T}-\\Psi_{EP}$, which is consistent with the experimental observation by the STAR collaboration. The dihadron azimuthal angle correlation functions on the away side of the trigger particle present a distinct evolution from a single peak to a broad, possibly double peak, structure when the trigger particle direction goes from in-plane to out-of-plane of the reaction plane. The away-side angular correlation functions are asymmetric with respect to the back-to-back direction in some regions of $\\phi_{s}$, which could provide insight on testing $v_{1}$ method to reconstruct the reaction plane. In addition, both the root-mean-square width ($W_{rms}$) of the away-side correlation distribution and the splitting parameter $D$ between the away-side double peaks increase slightly with $\\phi_{s}$, and the average transverse momentum of the away-side associated hadrons shows a strong $\\phi_{s}$ dependence. Our results indicate that strong parton cascade and resultant energy loss could play an important role for the appearance of a double-peak structure in the dihadron azimuthal angular correlation function on the away side of the trigger particle.

  4. Azimuthal correlations of transverse energy for Pb on Pb at 158 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wienold, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Huang, I. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); The NA49 Collaboration

    1996-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal correlations have been studied in heavy ion reactions over a wide range of beam energies. At low incident energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon where collective effects like the directed sidewards flow are generally small, azimuthal correlations provide a useful tool to determine the reaction plane event by event. In the energy regime of the BEVALAC (up to 1 GeV/nucleon for heavy ions) particular emission patterns, i.e. azimuthal correlations of nucleons and light nuclei with respect to the reaction plane, have been associated with the so called squeeze out and sidesplash effects. These effects are of particular interest because of their sensitivity to the equation of state at the high baryon density which is build up during the collision process. Angular distributions similar to the squeeze out have been observed for pions at the SIS in Darmstadt as well as from the EOS - collaboration. Recently also the sideward flow was measured for pions and kaons. However, the origin of the signal in the case of produced mesons is thought to be of a different nature than that for the nucleon flow. At the AGS, azimuthally anisotropic event shapes have been reported from the E877 collaboration for the highest available heavy ion beam energy (11.4 GeV/nucleon). Using a Fourier analysis of the transverse energy distribution measured in calorimeters, it was concluded that sideward flow is still of significant magnitude. Here we will report a first analysis of azimuthal correlations found in the transverse energy distribution from Pb on Pb collisions at the CERN SPS (158 GeV/nucleon).

  5. Bootstrap prediction intervals for linear, nonlinear, and nonparametric autoregressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li; Politis, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intervals in arch models: bootstrap versus parametricRomo, and Esther Ruiz. Bootstrap predictive inference for35] Jonathan J. Reeves. Bootstrap prediction intervals for

  6. Sun-relative pointing for dual-axis solar trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  7. Hadronization Scheme Dependence of Long-Range Azimuthal Harmonics in High Energy p+A Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esposito, Angelo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the distortion effects of three popular final state hadronization schemes that modify the initial-state gluon azimuthal harmonic correlations in high energy p+A collisions. The three models considered are (1) LPH: local parton-hadron duality, (2) CPR: collinear parton-hadron resonance independent fragmenation, and (3) LUND: color string hadronization. Strong initial-state multi-gluon azimuthal correlations are generated using the non-abelian beam jet bremsstrahlung GLVB model, assuming a saturation scale Qsat = 2 GeV. Long-range final hadron pair elliptic and triangular harmonics are compared based on the three hadronization schemes. Our analysis shows that the hadron level harmonics are strongly hadronization scheme dependent in the low pT < 3 GeV domain.

  8. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a longitudinally polarized deuterium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mueller, D; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Schueler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of a real photon from a longitudinally polarized deuterium target are measured with respect to target polarization alone and with respect to target polarization combined with beam helicity and/or beam charge. The asymmetries appear in the distribution of the real photons in the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ around the virtual photon direction, relative to the lepton scattering plane. The asymmetries arise from the deeply virtual Compton scattering process and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The results for the beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries from a tensor polarized deuterium target with vanishing vector polarization are shown to be compatible with those from an unpolarized deuterium target, which is expected for incoherent scattering dominant at larger momentum transfer. Furthermore, the results for the single target-spin asymmetry and for the double-spin asymmetry are found to be compatible with the corresponding asymmetries previously ...

  9. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. I. Local analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, D. [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ahedo, E., E-mail: eduardo.ahedo@uc3m.es [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results based on a local linear stability analysis of the Hall thruster discharge are presented. A one-dimensional azimuthal framework is used including three species: neutrals, singly charged ions, and electrons. A simplified linear model is developed with the aim of deriving analytical expressions to characterize the stability of the ionization region. The results from the local analysis presented here indicate the existence of an instability that gives rise to an azimuthal oscillation in the +E?×?B direction with a long wavelength. According to the model, the instability seems to appear only in regions where the ionization and the electric field make it possible to have positive gradients of plasma density and ion velocity at the same time. A more complex model is also solved numerically to validate the analytical results. Additionally, parametric variations are carried out with respect to the main parameters of the model to identify the trends of the instability. As the temperature increases and the neutral-to-plasma density ratio decreases, the growth rate of the instability decreases down to a limit where azimuthal perturbations are no longer unstable.

  10. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at ?s=7? [square root of s=7]?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding ...

  11. Single Interval Rényi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  12. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of pions in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brill, D.; Ahner, W.; Baltes, P.; Barth, R.; Bormann, C.; Cieslak, M.; Debowski, M.; Grosse, E.; Henning, W.; Koczon, P.; Kohlmeyer, B.; Miskowiec, D.; Muentz, C.; Oeschler, H.; Poeppl, H.; Puehlhofer, F.; Sartorius, S.; Schicker, R.; Senger, P.; Shin, Y.; Speer, J.; Stein, J.; Stiebing, K.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Voelkel, K.; Wagner, A.; Walus, W. (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, D-6000 Frankfurt/Main (Germany) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Philipps-Universitaet, D-3550 Marburg (Germany) Jagiellonian University, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1993-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple differential cross sections [ital d][sup 3][sigma]/[ital dp][sup 3] for charged pions produced in symmetric heavy-ion collisions were measured with the KaoS magnetic spectrometer at the heavy-ion synchrotron facility SIS at GSI. The correlations between the momentum vectors of charged pions and the reaction plane in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at an incident energy of 1 GeV/nucleon were determined. We observe, for the first time, an azimuthally anisotropic distribution of pions, with enhanced emission perpendicular to the reaction plane. The anisotropy is most pronounced for pions of high transverse momentum in semicentral collisions.

  13. The Beam-Charge Azimuthal Asymmetry and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Pickert, N; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Sommer, W; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Volmer, J; Wang, S; Wendland, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross--section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe--Heitler process and the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  14. Azimuthal Anisotropy of $?$ and $?^{0}$ Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions at 2 AGeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Taranenko; A. Kugler; R. Pleskac; P. Tlusty; V. Wagner; H. Lohner; R. W. Ostendorf; R. H. Siemssen; P. H. Vogt; H. W. Wilschut; R. Averbeck; S. Hlavac; R. Holzmann; A. Schubert; R. S. Simon; R. Stratmann; F. Wissmann; Y. Charbonnier; G. Martinez; Y. Schutz; J. Diaz; A. Marin; A. Doppenschmidt; M. Appenheimer; V. Hejny; V. Metag; R. Novotny; H. Stroher; J. Weiss; A. R. Wolf; M. Wolf; TAPS Collaboration

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal distributions of $\\eta$ and $\\pi^{0}$ mesons emitted at midrapidity in collisions of 1.9 AGeV $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and 2 AGeV $^{40}$Ca+$^{nat}$Ca are studied as a function of the number of projectile-like spectator nucleons. The observed anisotropy corresponds to a negative elliptic flow signal for $\\eta$ mesons, indicating a preferred emission perpendicular to the reaction plane. The effect is smallest in peripheral Ni+Ni collisions. In contrast, for $\\pi^{0}$ mesons, elliptic flow is observed only in peripheral Ni+Ni collisions, changing from positive to negative sign with increasing pion transverse momentum.

  15. Deterministic Kalman Filtering on Semi-infinite Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Faybusovich

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 28, 2011 ... Abstract: We relate a deterministic Kalman filter on semi-infinite interval to linear-

  16. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS BY THE INTERVAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS. BY THE INTERVAL ANALYSIS APPROACH: THE BELGIUM NETWORK CASE. J. FRÉDÉRIC BONNANS ...

  17. Feedback control of an azimuthal oscillation in the E Multiplication-Sign B discharge of Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, M. E.; Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback control of a low-frequency azimuthal wave known as a 'rotating spoke' in the E Multiplication-Sign B discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster was demonstrated. The rotating spoke is an m = 1 azimuthal variation in density, electron temperature, and potential that rotates at about 10% of the local E Multiplication-Sign B electron rotation speed. It causes increased electron transport across the magnetic field and is suspected to be an ionization wave. Feedback control of this wave required special consideration because, although it causes a rotating azimuthal variation in the current density to the anode, it does not show up as a signal in the total thruster discharge current. Therefore, an extra source of information was needed to track the oscillation, which was addressed by using a special anode that was split azimuthally into four segments. The current to each segment oscillates as the rotating spoke passes over it, and feedback is accomplished by resistors connected in series with each anode segment which causes the voltage on a segment to decrease in proportion to the current through that segment. The feedback resulted in the disappearance of a coherent azimuthal wave and a decrease in the time-averaged total discharge current by up to 13.2%.

  18. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WORKS ON INTERVAL COMPUTATIONS PUBLISHED IN RUSSIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    the The Editorial Board of "Interval Computations". The Editorial Board of the International Journal "Interval/1993 of the journal "Interval Computations". In this version we keep numbering of references. All corrections methods for the synthesis of regulators. Coll. of scien. proc.", Saratov Polytechnic Institute, Saratov

  19. Preliminaries Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Outline Preliminaries Results Conclusion Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes.Rizzi@unitn.it August the 16th Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12 Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12;Outline

  20. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a longitudinally polarized deuterium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; A. Jgoun; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; B. Krauss; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; D. Mueller; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schueler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; H. Stenzel; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; P. B. Van der Nat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of a real photon from a longitudinally polarized deuterium target are measured with respect to target polarization alone and with respect to target polarization combined with beam helicity and/or beam charge. The asymmetries appear in the distribution of the real photons in the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ around the virtual photon direction, relative to the lepton scattering plane. The asymmetries arise from the deeply virtual Compton scattering process and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The results for the beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries from a tensor polarized deuterium target with vanishing vector polarization are shown to be compatible with those from an unpolarized deuterium target, which is expected for incoherent scattering dominant at larger momentum transfer. Furthermore, the results for the single target-spin asymmetry and for the double-spin asymmetry are found to be compatible with the corresponding asymmetries previously measured on a hydrogen target. For coherent scattering on the deuteron at small momentum transfer to the target, these findings imply that the tensor contribution to the cross section is small. Furthermore, the tensor asymmetry is found to be compatible with zero.

  1. The Tricky Azimuthal Dependence of Jet Quenching at RHIC and LHC via CUJET2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiechen Xu; Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High transverse momentum neutral pion and charged hadron suppression pattern with respect to reaction plane at RHIC and LHC energies in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are studied in a perturbative QCD based model, CUJET2.0. CUJET2.0 has dynamical DGLV radiation kernel and Thoma-Gyulassy elastic energy loss, with both being generalized to including multi-scale running strong coupling as well as energy loss probability fluctuations, and the full jet path integration is performed in a low $p_T$ flow data constrained medium which has 2+1D viscous hydrodynamical expanding profile. We find that in CUJET2.0, with only one control parameter, $\\alpha_{max}$, the maximum coupling strength, fixed to be 0.26, the computed nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are consistent with RHIC and LHC data at average $\\chi^2/d.o.f.<1.5$ level. Simultaneous agreements with high $p_T$ azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ data are acquired given average $\\alpha_{max}$ over in-plane and out-of-plane paths varying as less as 10\\%, suggests a non-trivial dependence of the high $p_T$ single particle $v_2$ on the azimuthally varied strong coupling.

  2. Frequency domain design of interval controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Wunyong

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [0. 9, 1. 1], n& C [0 1, 0. 2], dp C [1. 9, 2. 1], dg E [1. 8, 2. 0], ds C [0. 9, 1. 0]. Then we can construct a set of four Kharitonov polynomials associated with interval polynomials as follows: K?'(s) = 0. 9 + 0. 1s K?(s) = 0 9+ 0 2s K... & in Pop(s) E P(s) is found to be nrf'l(s) 0. 9s + 1. 9 rff l(g) 0. 9s + l. lss + 4. 1s 53 I 2 locus(n ? rh~SS03 Fig. 19. Stability margin of the controller in example 10 (*): Now we use the Tsypkin gl: Polyak locus to get stability margin...

  3. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  4. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian [Baruch College, New York, NY (United States); The City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); China Central Normal Univ., Wuhan (China); Skokov, Vladimir [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions from genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)

  5. Volatility return intervals analysis of the Japanese market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Havlin, Shlomo; Kaizoji, Taisei; Moon, Hie-Tae; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate scaling and memory effects in return intervals between price volatilities above a certain threshold $q$ for the Japanese stock market using daily and intraday data sets. We find that the distribution of return intervals can be approximated by a scaling function that depends only on the ratio between the return interval $\\tau$ and its mean $$. We also find memory effects such that a large (or small) return interval follows a large (or small) interval by investigating the conditional distribution and mean return interval. The results are similar to previous studies of other markets and indicate that similar statistical features appear in different financial markets. We also compare our results between the period before and after the big crash at the end of 1989. We find that scaling and memory effects of the return intervals show similar features although the statistical properties of the returns are different.

  6. Azimuth ambiguity removal and non-linear force-free extrapolation of near-limb magnetic regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudenko, G V; Anfnogentov, S A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possibilities in principle for satisfactory removal of the 180-azimuthal ambiguity in the transverse field of vector magnetograms and the extrapolation of magnetic fields independently of their position on the solar disk are shown. Revealed here is an exact correspondence between the estimated field and the nonpotential loop structure on the limb. The Metropolis's algorithm modified to work in spherical geometry is used to resolve the azimuthal ambiguity. Based on a version of the optimization method from Rudenko and Myshyakov (2009), we use corrected magnetograms as boundary conditions for magnetic field extrapolation in the nonlinear force-free approximation.

  7. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; M. Stancari; M. Statera; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  8. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  9. In situ stress azimuth and magnitude from well log measurements. Final report, May 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walls, J.D.; Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Part 1 is to: (1) theoretically relate static to dynamic moduli in rocks with clays; (2) give a theoretical method for calculating horizontal from vertical stress in rocks with stress-induced anisotropy; and (3) give a theoretical method for accounting for velocity-frequency dispersion in saturated rocks. The new theory of cementation is used to describe stress-strain laws and dynamic moduli in high-porosity granular rocks with clay. The objective of Part 2 is to prove the feasibility of determining maximum and minimum in situ stress azimuth and magnitude from dipole velocity data. The conclusion is that a flexural wave splits into two flexural waves, a slow one and a fast one, that are polarized along the minimum and maximum horizontal stress directions, respectively.

  10. Optimal modeling of 1D azimuth correlations in the context of Bayesian inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Kock, Michiel B; Trainor, Thomas A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis and interpretation of spectrum and correlation data from high-energy nuclear collisions is currently controversial because two opposing physics narratives derive contradictory implications from the same data-one narrative claiming collision dynamics is dominated by dijet production and projectile-nucleon fragmentation, the other claiming collision dynamics is dominated by a dense, flowing QCD medium. Opposing interpretations seem to be supported by alternative data models, and current model-comparison schemes are unable to distinguish between them. There is clearly need for a convincing new methodology to break the deadlock. In this study we introduce Bayesian Inference (BI) methods applied to angular correlation data as a basis to evaluate competing data models. For simplicity the data considered are projections of 2D angular correlations onto 1D azimuth from three centrality classes of 200 GeV Au-Au collisions. We consider several data models typical of current model choices, including Fourier seri...

  11. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chkhaidze, L. V., E-mail: ichkhaidze@yahoo.com; Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute (Georgia); Kladnitskaya, E. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  12. Anisotropic particle production and azimuthal correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize some recent ideas relating to anisotropic particle production in high-energy collisions. Anisotropic gluon distributions lead to anisotropies of the single-particle azimuthal distribution and hence to disconnected contributions to multi-particle cumulants. When these dominate, the four-particle elliptic anisotropy $c_2\\{4\\}$ changes sign. On the other hand, connected diagrams for $m$-particle cumulants are found to quickly saturate with increasing $m$, a ``coherence'' quite unlike conventional ``non-flow'' contributions such as decays. Finally, we perform a first exploratory phenomenological analysis in order to estimate the amplitude ${\\cal A}$ of the $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ anisotropy of the gluon distribution at small $x$, and we provide a qualitative prediction for the elliptic asymmetry from three-particle correlations, $c_2\\{3\\}$.

  13. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  14. Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirner, Hans J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

  15. Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans J. Pirner

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

  16. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon -- Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG) which is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at about 8-10Msun radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of about 8-10Msun, albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any material there-on right up to the surface of the star is directed toward the forming star, hence accretion of mass by the nascent star is un-hampered.

  17. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarised hydrogen target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Diefenthaler

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on a transversely polarised hydrogen target were observed. SSA amplitudes for both the Collins and the Sivers mechanism are presented.

  18. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Ma; Adam Bzdak

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton-parton cross-section of $\\sigma=1.5 - 3$ mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2000 100 Azimuth Variation in Microwave Scatterometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2000 100 Azimuth/Imager (SSM/I) [13] have broad application in atmospheric remote sensing over the ocean and provide essential. Radiative cooling of surface air masses over the in- terior ice sheet causes negative buoyancy and the air

  20. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  1. MODELLING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE BY INTERVAL FEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pownuk, Andrzej

    and the comparison operators and some collection of standard transcendental functions (like sin, cos, power, etc of real function, one can transform system of linear equation into system of linear interval equation K value, one can use interval global optimization [39] or other global optimization method (solon

  2. Scaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets, we study the return intervals between the daily volatilities of the price changes that are above.federal- reserve.gov releases H10 hist. We choose to study daily data records because there are intraday trendsScaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets Kazuko Yamasaki* , Lev

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; V. Bairathi; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; W. Li; X. Li; C. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; R. Ma; Y. G. Ma; L. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; D. Mishra; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; X. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; Z. Tang; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Y. F. Xu; Q. H. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. Yang; C. Yang; S. Yang; Y. Yang; Q. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, $v_2\\{2\\}$ and $v_2\\{4\\}$, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the amount of energy deposited by spectators in the STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of $v_2\\{2\\}$ on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. An initial-state model with gluon saturation describes the slope of $v_2\\{2\\}$ as a function of multiplicity in central collisions better than one based on Glauber with a two-component multiplicity model.

  4. A two-dimensional (azimuthal-axial) particle-in-cell model of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coche, P.; Garrigues, L., E-mail: laurent.garrigues@laplace.univ-tlse.fr [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse 118, route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell model in the azimuthal and axial directions of the Hall thruster. A scaling method that consists to work at a lower plasma density to overcome constraints on time-step and grid-spacing is used. Calculations are able to reproduce the breathing mode due to a periodic depletion of neutral atoms without the introduction of a supplementary anomalous mechanism, as in fluid and hybrid models. Results show that during the increase of the discharge current, an electron-cyclotron drift instability (frequency in the range of MHz and wave number on the order of 3000 rad s{sup ?1}) is formed in the region of the negative gradient of magnetic field. During the current decrease, an axial electric wave propagates from the channel toward the exhaust (whose frequency is on the order of 400?kHz) leading to a broadening of the ion energy distribution function. A discussion about the influence of the scaling method on the calculation results is also proposed.

  5. Azimuthal modulation of cosmic ray flux as an effect of geomagnetic field in the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardini, P; He, H H; Mancarella, G; Perrone, L; Surdo, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomagnetic field causes not only the East-West effect on the primary cosmic rays but also affects the trajectories of the secondary charged particles in the shower, causing their lateral distribution to be stretched along certain directions. Thus both the density of the secondaries near the shower axis and the trigger efficiency of a detector array decrease. The effect depends on the age and on the direction of the showers, thus involving the measured azimuthal distribution. Here the non-uniformity of the azimuthal distribution of the reconstructed events in the ARGO-YBJ experiment is deeply investigated for different zenith angles on the light of this effect. The influence of the geomagnetic field as well as geometric effects are studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Auxiliary quantization constraints on the von Roos ordering-ambiguity at zero binding energies; azimuthally symmetrized cylindrical coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Mustafa

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using azimuthally symmetrized cylindrical coordinates, we report the consequences of zero-energy quantal states on the von Roos Hamiltonian. A position-dependent mass M({\\rho},\\phi,z)=bz^{j}{\\rho}^{2\\u{psion}+1}/2 is used. We show that the zero-energy setting not only offers an additional degree of freedom towards feasible separability for the von Roos Hamiltonian, but also manifestly yields auxiliary quantized ambiguity parametric constraints.

  7. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics; Bzdak, Adam [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Riken BNL Research Center

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  9. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  10. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian; McLerran, Larry; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions frommore »genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)« less

  11. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashida, Misa [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6H 2E1 (Canada); Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  12. Experimental uncertainty estimation and statistics for data having interval uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreinovich, Vladik (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Oberkampf, William Louis (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ginzburg, Lev (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ferson, Scott (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Hajagos, Janos (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the characterization of measurements that include epistemic uncertainties in the form of intervals. It reviews the application of basic descriptive statistics to data sets which contain intervals rather than exclusively point estimates. It describes algorithms to compute various means, the median and other percentiles, variance, interquartile range, moments, confidence limits, and other important statistics and summarizes the computability of these statistics as a function of sample size and characteristics of the intervals in the data (degree of overlap, size and regularity of widths, etc.). It also reviews the prospects for analyzing such data sets with the methods of inferential statistics such as outlier detection and regressions. The report explores the tradeoff between measurement precision and sample size in statistical results that are sensitive to both. It also argues that an approach based on interval statistics could be a reasonable alternative to current standard methods for evaluating, expressing and propagating measurement uncertainties.

  13. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=9.2 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au + Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were...

  14. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in ?s[subscript NN] = ...

  15. Differences in radar derived rainfall amounts due to sampling intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdenek, David James

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1986 Major Subject: Meteorology DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Approved as to style and content by: eorge L. Huebner (Chairman of Committee) CP~ CG~& Robert C...

  16. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  17. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland); STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  18. Measurement of Azimuthal Asymmetries With Respect To Both Beam Charge and Transverse Target Polarization in Exclusive Electroproduction of Real Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetisyan, E; Barion, L; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Bttcher, H; Bonomo, C; Borisov, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapiks, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, S; Lü, X; Ma, B Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W D; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rock, S E; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ruiz, A L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon.

  19. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studiedfor hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  20. Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

  1. Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

  2. On the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Tommie

    of iterated belief revision [5­7]. In the problem of belief set revision, the tpo can be thought of as extraOn the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders Richard Booth1 and Thomas) are often used in belief revision to encode an agent's strategy for revising its belief set in response

  3. Use of Utility Interval Meters in an Industrial Energy Audit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a unique approach to an energy audit of a large tank farm. The audit was unusual in that it was located out-of-doors and the energy-using equipment was made up almost entirely of pumps. The auditors used the utility interval...

  4. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  5. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  6. Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A are generated because of a cyclotron instability of the anisotropic distribution of ring current ions. Proton precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed

  7. Neurocomputing 6566 (2005) 371378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, William B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurocomputing 65­66 (2005) 371­378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes Patrick Crotty making it possible to determine whether the information processing is at an energy-efficient optimum between successive spikes. We compare the frequency and energy-efficiency results to those obtained

  8. Range Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezeshki, Ali

    is sensitive to Doppler effect. Off the zero- Doppler axis the ambiguity function of Golay pairs of phase codedRange Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval Yuejie Chi,1 Ali Pezeshki,2 Robert--We present a novel method of constructing a Doppler resilient pulse train of Golay complementary waveforms

  9. Towards Adding Probabilities and Correlations to Interval Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    or impossible to measure directly. Examples of such quantities are the distance to a star and the amount of oil the interval of possible values of the desired quantity. For example, if we did not detect any pollution, the pollution value v can be anywhere between 0 and the sensor's detection limit DL. In other words, the only

  10. Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fertin, Guillaume

    Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

  11. Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1 , Vladik Kreinovich2 , Pavel Sol´in2 advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher-order finite element methods (hp

  12. GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

  13. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, S., E-mail: sshinoha@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tanikawa, T. [Research Institute of Science and Technology, Tokai University, 4-1-1, Kita-kaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Motomura, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 807-1, Shuku-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 Japan (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, ±1, and ±2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density n{sub e} were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n{sub e} up to ?5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup ?3} was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and ±1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma.

  14. Measurement of the Azimuthal Anisotropy of Neutral Pions in Pb-Pb Collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of neutral pions produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?sNN =2.76??TeV are presented. The amplitudes of the second Fourier component (v2) of the ?0 azimuthal distributions are extracted using an event-plane technique. The values of v2 are studied as a function of the neutral pion transverse momentum (pT) for different classes of collision centrality in the kinematic range 1.6T2(pT) are similar to previously reported ?0 azimuthal anisotropy results from ?sNN=200??GeV Au-Au collisions at RHIC, despite a factor of ?14 increase in the center-of-mass energy. In the momentum range 2.5T<5.0??GeV/c , the neutral pion anisotropies are found to be smaller than those observed by CMS for inclusive charged particles.

  15. Transverse-rapidity $\\bf y_t$ dependence of the nonjet azimuth quadrupole from 62 and 200 GeV Au-Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettler, David T; Trainor, Thomas A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous measurements of a quadrupole component of azimuth correlations denoted by symbol $v_2$ have been interpreted to represent elliptic flow, a hydrodynamic phenomenon conjectured to play a major role in noncentral nucleus-nucleus collisions. $v_2$ measurements provide the main support for conclusions that a ``perfect liquid'' is formed in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). However, conventional $v_2$ methods based on one-dimensional (1D) azimuth correlations give inconsistent results and may include a jet contribution. In some cases the data trends appear to be inconsistent with hydrodynamic interpretations. In this study we distinguish several components of 2D angular correlations and isolate a nonjet (NJ) azimuth quadrupole denoted by $v_2\\{\\text{2D}\\}$. We establish systematic variations of the NJ quadrupole on $y_t$, centrality and collision energy. We adopt transverse rapidity $y_t$ as both a velocity measure and as a logarithmic alternative to transverse momentum $p...

  16. Mixed harmonic azimuthal correlations in Pb--Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76TeV measured with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Hori for the ALICE collaboration

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed harmonic charge dependent azimuthal correlations at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV were measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC. A clear charge dependence for a series of correlations is observed both via the multi-particle cumulant and the event plane methods. Implications from these measurements for the possible effects of local parity violation in QCD and for models which incorporate azimuthal anisotropic flow and "effective" local charge conservation on the kinetic freeze-out surface are discussed.

  17. Single Interval R\\'enyi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  18. Single-spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in Electroproduction of Neutral Pions in Semi-inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouhali, O; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Brunn, I; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Maas, A; Makins, N C R; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sanjiev, I; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Teryaev, O V; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-spin asymmetry in the azimuthal distribution of neutral pions relative to the lepton scattering plane has been measured for the first time in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons off longitudinally polarized protons. The analysing power in the sin(phi) moment of the cross section is 0.019 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.003(syst.). This result is compared to single-spin asymmetries for charged pion production measured in the same kinematic range. The pi^0 asymmetry is of the same size as the pi^+ asymmetry and shows a similar dependence on the relevant kinematic variables. The asymmetry is described by a phenomenological calculation based on a fragmentation function that represents sensitivity to the transverse polarization of the struck quark.

  19. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland); STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  20. Two-particle azimuthal correlations in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj.; Mendas, I. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11081 Belgrade, Serbia (Serbia and Montenegro); Jotanovic, O. [Faculty of Natural Science, Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Milosevic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two particle azimuthal correlations are studied in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions observed with the 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed at JINR Dubna Synchrophasotron. The correlations are analyzed both for protons and negative pions, and their dependence on the collision centrality, rapidity and rapidity difference is investigated. It is found that protons show a weak back-to-back correlations, while a side-by-side correlations are observed for negative pions. Restricting both protons to the target or projectile fragmentation region, the side-by-side correlations are observed for protons also. Using the two particle correlation function, the flow analysis is performed and intensity of directed flow is determined without event-by event estimation of the reaction plane.

  1. Asymmetries of azimuthal photon distributions in non-linear Compton scattering in ultra-short intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seipt, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linear Compton scattering in ultra-short intense laser pulses is discussed with the focus on angular distributions of the emitted photon energy. This is an observable which is accessible easily experimentally. Asymmetries of the azimuthal distributions are predicted for both linear and circular polarization. We present a systematic survey of the influence of the laser intensity, the carrier envelope phase and the laser polarization on the emission spectra for single-cycle and few-cycle laser pulses. For linear polarization, the dominant direction of the emission changes from a perpendicular pattern with respect to the laser polarization at low-intensity to a dominantly parallel emission for high-intensity laser pulses.

  2. Asymmetries of azimuthal photon distributions in non-linear Compton scattering in ultra-short intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Seipt; B. Kampfer

    2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linear Compton scattering in ultra-short intense laser pulses is discussed with the focus on angular distributions of the emitted photon energy. This is an observable which is accessible easily experimentally. Asymmetries of the azimuthal distributions are predicted for both linear and circular polarization. We present a systematic survey of the influence of the laser intensity, the carrier envelope phase and the laser polarization on the emission spectra for single-cycle and few-cycle laser pulses. For linear polarization, the dominant direction of the emission changes from a perpendicular pattern with respect to the laser polarization at low-intensity to a dominantly parallel emission for high-intensity laser pulses.

  3. Measurement of the Azimuthal Anisotropy of Neutral Pions in Pb-Pb Collisions at ?s(NN)=2.76??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    First measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of neutral pions produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?s(NN)=2.76??TeV are presented. The amplitudes of the second Fourier component (v(2)) of the ?(0) ...

  4. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in Pb-Pb collisions at ?s NN=2.76TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pT) range up to approximately 60??GeV/c. The data cover ...

  5. A scheme for fast exploratory simulation of azimuthal asymmetries in Drell-Yan experiments at intermediate energies. The DY_AB Monte Carlo event generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Bianconi

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note I report and discuss the physical scheme and the main approximations used by the event generator code DY\\_AB. This Monte Carlo code is aimed at preliminary simulation, during the stage of apparatus planning, of Drell-Yan events characterized by azimuthal asymmetries, in experiments with moderate center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ $<<$ 100 GeV.

  6. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartment ofFossilFredFrequent-Interval

  7. Parametric Bootstrap Interval Approach to Inference for Fixed Effects in the Mixed Linear Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staggs, Vincent

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    approximation of the test statistic distribution by some known distribution, and may not perform well under small samples. The parametric bootstrap interval is presented as an alternative to standard methods of inference. Several parametric bootstrap intervals...

  8. Scar sarcoidosis with a 50-year interval between an accident and onset of lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jr, Hiram Larangeira de Almeida; Fiss, Roberto Coswig

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year interval between an accident and onset of lesions Hiramreported in scars of accidents [ 2 ], herpes zoster [ 1 ],

  9. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in non-central collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three particle mixed harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho}-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators, and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  10. Beyond Collins and Sivers: further measurements of the target transverse spin-dependent azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS from COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Kotzinian

    2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In semi-inclusive DIS of polarized leptons on a transversely polarized target eight azimuthal modulations appear in the cross-section. Within QCD parton model four azimuthal asymmetries can be interpreted at leading order, two of them being the already measured Collins and Sivers asymmetries. The other two leading twist asymmetries, related to different transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions, and also additional four asymmetries which can be interpreted as twist-three contributions have been measured for the first time at COMPASS, using a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized ($P_{beam}\\simeq -0.8$) muon beam and a transversely polarized $^6LiD$ target. We present here the preliminary results from the 2002-2004 data.

  11. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76\\ \\mbox{TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  12. Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV in a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Wu Nie; Guo-Liang Ma

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets [$v_{n}^{jet} (n=2, 3)$] have been investigated in Pb+Pb collisions at the center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV within a framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The $v_{2}^{jet}$ is in good agreement with the recent ATLAS data. However, the $v_{3}^{jet}$ shows a smaller magnitude than $v_{2}^{jet}$, and approaches zero at a larger transverse momentum. It is attributed to the path-length dependence in which the jet energy loss fraction depends on the azimuthal angles with respect to different orders of event planes. The ratio $v_{n}^{jet}/\\varepsilon_{n}$ increases from peripheral to noncentral collisions, and $v_{n}^{jet}$ increases with the initial spatial asymmetry ($\\varepsilon_{n}$) for a given centrality bin. These behaviors indicate that the $v_{n}^{jet}$ is produced by the strong interactions between jet and the partonic medium with different initial geometry shapes. Therefore, azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jet are proposed as a good probe to study the initial spatial fluctuations, which are expected to provide constraints on the path-length dependence of jet quenching models.

  13. Measurement of the Azimuthal Angle Dependence of Inclusive Jet Yields in Pb + Pb Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76??TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, ??, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has ...

  14. Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  15. Azimuthal reflectivity inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mshepher

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    D., 2010, Principle stress estimation in shale plays using 3D seismic : GeoCanada. Hudson, J. A., 1981, Wave speeds and attenuation of elastic waves in ...

  16. Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider multi-target linear-quadratic control problem on semi- infinite interval. We show that the problem can be reduced to a simple convex optimization ...

  17. Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Faybusovich

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 12, 2011 ... Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval. L. Faybusovich (leonid.faybusovich.1 ***at*** nd.edu) T Mouktonglang ...

  18. Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Smith

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

  19. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R&D-1 project titled ``Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.`` The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  20. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN,

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  1. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=9.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lattice QCD [7] and those from several QCD-based models [8] suggest that for collisions corresponding to large ?B , the transition is first order. The point in the (T ,?B) plane where the first-order phase transition ends, is the QCD critical point [9... to obtain the results on pT spectra, yields, particle ratios, azimuthal anisotropy parameters, and pion interferometry for charged hadrons is the time projection chamber (TPC) [16]. The TPC is the primary tracking device at STAR. It is 4.2 m long and 4 m...

  2. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in $p^\\uparrow+p$ at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; X. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; C. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; X. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; Y. G. Ma; G. L. Ma; L. Ma; R. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; X. Sun; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; Y. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; S. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; X. P. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in $p^\\uparrow+p$ collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of five standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities eta>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the rho-meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. Comparing the results to data from lepton-nucleon scattering will test the universality of these spin-dependent quantities.

  3. Measurement of J/{psi} Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at {sqrt{s_{NN}}} = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of J/{psi} azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at {sqrt{s_{NN}}} = 200 GeV. The measured J/{psi} elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/{psi} with relatively large transverse momentum are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  4. Observation of different azimuthal emission patterns for K+ and of K- mesons in Heavy Ion Collisions at 1-2 AGeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Uhlig; A. Foerster; I. Boettcher; M. Debowski; F. Dohrmann; E. Grosse; P. Koczon; B. Kohlmeyer; F. Laue; M. Menzel; L. Naumann; H. Oeschler; W. Scheinast; E. Schwab; P. Senger; Y. Shin; H. Stroebele; C. Sturm; G. Surowka; A. Wagner; W. Walus

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal distributions of pi+, K+ and K- mesons have been measured in Au+Au reactions at 1.5 AGeV and Ni+Ni reactions at 1.93 AGeV. In semi-central collisions at midrapidity, pi+ and K+ mesons are emitted preferentially perpendicular to the reaction plane in both collision systems. In contrast for K- mesons in Ni+Ni reactions an in-plane elliptic flow was observed for the first time at these incident energies.

  5. Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval GARY L. THORNE Abstract Inhibition of the startle eyeblink response at long lead intervals has been hypothesized to occur the lead and startle stimuli are in different modalities under conditions of high perceptual load

  6. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1 Kazuko interval between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold q for 31 intraday data sets Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  7. 286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Using Denumerable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericola, Bruno

    286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Gerard0 Rubino and Bruno Sericola Abstiact-Interval availability is a dependability measure de- fined availability level is high enough. The system is assumed to be modeled as a Markov process with countable state

  8. Convergence Properties of an Interval Probabilistic Approach to System Reliability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    by the values of the corresponding parameters x = x(1), x(2), . . . , x(n) ; for example, for a nuclear reactor, interval analysis, reliability analysis, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, random sets, random intervals of these parameters, the system exhibits certain characteristics y = y(1), y(2), . . . , y(m) ; e.g., for a nuclear

  9. LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK Abstract­ the Lyapunov spectral intervals. Since any bounded and continuous coeficient matrix function can be smoothly/or continuous Lyapunov spectrum. Key words. Exponential dichotomy, Sacker-Sell spectrum, Lyapunov exponents

  10. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions. Expressed in terms of the Fourier components of the azimuthal distribution, the n = 3-6 harmonic coefficients are presented for charged particles as a function of their transverse momentum (0.3 < pt < 8.0 GeV), collision centrality (0-70%), and pseudorapidity (abs(eta) < 2.0). The data are analyzed using the event plane, multiparticle cumulant, and Lee-Yang zeros methods, which provide different sensitivities to initial-state fluctuations. Taken together with earlier LHC measurements of elliptic flow (n = 2), the results on higher-order harmonic coefficients develop a more complete picture of the collective motion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and shed light on the properties of the produced medium.

  11. Azimuthal Correlations with High-pT Multi-Hadron Cluster Triggers in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Haag; for the STAR Collaboration

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Di-hadron correlation measurements have been used to probe di-jet production in collisions at RHIC. A strong suppression of the away-side high-pT yield in these measurements is direct evidence that high-pT partons lose energy as they traverse the strongly interacting medium. However, since the momentum of the trigger particle is not a good measure of the jet energy, azimuthal di-hadron correlations have limited sensitivity to the shape of the fragmentation function. We explore the possibility to better constrain the initial parton energy by using clusters of multiple high-pT hadrons in a narrow cone as the 'trigger particle' in the azimuthal correlation analysis. We present first results from this analysis of multi-hadron triggered correlated yields in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV from STAR. The results are compared to Pythia calculations, and the implications for energy loss and jet fragmentation are discussed.

  12. Towards the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of "Chelyabinsk" meteorite fall according to the data from coherent radar, GPS and seismic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berngardt, O I; Kutelev, K A; Zherebtsov, G A; Dobrynina, A A; Shestakov, N V; Zagretdinov, R V; Bakhtiyarov, V F; Kusonsky, O A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a study of the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of the meteorite 'Chelyabinsk', based on the data from the network of GPS receivers, coherent decameter radar EKB SuperDARN and network of seismic stations. It is shown, that 6-14 minutes after the bolide explosion, GPS network observed the cone-shaped wavefront of TIDs that is interpreted as a ballistic acoustic wave. The typical TIDs propagation velocity were observed 661+/-256m/s, which corresponds to the expected acoustic wave speed for 240km height. 14 minutes after the bolide explosion, at distances of 200km we observed the emergence and propagation of a TID with spherical wavefront, that is interpreted as gravitational mode of internal acoustic waves. The propagation velocity of this TID was 337+/-89m/s which corresponds to the propagation velocity of these waves in similar situations. At EKB SuperDARN radar, we observed TIDs in the sector of azimuthal angles close to the perpendicular to the meteorite...

  13. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions. Expressed in terms of the Fourier components of the azimuthal distribution, the n = 3-6 harmonic coefficients are presented for charged particles as a function of their transverse momentum (0.3 harmonic coefficients develop a more complete picture of the collective motion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and shed light on the properties of the produced medium.

  14. Mixed harmonic charge dependent azimuthal correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV measured with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuto Hori; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed harmonic charge dependent azimuthal correlations at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV were measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC. A clear charge dependence for a series of correlations is observed both via the multi-particle cumulant and the event plane methods. Implications from these measurements for the possible effects of the local parity violation in QCD and for models which incorporate the azimuthal anisotropic flow and the local charge conservation on the kinetic freeze-out surface are discussed.

  15. Computing Best Possible Pseudo-Solutions to Interval Linear Systems of Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    . Panyukov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia a_panyukov@mail.ru Valentin A. Golodov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia avaksa@gmail.com Abstract In the paper, we consider interval

  16. Fast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    engineering applications, we are interested in computing statistics. For example, in environmental analysis, a reasonable statistic for estimating the mean value of a probability distribution is the population average EFast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty

  17. The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Ji Won

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity. In order to accomplish the research goal, brickwork of five different construction sites was videotaped. Various interval time-lapse photographs were generated from each video. Worker?s activity in these photographs was examined and graded...

  18. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinchen

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate ...

  19. Adult Age Differences in the Forgetting of Verbal Material Over Extended Time Intervals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Selliers, Sophie

    2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . The role of semantic organization on forgetting rates was also examined. Rate of forgetting was measured as a percentage of words initially recalled, at time intervals of 30 minutes, 24 hours, and seven days. Results showed that older participants forgot...

  20. Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

    1 Copyright ? 2005 by ASME CASE STUDIES IN USING WHOLE BUILDING INTERVAL DATA TO DETERMINE ANNUALIZED ELECTRICAL SAVINGS Mark Effinger James Anthony Lia Webster Engineer Engineer Senior Engineer Portland Energy Conservation, Inc... Portland, OR USA ABSTRACT Whole building interval analysis to determine savings from energy reduction measures is addressed in several guidelines. The whole building method has typically focused on measured savings where baseline regression...

  1. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}} > 0 $ at $r r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$. We compare the value of $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at $rwind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ exceeds $Q_{\\alpha}$ at $r < 1\\,\\mathrm{AU}$, $Q_{...

  2. On the dependence of the efficiency of a 240?GHz high-power gyrotron on the displacement of the electron beam and on the azimuthal index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumbrajs, O. [Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP), Association EUROATOM-University of Latvia, Kengaraga iela 8, LV-1063 Riga (Latvia)] [Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP), Association EUROATOM-University of Latvia, Kengaraga iela 8, LV-1063 Riga (Latvia); Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Jelonnek, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Association EURATOM-KIT, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Association EURATOM-KIT, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two issues in the cavity design for a Megawatt-class, 240?GHz gyrotron are addressed. Those are first, the effect of a misaligned electron beam on the gyrotron efficiency and second, a possible azimuthal instability of the gyrotron. The aforementioned effects are important for any gyrotron operation, but could be more critical in the operation of Megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies above 200 GHz, which will be the anticipated requirement of DEMO. The target is to provide some basic trends to be considered during the refinement and optimization of the design. Self-consistent calculations are the base for simulations wherever possible. However, in cases for which self-consistent models were not available, fixed-field results are presented. In those cases, the conservative nature of the results should be kept in mind.

  3. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclearmodification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman,R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll,J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay,S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Drosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; et al.

    2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v{sub 2} and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R{sub CP} for kaons and lambdas ({Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}}) at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In combination, the v{sub 2} and R{sub CP} particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p{sub T} {approx} 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}} v{sub 2} values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination.

  4. Determination of the Azimuthal Asymmetry of Deuteron Photodisintegration in the Energy Region E{sub {gamma}} = 1.1 - 2.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas Zachariou

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Deuteron photodisintegration is a benchmark process for the investigation of the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei. Existing theoretical models of this process describe the available cross sections with the same degree of success. Therefore, spin-dependent observables are crucial for a better understanding of the underlying dynamical mechanisms. However, data on the induced polarization (P{sub y}), along with the polarization transfers (C{sub x'} and C{sub z'} ), have been shown to be insensitive to differences between theoretical models. On the other hand, the beam-spin asymmetry {Sigma} is predicted to have a large sensitivity and is expected to help in identifying the energy at which the transition from the hadronic to the quark-gluon picture of the deuteron takes place. Here, the work done to determine the experimental values of the beam-spin asymmetry in deuteron photodisintegration for photon energies between 1.1 ? 2.3 GeV is presented. The data were taken with the CLAS at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility during the g13 experiment. Photons with linear polarization of ~80% were produced using the coherent bremsstrahlung facility in Hall B. The work done by the author to calibrate a specific detector system, select deuteron photodisintegration events, study the degree of photon polarization, and finally determine the azimuthal asymmetry and any systematic uncertainties associate with it, is comprehensively explained. This work shows that the collected data provide the kinematic coverage and statistics to test the available QCD-based models. The results of this study show that the available theoretical models in their current state do not adequately predict the azimuthal asymmetry in the energy region 1.1 ? 2.3 GeV.

  5. Azimuthal correlation between the $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{p}_{X_b})$ and $(\\vec{p}_l,\\vec{P}_t)$ planes in the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark: An $O(?_s)$ effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Groote; W. S. Huo; A. Kadeer; J. G. Korner

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal correlation between the planes formed by the vectors $(\\vec{p}_\\ell,\\vec{p}_{X_b})$ and $(\\vec{p}_\\ell,\\vec{P}_t)$ in the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark $t(\\uparrow) \\to X_b + l^+ + \

  6. Distribution of Primes and of Interval Prime Pairs Based on $?$ Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Fan; Zhiyu Li

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\Theta$ function is defined based upon Kronecher symbol. In light of the principle of inclusion-exclusion, $\\Theta$ function of sine function is used to denote the distribution of composites and primes. The structure of Goldbach Conjecture has been analyzed, and $\\Xi$ function is brought forward by the linear diophantine equation; by relating to $\\Theta$ function, the interval distribution of composite pairs and prime pairs (i.e. the Goldbach Conjecture) is thus obtained. In the end, Abel's Theorem (Multiplication of Series) is used to discuss the lower limit of the distribution of the interval prime pairs.

  7. Relativistic velocity addition and the relativity of space and time intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A thought experiment first proposed by Sartori is analysed using the parallel velocity addition formula of special relativity. The distances and proper-time intervals between some similarly defined spatial coincidence events are found to be widely different in different inertial frames. This relativity of space and time intervals is quite distinct from the well-known time-dilatation and length contraction effects of special relativity. Sartori's claimed derivation of the parallel velocity addition formula, assuming relativistic time dilatation, based on the thought experiment, is shown to be fortuitous.

  8. Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ordo~nez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordóñez, Fernando

    Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ord´o~nez , and Kurt Palmer Representative origin-destination (OD) demand tables are a crucial part of making many transportation models relevant to practice. However estimating these OD tables is a challenging problem, even more so determining

  9. MonteCarloType Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte­Carlo­Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  10. Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  11. ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY USING MCMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY and Computing Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana USA ABSTRACT Climate models that predict polar ice sheet behavior require accurate measurements of the bedrock-ice and ice-air bound- aries in ground

  12. Physiologically realistic modelling of a mechanism for neural representation of intervals of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    -8610, Japan c CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Saitama 332-0012, Japan Abstract A model, Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd., 430 Sakai, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 259-0157, Japan b Department as well as the difference stated above, will lead us to the idea that an interval of time, T

  13. Optimal interval clustering: Application to Bregman clustering and statistical mixture learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Frank

    clustering of n scalar elements into k pairwise disjoint intervals. This case includes 1D Euclidean k-means- hood. Index Terms--Clustering, dynamic programming, k-means, Bregman divergences, statistical mixtures is the celebrated k-means [1] that seeks to minimize the sum of intra-cluster variances by prescribing beforehand

  14. Batch self-organizing maps based on city-block distances for interval variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methods [14, 18]. K-means algorithm and fuzzy c-means are the most famous partitional approaches learning strategy which has both clustering and visualization properties. Different from K-means, SOM uses interval-valued data sets, in comparison with batch SOM algorithms based on adaptive and non

  15. Modeling Effects of Rhythmic Context on Perceived Duration: A Comparison of Interval and Entrainment Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Jones Ohio State University Relative merits of interval and entrainment conceptions of the internal. Research on timing and time perception has a long, well- established history in experimental psychology, 2001b; Killeen & Weiss, 1987). This is perhaps not surprising, because arguably all human behaviors

  16. Robust control for a class of interval model: application to the force control of piezoelectric cantilevers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the second one on force [4][5]. In order to synthesize a controller for the manipulation force, a model is necessary. However, it is known that the model linking this manipulation force and the input controlRobust control for a class of interval model: application to the force control of piezoelectric

  17. STRONG NEGATION: ITS RELATION TO INTERVALS AND ITS USE IN EXPERT SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Mexico State University Environmental and Earth Studies) Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA University of Texas of Electrical Engineering Nghia­Do, Tu­Liem Czech Technical University Institute of Information Technology, Vietnam email navara@cmp.felk.cvut.cz email nhphuong@bdvn.vnmail.vnd.net I. INTERVALS IN DIFFERENT LOGICS

  18. Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas David D. Coblentz, G. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often a controversial issue, with different evidence of the geological subdivision is the fact that the existing subdivision is often based on the chemical and physical

  19. Estimation of shear-wave interval attenuation from mode-converted data Bharath Shekar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    Tsvankin1 ABSTRACT Interval attenuation measurements provide valuable infor- mation for reservoir characterization and lithology discrimi- nation. We extend the attenuation layer-stripping method of Behura of the material (Prasad and Nur, 2003), the pre- sence of aligned fluid-filled fractures (Chapman, 2003; Batzle et

  20. VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola Department of Physics ra- diation. This article examines at the variability of beam and global solar radiation over short solar radiation values with ground-based data. 1. INTRODUCTION It is difficult to evaluate solar

  1. A Genealogy for Finite Kneading Sequences of Bimodal Maps on the Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ringland; Charles Tresser

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We generate all the finite kneading sequences of one of the two kinds of bimodal map on the interval, building each sequence uniquely from a pair of shorter ones. There is a single pair at generation 0, with members of length 1. Concomitant with this genealogy of kneading sequences is a unified genealogy of all the periodic orbits. (6/93)

  2. Modal Transition Systems with Weight Intervals , Kim G. Larsen, Jiri Srba1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srba, Jiri

    Modal Transition Systems with Weight Intervals Line Juhl , Kim G. Larsen, Jir´i Srba1 Aalborg weighted modal transition systems, an extension to the well-studied specification formalism of modal transition systems that allows to express both required and optional behaviours of their intended

  3. Prediction Intervals for NAR Model Structures Using a Bootstrap De Brabanter J.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediction Intervals for NAR Model Structures Using a Bootstrap Method De Brabanter J structure. Our approach relies on the external bootstrap procedure [1]. This method is contrasted. In this paper, an external bootstrap method will be proposed for this purpose. The bootstrap is a computer

  4. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  5. Estimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , uncertain systems, microalgae biofuel, neu- tral lipid. 1 Introduction Microalgae are a promising sourceEstimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers stress conditions, microalgae are known to accumulate large amounts of neutral lipids and carbohydrates

  6. Original Research Article First Birth Interval, An Indicator of Energetic Status, Is a Predictor of Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    by a shorter waiting time to the first birth (first birth interval, FBI), are able to afford higher costs was divided into tertiles based on the length of FBI. Results: Women with the shortest FBI had a higher number.06). Women who had ever given birth to twins had shorter FBI than women of singletons (20.1 and 26.1 months

  7. Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval-parameter-programming-based approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval A sophisticated biodiesel manufacturing study demonstrated methodological efficacy. a r t i c l e i n f o Article Simulation Uncertainty a b s t r a c t Biodiesel, a clean-burning alternative fuel, can be produced using

  8. LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION #3; LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z dichotomy of Sacker and Sell and the spectrum de#12;ned in terms of upper and lower Lyapunov exponents information. Finally, we discuss the algorithms we have used to approximate the Lyapunov and Sacker

  9. In-flight Receptivity Experiments on a 30-degree Swept-wing using Micron-sized Discrete Roughness Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Andrew L.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and operated at a chord Reynolds number of 6.5 to 7.5 million. Spanwise-periodic, micronsized discrete roughness elements were applied at the leading edge of the swept-wing in order to excite the most unstable crossflow wavelength and promote early boundary...

  10. Azimuthal decorrelations and multiple parton interactions in photon+2 jet and photon+3 jet events in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of inclusive {gamma} + 2 jet and {gamma} + 3 jet events collected by the D0 experiment with an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are used to measure cross sections as a function of the angle in the plane transverse to the beam direction between the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of the {gamma} + leading jet system (jets are ordered in p{sub T}) and p{sub T} of the other jet for {gamma} + 2 jet, or p{sub T} sum of the two other jets for {gamma} + 3 jet events. The results are compared to different models of multiple parton interactions (MPI) in the pythia and sherpa Monte Carlo (MC) generators. The data indicate a contribution from events with double parton (DP) interactions and are well described by predictions provided by the pythia MPI models with p{sub T}-ordered showers and by sherpa with the default MPI model. The {gamma} + 2 jet data are also used to determine the fraction of events with DP interactions as a function of the azimuthal angle and as a function of the second jet p{sub T}.

  11. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 9.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at {radical}s{sub NN} = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar {radical}s{sub NN} from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate that the capabilities of the STAR detector, although optimized for {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, are suitable for the proposed QCD critical point search and exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

  12. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pt) range up to approximately 60 GeV. The data cover both the low-pt region associated with hydrodynamic flow phenomena and the high-pt region where the anisotropies may reflect the path-length dependence of parton energy loss in the created medium. The anisotropy parameter (v2) of the particles is extracted by correlating charged tracks with respect to the event-plane reconstructed by using the energy deposited in forward-angle calorimeters. For the six bins of collision centrality studied, spanning the range of 0-60% most-central events, the observed v2 values are found to first increase with pt, reaching a maximum around pt = 3 GeV, and then to gradually decrease to almost zero, with the decline persisting up to at least pt = 40 GeV over the full centrality range measured.

  13. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; Daniel Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta \\pt{} of charged particles associated with intermediate to high-\\pt{} trigger particles ($2.5 < \\pt < 10$ \\GeVc) in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\snn=200$ GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher $\\pt \\gtrsim 2.5$ \\GeVc, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+Au and Au+Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle $\\pt < 2$ \\GeVc, a large enhancement of the near- ($\\dphi \\sim 0$) and away-side ($\\dphi \\sim \\pi$) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au+Au collisions compared to d+Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at $\\dphi \\sim \\pi$ in central Au+Au collisions.

  14. Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

  15. Interval Data Analysis with the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Koran, William

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing whole building interval data is an inexpensive but effective way to identify and improve building operations, and ultimately save money. Utilizing the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM) add-in for Microsoft Excel, building operators and managers can begin implementing changes to their Building Automation System (BAS) after trending the interval data. The two data components needed for full analyses are whole building electricity consumption (kW or kWh) and outdoor air temperature (OAT). Using these two pieces of information, a series of plots and charts and be created in ECAM to monitor the buildings performance over time, gain knowledge of how the building is operating, and make adjustments to the BAS to improve efficiency and start saving money.

  16. Genetic and interval mapping of the bovine X chromosome for quantitative trait loci using microsatellite markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Chen-Chen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mapping MATERIALS AND METHODS . 16 16 17 18 19 20 20 22 22 23 25 Animals . Microsatellite markers Polymerase chain reaction Genetic/Linkage map QTL detection Phenotypic data Statistical analysis . 25 28 31 31 32 33 35 RESULTS... AND DISCUSSION 36 Microsatellite scoring . Linkage analysis . QTL analysis . Interval mapping . 36 37 51 52 CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED 65 VITA 85 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page A summary of bovine X-linked traits . 12 Structure and breed composition...

  17. Z .International Journal of Psychophysiology 32 1999 239 250 Attentional modulation of short-and long-lead-interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and long-lead-interval modification of the acoustic startle eyeblink response: comparing auditory that modification of startle by lead stimuli with short- and long-lead-intervals is modulated by stimulus significance. The significant stimulus in a tone duration judgement task generates enhanced short-lead

  18. CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point estimates for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in SURPH 3 The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point based on profile likelihoods provide a non-parametric alternative. In most instances there will be close that the profile likelihood confidence intervals should be used. The theory behind profile likelihood confidence

  19. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1

  20. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM), Martin; Grant D. (Marlborough, MA), Holzrichter; Michael W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  1. Azimuthal asymmetries in pion electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delia Hasch XL International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics, Bormio, 09/01/2002 3 #12; WHY. (+; ;+; ) g 1 : 1. + 2. 3. (+; ; ;+) h1 : 3. Delia Hasch XL International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics to the transversity Delia Hasch XL International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics, Bormio, 09/01/2002 6 #12; semi

  2. Short-interval multi-laser Thomson scattering measurements of hydrogen pellet ablation in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuhara, R., E-mail: yasuhara@nifs.ac.jp; Sakamoto, R.; Yamada, I.; Motojima, G.; Hayashi, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322–6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509–5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomson scattering forms an important aspect of measuring the electron density and temperature profiles of plasmas. In this study, we demonstrate Thomson scattering measurements obtained over a short interval (<1 ms) by using an event triggering system with a multi-laser configuration. We attempt to use our system to obtain the electron temperature and density profiles before and immediately after pellet injection into the large helical device. The obtained profiles exhibit dramatic changes after pellet injection as per our shot-by-shot measurements. We believe that this measurement technique will contribute towards a better understanding of the physics of the pellet deposition.

  3. Is walking a random walk? Evidence for long-range correlations in stride interval of human gait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interval of 10 healthy young men was measured as they walked for 9 min at their usual rate. From these time, and the basal ganglia, as well as feedback from visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensors. Under healthy

  4. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time...

  5. Clastic facies and diagenesis, Lewis-Evans interval in Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaves, A.W.; Bat, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface maps of the Lewis and Evans sandstone-facies tracts (Chester Group) on the northern shelf of the Black Warrior basin document two distinct deltaic depositional systems, each having a source area from the Mid-Dontinent interior. Within the Lewis genetic interval, six dip-elongate, river-dominated, cratonic delta lobes comprise the principal coarse-grained clastic units. However, in the higher Evans interval, five strike-elongate (cuspate) wave-dominated lobes are present on the northwestern rim of the basin. Petrographic evidence from four Mississippi cores associated with delta-plain and delta-front facies in the two sandstone unites indicates a dominance of monocrystalline quartz and chert rock fragments and a relative absence of orogenic indicators such as polycrystalline quartz, muscovite, and metamorphic rock fragments. Porosity development results largely from the formation of moldic secondary porosity and enlarged intergranular porosity. Primary porosity is occluded by the precipitation of quartz overgrowths and early calcite cement. Secondary moldic porosity was generated through the dissolution of feldspars and shale fragments. Enlarged intergranular porosity resulted from the dissolution of detrital illite matrix. Secondary porosity itself is partially occluded by authigenic kaolinite and illite, as well as by late-stage pyrite and dolomite.

  6. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, K; Havlin, Shlomo; Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the return interval $\\tau$ between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold $q$ for 31 intraday datasets, including the Standard & Poor's 500 index and the 30 stocks that form the Dow Jones Industrial index. For different threshold $q$, the probability density function $P_q(\\tau)$ scales with the mean interval $\\bar{\\tau}$ as $P_q(\\tau)={\\bar{\\tau}}^{-1}f(\\tau/\\bar{\\tau})$, similar to that found in daily volatilities. Since the intraday records have significantly more data points compared to the daily records, we could probe for much higher thresholds $q$ and still obtain good statistics. We find that the scaling function $f(x)$ is consistent for all 31 intraday datasets in various time resolutions, and the function is well approximated by the stretched exponential, $f(x)\\sim e^{-a x^\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma=0.38\\pm 0.05$ and $a=3.9\\pm 0.5$, which indicates the existence of correlations. We analyze the conditional probability distribution $P_q(\\tau|\\tau_0)$ for $\\tau$ following a certa...

  7. The Entanglement Renyi Entropies of Disjoint Intervals in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Faulkner

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study entanglement Renyi entropies (EREs) of 1+1 dimensional CFTs with classical gravity duals. Using the replica trick the EREs can be related to a partition function of n copies of the CFT glued together in a particular way along the intervals. In the case of two intervals this procedure defines a genus n-1 surface and our goal is to find smooth three dimensional gravitational solutions with this surface living at the boundary. We find two families of handlebody solutions labelled by the replica index n. These particular bulk solutions are distinguished by the fact that they do not spontaneously break the replica symmetries of the boundary surface. We show that the regularized classical action of these solutions is given in terms of a simple numerical prescription. If we assume that they give the dominant contribution to the gravity partition function we can relate this classical action to the EREs at leading order in G_N. We argue that the prescription can be formulated for non-integer n. Upon taking the limit n -> 1 the classical action reproduces the predictions of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for the entanglement entropy.

  8. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)

  9. Oscillating HBT radii and the time evolution of the source - sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au data analyzed with azimuthally sensitive Buda-Lund hydro model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ster; M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad; B. Tomasik

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Identified particle spectra of pions, kaons and (anti)protons, and elliptic flow and azimuthal dependence of Bose-Einstein or HBT correlations of identified pions in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is analyzed simultaneously using an ellipsoidally symmetric generalization of the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model. The transverse flow is found to be faster in the reaction plane than out of plane, which results in a reaction zone that gets slightly more elongated in-plane than out of plane.

  10. Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderóndela Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

  11. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Fuzzy IntervalValued Inference System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    . Kohout Many­valued logic based interval reasoning plays increasingly important role in fuzzy and other

  12. The use of latin hypercube sampling for the efficient estimation of confidence intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabaskas, D.; Denning, R.; Aldemir, T. [Ohio State Univ., 201 W 19th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nakayama, M. K. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, 218 Central Ave, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) has long been used as a way of assuring adequate sampling of the tails of distributions in a Monte Carlo analysis and provided the framework for the uncertainty analysis performed in the NUREG-1150 risk assessment. However, this technique has not often been used in the performance of regulatory analyses due to the inability to establish confidence levels on the quantiles of the output distribution. Recent work has demonstrated a method that makes this possible. This method is compared to the procedure of crude Monte Carlo using order statistics, which is currently used to establish confidence levels. The results of several statistical examples demonstrate that the LHS confidence interval method can provide a more accurate and precise solution, but issues remain when applying the technique generally. (authors)

  13. Robust stabilizer synthesis for interval plants using H-Infinity methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Saikat

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the polynomial P;(s). Let F be the family of all such possible m-tuples. Now let us define a family of m4 segments as follows: For any fixed integer I between 1 and m, let P;(s) = K, "(s), for i g I and for some k = I, 2, 3, 4, and for i = I, let Pi(s) vary..., stabilizing the finite set K is not sufficient when the polynomials Q, (s) do not satisfy the restrictions specified in part 2. The proof of the above is dealt with in [5]. In case of a SISO system with an interval plant, we have rn = 2 and Pi(s) and Pz...

  14. Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, D.C.; Tailleur, I.L.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature and related records from 28 wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) although somewhat constrained from accuracy by data gathering methods, extrapolate to undisturbed formation temperatures at specific depths below permafrost, and lead to calculated geothermal graidents between these depths. Tabulation of the results show that extrapolated undisturbed temperatures range from a minimum of 98/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) at 4000 feet (1220 m) to a maximum of 420/sup 0/F (216/sup 0/C) at 20,260 feet (6177 m) and that geothermal gradients range from 0.34/sup 0/F/100' (6/sup 0/C/km) between 4470 feet to 7975 feet (Lisburne No. 1) and 3.15/sup 0/F/100' (57/sup 0/C/km) between 6830 feet to 7940 feet (Drew Point No. 1). Essential information needed for extrapolations consists of: time-sequential bottom-hole temperatures during wire-line logging of intermediate and deep intervals of the borehole; the times that circulating drilling fluids had disturbed the formations; and the subsequent times that non-circulating drilling fluids had been in contact with the formation. In several wells presumed near direct measures of rock temperatures recorded from formation fluids recovered by drill stem tests (DST) across thin (approx. 10-20 foot) intervals are made available. We believe that the results approach actual values close enough to serve as approximations of the thermal regimes in appropriate future investigations. Continuous temperature logs obtained at the start and end of final logging operations, conductivity measurements, and relatively long-term measurements of the recovery from disturbance at shallow depths in many of the wells will permit refinements of our values and provide determination of temperatures at other depths. 4 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-stochastic mixed-integer programming approach for environmental management under multiple uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P., E-mail: guoping@iseis.or [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, G.H., E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.c [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, an interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-chance-constrained mixed-integer linear programming (ISIFCIP) approach is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste-management systems under multiple uncertainties in the City of Regina, Canada. The method improves upon the existing interval-parameter semi-infinite programming (ISIP) and fuzzy-chance-constrained programming (FCCP) by incorporating uncertainties expressed as dual uncertainties of functional intervals and multiple uncertainties of distributions with fuzzy-interval admissible probability of violating constraint within a general optimization framework. The binary-variable solutions represent the decisions of waste-management-facility expansion, and the continuous ones are related to decisions of waste-flow allocation. The interval solutions can help decision-makers to obtain multiple decision alternatives, as well as provide bases for further analyses of tradeoffs between waste-management cost and system-failure risk. In the application to the City of Regina, Canada, two scenarios are considered. In Scenario 1, the City's waste-management practices would be based on the existing policy over the next 25 years. The total diversion rate for the residential waste would be approximately 14%. Scenario 2 is associated with a policy for waste minimization and diversion, where 35% diversion of residential waste should be achieved within 15 years, and 50% diversion over 25 years. In this scenario, not only landfill would be expanded, but also CF and MRF would be expanded. Through the scenario analyses, useful decision support for the City's solid-waste managers and decision-makers has been generated. Three special characteristics of the proposed method make it unique compared with other optimization techniques that deal with uncertainties. Firstly, it is useful for tackling multiple uncertainties expressed as intervals, functional intervals, probability distributions, fuzzy sets, and their combinations; secondly, it has capability in addressing the temporal variations of the functional intervals; thirdly, it can facilitate dynamic analysis for decisions of facility-expansion planning and waste-flow allocation within a multi-facility, multi-period and multi-option context.

  16. Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, D.M.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

  17. A Spatial Odyssey of the Interval Algebra: 1. Directed Intervals To appear in: Proceedings of the 17th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI'01), Seattle, WA, August 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Jochen

    as the underlying line. There are several differences of temporal and spatial intervals which have to be considered to the underlying line. We de- velop an algebra for qualitative spatial representa- tion and reasoning about of influence (such as safety margin, braking dis- tance, or reaction distance) could be represented

  18. Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jonathan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intra-set rest intervals (ALT) and traditional resistance (STD) training in hypertrophic resistance training. 22 males (25 +/- 5yrs, 179.71 +/- 5.0cm, 82.1 +/- 10.6kg, 13.6 +/- 4.3% fat, 6...

  19. Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based on the Properties of Rough Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based, 121 35 Prague 2, Czech Republic Abstract Web usage mining involves application of data mining techniques to discover usage patterns from the web data. Clustering is one of the important functions in web

  20. Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Sol'in 2 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Ÿ Sol advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher­order finite element methods (hp

  1. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed tomore »nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)« less

  2. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Interval Fuzzy Data Processing: Case When

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    an interval [0; 0:3] of possible values of d(A&B). This idea was proposed and used by L. Kohout. ffl Even

  3. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, Vance (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

  4. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  5. Evaluation of Cross-Hole Seismic Tomography for Imaging Low Resistance Intervals and Associated Carbonate Sediments in Coastal Plain Sequences on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumbest, R. J.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the pilot study were to investigate the limitations of the technique for imaging the presence, extent, and boundaries of the low-resistance intervals and associated carbonate sediments.

  6. Long-Range Azimuthal Correlations from Parton Scattering in Central p+Au, d+Au, and $^{3}$He+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Orjuela Koop; A. Adare; D. McGlinchey; J. L. Nagle

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data from p+p and p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) reveal patterns that---when observed in the collisions of two heavy nuclei---are commonly interpreted as indicators of a locally equilibrated system in collective motion. Forthcoming results from p+Au and $^{3}$He+Au collisions at RHIC will help to elucidate the geometric dependence of such patterns. Recently, it has been shown that a multiphase transport model (AMPT) can describe some of these features in LHC data with a parton-parton scattering cross section comparable to that required to describe A+A data. In this paper, we extend these studies by incorporating a full wave function description of the $^3$He nucleus, and calculating the long-range azimuthal correlations for p+Au, d+Au and $^{3}$He+Au collisions at the RHIC top energy of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV. We find reasonable agreement with the measured d+Au elliptic flow coefficient ($v_{2}$), and we predict a pattern of coefficients ($v_{2}$, $v_{3}$) for the other geometries dominated by differences in the number of induced local hot spots (i.e. one, two, or three). The possibility of a simultaneous description of RHIC- and LHC-energy data, the suite of different geometries, and high multiplicity p+p data is an exciting possibility for understanding the underlying physics mechanisms at play.

  7. Power law burst and inter-burst interval distributions in the solar wind: turbulence or dissipative SOC ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Freeman; N. W. Watkins; D. J. Riley

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate for the first time the probability density functions (PDFs) P of burst energy e, duration T and inter-burst interval tau for a known turbulent system in nature. Bursts in the earth-sun component of the Poynting flux at 1 AU in the solar wind were measured using the MFI and SWE experiments on the NASA WIND spacecraft. We find P(e) and P(T) to be power laws, consistent with self-organised criticality (SOC). We find also a power law form for P(tau) that distinguishes this turbulent cascade from the exponential P(tau) of ideal SOC, but not from some other SOC-like sandpile models. We discuss the implications for the relation between SOC and turbulence.

  8. Horizontal velocities in the central and eastern United States from GPS surveys during the 1987-1996 interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snay, R.A.; Strange, W.E.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geodetic Survey and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission jointly organized GPS surveys in 1987, 1990, 1993, and 1996 to search for crustal deformation in the central and eastern United States (east of longitude 108{degrees}W). We have analyzed the data of these four surveys in combination with VLBI data observed during the 1979-1995 interval and GPS data for 22 additional surveys observed during the 1990-1996 interval. These latter GPS surveys served to establish accurately positioned geodetic marks in various states. Accordingly, we have computed horizontal velocities for 64 GPS sites and 12 VLBI sites relative to a reference frame for which the interior of the North American plate is considered fixed on average. None of our derived velocities exceeds 6 mm/yr in magnitude. Moreover, the derived velocity at each GPS site is statistically zero at the 95% confidence level except for the site BOLTON in central Ohio and the site BEARTOWN in southeastern Pennsylvania. However, as statistical theory would allow approximately 5% of the 64 GPS sites to fall our zero-velocity hypothesis, we are uncertain whether or not these estimated velocities for BOLTON and BEARTOWN reflect actual motion relative to the North American plate. We also computed horizontal strain rates for the cells formed by a 1{degrees} by 1{degrees} grid spanning the central and eastern United States. Corresponding shearing rates are everywhere less than 60 nanoradians/yr in magnitude, and no shearing rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level except for a grid cell near BEARTOWN whose rate is 57 {+-} 26 nanoradians/yr. Also corresponding areal dilatation rates are everywhere less than 40 nanostrain/yr in magnitude, and no dilatation rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Results based on a generic jet-energy loss model that interpolates between running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired holographic prescriptions are compared to recent data on the high-p_T pion nuclear modification factor and the high-p_T elliptic flow in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC. The jet-energy loss model is coupled to various (2+1)d (viscous hydrodynamic) fields. The impact of energy-loss fluctuations is discussed. While a previously proposed AdS/CFT jet-energy loss model with a temperature-independent jet-medium coupling is shown to be inconsistent with the LHC data, we find a rather broad class of jet-energy independent energy-loss models $dE/dx= \\kappa(T) x^z T^{2+z}$ that can account for the current data with different temperature-dependent jet-medium couplings $\\kappa(T)$ and path-length dependence exponents of $0\\le z \\le 2$.

  10. 10a- Azimuthal modesNEW.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less is more:culturingProtonAPRIL/MAY9Hydrate from

  11. Distributions of the Hardness Ratio of short and Long Gamma-Ray Bursts in Different Time Intervals within the First 2 Seconds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Ming Dong; Yi-Ping Qin

    2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, we investigated the distribution of hardness ratio (HR) for short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different time scales for the first two seconds. After including and subtracting the background count, we performed a Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K-S) test to the HR distributions of the two classes of GRBs in each time interval. Our analysis shows that the probabilities of the KS test to the distributions are very small, suggesting that the two classes of bursts are unlikely to arise from the same HR distributions, and indicating that they probably originate from the different physical processes and central engine. In addition, we found that the hardness ratio of short bursts within the time interval of 0$-$0.96 seconds changes hard-to-soft, on the other hand long bursts do not. The two kinds of bursts have different characteristics in the first 2 seconds which might be associated with different physical mechanisms.

  12. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering WATER AND GAS CONING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM...

  13. An evaluation of the B&W Owners Group BAW-10182 topical report: Justification for increasing the engineered safety features actuation system on-line test intervals. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.L.; Hansen, J.L.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides an evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B&WOG) Technical Specifications Committee Topical Report BAW-10182, entitled, ``Justification for Increasing Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) On-Line Test Intervals.`` This evaluation was performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The BAW-10182 report presents justification for the extension of on-line test intervals from the existing one-month interval to a three-month interval for the ESFAS system. In the BAW-10182 report, the B&WOG stated that ``{hor_ellipsis}the B&WOG proposes to increase the ESFAS test interval from one to three months and concludes that the effect on plant risk is insignificant.`` The proposed extension was based upon risk-based [i.e., probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)] methods such as reliability block diagrams, uncertainty analyses, and time-dependent system availability analyses. This use of PRA methods requires a detailed evaluation to determine whether the chosen methods and their application are valid in the context of the proposed test interval extension. The results of the evaluation agreed that the effect on plant risk is small if the ESFAS test interval is extended to three months for the ESFAS designs that were evaluated.

  14. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ?18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ?18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ?18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ?18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ?18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ?18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.

  15. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

  16. Confidence Intervals Laboratory Project #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kofman, Ilya

    concerning the amount of soda in some soda bottles. The Pepsi Bottling Plant in Astoria Queens produces a huge number of half gallon, plastic Diet Pepsi bottles. The company claims that, due to manufacturing we had ALL the data on Pepsi's Astoria soda bottles. This is the same as assuming we know everything

  17. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd9-32.pdf28v1.pdf1.pdf8.pdfEnergyCost3Department

  18. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne, E-mail: karalynne.kerr@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Hiatt, Jessica R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Dipetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Price, Lori Lyn [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were not associated with late toxicity.

  19. Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Conclusion Comparing genomes Genomes evolved from a common ancestor tend to share the same varieties of gene clusters used in genomes comparison. . . . seeking for gene clusters between their genomes. A gene cluster = a set of genes appearing, in spatial proximity along the chromosome, in at least two genomes. G. Blin

  20. The Interval to Biochemical Failure Is Prognostic for Metastasis, Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality, and Overall Mortality After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Skyler, E-mail: Skylerjohn3101@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jackson, William; Li, Darren; Song, Yeohan; Foster, Corey; Foster, Ben; Zhou, Jessica; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Feng, Felix; Hamstra, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer as a surrogate endpoint for distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality (OM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 575 patients treated with SRT after RP from a single institution. Of those, 250 patients experienced biochemical failure (BF), with the IBF defined as the time from commencement of SRT to BF. The IBF was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models for its association with DM, PCSM, and OM. Results: The median follow-up time was 85 (interquartile range [IQR] 49.8-121.1) months, with a median IBF of 16.8 (IQR, 8.5-37.1) months. With a cutoff time of 18 months, as previously used, 129 (52%) of patients had IBF ?18 months. There were no differences among any clinical or pathologic features between those with IBF ? and those with IBF >18 months. On log–rank analysis, IBF ?18 months was prognostic for increased DM (P<.0001, HR 4.9, 95% CI 3.2-7.4), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.4-7.1), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.1). Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other clinical variables demonstrated that IBF was independently prognostic for DM (P<.001, HR 4.9), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.0), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7). IBF showed minimal change in performance regardless of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use. Conclusion: After SRT, a short IBF can be used for early identification of patients who are most likely to experience progression to DM, PCSM, and OM. IBF ?18 months may be useful in clinical practice or as an endpoint for clinical trials.

  1. azimuthal angle correlations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Bsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk,...

  2. azimuthal correlation measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at center-of-mass energy sqrtsNN200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between gammadir and pi0....

  3. azimuthal energy flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at center-of-mass energy sqrtsNN200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between gammadir and pi0....

  4. azimuthal signal variations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has primarily come when missing signal Sandryhaila, Aliaksei 16 Power, Parasitics, and Process-Variation (P3) Awareness in Mixed-Signal Design Computer Technologies and...

  5. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  6. azimuthal pinch devices linear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the thermal distribution function at freeze-out constrain estimates of the specific viscosity and the freeze-out temperature for two different models for the initial...

  7. Vacuum Calculations in Azimuthally Symmetric Geometry \\Lambda M. S. Chance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of topologically spherical shell enclosing the whole plasma discharge, was used for analyzing the SPHEROMAK device

  8. LRRR Emplacement Range and Azimuth From. LM for Fra Mauro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    from the site during the landing, and the effectiveness of the descent stage as a blast deflector by decent engine blast; 4) dust "kicked-up'' by the ALSEP Active Seismic Experiment mortar; 5) the mortar flight path Heating F ~·om LM Exhaust Gas. - A detailed analysis has not been per- formed of this effect

  9. Azimuthal modulational instability of vortices in the nonlinear Schrdinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carretero, Ricardo

    . We formulate predictions of growth rates of individual modes and find that vor- tices are unstable is an ultra-cold (on the order of 10À8 K) gas of, typically, 103 ­106 atoms which have predominantly condensed W þ VextðrÞW; ð1Þ where h is the reduced Planck constant, ma is the mass of one of the atoms

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Li; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the spatial anisotropy of the initial density profile. Along-standing problem in the interpretation of flow data is that uncertainties in the initial anisotropy are mingled with uncertainties in the response. We argue that the non-Gaussianity of flow fluctuations in small systems with large fluctuations can be used to disentangle the initial state from the response. We apply this method to recent measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC, assuming linear response to the initial anisotropy. The response coefficient is found to decrease asmore »the system becomes smaller and is consistent with a low value of the ratio of viscosity over entropy of ?/s 0.19. Deviations from linear response are studied. While they significantly change the value of the response coefficient they do not change the rate of decrease with centrality. Thus, we argue that the estimate of ?/s is robust against non-linear effects.« less

  11. HERMES results on azimuthal modulations in the spin-independent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -hadron separation efficiency ~ 98-99% Hadron identification with dual-radiator RICH Aerogel n=1.03 C4F10 n=1

  12. amma-catch gourma observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.8Angpix and 3.6Angpix. Our spectra include all the important Sodium and Mercury light pollution lines and span a wide interval of azimuth and observing conditions, essential to...

  13. 23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz co2 day of year 2006 licormotionmodel.m, licormotionmodel.pdf, 15-Jun-2006, 14:16:6 #12;0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 10 4 440 450 460 (24) concatenated (3-minute

  14. Interval Analysis and Reliability in Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be highly reliable (i.e. for a robot used in surgical applications). The sources of uncertainties will restrict ourself in this paper to industrial robot. These type of robots have a base that is attached the mechanism motion). There are two main classes of industrial robots mechani- cal architecture: serial

  15. Parallel Interval Continuous Global Optimization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abdeljalil benyoub

    2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2002 ... Abstract: We theorically study, on a distributed memory architecture, the parallelization of Hansen's algorithm for the continuous global ...

  16. Lyapunov Spectral Intervals: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2002-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exponents in stability theory. Important results on stability of Lyapunov exponents that we use are due to Bylov [6], Bylov et al. [5], Bylov and Izobov [7], and Millionshchikov [24, 25]. An alternative to the spectrum of Lyapunov is based upon defining a... School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (evanvlec@mines.edu). 516 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  17. Bootstrap Prediction Intervals for Time Series /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6 Generalized Bootstrap predictionSieve/PRR Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. Neural circuitry for recognizing interspike interval sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abarbanel, HDI; Talathi, Sachin S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week ending 14American Physical Society PRL 96, 148104 (2006) (a) PHYSICAL1 at t 0 and t 1 t 0 T 0 are PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL

  19. Interval Analysis for Unknown Dependencies and Genetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Power Systems Engineering Research Center Cornell University 428 Phillips Hall Ithaca, New York 14853 given to MidAmerican Energy for its support of this project. Thanks are also given to our industry advisors: · O. Dale Stevens, II, MidAmerican Energy Co. · John Thomas Chatelain, MidAmerican Energy Co. #12

  20. Interval Data Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy Jump to:IESInterval Data Systems Inc Jump to:

  1. On the representation of even numbers as the sum and difference of two primes and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime and an even semiprime and the distribution of primes in short intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan-Guang Tan

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The representation of even numbers as the sum of two primes and the distribution of primes in short intervals were investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n-q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be an odd prime number greater than $2n-\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 1, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ which are symmetrical about the number $n$ so that even numbers greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes. Hence, the Goldbach's conjecture was proved. Also theorems of the distribution of primes in short intervals were given out and proved. By these theorems, the Legendre's conjecture, the Oppermann's conjecture, the Hanssner's conjecture, the Brocard's conjecture, the Andrica's conjecture, the Sierpinski's conjecture and the Sierpinski's conjecture of triangular numbers were proved and the Mills' constant can be determined. The representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime was investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n+1-2q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any odd prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be a prime number greater than $2n+1-2\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 2, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ so that all odd integers greater than 5 can be represented as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime. Hence, the Lemoine's conjecture was proved.

  2. Online Selection of Intervals and t-Intervals Unnar Th. Bachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shachnai, Hadas

    by Kolen et al. [16], operations management has undergone a "transition in the last decennia from resource

  3. Online Selection of Intervals and t-Intervals Unnar Th. Bachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halldórsson, Magnús M.

    by Kolen et al. [12], operations management has undergone a "transition in the last decennia from resource

  4. Effects of triangular flow on di-hadron azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Phys. A 774, 577 (2006). [17] T. Renk and J. Ruppert, Phys. Rev. C 73, 011901 (2006). [18] C. B. Chiu and R. C. Hwa, Phys. Rev. C 74, 064909 (2006). [19] W. Li, S. Zhang, Y. G. Ma, X. Z. Cai, J. H. Chen, H. Z. Huang, G. L. Ma, and C. Zhong, Phys...). [7] K. Adcox et al. (PHENIX Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 022301 (2002). [8] C. Adler et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 202301 (2002). [9] C. Adler et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 082302 (2003). [10] C...

  5. azimuthal charged-particle correlations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at center-of-mass energy sqrtsNN200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between gammadir and pi0....

  6. azimuthal di-hadron correlations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at center-of-mass energy sqrtsNN200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between gammadir and pi0....

  7. Azimuthal Offset-Dependent Attributes (AVO And FVO) Applied To Fracture Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Feng

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the amplitude versus offset (AVO) and the frequency versus offset (FVO) information, the diagnostic ability of P-wave seismic data in fracture detection is investigated. The offset-dependent attributes (AVO and FVO) ...

  8. Fracture studies from amplitude versus offset and azimuth and vertical seismic profile data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gutierrez, Isabel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I address the problem of determining fracture properties of subsurface rocks from geophysical surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data. In the first part of this thesis I perform multi-attribute ...

  9. Analyses of azimuthal seismic anisotrophy in the vertically fractured Spraberry and Dean formations, Midland County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarmo, Bernadus Supraptomo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zone of interest is the Spraberry trend, which consists of Spraberry and Dean formations. The Spraberry trend, which is a deep sub-marine fan complex deposited from turbidity currents (Wilkinson, 1953; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988), forms... and sandstone (McLennan and Bradley, 1951; Schmidt, 1954; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988). The Dean formation consists of sandstone, gray-white to brown sandstone with thin streaks of tan to brown limestone and black shale (Mc Lennan and Bradley...

  10. Liquid Crystal Pretilt and Azimuth Angle Study of Stacked Alignment Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    angles for the liquid crystal. It is based on stacking both photo- aligned polymer and rubbed polyimide comprise of both photo-aligned horizontal polymer and rubbed vertical polyimide. The advantage alignment polyimide JALS2021 form JSR Corporation is spin coated on the substrate. Then it is baked inside

  11. Tables for azimuths, great-circle sailing, and reduction to the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harold S. Blackburne, Charles Westland

    It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. ... to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. ... + Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by ...

  12. The BeamCharge Azimuthal Asymmetry and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering A. Airapetian,17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Akopov,29 Z. Akopov,29 M. Amarian,8, 29 A. Andrus,16 E.C. Aschenauer,8 W. Augustyniak,28 R. Avakian,29 A

  13. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on an unpolarized deuterium target The HERMES Collaboration A. Airapetian ,o N. Akopov z Z. Akopov e M. Amarian f,1

  14. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a longitudinally polarized deuterium target The HERMES Collaboration A. Airapetian ,o N. Akopov z Z. Akopov e E

  15. Observation of a Single-Spin Azimuthal Asymmetry in Semi-Inclusive Pion Electro-Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Airapetian32 , N. Akopov32 , M. Amarian24,27,32 , E.C. Aschenauer13,14,6 , H. Avakian10 , R. Avakian32 , A

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  17. Dependence of the gyrotron efficiency on the azimuthal index of non-symmetric modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumbrajs, O. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga Street 8, LV-1063Riga (Latvia); Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of MW-class gyrotrons for future controlled fusion reactors requires careful analysis of the stability of high efficiency operation in very high-order modes. In the present paper, this problem is analyzed in the framework of the non-stationary self-consistent theory of gyrotrons. Two approaches are used: the one based on the wave envelope representation of the resonator field and the second one based on representation of this field as a superposition of eigenmodes, whose fields are determined by a self-consistent set of equations. It is shown that at relatively low beam currents, when the maximum efficiency can be realized in the regime of soft self-excitation, the operation in the desired mode is stable even in the case of a very dense spectrum of competing modes. At higher currents, the maximum efficiency can be realized in the regimes with hard self-excitation; here the operation in the desired mode can be unstable because of the presence of some competing modes with low start currents. Two 170?GHz European gyrotrons for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor are considered as examples. In the first one, which is the 2?MW gyrotron with a coaxial resonator, the stability of operation in a chosen TE{sub 34,19}-mode in the presence of two sideband modes with almost equidistant spectrum is analyzed and the region of magnetic fields in which the oscillations of the central mode are stable is determined. The operation of the second gyrotron, which is the 1?MW gyrotron with a cylindrical cavity currently under development in Europe, is studied by using the wave envelope approach. It is shown that high efficiency operation of this gyrotron in the TE{sub 32,9}-mode should be stable.

  18. Azimuthal jet flavor tomography with CUJET2.0 of nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiechen Xu; Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A perturbative QCD based jet tomographic Monte Carlo model, CUJET2.0, is presented to predict jet quenching observables in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC/BNL and LHC/CERN energies. This model generalizes the DGLV theory of flavor dependent radiative energy loss by including multi-scale running strong coupling effects. It generalizes CUJET1.0 by computing jet path integrations though more realistic 2+1D transverse and longitudinally expanding viscous hydrodynamical fields contrained by fits to low $p_T$ flow data. The CUJET2.0 output depends on three control parameters, $(\\alpha_{max},f_E,f_M)$, corresponding to an assumed upper bound on the vacuum running coupling in the infrared and two chromo-electric and magnetic QGP screening mass scales $(f_E \\mu(T), f_M \\mu(T))$ where $\\mu(T)$ is the 1-loop Debye mass. We compare numerical results as a function of $\\alpha_{max}$ for pure and deformed HTL dynamically enhanced scattering cases corresponding to $(f_E=1,2, f_M=0)$ to data of the nuclear modification factor, $R^f_{AA}(p_T,\\phi; \\sqrt{s}, b)$ for jet fragment flavors $f=\\pi,D, B, e$ at $\\sqrt{s}=0.2-2.76$ ATeV c.m. energies per nucleon pair and with impact parameter $b=2.4, 7.5$ fm. A $\\chi^2$ analysis is presented and shows that $R^\\pi_{AA}$ data from RHIC and LHC are consistent with CUJET2.0 at the $\\chi^2/d.o.f< 2$ level for $\\alpha_{max}=0.23-0.30$. The corresponding $\\hat{q}(E_{jet}, T)/T^3$ effective jet transport coefficient field of this model is computed to facilitate comparison to other jet tomographic models in the literature. The predicted elliptic asymmetry, $v_2(p_T;\\sqrt{s},b)$ is, however, found to significantly underestimated relative to RHIC and LHC data. We find the $\\chi^2_{v_2}$ analysis shows that $v_2$ is very sensitive to allowing even as little as 10\\% variations of the path averaged $\\alpha_{max}$ along in and out of reaction plane paths.

  19. Detection of azimuthal anisotropy from 3-D p-wave seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildizel, Ali

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the equation; (II ? 1) for u(z) = V t(z) is wave slowness. Velocity estimation using reflections and the tau-p approach was first suggested by Schultz and Claerbout (1978), They showed that velocity analysis can be done in a ' similar manner... to conventional analysis by looking for maximum coherency over each ' trajectory of ellipses in r-p domain instead of a hyperbola in conventional analysis. Schultz (1982) also suggested a method of layer-stripping for velocity estimation in the r-p domain...

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 O. Catu,48 D. Cebra,7 Z. Chajecki,44 P. Chaloupka,11 S...

  1. CASL-U-2015-0178-000 An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-based Transverse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o .7-0007-000 COBRA-TF6-0007-000

  2. Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17, 2015Martin E. Griswold, C. Leland

  3. An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-Based Axial SN Solver for the 2D/1D Scheme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization| Department of

  4. Variation in human gait intervals on a treadmill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Mark Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to produce a map with uniform distribution. A fractal return map has a non-homogeneous distribution. There are regions with high concentrations of data points and regions containing no data points (even with large sample sizes). The data collection..., and four behavior is indicated by clusters of one, two, or four points. The return maps produced from the chaotically dripping faucet have a definite fractal structure. A random signal would not produce a map with a fractal structure, but would tend...

  5. An Interval Partitioning Approach for Continuous Constrained Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csendes, Tibor

    -linear relationships among variables are defined by problem constraints resulting in non-convex feasible sets a new subdivision direction selection method as well as an adaptive search tree framework where nodes (boxes defining different variable domains) are explored using a restricted hybrid depth-first and best

  6. Ecient Object-Relational Interval Management and Beyond ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arge, Lars

    of the SQL layer of any relational database server|was proposed as a way to design easy to implement indexes model in a large database requires eÆcient index support for its language features. In their pioneering Foundation through ESS grant EIA{9870734, RI grant EIA{9972879, CAREER grant CCR{9984099, and ITR grant EIA

  7. aware interval caching: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a wide range of devices, starting from mobile take a high-level view of the architecture and neglect micro-architectural features such as caches modeling of the processor...

  8. Multiple Imputation for Threshold-Crossing Data with Interval Censoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredierick J. Dorey; Roderick J.A. Little; Nathaniel Schenker

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lines between the prosthesis and the cement interface.magnitude indicate that the prosthesis has begun to loosenwith insertion of a new prosthesis. The crossing of this

  9. Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

  10. Lattices which can be represented as lattices of intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaggelis Felouzis

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate lattices that can be represented as sublattices of the lattice of all convex subsets of a linearly ordered set $(X, \\leq)$ and as lattices of convex subsets of $(X, \\leq)$. A representation theory for general lattices is presented and also some applications in general topology are given.

  11. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases, for the selected fossil, we

  12. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake the fossils that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases

  13. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy­to­access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  14. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy-to-access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  15. Combining Interval, Probabilistic, and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Foundations, Algorithms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    National Laboratories as part of the Department of Energy Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI, by NSF grants EAR-0112968, EAR-0225670, and EIA-0321328, by NIH grant 3T34GM008048-20S1, and by the Army Conference on Fuzzy Systems, Neural Networks, and Genetic Algorithms FNG'05 (Tijuana, Mexico, October 13

  16. ON CONFIDENCE INTERVALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USUAL AND ADJUSTED LIKELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    and Mukerjee (1994) on higher order power shed light on the power properties of the associated confidence. Highest posterior density regions, with approximate frequentist validity, are also included in the study. Keywords: Bartlett correction; expected length; highest posterior density region; likeli­ hood ratio

  17. Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Fraser, James A.

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    /dark cycles. All procedures were performed in institutional premises, approved under the UK Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (1986), under UK Home Office project licence PPL number 80/1974, approved by a university Ethics Review Board. Accordingly, proce...

  18. Estimating DEA Confidence Intervals for Canadian Urban Paratransit Agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    focuses on performance measurement. John M. Gleason, Creighton University (jgleason's true efficiency. Second, it uses Panel Data Analysis methodology, a set of statistical procedures method of identifying and adjusting for environmental effects that has more power than conventional

  19. Exact Bounds for Interval and Fuzzy Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    of fossil species in samples recovered from a well that penetrates an undisturbed sequence of sedimentary the environment in which rocks have accumulated: for example, a coral is an unambiguous indication of a warm ocean that in a normal sequence the age increases with the depth in the well that penetrates that sequence. So

  20. Making Adaptive an Interval Constraint Propagation Algorithm Exploiting Monotonicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    domains such as robotics design [10], dynamic systems in robust control or robot localization [8], robust([v]) := v - v denotes the size, or diameter, of [v]. A box [V ] = ([v1], ..., [vn]) represents the Cartesian

  1. Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that transfer energy from the reactor to steam turbines. Such exchangers typically have 10,000 to 1 #12;2 20,000 stainless steel tubes that conduct the ow of steam. Due to stress and corrosion, the tubes develop cracks

  2. Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that transfer energy from the reactor to steam turbines. Such exchangers typically have 10,000 to 1 #12; 2 20,000 stainless steel tubes that conduct the flow of steam. Due to stress and corrosion, the tubes develop cracks

  3. Exploiting Heterogeneous Channel Coherence Intervals for Blind Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed Ali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the degrees of freedom of MISO broadcast channels withtrend, are listed below. 1. MISO BC with no CSIT for onemultiple input single output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC)

  4. Interval-Valued Fuzzy Control in Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    . Kohout. Before we proceed to explain how to use them in fuzzy control, let us first explain why we need

  5. Towards Adding Probabilities and Correlations to Interval Computations #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    #cult or impossible to measure directly. Examples of such quantities are the distance to a star and the amount of oil not detect any pollution, the pollution value v can be anywhere between 0 and the sensor's detection limit DL: to study the e#ect of a pollutant on the fish, we check on the fish daily; if a fish was alive on Day 5

  6. Integrity Zone Computation using Interval Analysis Vincent Drevelle, Philippe Bonnifait,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    department. His current research interests are in In- telligent Vehicles and Advanced Driving Assistance to a decision linked to safety. The snapshot GNSS localization problem consists in inverting a non-linear pseudo-range observation function, with often redundant measurements. This is generally solved as a non-linear Least

  7. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1,D O E / E I A -Year

  8. Nonhyperbolic reflection moveout for orthorhombic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection moveout in azimuthally anisotropic media is not only azimuthally dependent but it is also

  9. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    separate ?sin #4;?? sin #4;??? = ?a?a?? + Bout, (3) where ?a?a?? is caused byP violation and Bout (defined by this expression) includes all other correlations projected onto the direction perpendicular to the reaction plane (?out of plane...?a?? + Bout], (5) where, similarly to Eq. (3), Bin is defined via ?cos #4;?? cos #4;??? = ?v1,?v1,?? + Bin. (6) The correlator Eq. (4) represents the difference between correlations of the projections of the particle transverse momentum unit vectors onto...

  10. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616... at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is to quantify the properties of the QCD matter created in heavy-ion collisions at high energy [1]. One key property is the medium energy density, which can be probed by its effect on a fast parton propagating through...

  11. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the existence of a new state of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. This state has now been observed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory [2]. Many interesting... of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 6University of California, Los Angeles...

  12. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  13. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of the $\\gamma_{dir}$ energy within uncertainties. These measurements indicate that the parton energy loss, in the covered kinematic range, is insensitive to the parton path length.

  14. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of t...

  15. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Korsch,19 L. Kotchenda,25 V. Kouchpil,11 P. Kravtsov,25 V. I. Kravtsov,32 K. Krueger,1 M. Krus,10 C. Kuhn,15 L. Kumar,30 P. Kurnadi,6 M. A. C. Lamont,3 J. M. Landgraf,3 S. LaPointe,50 J. Lauret,3 A. Lebedev,3 R. Lednicky,17 C-H. Lee,34 J. H. Lee,3 W...

  16. Azimuthally sensitive hanbury brown-twiss interferometry in Au + Au collisions sqrt S sub NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, L.S.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a systematic study of the shape of the pion distribution in coordinate space at freeze-out in Au+Au collisions at RHIC using two-pion Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry. Oscillations of the extracted HBT radii vs. emission angle indicate sources elongated perpendicular to the reaction plane. The results indicate that the pressure and expansion time of the collision system are not sufficient to completely quench its initial shape.

  17. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  18. The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , and reproducibility). J Orthop Sci 2011, 16:7–13. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35:2406–2414. 21... Sci 2011, 16:7–13. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35...

  19. Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 62 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. de Souza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations on relative pseudorapidity $\\eta$ and azimuth $\\phi$ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV with transverse momentum $p_t \\geq 0.15$ GeV/$c$, $|\\eta| \\leq 1$ and $2\\pi$ azimuth. Observed correlations include a {same-side} (relative azimuth $< \\pi/2$) 2D peak, a closely-related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until mid-centrality where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within a small centrality interval. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly {relative to} binary-collision scaling, the $\\eta$ width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly ($\\eta$ elongation) and the $\\phi$ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are more remarkable when contrasted with expectations of jet quenching in a dense medium. Observed centrality trends are compared to {\\sc hijing} predictions and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy ion collision scenarios which invoke rapid parton thermalization. On the other hand, if the collision system is effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the observations reported here would be inconsistent with a minijet picture.

  20. AIMR (Azimuth and Inclination Modeling in Realtime): A Method for Prediction of Dog-Leg Severity based on Mechanical Specific Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noynaert, Samuel F

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    foot by foot basis while accurately predicting the effects of each parameter is impossible for the human brain alone. Given current rig rates, any amount of increased slide time and its reduced ROP which occurred due to poorly predicted directional...

  1. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d plus Au and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Klein,22 A. G. Knospe,53 A. Kocoloski,23 D. D. Koetke,47 T. Kollegger,12 J. Konzer,34 I. Koralt,30 L. Koroleva,16 W. Korsch,20 L. Kotchenda,26 V. Kouchpil,11 P. Kravtsov,26 K. Krueger,1 M. Krus,10 L. Kumar,19 P. Kurnadi,6 M. A. C. Lamont,3 J. M...

  2. AIMR (Azimuth and Inclination Modeling in Realtime): A Method for Prediction of Dog-Leg Severity based on Mechanical Specific Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noynaert, Samuel F

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    across basins due to similar trends. Increasing MSE values (blue track on right of each well) indicate low ROP due to high vibrations (Dupriest 2006). ............................................... 58 Fig. 23 - Test apparatus for SPE 7518 where... on the definition by Holditch, I will define unconventional resources as resources that have low matrix permeability or unique fluid properties that require advanced drilling or stimulation technologies to be produced at commercial flow rates (Holditch 2006...

  3. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 65, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2000); P. 232246, 11 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Inversion of azimuthally dependent NMO velocity in transversely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    ) or crack systems. P-wave kinematic signatures in TTI media are controlled by the velocity VP0 kinematic signatures, can be found only from the moveout of shear waves. Using the exact NMO equation, we ) of the symmetry axis. Here, we show that all five parameters can be obtained from az- imuthally varying P-wave NMO

  4. Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrin, D. G.

    , store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? • A data acquisition system. • Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? • Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

  5. Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    cell systems (SOFC systems) [13, 3, 27, 10, 28, 29, 6, 18] are characterized by the fact that internal

  6. Intersplines: A New Approach to Globally Optimal Multivariate Splines Using Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    - proximators are the multivariate simplex B-splines. Multivariate simplex B-splines consist of Bernstein basis polynomials that are defined on a ge- ometrical structure called a triangulation. Multivariate simplex B. Secondly, the simplex spline models are parametric models, which allows for effi- cient approximation

  7. Timing analysis of logic=level digital circuits using uncertainty intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Joshua Asher

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    satisfiability problem and is a known NP complex problem. Despite this several procedures have been developed and applied to the path sensitization problem. Many of these solutions come f'rom automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) research 17 which has...-algorithm, but a systematic enumeration of the search space required for false paths is still computationally expensive. The ATPG technique of FAN [17] has also been applied to the path sensitization problem. This technique is an improvement over both the D...

  8. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    magnetization. In the weak-noise limit, noise-activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula "!$#&% ')(1032547698 . Here 6 is the noise strength, 0 study a spatially extended model of noise-induced magne- tization reversal: a classical Ginzburg

  9. An analysis of beef cattle weights and gains measured at varying intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, James David

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be computed with the effect of fill removed. The type of ration being fed has a decided influence on fill as illustrated by Neyer et al. (1965). Their results indicated that reticulo-rumen fill was inversely correlated with energy intake. Their high energy...

  10. Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  11. Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermond, Jean-Claude

    occurs when a natural gas provider wants to build a most profitable transportation system to send natural 100190, China Abstract. Given a graph G = (V, E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex gas from a station to some customers on scattered locations, where each link (segment of pipleline

  12. Case Studies in Using Interval Data Energy Models for Savings Verification: Lessons from the Grocery Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    responsible for driving energy use at the five stores. However, it?s recognized that poor regressions, defined by low R2 and high CV(RMSE), may still produce ?accurate? savings or at least savings that are good enough for some situations. Since many... to evaluate accuracy throughout this research. SAVINGS ANALYSIS This section outlines the process for determining the regression model specifications. Included is an analysis of possible driving variables and data resolution as well as an evaluation...

  13. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con- centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc- tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

  14. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con­ centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc­ tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

  15. Finite Element Method with the Interval Set Parameters and its Applications in Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pownuk, Andrzej

    Science ANDRZEJ POWNUK The University of Texas at El Paso Department of Mathematical Sciences 500 West-ROUHANI The University of Texas at El Paso Department of Mathematical Sciences 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas of Civil Engineering 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas USA r.naveengoud@gmail.com Abstract

  16. Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

  17. Strong Negation: Its Relation to Intervals and Its Use in Expert Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Sciences, New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, email hunguyen@nmsu.edu Hoang Phuong­Liem National Center for Natural Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam email nhphuong@bdvn.vnmail.vnd.net Mirko Navara Center for Machine Perception, Faculty of Electrical Engineering Czech Technical University

  18. Somatotopic distortion of tactile temporal interval estimation Shinobu Kuroki1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    that sluggish neural signal, caused by transient luminance noise [2], impaired the accuracy of timing judgment events are crucial for human sensory and motor system, we focused whether this modification mechanism.1 Apparatus To avoid the negative effect of finger skin vibration, we used an

  19. Little Ice Age cold interval in West Antarctica: Evidence from borehole temperature at the West Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    future climate changes. The LIA cooling was associated with a time of lower solar irradiance.1. The Last 1000 Years [2] The Northern Hemisphere experienced a widespread cooling from about 1400 to 1850 C of event is key to our knowledge of the variability in the climate system, and to our ability to forecast

  20. The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to semiparametric GARCH-in-Mean models. ” University ofWe estimate the following GARCH(1,1) model y ct = µ c + ?Method CCRM CRM TS MTS GARCH-N (99%) GARCH-N (99.5%) GARCH-

  1. An analysis of the relationship of heart sound time intervals to respiratory sinus arrhythmia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schorsch, Eric Todd

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be close to the clinically significant left ventricular ejection time (LVET). These results were obtained in a laboratory setting. Recording heart sounds at the trachea was not easy. The heart sound signal was not very stable. In order for a useful... VALVE R - LEFT VENTRICLE Figure 1. Crossectional view of the heart showing the four chambers and the four valves. l20 X IOO E E 80 oI 60 In 40 Aornc volve opens PROTODIASTOLE EJECTION~ COIJTRACTION~ I, r Aortic valve closes r ISOMETRIC...

  2. Indication of multiscaling in the volatility return intervals of stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    of financial markets has long been a focus of economics and econophysics research 1­9 . Study- ing recently, some related studies on financial markets, such as escape time 30 , exit time 31,32 , first and nonlinear features 36 . Recent studies 37­39 of stock markets show that the distribution of activ- ity

  3. Multifactor analysis of multiscaling in volatility return intervals Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets 17­21 show the following, for both daily and intraday data. i The distribution of the scaled and earthquakes 13­15 . Also there are some related studies on financial markets, such as first passage time 25 Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  4. Multiple Interval Mapping for Gene Expression QTL and Zhao-Bang Zeng,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Zhao-Bang

    analysis on the 5182 eQTL we declared from the yeast data. The mapping results are available at http

  5. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

  6. Supplementary Material AMS Data Processing. AMS data were saved in 150-s intervals in alternating medium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 46 were adjusted to account for the variability of gas-phase contributions and for the interference measured gas-phase CO2 concentration. The signals of CO+ at m/z 28 and organic HxO+ at m/z 16, 17, and 18 that 50% of the emitted organic particles from combustion sources was hydrophobic, with an e

  7. Approximations for Aligned Coloring and Spillage Minimization in Interval and Chordal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerson, Adam W.

    Douglas Carroll1 , Adam Meyerson2 , and Brian Tagiku2 1 Raytheon Company. E-mail: decarroll@raytheon.com 2

  8. THE SIZE OF EXPONENTIAL SUMS ON INTERVALS OF THE REAL LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdélyi, Tamás

    | Mjµ , |a0| = 1 , n N , where the exponents j R satisfy 0 = 0 , j j > 0 , j = 1, 2's conjecture, Konyagin's conjecture, Uhrig protocol, decoupling methods, quantum coherence, multi-pulse control

  9. Optimizing control flow in loops using interval and dependence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghodrat, Mohammad Ali; Givargis, Tony; Nicolau, Alex

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?

  10. The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Miller, D. (2000). Econometric Foundations. CambridgeRegression Models,” Econometric Reviews. Vol. 8, pp. 217-De- pendent Bootstrap,” Econometric Reviews. Vol. 23, pp.

  11. Random Interval Generator v.3.x Russell T. Hurlburt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    . If the device is left unattended, it enters a battery- saving "chirp" mode. Dimensions (inches): 4.15 X .85 X 2.40. Weight including batteries: 4.5 oz. The end and side views shown below are actual size. Controls outside Switch Bank Report Mode below.) 2. On/Off/Volume thumbwheel: Volume of both the onboard and earphone

  12. COLREGS-compliant autonomous collision avoidance using multi-objective optimization with interval programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woerner, Kyle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High contact density environments are becoming ubiquitous in autonomous marine vehicle (AMV) operations. Safely managing these environments and their mission greatly taxes platforms. AMV collisions will likely increase as ...

  13. PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval tests for gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jinghua; Xue, Fuzhong

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    2005, 77:567-581. 23. Kallberg H, Padyukov L, Plenge RM, Ronnelid J, Gregersen PK, Helm-van Mil van der AHM, Toes REM, Huizinga TW, Klareskog L, Alfredsson L, et al: Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and smoking...

  14. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11] [12FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-I fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  15. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-1 fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  16. No-Free-Lunch Result for Interval and Fuzzy Computing: When Bounds Are Unusually Good,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Mexicano de Petr´oleo, Ejec Central L´azaro Cardenas Norte 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan M´exico D, Their Computation is Unusually Slow Ildar Batyrshin1 , Martine Ceberio2 , and Vladik Kreinovich2 1 Instituto

  17. Robust stabilizer synthesis for interval plants using H-Infinity methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Saikat

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), It is also assumed that r(s) is a stable, proper, rational function. From the small gain theorem [12], it can be guaranteed that the system will be robustly stable iff 12 sup l(1+ Pp(j u)C(j ~) 'C(j ~)bP(jip)I & 1. A necessary and suf6cient condition.... Uncertainty band when r = ((6P~, ~(e, j u) ~(~ 32 This conservativeness can possibly be minimized by introducing poles and zeros in r(s) and shaping it such that ]r(ja)] approximates 6P, (ej w) at each w, as closely as possible. So, for each c, the maximum...

  18. Finding limiting flows of batch extractive distillation with interval Erika R. Fritsa,b*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csendes, Tibor

    ., Hungary, e-mail: ufo@mail.bme.hu b HAS ­ BUTE Research Group of Technical Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest, P

  19. Reliable Computing 1 (2) (1995), pp. 109-140 Parallel interval-basedreasoning in medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    -based system Clinaid LADISLAVJ. KOHOUT, ISABEL STABILE,HASAN KALANTARt MARIA F. SAN-ANDRES, and JOHN ANDERSON Record Unit. 4. Co-ordination and Planning Unit. (~) U J. Kohout, I. Stabile, H Kalantar,M. F San

  20. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cekanova, Maria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Donnell, Robert [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Finocchiaro, Vincenzo [University of Messina, Messina, Italy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.

  1. Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Elizabeth anne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that reining horse maneuvers including galloping large, fast circles, spinning, and running to the sliding stop elicit anaerobiosis. Because the reining horse must produce energy anaerobically it is logical that the reining horse would benefit &om... in-depth maneuver workout which included spinning, galloping (500m/min) and stopping at intensities to elicit significant anaerobiosis (HR&200). Horses received stall rest with no forced exercise on d 6 and 7 of each week. This protocol is typical...

  2. File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdf Jump to:student-HS.pdf JumpSkystream

  3. STATISTICA INFERENZIALE SHEDA N. 2 INTERVALLI DI CONFIDENZA PER IL VALORE ATTESO E LA FREQUENZA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogantin, Maria Piera

    determinare il prezzo medio l'ISTAT (Istituto Nazionale di Statistica) effettua un campionamento su vari negozi della regione, tenendo conto della dislocazione geografica, del tipo di distribuzione . Sappiamo, inoltre, che X ha ancora distribuzione normale: ( ,2.25).X N Vogliamo determinare tale che ( )P

  4. Decision Making under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Towards an Operational Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    State Oil Academy, Baku, Azerbaijan raliev@asoa.edu.az, oleg huseynov@yahoo.com 2 Azerbaijan Association assumption that for each two alterna- tives, a user can always meaningfully decide which of them. Traditional decision theory is based on a simplifying assumption that for each two alternatives, a user can

  5. Considerations for the use of radar-derived precipitation estimates in determining return intervals for extreme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert J.

    to those based on traditional rain gauge networks. For both the radar and gauge data, increasing, considerable differences between radar ARF and gauge ARF exist. Radar ARF decays at a faster rate (with increasing area) than gauge ARF. For a basin size of 20,000 km2 , the percent difference between radar ARF

  6. SEP Request for Approval Form 1 - Modeling of Data at Finer Intervals than

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | DepartmentFinancing ProgramsWeekly

  7. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S.:7)An Assessment

  8. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined withtracking solar panel. 44and azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for a

  9. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tracking solar panel. 44and azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for aannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined with

  10. Magnetoconvection and dynamo coefficients III: alpha-effect and magnetic pumping in the rapid rotation regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; M. Ossendrijver; M. Stix

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. The alpha- and gamma-effects, which are responsible for the generation and turbulent pumping of large scale magnetic fields, respectively, due to passive advection by convection are determined in the rapid rotation regime corresponding to the deep layers of the solar convection zone. Methods. A 3D rectangular local model is used for solving the full set of MHD equations in order to compute the electromotive force (emf), E = , generated by the interaction of imposed weak gradient-free magnetic fields and turbulent convection with varying rotational influence and latitude. By expanding the emf in terms of the mean magnetic field, E_i = a_ij , all nine components of a_ij are computed. The diagonal elements of a_ij describe the alpha-effect, whereas the off-diagonals represent magnetic pumping. The latter is essentially the advection of magnetic fields by means other than the underlying large-scale velocity field. Comparisons are made to analytical expressions of the coefficients derived under the first-order smoothing approximation (FOSA). Results. In the rapid rotation regime the latitudinal dependence of the alpha-components responsible for the generation of the azimuthal and radial fields does not exhibit a peak at the poles, as is the case for slow rotation, but at a latitude of about 30 degrees. The magnetic pumping is predominantly radially down- and latitudinally equatorward as in earlier studies. The numerical results compare surprisingly well with analytical expressions derived under first-order smoothing, although the present calculations are expected to lie near the limits of the validity range of FOSA.

  11. Quality characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef as affected by postmortem chill, storage temperature and storage interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, Sammy Denzil

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    styrofoam tray and overwrapped with Goodyear "Choice Wrap" and displayed under retail conditions (1-3 C under 82 footcandles of incandescent light). The retail cuts were scored for four consecutive days for surface discoloration, peripheral discolora...

  12. Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jonathan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    +/- 245, 704 +/- 233, 723 +/- 227, 830 +/- 232W; ALT 632 +/- 171, 734 +/- 179, 783 +/- 188, 914 +/- 207W; pdesigned to elicit hypertrophy results in greater gains in strength and power...

  13. Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

  14. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simulated energy consumption can match the measured data. The simulation accuracy of room air temperature and energy consumption during the air-conditioner start-up period is not good and needs to be improved in future research. But in general...

  15. A comparison of the regular interval, varying start technique of work sampling with the completely random technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poage, Scott Tabor

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . D. HE Denholm whereby the "p oharts" of statistical ouality control are used to maintain sta- tistical control. 1. Brisleyp C. L. y "How You Can Put Work Sampling to Work, " FactorI Management and Maintenance, Vol. 110, No. 7, July N l~d, pp. H... 2 tt tttt2, 9 l. 76, N . 2, P trtprp, 1954, pp. ~331-33 1 the th h, 1954, te e r ~re t r ~Nehe e t ehd Maintenance, Mr. John M. Alderidgs presented and demon- strated. ths use of two nomographs for the calculations involved ln work sampling...

  16. [FG94] Fraigniaud, P., Gavoile, C.: Interval Routing Schemes. Research Rep. 9404, LIPSENS Lyon (1994). To appear in Algorithmica.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moran, Shlomo

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a significant price in time. Moreover, in Section 4 we revealed a connection between the total 2 ­diameter of an LIRS for it. We introduced the family of petal graphs (which includes all lithium graphs achieved by this result for lithium graphs is 1, which implies the impossibility result of [FG94]. Our work

  17. Shape and location effects on filled- and empty-intervals as indicators of an independent temporal code in working memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Alexia

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives Using the filled-duration illusion, this study investigated the existence of an independent temporal code operating in working memory. Extending research suggesting the principle distinction between filled- and ...

  18. 01988 Alan R. Liss. Inc. Cytometry 9:418425 (1988) Interval-Coded Texture Features for Artifact Rejection in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodenacker, Karsten

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .B.);Department of Electrical Engineering,SydneyUniversity, Sydney,Australia (P.N.);Department of Cytopathology,Charing Cross Hospital,London W68RF, England (K.W.) Received for publicationSeptember 23, 1987;acceptedApril 4), and statistical parameters (1).In quantitative cytology, the analysis of nuclear texture has been particularly

  19. Reliable Prediction of Phase Stability Using an Interval Newton Method James Z. Huaa, Joan F. Brenneckeb and Mark A. Stadtherra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    mathematics, for the solution of the phase stability problem for the Margules equation and the NRTL equation

  20. Percentile Norms and Accompanying Interval Estimates from an Australian General Adult Population Sample for Self-Report Mood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    , Adelaide, South Australia, 3 School of Psychology, University of NSW, and 4 University of Kurdistan Hawler

  1. A study of the sensitivity of topological dynamical systems and the Fourier spectrum of chaotic interval maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roque Sol, Marco A.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study some topological properties of dynamical systems. In particular the rela- tionship between spatio-temporal chaotic and Li-Yorke sensitive dynamical systems establishing that for minimal dynamical systems those properties are equivalent...

  2. SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO: IEEE COMPUTER, 2002, JANUARY 28, 2002 1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Web Users with Rough K-means Pawan Lingras Chad West Abstract Data collection and analysis in web mining faces certain unique challenges. Due to a variety of reasons inherent in web browsing and web techniques in web mining need to accommodate such data. Fuzzy and rough sets provide the ability to deal

  3. Effect of Alfaprostol, Lasalocid and Once Daily Suckling on postpartum interval in Brahman and Brahman crossbred cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Vecchio, Ronald Paul

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 7 +3. 8 vs 87. 4+ 3. 9) and positively influenced the cumulative frequency of return to estrus (CFE; P& . 04) in cows and heifers. Alfaprostol did not affect PPI in cows or heifers but did increase (P& . 02) CFE by 90 days postpartum in heifers.... Lasalocid did not affect PPI or CFE in cows or heifers. First service conception and overall pregnancy rates did not differ between treatments. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like to extend his gratitude and utmost respect to Dr. R. D. Randel who...

  4. A Divide-and-Conquer Approach for Solving Interval Algebra Networks Jason Jingshi Li, Jinbo Huang, and Jochen Renz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jinbo

    information such as "the financial crisis begun dur- ing the 2008 presidential campaign" does not specify is NP-hard for many cal- culi including IA. If only atomic IA relations are permitted, however

  5. AnyExpress: Integrated toolkit for analysis of cross-platform gene expression data using a fast interval matching algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jihoon; Patel, Kiltesh; Jung, Hyunchul; Kuo, Winston P; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    external software tools such as Bowtie (indicated by pinkruns via software such as Bowtie or RMAP. The standard inputsoft- ware as inputs (e.g. , Bowtie for NGS), which consist

  6. Abstract--EEG inter-burst interval (IBI) and its evolution is a robust parameter for grading hypoxic encephalopathy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [2, 3]. The degree of hypoxic brain injury and recovery is mainly determined by the severity and duration of insults [4]. However, secondary injury also develops over a time-period of several hours of the newborn. For this purpose, recovery of the IBI is again the most frequently used parameter. In [9

  7. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Functional Programming and Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    increases. Nowadays, software already controls nuclear plants, weapons, etc. Human lives, and even to guarantee reliability is to test a pro­ gram for all possible cases. Usually, there are many possible inputs, so testing all of them is always dif­ ficult, and most of the time practically impossible. If we test

  8. Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drozd, Leann Francine

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) on an equine treadmill. The total conditioning portion of the study was divided into two, 42-d phases. The first 42 d of conditioning were designed to condition the horses through long, slow, distance (LSD) exercise. Horses were galloped 4. 8 km at 400 m... were not significantly different. After a 14-wk study of traditionally training the Thoroughbred, Foreman et al. (1983) reported no significant differences in HR at rest, during a SET gallop, nor at 20, 40 and 60 min post exercise. However...

  9. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 69, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2004); P. 699707, 15 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1759456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    coefficient for a dipping azimuthally anisotropic layer Andr´es Pech and Ilya Tsvankin ABSTRACT Interpretation and inversion of azimuthally varying non- hyperbolic reflection moveout requires accounting for both velocity on the azimuthally varying coefficient A4 suggests that non- hyperbolic moveout recorded in wide-azimuth surveys can

  10. Derivation of the Viscous Moore-Greitzer Equation for Aeroengine Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Hou, Songming; Wellander, Niklas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    longitudinal and azimuthal thermoacoustic instabilities inincluding control of thermoacoustic instabilities in the

  11. Photons with a Twist: Coherent Optical Vortices From Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knyazik, Andrey

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14] Gerard Nienhuis. Doppler effect induced by rotatingfrequency via azimuthal Doppler effect [15], with later work

  12. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-11 CONVERSION FROM FILM TO MAGNETIC CASSETTE RECORDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for current speed (savonius rotor), meter azimuth, current direction, and meter tilt. The modifications

  13. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  14. Erratum: Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e?e? annihilation at ?s=10.58 GeV [Phys. Rev. D 78, 032011 (2008)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bartel, W.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kaji, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Križan, P.; Kumar, R.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Limosani, A.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Palka, H.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Peak, L. S.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Sekiya, A.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Vervink, K.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the original article, it was found in Monte Carlo simulations that the reconstructed A? results are roughly consistent with the generated asymmetries, while the A?? results systematically underestimate the generated asymmetries. This underestimation can be attributed to the difference between the reconstructed thrust axis and the original quark-antiquark axis. The corresponding correction factors are 1.6 ± 0.04 for the A?? results and 1.11 ± 0.05 for the A? results. Because of a flaw in the original analysis program, these correction factors were not applied to the AUC-type asymmetries in Table V as well as in some figures. In addition, a small mistake in the error propagation in the charm correction resulted in slightly underestimated statistical uncertainties. These omissions affect all but the charm asymmetry results. The correct central values are therefore given in Tables IV and V of this Erratum. The systematic uncertainties of the original publication remain unchanged.

  15. Particle-yield modification in jet-like azimuthal di-hadron correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The yield of charged particles associated with high-pT trigger particles (8 3 GeV/c on the away-side drops to about 60% of that observed in pp collisions, while on the near-side a moderate enhancement of 20-30% is found.

  16. Long-range angular correlations on the near and away side in p-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular correlations between charged trigger and associated particles are measured by the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV for transverse momentum ranges within 0.5 < pT,assoc < pT,trig < 4 GeV/c. The correlations are measured over two units of pseudorapidity and full azimuthal angle in different intervals of event multiplicity, and expressed as associated yield per trigger particle. Two long-range ridge-like structures, one on the near side and one on the away side, are observed when the per-trigger yield obtained in low-multiplicity events is subtracted from the one in high-multiplicity events. The excess on the near-side is qualitatively similar to that recently reported by the CMS collaboration, while the excess on the away-side is reported for the first time. The two-ridge structure projected onto azimuthal angle is quantified with the second and third Fourier coefficients as well as by near-side and away-side yields and widths. The yields on the near side and on the away side are equal within the uncertainties for all studied event multiplicity and pT bins, and the widths show no significant evolution with event multiplicity or pT. These findings suggest that the near-side ridge is accompanied by an essentially identical away-side ridge.

  17. Use of comparative geothermometry to reconstruct burial history and timing of oil generation and migration in Niobrara Formation, Berthoud State 4 well, Denver basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crysdale, B.L.; Barker, C.E. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara limestone in the Denver basin is largely restricted to the more permeable, fractured portions of the formation. Berthoud State 4 well cores from about 880 to 975 m (2,900-3,200 ft) depth contain zoned calcite in nearly vertical veins. Primary two-phase oil inclusions in these veins homogenize at a mean temperature of about 85{degree}C. Mean random vitrinite-reflectance (R{sub m}) over this same depth interval is 0.65%. Interpretation of this R{sub m}, using an empirical calibration with peak burial-temperature (T{sub peak}), indicates that these rocks reached at T{sub peak} of approximately 100{degree}c. Published clay mineral assemblage data suggest T{sub peak} was at least 100{degree}c. Burial history reconstruction for Berthoud State 4 suggests T{sub peak} was reached about 70 Ma, quickly followed by a 30{degree}-40{degree}C decrease due to uplift and erosion of approximately 3,000 ft of overburden. This short time at peak burial temperature fixes the time of oil migration at near-maximum burial.

  18. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; B. S. , The George Vashington University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Larry D. Piper This work presents an accurate and simple method of estimating the critical oi. l production rate for both two phase (oil-water or oil-gas) and three phase... The author would like to express his sincere appreciation to the following indivi. duels who, by their assistance and valuable suggestions, made this work possible. Professor Larry D. Piper for his guidance in outlining the goals of the project...

  19. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier 1;2 and D. L. Stein 2;1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    and negative magnetization. In the weak­noise limit, noise­activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula \\Gamma ¸ \\Gamma 0 exp], who worked out a `large deviation theory' of its magnetization reversals, but did not compute

  20. Effect of local cold-pack application on systemic anabolic and inflammatory response to sprint-interval training: a prospective comparative trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemet, Dan; Meckel, Yoav; Bar-Sela, Sheli; Zaldivar, Frank; Cooper, Dan M.; Eliakim, Alon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluated the eVect of cold ice-pack application following aon the eVec- tiveness of ice-pack application to improvecold- pack application could be made. In summary, local ice

  1. Effects of application intervals and levels of N, P, and K on cold hardiness relationships in Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.) and St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Sim Adair

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direct relationship between N-K and N-P. As tissue N levels increased, the P and K levels increased also, Tifgreen bermudagrass grown under different nutrient levels, con- trolled conditions, and artificially frozen in a growth chamber showed...-inch round plastic containers, surrounded with sand, and moved to the greenhouse where the temperature was maintained at approximately 75-80 F. Immediately after transplanting, one plug from each block was artificially frozen in a Sherer growth...

  2. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Wood

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  3. Understanding the Impact of Open-Framework Conglomerates on Water-Oil Displacements: Victor Interval of the Ivishak Reservoir, Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Victor Unit of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is characterized by high net-to-gross fluvial sandstones and conglomerates. The highest permeability is found within sets of cross-strata of open-framework conglomerate (OFC). They are preserved within unit bar deposits and assemblages of unit bar deposits within compound (braid) bar deposits. They are thief zones limiting enhanced oil recovery. We incorporate recent research that has quantified important attributes of their sedimentary architecture within preserved deposits. We use high-resolution models to demonstrate the fundamental aspects of their control on oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. We found that when the pressure gradient is oriented perpendicular to the paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller, than when it is oriented parallel to paleoflow. The pressure differe...

  4. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (La Luna Formation) main source rock in the basin (Bertagne et al., n.d.). During the Santonian to Maestrichtian time, the sedimentation took place in an open marine (oxic) condition represented by the thick shales of the Colon Formation which consists..., in the southwest of the basin, non-marine shale, sandstone, and coal of the Orocue Formation were deposited. Among its three members, the Catatumbo, Barco, and Los Cuervos Members, the lower Catatumbo and the upper Barco contain coal that is a secondary source rock...

  5. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

  6. An Application of Chaos Theory for Estimation of Simultaneous Variability of RR-intervals in Heart and Systolic Blood Pressure in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elio Conte; Antonio Federici; Joseph P. Zbilut

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new method to estimate BaroReflex Sensitivity (BRS) . The methodology, based on the CZF formulation, recently published (see Conte et al 2008), enables to evaluate simultaneous variability of RR and SBP and to estimate the coupling strength. The technique is applied to subjects (female and men with age ranging from 21 to 28 years old) and it is compared with the results that may be obtained by using the standard Fourier spectral analysis technique. The comparison is also performed by using the technique of Lomb-Scargle periodogram, based on Fourier analysis.

  7. Complex facies relationships and regional stratigraphy of the Mississippian Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases Formations, Illinois basin: A major hydrocarbon-producing interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.; Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Ste. Genevieve and Paoli Limestones and sandstones of the Aux Vases Formation are lateral facies of one another. This interpretation is based on comprehensive investigations of outcrops, and selected cores, samples of well cuttings, and geophysical logs conducted over a period of four years. Both units exhibit similar sedimentological characteristics and represent open marine, shallow subtidal, and intertidal environments. The presence of low-angle cross-laminae, ripple- and plane-laminae, climbing ripples, and ooid shoals suggest most deposition occurred under low energy conditions. Lenticular, channel-like scour and fill structures that contain both fine-grained quartz sand and abraded, disarticulated fossil fragments indicate localized higher energy deposition. The authors studies indicate that siliciclastic vs. carbonate deposition was controlled strictly by available sediment, and not by regressive (siliciclastic) and transgressive (carbonate) events, as inferred by previous workers. This conclusion is based on lateral facies relationships, and the supplanting of carbonates by clastics occurring in the upper part of the Ste. Genevieve through the middle part of the Paoli. The Aux Vases is thickest, coarsest, and least mature in the northwestern part of the Illinois Basin, and pinches out to the southeast. This implies a northwesterly source for clastics, perhaps the Transcontinental Arch. After early Chesterian time, the Transcontinental Arch apparently supplied little or no sediment to any flanking basin. The Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases are major oil-producing units in the Illinois Basin. New understanding of regional relationships should enhance exploratory success and improve recovery from established fields.

  8. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Interval Computations 1 Error Estimate of the Result of Measuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    , when we need the signal to go only in one direction and do not want to waste energy on the broad beams of light of every ele­ ment of this matrix; ffl to compute the total energy I of the laser beam by adding­ ameter consists of placing a matrix of pho­ toelements on its way, measuring the energy (power) in each

  9. Determination of Near-Surface Anisotropy From Surface Electromagnetic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, AbdulFattah

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) signatures, such as reflection moveout, are sensitive to the presence of azimuthal anisotropy. Azimuthal anisotropy can occur as an intrinsic property of the medium and/or due to the presence ...

  10. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined withand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for a

  11. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for aannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined with

  12. Methods for controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella surrogates during the production of non-intact beef products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Carson

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated methods for controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella non-pathogenic bacterial surrogates during the production of marinated non-intact beef products. Hot (~30 degrees C) boneless, beef strip loins (n = 54...

  13. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 8)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    This is the fifth of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at -30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  14. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    This is the third of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at +30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  15. Application of the computational aeroacoustics method to an advanced counterrotating propfan configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jinhan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time History at Axial Location I=103 for Three Different Azimuthal Grids. . . 55 29. Sound Pressure Level as a Function of Axial Location I'o r Three Different Azimuthal Grids (Harmonic Number = I). . . 56 Figure Page 30. Sound Pressure Level as a... Function of Axial Location for Three Different Azimuthal Grids (Harmonic Number = 2). Sound Pressure Level as a Function of Axial Location for Three Different Azimuthal Grids (Harmonic Number = 3). . . 58 32. Sound Pressure Level as a Function of Axial...

  16. DESY 06227 arXiv:hepex/0612059v1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Azimuthal Distribution of Pion Electroproduction A. Airapetian, 16 Z. Akopov, 27 M. Amarian, 7, 27 A. Andrus

  17. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  18. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26{degree}C and downshifted 30-26-30{degree}C) and females (constant 30{degree}C and upshifted 26-30-26{degree}C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26{degree}C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30{degree}C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26{degree}C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30{degree}C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25{degree}C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30{degree}C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  19. WARPED IONIZED HYDROGEN IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cersosimo, J. C.; Figueroa, N. Santiago; Velez, S. Figueroa; Soto, C. Lozada [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Puerto Rico at Humacao, Humacao, PR 00791 (Puerto Rico); Mader, S. [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, New South Wales (Australia); Azcarate, D. [Instituto Argentino de RadioastronomIa, CC No. 5, 1894 Villa Elisa. BsAs (Argentina)], E-mail: juan.cersosimo@upr.edu

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations of the H166{alpha} ({nu} = 1424.734 MHz) radio recombination line (RRL) emission from the Galactic plane in the longitude range l = 267 deg. - 302 deg. and latitude range b = -3.{sup 0}0 to +1.{sup 0}5. The line emission observed describes the Carina arm in the Galactic azimuth range from {theta} = 260 deg. to 190 deg. The structure is located at negative latitudes with respect to the formal Galactic plane. The observations are combined with RRL data from the first Galactic quadrant. Both quadrants show the signature of the warp for the ionized gas, but an asymmetry of the distribution is noted. In the fourth quadrant, the gas is located between Galactic radii R {approx} 7 and 10 kpc, and the amplitude of the warp is seen from the midplane to z {approx} -150 pc. In the first quadrant, the gas is found between R {approx} 8 and 13-16 kpc, and flares to z {approx} +350 pc. We confirm the warp of the ionized gas near the solar circle. The distribution of the ionized gas is compared with the maximum intensity H I emission (0.30 < n{sub HI} < 0.45 cm{sup -3}) at intervals of the Galactic ring. The ionized material is correlated with the H I maximum intensity in both quadrants, and both components show the same tilted behavior with respect to the mid-Galactic plane.

  20. The High-Acceptance Dielectron Spectrometer HADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; B. Bannier; R. Bassini; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; W. Enghardt; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. PerezCavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebac; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wuestenfel; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 degree, a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range. This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system.

  1. anambra state nigeria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study area. Results revealed that the axes of maximum electrical anisotropy correlated well with the measured strikes of the geologic formations and the azimuth-frequency...

  2. azo dye polymer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecules. In the mean field approximation, we found that the bare surface anchoring energy linearly depends on the azo-dye order parameter and the azimuthal anchoring strength...

  3. Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investigation (100 m); and (3) the azimuths to two of the usable transmitters (NLK and NPM) are aligned favorably with most of the principal geologic features. Measurements of...

  4. Ovid: Yang: J Vasc Interv Radiol, Volume 9(6).November/December 1998.953-959 Copyright 1998 Society of Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Volume 9(6), November/December 1998, pp 953-959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    of view, RF = radiofrequency, SPGR = spoiled gradient echo, TE = echo time, TR = repetition time, 3D cancer, laser or radio-frequency (RF) ablation of head and neck tumors, monitoring of prostate cancer agent needed, and no risk of ionizing radiation, MR-guided cardiovascular interventions are still

  5. Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over specific intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data Histogram A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over energies. Before you start you should know that: o This set of instructions only assumes a very minimal

  6. Low-Resolution STELab IPS 3D Reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval and Comparison with in-Ecliptic Solar Wind Measurements from STEREO and Wind Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Tokumaru, M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structure of the fast solar wind. J. Geophys. Res. 112,observations of the solar wind. Proc. SPIE 6689, 668911-1.W.A. , Maagoe, S. : 1972, Solar wind velocity from ips

  7. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.

  8. 2. Eastward and westward field motions Method: Radon Transform of TL windows Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlay, Christopher

    determination of azimuthal speeds Christopher Finlay, Mathieu Dumberry, Nicolas Gillet and Andrew Jackson School are driven by magnetic and thermal winds. It is proposed that such processes in Earth's fluid outer core could be responsible for the observed azimuthal field motions. 5. Thermal and magnetic winds

  9. Abstract--Synthetic aperture radar has become an important technique for generating high-resolution images of the ground,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    velocity vector, because of the Doppler shift dependency on azimuthal position and radial velocity of the Doppler shift dependence on both azimuthal position and radial velocity of the moving target [15]. 2 is nowadays well mastered. If targets are moving, it induces a delocalization and a defocusing effect

  10. Weather Radar Monitoring using the Sun Iwan Holleman and Hans Beekhuis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Weather Radar Monitoring using the Sun Iwan Holleman and Hans Beekhuis Technical Report, KNMI TR and azimuthal averaging 13 2.5 Corrected solar power 15 3 Position of the sun 17 3.1 Celestial sphere and equatorial coordinates 17 3.2 Equatorial coordinates of the sun 18 3.3 Conversion to elevation and azimuth 20

  11. Wind retrieval capability of rotating, range-gated, fanbeam spaceborne scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    at different azimuth view-angles over the resolution cell, and inverting the backscatter model, a so-called geophysical model function (GMF), to extract the wind information using the azimuth anisotropy of the radar simulations and an investigation of advanced features such as multi-beam, dual-polarisation, dual- frequency

  12. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 90, 6, pp. 15541558, December 2000 A Geometrical Error in Some Computer Programs based on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    , but it is approximately the same as the azimuthal-equidistant map- ping. Grid Directions Versus True Directions In its contain an error caused by identifying local grid directions with azimuths on the spherical Earth true and grid directions. Methods for computing these directions are pre- sented in this article

  13. Evaluating the Behavior of Laterally Loaded Piles under a Scoured Condition by Model Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismael, Omar Khaleel

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and repeated loading. Total of 41 tests were conducted in this study. For the static loading phase, the scour depth ranged from 0 to 500 mm with a 100-mm increment and a test was conducted for each scour depth. The scour slope ranged from 0 to 30 degrees with a...

  14. Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

  15. Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

  16. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL CONDITIONING ON THIN-LAYER DRYING OF ENERGY SORGHUM (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic energy varieties of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench show promise as a bioenergy feedstock, however, high moisture content at the time of harvest results in unacceptable levels of degradation when stored in aerobic conditions. To safely store sorghum biomass for extended periods in baled format, the material must be dried to inhibit microbial growth. One possible solution is allowing the material to dry under natural in-field conditions. This study examines the differences in thin-layer drying rates of intact and conditioned sorghum under laboratory-controlled temperatures and relative humidity levels (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C from 40% to 85% relative humidity), and models experimental data using the Page’s Modified equation. The results demonstrate that conditioning drastically accelerates drying times. Relative humidity had a large impact on the time required to reach a safe storage moisture content for intact material (approximately 200 hours at 30 degrees C and 40% relative humidity and 400 hours at 30 degrees C and 70% relative humidity), but little to no impact on the thin-layer drying times of conditioned material (approximately 50 hours for all humidity levels < 70% at 30 degrees C). The drying equation parameters were influenced by temperature, relative humidity, initial moisture content, and material damage, allowing drying curves to be empirically predicted. The results of this study provide valuable information applicable to the agricultural community and to future research on drying simulation and management of energy sorghum.

  17. IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHN ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of 25 kilometers [1]. The effect of this dense cloud upon the atmosphere and climate in the Northern around the earth from 5 degrees to about 30 degrees north latitude. The cloud has had an effect upon in the Pacific Northwest due to the effects of the stratospheric cloud from El Chichón. By looking at quantities

  18. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strength of forward-backward (FB) multiplicity correlations is measured by the ALICE detector in proton-proton (pp) collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=0.9$, 2.76 and 7 TeV. The measurement is performed in the central pseudorapidity region ($|\\eta| 0.3$ GeV/$c$. Two separate pseudorapidity windows of width ($\\delta \\eta$) ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 are chosen symmetrically around $\\eta=0$. The multiplicity correlation strength ($b_{\\rm cor}$) is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity gap ($\\eta_{\\rm gap}$) between the two windows as well as the width of these windows. The correlation strength is found to decrease with increasing $\\eta_{\\rm gap}$ and shows a non-linear increase with $\\delta\\eta$. A sizable increase of the correlation strength with the collision energy, which cannot be explained exclusively by the increase of the mean multiplicity inside the windows, is observed. The correlation coefficient is also measured for multiplicities in different configurations of two azimuthal sectors selected within the symmetric FB $\\eta$-windows. Two different contributions, the short-range (SR) and the long-range (LR), are observed. The energy dependence of $b_{\\rm cor}$ is found to be weak for the SR component while it is strong for the LR component. Moreover, the correlation coefficient is studied for particles belonging to various transverse momentum intervals chosen to have the same mean multiplicity. Both SR and LR contributions to $b_{\\rm cor}$ are found to increase with $p_{\\rm T}$ in this case. Results are compared to PYTHIA and PHOJET event generators and to a string-based phenomenological model. The observed dependencies of $b_{\\rm cor}$ add new constraints on phenomenological models.

  19. Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Evaluation of the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell Area, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widness, Scott

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study area is located in portions of Adams, Grant, Lincoln, and Franklin counties of eastern Washington. The area is representative of a complex stratigraphic and geohydrologic system within the basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. The regional piezometric surface and stratigraphic units dip towards the southwest. Fluid temperature data were collected by three different agencies. The Geological Engineering Section (WSU) at Washington State University, runs a continuous fluid temperature (FT) log as part of a complete suite of geophysical logs. The US Geological Survey (USGS) runs a continuous fluid FT log in conjunction with caliper and natural-gamma logs. Southern Methodist University (SMU) and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DNR), have cooperated in gathering FT data. The DNR-SMU data were collected by taking temperature measurements at 5 m intervals. Bottom-hole temperatures (BHT) and bottom-hole depths (BHD) of selected wells in the study area are given in table 2. Some of the BHT data in table 2 may vary from those previously reported by WSU. These discrepancies are the result of changes in the calibration method of the FT tool. A technique developed by Giggane (1982) was used to determine the geothermal gradients within the area. A least squares linear regression analysis of the relationship between the BHT and BHD was used to determine the geothermal gradient of a given well data group (WDG). Well data groups were selected on the premises of geographic proximity, position within the regional groundwater flow system, land slope azimuth, and land slope dip. Some data points have been excluded from the linear regression analysis on the basis of factors such as duplicate logging of the same hole, down-hole flow, holes not logged to total depth, and questionable FT tool responses.

  20. Harmonic decomposition of two-particle angular correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 pT^a. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval |\\eta| 0.8, and are referred to as "long-range correlations". Fourier components V_{n\\Delta} \\equiv are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies v_n(pT) as V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) = v_n(pT^t) v_n(pT^a). This expectation is tested for 1 \\leq n \\leq 5 by applying a global fit of all V_{n\\Delta}(pT^t, pT^a) to obtain the best values v_n{GF}(pT). It is found that for 2 \\leq n \\leq 5, the fit agrees well with data up to pT^a \\sim 3-4 GeV/c, with a trend of increasing deviation as pT^t and pT^a are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25 harmonic, however, a single v_1(pT) curve is not obtained even within the reduced range pT^a < 4 GeV/c.

  1. The in vivo study on the radiobiologic effect of prolonged delivery time to tumor control in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with 60 min interval group and the seven subfractions withwith 30 min interval group, the seven subfractions with 5

  2. Collective flow effects on charge balance correlations and local parity-violation observables in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Hori; T. Gunji; H. Hamagaki; S. Schlichting

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of collective flow on charge dependent azimuthal correlations at LHC energies. We propose a series of correlations as a signature of the combined effects of azimuthal collective flow and local charge conservation and perform an analysis within a statistical freeze-out model. We find that present LHC measurements of charge dependent azimuthal correlations are consistent with local charge conservation on the kinetic freeze-out surface. In view of experimental searches for signatures of the chiral-magnetic effect, we provide an alternative explanation of the charge dependence of the observed signal and propose additional measurements to disentangle the effects.

  3. Can one use Mueller-Navelet jets at LHC as a clean test of QCD resummation effects at high energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ducloué; L. Szymanowski; S. Wallon

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of azimuthal correlations of Mueller-Navelet jets is generally considered as a decisive test to reveal the effect of BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders. The first experimental study of these correlations at the LHC has been recently performed by the CMS collaboration. We show that the ratios of cosine moments of the azimuthal distribution are successfully described within our next-to-leading logarithmic BFKL treatment. The whole set of CMS data for the azimuthal correlations can also be consistently described provided that one uses a larger renormalization/factorization scale than its natural value.

  4. Can one use Mueller-Navelet jets at LHC as a clean test of QCD resummation effects at high energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducloué, B; Wallon, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of azimuthal correlations of Mueller-Navelet jets is generally considered as a decisive test to reveal the effect of BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders. The first experimental study of these correlations at the LHC has been recently performed by the CMS collaboration. We show that the ratios of cosine moments of the azimuthal distribution are successfully described within our next-to-leading logarithmic BFKL treatment. The whole set of CMS data for the azimuthal correlations can also be consistently described provided that one uses a larger renormalization/factorization scale than its natural value.

  5. 2524 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 42, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2014 Mitigation of Instabilities in a Z-Pinch Plasma by a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doron, Ramy

    the azimuthal and axial fields. Index Terms--Magnetic field effects, optical imaging, plasma pinch, plasma strengths at the same stage of compression, i.e., when the plasma column is imploded to a radius of 8 mm

  6. Analysis of P-wave seismic response for fracture detection: modelling and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yungui

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses a few specific issues in the use of wide azimuth P-wave seismic data for fracture detection based on numerical modelling and real data. These issues include the seismic response of discrete fractures, ...

  7. Effect of Dynamic Stall on the Aerodynamics of Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    = kinematic viscosity = air density = azimuth = angular velocity of the rotor ! = vorticity !b = bound, there is a perceived need to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants by replacing fossil

  8. Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller, and Nikolai M. Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller: surface waves, azimuthal anisotropy, Pacific Citation: Smith, D. B., M. H. Ritzwoller, and N. M. Shapiro

  9. A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Somnath

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research work aims at mapping the BVI azimuthal locations using a model rotor. A model rotor was first developed. An experimental investigation was then carried out to determine the possible BVI locations. The results of the mapping...

  10. Measurements of dynamics in an orientationally anisotropic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borthwick, Matthew A. (Matthew Alan), 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) coefficients, and these were compared to the "effective" coefficients yielded by the former. Because scattering from a nematic domain is limited to a narrow azimuthal range, while an isotropic domain scatters ...

  11. 300ºC DDS + 300ºC MWD

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    50 Azimuth 10 Inclination Down High Side 0 o TFO Low Side 180 o TFO 90 o Oriented Drilling 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov * A directional drilling system (DDS;...

  12. Role of magnetic anisotropy in spin-filter junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopdekar, R.V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and azimuthal angle for a 2 nm MCO based junction. Figure 1.4 (CCO) or MnCr 2 O 4 (MCO)- both of which are isostructuralin CCO junctions compared to MCO junctions. Detailed studies

  13. Detection of near-surface anisotropy in a weathered metamorphic schist using time-domain electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Jamie Lynne

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlled-source, azimuthal, time-domain, electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys were conducted over a schist formation with uniformly striking, nearly vertical foliation. Direct current electrical resistivity and seismic refraction surveys provided...

  14. EPJ manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and F 2 are the Dirac and Pauli form factors, respectively. The longitudinal target­spin asymmetry (LTSA (parallel) to the beam direction. The azimuthal amplitude A sin # UL of the LTSA appears to leading order

  15. Ferrofluid spin-up flows from uniform and non-uniform rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khushrushahi, Shahriar Rohinton

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When ferrofluid in a cylindrical container is subjected to a rotating azimuthally directed magnetic field, the fluid "spins up" into an almost rigid-body rotation where ferrofluid nanoparticles have both a linear and an ...

  16. Design and manufacture of a modular cylindrical apparatus for ferrofluid experimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoen, Katrina Leigh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrofluids, colloidal suspensions of coated magnetic nanoparticles inside a carrier fluid, respond to externally applied magnetic fields. This thesis addresses the behavior of these fluids when subjected to an azimuthally ...

  17. P and SV waves 3-D Numerical Modeling of AVOA from Heterogeneous Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiang

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of fracture-induced anisotropy and lateral fracture density heterogeneity on the reflected P and SV wave amplitude variation with offset and azimuth (AVOA), using 3-D finite-difference simulations. The ...

  18. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: multiplicities and Phenomenology - part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, Mauro [TURIN; Boglione, Mariaelena [TURIN; Gonzalez H., J.O. [TORINO; Melis, Stefano [TURIN; Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  19. Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV p + p and Central Au + Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Justin

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au + Au and p + p collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population ...

  20. Viscosity and the Soft Ridge at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Gavin; George Moschelli

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation studies exhibit a ridge-like feature in rapidity and azimuthal angle, with and without a jet trigger. We ask whether the feature in untriggered correlations can be a consequence of transverse flow and viscous diffusion.

  1. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the NIP was mounted on an Eppley SMT-3 Solar Tracker.The SMT-3 can orient in a two-axis (azimuth/elevation) planeincidence to the sun. The SMT-3 tracks the sun using built-

  2. Observation of Associated Near-Side and Away-Side Long-Range Correlations in ?[subscript NN]=5.02??TeV Proton-Lead Collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Two-particle correlations in relative azimuthal angle (??) and pseudorapidity (??) are measured in ?s[subscript NN]=5.02??TeV p+Pb collisions using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are performed using ...

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the following tasks: high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the southern Piceance Basin of western Colorado; field performance site selection of Rulison Field for seismic acquisition which covers technical work to be performed; seismic acquisition processing and associated costs;theoretical background concerning P-wave multi-azimuth 3D seismic; field data examples of P-wave multi-azimuth data; and 3D basin modeling.

  4. Progress in the Study of the Mechanical Harvesting of Cotton.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harvesting of Cotton AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President STATION STAFPt Administration : Veterinary Science : A. B. Conner, M. S., Diraetor *M. Francis, D. V. M., Chief R. E. Karper. M. S., Vice Director 33. Schmidt, D... slightly roughened surface gave a high efficiency in harvesting cotton. Rolls 56 inches in length, operated at an angle between 25 and 30 degrees with the ground, and hav- ing a peripheral travel faster than that of the forward travel of the tractor...

  5. Tightening procedures for large diameter anchor bolts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Ryan Charles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Column Base Moment. 43 25 Pole Base Moment vs. Weld Tensile Stress. . . . . . 44 26 Stresses Induced from Pole Base Moment When Snug Tight. . . . . 45 27 Stresses Induced from Pole Base Moment When 30 Degrees Past Snug Tight. . 45 28 Stresses.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 36 Crack and Repair Locations on Pole to Base Plate Weld. . . . 64 37 Ultrasonic Inspection for Fatigue Cracks. . . . . . LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page Stresses Induced From Snug Tight, 4 I/2 UNC Threads. . . . . 25 Stresses Induced From 30...

  6. Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

  7. ON THE ABSENCE OF PHOTOSPHERIC NET CURRENTS IN VECTOR MAGNETOGRAMS OF SUNSPOTS OBTAINED FROM HINODE (SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/SPECTRO-POLARIMETER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.i, E-mail: stiwari@prl.res.i [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur-313 001 (India)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Various theoretical and observational results have been reported regarding the presence/absence of net electric currents in the sunspots. The limited spatial resolution of the earlier observations perhaps obscured the conclusions. We have analyzed 12 sunspots observed from Hinode (Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-polarimeter) to clarify the issue. The azimuthal and radial components of magnetic fields and currents have been derived. The azimuthal component of the magnetic field of sunspots is found to vary in sign with azimuth. The radial component of the field also varies in magnitude with azimuth. While the latter pattern is a confirmation of the interlocking combed structure of penumbral filaments, the former pattern shows that the penumbra is made up of a 'curly interlocking combed' magnetic field. The azimuthally averaged azimuthal component is seen to decline much faster than 1/piv in the penumbra, after an initial increase in the umbra, for all the spots studied. This confirms the confinement of magnetic fields and absence of a net current for sunspots as postulated by Parker. The existence of a global twist for a sunspot even in the absence of a net current is consistent with a fibril-bundle structure of the sunspot magnetic fields.

  8. Preparation and atomic structure of reconstructed (0001) InGaN surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, C.; Biermann, A.; Kneissl, M.; Vogt, P. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik EW6-1, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, V. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Esser, N. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik EW6-1, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preparation and surface structure of high quality group-III-polar (0001) InGaN layers grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated. In order to obtain a clean and well-ordered surface we studied the preparation by annealing at various temperatures under ultra high vacuum and nitrogen-rich conditions in nitrogen-plasma. We show that different InGaN surface reconstructions such as (1 Multiplication-Sign 1), (1 + 1/6), (2 Multiplication-Sign 2), and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign can be obtained as observed by low energy electron diffraction. Dependent on the annealing temperature and nitrogen supply these surfaces exhibit significant differences in stoichiometry and morphology as determined by Auger electron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. The (1 Multiplication-Sign 1), (2 Multiplication-Sign 2), and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign superstructures are terminated by single group-III-adatoms, whereas the (1 + 1/6) exhibits a incommensurate overlayer of group-III-atoms. We show that the (2 Multiplication-Sign 2) and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign an In depletion in the first group-III layer and In or Ga adatoms in ontop position. Strain-relaxation is suggested to explain this structure formation.

  9. Reclaimer Scheduling: Complexity and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 18, 2014 ... R1 has to spend a time interval of length 39B in the interval X = [9B, 35B]. ... X, the maximal time that R1 can spend in the interval [51B, 53B] is ...

  10. anatomical mapping analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markov Interval Maps CERN Preprints Summary: We set up a multiresolution analysis on fractal sets derived from limit sets of Markov Interval Maps. For this we consider the ...

  11. 995.ps.gz - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The authors consider the minimum spanning tree and the shortest. path problems on a ..... some intervals. No stochastic distribution is given inside intervals. The.

  12. Measurements of Dihadron Correlations Relative to the Event Plane in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; Oh; Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; Tribedy; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Dihadron azimuthal correlations containing a high transverse momentum ($\\pt$) trigger particle are sensitive to the properties of the nuclear medium created at RHIC through the strong interactions occurring between the traversing parton and the medium, i.e. jet-quenching. Previous measurements revealed a strong modification to dihadron azimuthal correlations in Au+Au collisions with respect to \\pp\\ and \\dAu\\ collisions. The modification increases with the collision centrality, suggesting a path-length dependence to the jet-quenching effect. This paper reports STAR measurements of dihadron azimuthal correlations in mid-central (20-60\\%) Au+Au collisions at $\\snn=200$~GeV as a function of the trigger particle's azimuthal angle relative to the event plane, $\\phis=|\\phit-\\psiEP|$. The azimuthal correlation is studied as a function of both the trigger and associated particle $\\pt$. The subtractions of the combinatorial background and anisotropic flow, assuming Zero Yield At Minimum (\\zyam), are described. The away-side correlation is strongly modified, and the modification varies with $\\phis$, which is expected to be related to the path-length that the away-side parton traverses. The pseudo-rapidity ($\\deta$) dependence of the near-side correlation, sensitive to long range $\\deta$ correlations (the ridge), is also investigated. The ridge and jet-like components of the near-side correlation are studied as a function of $\\phis$. The ridge appears to drop with increasing $\\phis$ while the jet-like component remains approximately constant. ...

  13. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  14. Cancer risk in childhood-onset systemic lupus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phoma, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The firstALL: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia; CI: Confidence interval;

  15. Unified approach to the classical statistical analysis of small signals Gary J. Feldman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Gary

    -sided intervals leads to intervals which are not confidence intervals if the choice is based on the data. We apply and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 Received 21 November 1997; published 6 led the Particle Data Group PDG 2 to describe procedures for Bayesian interval construction

  16. Directed modified Cholesky factorizations and convex quadratic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 3, 2014 ... analysis, constraint satisfaction problems, bounding ellipsoids, interval hull, rounding .... 1 if Aii failure;.

  17. SIAM J. ScI. STAT. COMPUT. Vol. 7, No. 2, April 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Mathematics OO9 CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR INEQUALITY-CONSTRAINED LEAST SQUARES PROBLEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS

  18. Download - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 20, 2003 ... Sections on interval arithmetic, constrained propagation ..... is trapped in a high-

  19. Gluon distribution functions and Higgs boson production at moderate transverse momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun P.; Yuan F.; Xiao, B.W.

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gluon distribution functions and their contributions to the Higgs boson production in pp collisions in the transverse momentum-dependent factorization formalism. In addition to the usual azimuthal symmetric transverse momentum-dependent gluon distribution, we find that the azimuthal correlated gluon distribution also contributes to the Higgs boson production. This explains recent findings on the additional contribution in the transverse momentum resummation for the Higgs boson production as compared to that for electroweak boson production processes. We further examine the small-x naive kt-factorization in the dilute region and find that the azimuthal correlated gluon distribution contribution is consistently taken into account. The result agrees with the transverse momentum-dependent factorization formalism. We comment on the possible breakdown of the naive kt-factorization in the dense medium region, due to the unique behaviors for the gluon distributions.

  20. Two-dimensional single-stream electron motion in a coaxial diode with magnetic insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuks, Mikhail I.; Schamiloglu, Edl [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSC01 1100, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSC01 1100, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most widespread models of electrons drifting around the cathode in magnetrons is the single-stream state, which is the Brillouin stream with purely azimuthal motion. We describe a single-stream state in which electrons not only move in the azimuthal direction, but also along the axial direction, which is useful for consideration, for example, of relativistic magnetrons, MILOs, and coaxial transmission lines. Relations are given for the conditions of magnetic insulation for 2D electron motion, for 1D azimuthal and axial motion, and for synchronism of these streams with the operating waves of M-type microwave sources. Relations are also provided for the threshold of generation in magnetrons with 2D electron motion.