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1

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase I will consist of the acquisition, processing and interpretation of two 2-dimensional vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) at strategic positions crossing the range front fault system in the Humboldt House-Rye Patch (HH-RP) geothermal resource area. APEX-HiPoint Reservoir Imaging, Project team partner, will use its borehole seismic technology deploying up to 240 multicomponent phones on a fiber optic wireline system coupled to a high-volume data acquisition system. A vibroseis source will be recorded along the 2D profiles with offsets up to 10,000 feet on either side of the receiver wells, creating a wide horizontal aperture. Using dynamic borehole cooling, the APEX receivers will be deployed in an extended vertical array above and below the interface (and large velocity contrast) between Tertiary valley fill sediments and Triassic and older reservoir rocks, significantly increasing vertical aperture, multiplicity, frequency and signal quality. Optim, Project Team partner, will use its patented nonlinear optimization technique on both borehole and surface data to obtain high resolution velocity models down to target depths, also a "first". HiPoint's patented, time-domain processing techniques will be employed to provide accurate, high-resolution reflection images in a fraction of previous compute times.

2

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: A novel 2D VSP imaging technology and patented processing techniques will be used to create accurate, high-resolution reflection images of a classic Basin and Range fault system in a fraction of previous compute times.

3

Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Christine M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Joseph C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark W. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Pershing County, Nevada This presentation does not contain any...

5

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July...

6

SEEING 3D OBJECTS IN A SINGLE 2D IMAGE Diego Rother  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEEING 3D OBJECTS IN A SINGLE 2D IMAGE By Diego Rother and Guillermo Sapiro IMA Preprint SeriesD segmentation, object recognition, and 3D reconstruction from a single image is introduced in this paper. The proposed approach partitions 3D space into voxels and estimates the voxel states

7

High-Accuracy 2D Digital Image Correlation Measurements with Bilateral Telecentric Lenses: Error Analysis and Experimental Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing two digital images of a test planar specimen surface recorded in different configurations, two-dimensional digital image correlation (2D-DIC) provides full-field displacements to sub-pixel accurac...

Bing Pan; Liping Yu; Dafang Wu

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

9

Accelerated Short-TE 3D Proton Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging Using 2D-SENSE with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerated Short-TE 3D Proton Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging Using 2D-SENSE with a 32-Channel times and 2D acceleration with a large array coil is expected to provide high acceleration capability using a 32-channel array coil can be accelerated 8-fold (R 4 2) along y-z to achieve a minimum

10

DATA FUSION IN 2D AND 3D IMAGE PROCESSING: AN OVERVIEW Isabelle BLOCH, Henri MA^ITRE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATA FUSION IN 2D AND 3D IMAGE PROCESSING: AN OVERVIEW Isabelle BLOCH, Henri MA^ITRE Ecole of the art in image fusion, with an emphasis on the emergence of new techniques, often issued from other the aim of data fusion and its speci city when image informationhas to be combined, with emphasis

11

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33 PNWD-SA-7032 / 33 Map View Sample Information Box Click in this Column #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 34 PNWD-SA-7032 / 34 Sample Information Box Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 35 PNWD-SA-7032 / 35 Segment Sample Results Box Enter Measurements

12

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17 PNWD-SA-7032 / 17 Edit Sample Areas Define New Sample Area Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 18 PNWD-SA-7032 / 18 "New Area" button on the Toolbar Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 19 PNWD-SA-7032

13

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49 PNWD-SA-7032 / 49 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 50 PNWD-SA-7032 / 50 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued)Hypothetical Case Study Save #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 51 PNWD-SA-7032 / 51 Coordinate View X and Y

14

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41 PNWD-SA-7032 / 41 Assumptions Underlying the UCLs. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 42 PNWD-SA-7032 / 42 Hypothetical Case Study that the action limit for the RDX mean (4.4 ppm) is not exceeded. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 43

15

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1 PNWD-SA-7032 Range Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software Range Sustainability ModuleRange Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 2 PNWD-SA-7032 / 2 ObjectiveObjectiveObjective Learn how to use the Range

16

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57 PNWD-SA-7032 / 57 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 the RDX Measurements for the 2 MI Samples in Segment 4 #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 58 PNWD;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 59 PNWD-SA-7032 / 59 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 UCL

17

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25 PNWD-SA-7032 / 25 Sampling Goals Establish Boundary of Contamination Partial Boundary #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 26 PNWD-SA-7032 / 26 Required Samples #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 27 PNWD-SA-7032 / 27 Specify Constituents of Concern

18

2D grating simulation for X-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging with a Talbot interferometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Talbot interferometry is a recently developed and an extremely powerful X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique. Besides giving access to ultra-high sensitivity differential phase contrast images, it also provides the dark field image, which is a map of the scattering power of the sample. In this paper we investigate the potentialities of an improved version of the interferometer, in which two dimensional gratings are used instead of standard line grids. This approach allows to overcome the difficulties that might be encountered in the images produced by a one dimensional interferometer. Among these limitations there are the phase wrapping and quantitative phase retrieval problems and the directionality of the differential phase and dark-field signals. The feasibility of the 2D Talbot interferometer has been studied with a numerical simulation on the performances of its optical components under different circumstances. The gratings can be obtained either by an ad hoc fabrication of the 2D structures or by a superposition of two perpendicular linear grids. Through this simulation it has been possible to find the best parameters for a practical implementation of the 2D Talbot interferometer.

Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon [Paul Scherrer Insitute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

Extraction and comparison of gene expression patterns from 2D RNA in situ hybridization images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for low signal/strong lighting effects, the significance...larger computational cost. Imaging in situ hybridizations...the overall position, lighting conditions and focal...consistent staining/lighting) and small datasets...mutual information. Medical Imaging 1998: Image......

Daniel L. Mace; Nicole Varnado; Weiping Zhang; Erwin Frise; Uwe Ohler

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of permeability will result from images between 2 and 4 lm resolution. To reduce permeability underestimation from analyses of high-resolu- tion images, a resolution threshold between 3 and 15 lm was found to be effective, but it is not known whether this range is applicable beyond the samples studied here.

Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP in low Permeability Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

Mark Willis; Daniel Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

L.J. van Vliet and P.W. Verbeek, Curvature and bending energy in digitized 2D and 3D images, in: SCIA'93, Proc. Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, Tromso, Norway, 1993, 1403-1410.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.J. van Vliet and P.W. Verbeek, Curvature and bending energy in digitized 2D and 3D images, in: SCIA'93, Proc. 8th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, Tromso, Norway, 1993, 1403-1410. Curvature and Bending Energy in Digitized 2D and 3D Images Lucas J. van Vliet and Piet W. Verbeek Pattern

van Vliet, Lucas J.

23

L.J. van Vliet and P.W. Verbeek, Curvature and bending energy in digitized 2D and 3D images, in: SCIA'93, Proc. 8 th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, Tromso, Norway, 1993, 14031410.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.J. van Vliet and P.W. Verbeek, Curvature and bending energy in digitized 2D and 3D images, in: SCIA'93, Proc. 8 th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, Tromso, Norway, 1993, 1403­1410. Curvature and Bending Energy in Digitized 2D and 3D Images Lucas J. van Vliet and Piet W. Verbeek Pattern

van Vliet, Lucas J.

24

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with 2D spectroscopy for the detection of brain metabolites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) derives its signal from protons in water, additional biochemical compounds are detectable in vivo within the proton spectrum. The detection and mapping of these much weaker signals ...

Kok, Trina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An optimal parallel algorithm for the Euclidean distance maps of 2D binary images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euclidean distance map (EDM) of a black and white n 2 n binary image is the n 2 n map where each element has the Euclidean distance between the corresponding pixel and the nearest black pixel. The EDM plays an important role in machine vision, pattern recognition, and robotics[9]. Many algorithms have been proposed

Fujiwara, Akihiro

26

Isotropic 3D fast spin-echo imaging versus standard 2D imaging at 3.0 T of the knee—image quality and diagnostic performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SB (2007) High-resolution 3D cartilage imaging with IDEALMa Thomas M. Link Isotropic 3D fast spin-echo imaging versusintermediate-weighted (IM-w) 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) se-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A VSP transformation technique for the determination of subsurface structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the dominant wavelength. With the surface reflection profiling technique, resolution typically ranges from tens to hundreds of meters. With this degree of resolution, a detailed understanding of the subsurface is hard to achieve, In a vertical seismic... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Terry W. Spencer An algorithm was developed which transforms a vertical seismic profile (VSP) from the time-depth domain into the offset-time domain. The procedure operates by calculating the dips of the reflectors...

Malloy, Jeffrey Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Applicability of 2-D Time-Lapse High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Approach to Image Natural Salt-Dissolution and Subsidence in Central Kansas and Improved Post-Processed Vibroseis Data Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of 2-D time-lapse imaging for monitoring natural dissolution of the Hutchinson Salt in eastern Reno County, Kansas was shown to be restricted when comparing high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired ...

Rice, Daniel

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Insights to the Sawtooth Oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Hot Plasmas based on High Resolution 2-D Images of Te Fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dimensional (2-D) images of electron temperature fluctuations with high temporal and spatial resolution have been employed to study the sawtooth oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Toroidal EXperiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) tokamak plasmas. 2-D imaging data revealed new physics which were not available in previous studies based on the 1-D electron temperature measurement and X-ray tomography. Review of the physics of the sawtooth oscillation is given by comparative studies with prominent theoretical models suggest that a new physics paradigm is needed to describe the reconnection physics of the sawtooth oscillation. The new insights are: A pressure driven instability (not a ballooning mode) leads to the X-point reconnection process. The reconnection process is identified as a random 3-D local reconnection process with a helical structure. The reconnection time scale is similar for different types of sawtooth oscillation ("kink" and tearing type) and is significantly faster than the resistive time scale. Heat flow from the core to the outside of the inversion radius during the reconnection process is highly collective rather than stochastic.

H.K. Park, N.C. Luhmann, Jr, A.J.H. Donné, C.W. Domier, T. Munsat, M.J. Van de Pol, and the TEXTOR Team

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

30

A COMPARISON OF 2D IMAGE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN-BASED STEREOLOGY FOR EVALUATING MORPHOLOGICAL AND ANATOMICAL CHANGES IN THE DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEM OF THE RODENT MIDBRAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background. 2D analyses produce systematic errors in quantifying anatomical and morphological features in the brain. Design-based stereology overcomes this limitation by applying probability theory, yet many neuroscience ...

Park, Ji-Hyuk

2010-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP data from Bradys EGS Site and Update of the...

32

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office 2013 Peer Review I: Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP data from Brady's...

33

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced Robotics, Vol. 21, No. 10, pp. 11151129 (2007) VSP and Robotics Society of Japan 2007.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Robotics, Vol. 21, No. 10, pp. 1115­1129 (2007) VSP and Robotics Society of Japan 2007. Also available online - www.brill.nl/ar Full paper Integrating robotics and neuroscience: brains for robots, bodies for brains MICHELE RUCCI , DANIEL BULLOCK and FABRIZIO SANTINI Department of Cognitive

Rucci, Michele

37

Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we begin to examine the feasibility of using time-lapse seismic methods-specifically the vertical seismic profiling (VSP) method-for monitoring changes in hydrate accumulations that are predicted to occur during production of natural gas.

Kowalsky, M.B.; Nakagawa, S.; Moridis, G.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Processing of a nine-component near-offset VSP for seismic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A convolutional sequence of matrix operators is offered as a convenient deterministic scheme for processing a multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP). This sequence is applied to a nine-component near-offset VSP recorded at the Conoco borehole test facility, Kay County, Oklahoma. These data are corrected for tool spin and near-surface anisotropy together with source coupling or imbalance. After wave-field separation using a standard f-k filter, each source and receiver pair for the upgoing waves is adjusted to a common reference depth using a matrix operator based on the downgoing wavefield. The up- and downgoing waves are then processed for anisotropy by a similarity transformation, to separate the qS1 and qS2 waves, from which the anisotropic properties are estimated. These estimates reveal a strong (apparent) vertical birefringence in the near-surface, but weak or moderate values for the majority of the subsurface. The target zone consists of a thin sandstone and deeper shale layer, both of which possess a strong vertical birefringence. The sandstone corresponds to a zone of known fluid flow. An observed qS2 attenuation and polarization change in the shale suggest it contains large fractures.

MacBeth, C.; Li, X.Y.; Zeng, X. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cox, D.; Queen, J. [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.] [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ARM - Datastreams - sonicwind2d  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Datastreamssonicwind2d Datastreamssonicwind2d Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SONICWIND2D Horizontal wind speed and direction from ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala WS425), 2m above ground on Barrow MET tower Active Dates 2003.10.31 - 2008.09.16 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument ultrasonic wind sensor (SONICWIND) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Horizontal wind Wind direction vector mean deg SonicWD_DU_WVT ( time ) Wind direction vector mean standard deviation deg SonicWD_SDU_WVT ( time ) Horizontal wind Wind speed arithmetic mean m/s SonicWS_S_WVT ( time )

40

JGI Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP) provides an opportunity for researchers who are seeking to build upon their line of scientific inquiry by leveraging JGI experimental, computational, and personnel resources for genomic research and sequence-based science. Projects include de novo generation of genome data, assistance in interpreting and/or building on an existing data set, or the refining of new technology (e.g., single-cell genomics; metagenomics, etc.). Length of stay depends on complexity of the project being considered and availability of data and other resources. Investigators, post docs, and graduate students participating in approved JGI User Projects are also invited to apply for on-site access to JGI

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2D Gauge Field Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show from the action integral that under the assumption of longitudinal dominance and transverse confinement, QCD4 in (3+1) dimensional space-time can be approximately compactified into QCD2 in (1+1) dimensional space-time. In such a process, we find the relation between the coupling constant $g(2D)$ in QCD2 and the coupling constant $g(4D)$ in QCD4. We also show that quarks and gluons in QCD2 acquire masses as a result of the compactification.

Koshelkin, Andrey V. [Moscow Institute for Physics and Engineering, Russia] [Moscow Institute for Physics and Engineering, Russia; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

mylc2d4.tmp  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

flat portion of the beam. The resulting irradiance can be imaged with magnification to control the size of the output beam. The major Fig. 1 Uniformirradianceobtainedby...

43

Unparticle Example in 2D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

Howard Georgi and Yevgeny Kats

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

Multiparameter TTI tomography of P-wave reflection and VSP data Xiaoxiang Wang1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for dipping shale layers. Then in 2D, the tilt is equal to the reflector dip, which can be estimated from does not adequately describe anisotropic velocity fields and makes it difficult to fit the normal

Tsvankin, Ilya

45

Form 2D | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form 2DLegal Abstract Form 2D: Application for Permit to Discharge Process Wastewater - New Industrial Facilities, current through August 14, 2014. Published NA Year...

46

areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

Rivers, M. (UC)

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

Rivers, Mark L. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources and Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hopkinson bar simulation using DYNA2D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-element simulation of a Split Hopkinson's bar (Kolsky apparatus) technique involving mortar specimens is accomplished with DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional finite-element code. Calculations are compared with experimental results contained in a University of Florida report Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures, and with analytic solutions of the appropriate wave propagation problem.

Smith, J.A.; Glover, T.A.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

Choshi design system from 2D images Natsuki Takayama1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo msb8063@yahoo.co.jp, rocky be squeezed into a flat surface, while maintaining as much as possible the perception of the full 3D scene

Boyer, Edmond

50

GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

Zvonarev, P. S. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada); Sur, R. K. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dissipative flows of 2D foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the flow of a liquid foam between two plates separated by a gap of the order of the bubble size (2D foam). We concentrate on the salient features of the flow that are induced by the presence, in an otherwise monodisperse foam, of a single large bubble whose size is one order of magnitude larger than the average size. We describe a model suited for numerical simulations of flows of 2D foams made up of a large number of bubbles. The numerical results are successfully compared to analytical predictions based on scaling arguments and on continuum medium approximations. When the foam is pushed inside the cell at a controlled rate, two basically different regimes occur: a plug flow is observed at low flux whereas, above a threshold, the large bubble migrates faster than the mean flow. The detailed characterization of the relative velocity of the large bubble is the essential aim of the present paper. The relative velocity values, predicted both from numerical and from analytical calculations that are discussed here in great detail, are found to be in fair agreement with experimental results.

Isabelle Cantat; Renaud Delannay

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Narrow band region-based active contours and surfaces for 2D and 3D segmentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a narrow band region approach for deformable curves and surfaces in the perspective of 2D and 3D image segmentation. Basically, we develop a region energy involving a fixed-width band around the curve or surface. Classical region-based methods, ... Keywords: Active contour, Active surface, Deformable model, Level sets, Narrow band region energy, Segmentation

Julien Mille

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Lie symmetries and 2D Material Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired from Lie symmetry classification, we establish a correspondence between rank two Lie symmetries and 2D material physics. The material unit cell is accordingly interpreted as the geometry of a root system. The hexagonal cells, appearing in graphene like models, are analyzed in some details and are found to be associated with A_2 and G_2 Lie symmetries. This approach can be applied to Lie supersymmetries associated with fermionic degrees of freedom. It has been suggested that these extended symmetries can offer a new way to deal with doping material geometries. Motivated by Lie symmetry applications in high energy physics, we speculate on a possible connection with (p,q) brane networks used in the string theory compactification on singular Calabi-Yau manifolds.

Adil Belhaj; Moulay Brahim Sedra

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

2D 3D * iklee)@yonsei.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2012 2D 3D * 0 , 1 , 2 0,2 1 ( 0 skrcjstk, 2 iklee)@yonsei.ac.kr 1 rinthel Science, Yonsei University. 1 Dept. of Information Media, The University of Suwon. 2D 3D . 2D - , 3D (Disparity) 3D . . 1. 3D 3D . 3D 3D [1

Lee, In-Kwon

58

The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated lesions (p > 0.05). Agreement between allocated lesion scores for 2D mammography and those for the tomosynthesis series was poor. Conclusions: The realistic appearance of the 3D models of microcalcification clusters, whether malignant or benign clusters, was confirmed for 2D digital mammography images and the breast tomosynthesis datasets; this database of clusters is suitable for use in future observer performance studies related to the detectability of microcalcification clusters. Such studies include comparing 2D digital mammography to breast tomosynthesis and comparing different reconstruction algorithms.

Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Specific heat of a superconducting multilayer: 2D fluctuations and 2D-0D crossover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the specific heat of multilayers of superconducting amorphous Mo77Ge23 layers separated by insulating amorphous germanium. We observe a fluctuation regime in quantitative agreement with predictions for two-dimensional superconductivity. The fluctuation peak is rapidly suppressed by the application of small magnetic fields perpendicular to the layers, and the transition becomes extremely broad as the field is increased. The transition widths scale as expected for a field-induced 2D to 0D crossover, and are in excellent agreement with the exact result for 0D fluctuations.

J. S. Urbach; W. R. White; M. R. Beasley; A. Kapitulnik

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Photorefractive holography for 2D mechanical vibrations measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report an efficient holographic setup for the real time measurement of 2D mechanical vibration modes in surfaces, based on the time-average holographic interferometry technique...

de Oliveira, Ivan; Frejlich, Jaime

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Energy Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation October 28, 2014 (a) Illustration of the digital transfer growth...

62

Enhanced 2D/3D Approaches Based on Relevance Index for 3D-Shape Retrieval Mohamed Chaouch, Anne Verroust-Blondet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced 2D/3D Approaches Based on Relevance Index for 3D-Shape Retrieval Mohamed Chaouch, Anne.Chaouch,Anne.Verroust}@inria.fr Shape Modeling International'06, Matsushima, June 14-16, 2006 Abstract We present a new approach for 3D model indexing and retrieval using 2D/3D shape descriptors based on silhou- ettes or depth-buffer images

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

CFD Modelling of Particle Mixtures in a 2D CFB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capability of Fluent 6.2.16 to simulate particle mixtures in a laboratory scale 2D circulating fluidized bed (CFB) unit has been tested. In the ... 40 cm wide and 3 m high 2D CFB was modeled using a grid with...

M. Seppälä; S. Kallio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

P2Q2Iso2D = 2D ISOPARAMETRIC FEM IN MATLAB S. BARTELS, C. CARSTENSEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P2Q2Iso2D = 2D ISOPARAMETRIC FEM IN MATLAB S. BARTELS, C. CARSTENSEN , AND A. HECHT Abstract. A short Matlab implementation realizes a flexible isoparametric finite element method up to quadratic a short Matlab implementation of this finite element method for the Laplace equation in two dimensions

Bartels, Soeren

65

Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must be noted that clinical 2D versus 3D datasets may have additional differences—for example, if 2D measurements are made with a different dosimeter than 3D measurements. Factors such as inherent dosimeter differences may be an important additional consideration to the extra dimension of available data that was evaluated in this study.

Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Bosca, Ryan [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); O’Daniel, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Image-based building modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Image-based modeling is the process of converting 2D images of the real world into digital 3D models in computer. Among myriad kinds of objects in… (more)

Xiao, Jianxiong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

2D Ising model for hydrated protein surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To understand the nature of the glassy dielectric relaxation recently observed in hydrated protein powders, we model the protein surface as a 2D Ising square net, and identify frustration at the...

G. Careri

68

Ising-Bloch transition in 2D degenerate wave mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show experimentally and theoretically the existence of a 2D Ising-Bloch transition in the field generated by degenerate four wave mixing in a BaTiO3-resonator.

Larionova, Yevgeniya; Peschel, Ulf; Esteban-Martin, Adolfo; Weiss, Carl Otto

69

Unfolding Square Root Singularities in the 2D Boussinesq Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unfolding Square Root Singularities in the 2D Boussinesq Equations Russel Caflisch October 13 in the complex plane for Boussinesq. 1 Boussineq Equations The Boussinesq equations in stream function

Soatto, Stefano

70

Tripyrrylmethane based 2D porous structure for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The key to hydrogen storage is to design new materials with light ... explored Ti-tripyrrylmethane based 2D porous structure for hydrogen storage using density functional theory. We have found ... and the exposed...

Xiao Zhou ??; Jian Zhou ??; Qiang Sun ??

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

4d/2d correspondence : instantons and W-algebras.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this thesis, we study the 4d/2d correspondence of Alday-Gaiotto-Tachikawa, which relates the class of 4-dimensional N=2 gauge theories (theories of class S) to… (more)

Song, Jaewon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Branching of Graphs in 2-d Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching ratio is calculated for three different models of 2d gravity, using dynamical planar phi-cubed graphs. These models are pure gravity, the D=-2 Gaussian model coupled to gravity and the single spin Ising model coupled to gravity. The ratio gives a measure of how branched the graphs dominating the partition function are. Hence it can be used to estimate the location of the branched polymer phase for the multiple Ising model coupled to 2d gravity.

M. G. Harris

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

74

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

75

2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small gold cluster anions Aun? are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12. It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

Mikael P. Johansson; Anne Lechtken; Detlef Schooss; Manfred M. Kappes; Filipp Furche

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shallow quantum well excitons: 2D or 3D?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new regime is obtained in semiconductor heterostructures with constituents of nearly identical band gaps. Previously, it has been shown that even extremely shallow quantum wells (SHQWs) exhibit excitonic and electroabsorption properties typical of a 2D system, but 3D transport features. We show that, surprisingly, even when carriers are two-dimensionally confined in SHQWs, the hole spin relaxation is extremely fast (?400 fsec) as in the bulk (3D) limit and that a 2D-3D transition in the hole spin dynamics in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs SHQWs takes place at x?5%.

I. Brener; W. H. Knox; K. W. Goossen; J. E. Cunningham

1993-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

2D-1D Coupling in Cleaved Edge Overgrowth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the scattering properties of an interface between a one-dimensional (1D) wire and a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas. Experiments were conducted in the highly controlled geometry provided by molecular bean epitaxy overgrowth onto the cleaved edge of a high quality GaAs /AlGaAs quantum well. Such structures allow for the creation of variable length 1D-2D coupling sections. We find ballistic 1D electron transport through these interaction regions with a mean free path as long as 6 ?m. Our results explain the origin of the puzzling nonuniversal conductance quantization observed previously in such 1D wires.

R. de Picciotto; H. L. Stormer; A. Yacoby; L. N. Pfeiffer; K. W. Baldwin; K. W. West

2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fast approximate Duplicate Detection for 2D-NMR Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the one-dimensional plots at the axes are projections of the original two-dimensional intensity function the influences of two different atom types at the same time, e.g. 1 H (hydrogen) and 13 C (carbon). The result of a 2D-NMR measurement can be seen as an intensity function measured over two independent variables3

Hinneburg, Alexander

80

The AAO 2dF QSO Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the aims, strategy and status of the AAO 2dF QSO redshift survey. This goal of the survey is to obtain redshifts for 30000 QSOs in a homogeneous magnitude limited (B<21) survey. The survey began in early 1997 and should be complete by the end of 1999.

Boyle; R. J. Smith; T. Shanks; S. M. Croom; L. Miller

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dispersion diagrams of chromospheric MHD waves in a 2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dispersion diagrams of chromospheric MHD waves in a 2D simulation Chris Dove The Evergreen State MHD code models dynamics · Methods to get clearer pictures · Analysis of results · Patterns/NCAR, Thursday 29 July 2004 A diagram of the Sun, courtesy NASA sohowww

Zita, E.J.

82

Universal topological phase of 2D stabilizer codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two topological phases are equivalent if they are connected by a local unitary transformation. In this sense, classifying topological phases amounts to classifying long-range entanglement patterns. We show that all 2D topological stabilizer codes are equivalent to several copies of one universal phase: Kitaev's topological code. Error correction benefits from the corresponding local mappings.

H. Bombin; Guillaume Duclos-Cianci; David Poulin

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hopkinson bar simulation using DYNA2D. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-element simulation of a Split Hopkinson's bar (Kolsky apparatus) technique involving mortar specimens is accomplished with DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional finite-element code. Calculations are compared with experimental results contained in a University of Florida report Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures, and with analytic solutions of the appropriate wave propagation problem.

Smith, J.A.; Glover, T.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Anglo-Australian Observatory's 2dF Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF (Two-degree Field) facility at the prime focus of the Anglo-Australian Telescope provides multiple object spectroscopy over a 2 degree field of view. Up to 400 target fibres can be independently positioned by a complex robot. Two spectrographs provide spectra with resolutions of between 500 and 2000, over wavelength ranges of 440nm and 110nm respectively. The 2dF facility began routine observations in 1997. 2dF was designed primarily for galaxy redshift surveys and has a number of innovative features. The large corrector lens incorporates an atmospheric dispersion compensator, essential for wide wavelength coverage with small diameter fibres. The instrument has two full sets of fibres on separate field plates, so that re-configuring can be done in parallel with observing. The robot positioner places one fibre every 6 seconds, to a precision of 0.3 arcsec (20micron) over the full field. All components of 2dF, including the spectrographs, are mounted on a 5-m diameter telescope top-end ring for ease of handling and to keep the optical fibres short in order to maximise UV throughput . There is a pipeline data reduction system which allows each data set to be fully analysed while the next field is being observed. In this paper we provide the historical background to the 2dF facility, the design philosophy, a full technical description and a summary of the performance of the instrument. We also briefly review its scientific applications and possible future developments.

I. J. Lewis; R. D. Cannon; K. Taylor; K. Glazebrook; J. A. Bailey; I. K. Baldry; J. R. Barton; T. J. Bridges; G. B. Dalton; T. J. Farrell; P. M. Gray; A. Lankshear; C. McCowage; I. R. Parry; R. M. Sharples; K. Shortridge; G. A. Smith; J. Stevenson; J. O. Straede; L. G. Waller; J. D. Whittard; J. K. Wilcox; K. C. Willis

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

1D-to-2D tunneling in electron waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive experimental study of the tunneling and transport characteristics of split-gate ‘‘leaky’’ one-dimensional (1D) electron waveguides implemented in AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructures. In a leaky electron waveguide, electrons can tunnel out of the 1D channel through a thin side wall barrier into an adjacent 2D electron bath. A sharp peak and valley structure is observed in the 1D-to-2D tunneling current as the carrier concentration is modulated in the 1D waveguide through the field-effect action of the split gates. A semiclassical model confirms that the tunneling features originate from the 1D subbands in the channel.

Cristopher C. Eugster; Jesús A. del Alamo; Michael R. Melloch; Michael J. Rooks

1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cellular-automaton-based simulation of 2D polymer dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cellular-automaton-based model that simulates flexible polymers in good solvents is constructed. Excluded-volume effects as well as hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated in this model in a very natural way. The center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function of a single polymer chain in a 2D solution is found to obey a dynamic scaling relation which violates the nondraining concept.

J. M. Vianney A. Koelman

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene. Neglecting spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotics of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. We argue that this scaling law for the near-field heat transfer is generic for any two-dimensional systems.

Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Valley and electric photocurrents in 2D silicon and graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the optical excitation of multi-valley systems leads to valley currents which depend on the light polarization. The net electric current, determined by the vector sum of single-valley contributions, vanishes for some peculiar distributions of carriers in the valley and momentum spaces forming a pure valley current. We report on the study of this phenomenon, both experimental and theoretical, for graphene and 2D electron channels on the silicon surface.

Tarasenko, S. A.; Ivchenko, E. L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Olbrich, P.; Ganichev, S. D. [Terahertz Center, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

Local Topological Order Inhibits Thermal Stability in 2D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the robustness of quantum information stored in the degenerate ground space of a local, frustration-free Hamiltonian with commuting terms on a 2D spin lattice. On one hand, a macroscopic energy barrier separating the distinct ground states under local transformations would protect the information from thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, local topological order would shield the ground space from static perturbations. Here we demonstrate that local topological order implies a constant energy barrier, thus inhibiting thermal stability.

Olivier Landon-Cardinal and David Poulin

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessment of 2D resistivity structures using 1D inversions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) E. R. Hoskins (Head of Departsnent) May 1987 ABSTRACT Assessment of 2D Resistivity Structures Using 1D Inversion. (May 1987) Les Paul Beard, B. S. , East Texas State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Frank Dale Morgan Resistivity... sections from Schlumberger soundings over and near normal fault. 4. 11 Inverted sections from Wenner soundings over and near nornral fault 4. 12 Schlumberger apparent resistivity contour for normal fault 4. 13 Wenner apparenl resistivity contour...

Beard, Les Paul

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fusion of images on affine sampling grids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a method for combining multiple images of a common object assuming two-dimensional (2D) affine transformations between the image sampling grids. Our method is based upon the...

Granrath, Douglas; Lersch, James

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Zero curvature condition and 2D gravity theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors propose interpreting the zero curvature condition associated with an integrable model as an anomaly equation. This can lead to the WZWN action and the associated current algebra quite readily and clarifies further the connections found between the integrable models and 2D gravity theories. The authors analyze, in detail, the cases SL(2,R) (KdV hierarchy), OSp(2/1) (sKdV hierarchy) and SL(3,R) (Boussinesq hierarchy) and obtain the operator product expansions of the appropriate fields. The authors also make some observations on the generalization of our method to SL(n,R).

Das, A.; Huang, W.J.; Roy, S. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (US))

1992-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Polarization Singularities in 2D and 3D Speckle Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 3D structure of randomly polarized light fields is exemplified by its polarization singularities: lines along which the polarization is purely circular (C lines) and surfaces on which the polarization is linear (L surfaces). We visualize these polarization singularities experimentally in vector laser speckle fields, and in numerical simulations of random wave superpositions. Our results confirm previous analytical predictions [M.?R. Dennis, Opt. Commun. 213, 201 (2002)] regarding the statistical distribution of types of C points and relate their 2D properties to their 3D structure.

Florian Flossmann; Kevin O‘Holleran; Mark R. Dennis; Miles J. Padgett

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Multiple Ising Spins Coupled to 2d Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a model in which p independent Ising spins are coupled to 2d quantum gravity (in the form of dynamical planar phi-cubed graphs). Consideration is given to the p tends to infinity limit in which the partition function becomes dominated by certain graphs; we identify most of these graphs. A truncated model is solved exactly providing information about the behaviour of the full model in the limit of small beta. Finally, we derive a bound for the critical value of the coupling constant, beta_c and examine the magnetization transition in the limit p tends to zero.

M. G. Harris; J. F. Wheater

1994-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

MESH2D GRID GENERATOR DESIGN AND USE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j{sub 0}) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations. The overall mesh is constructed from grid zones that are typically then subdivided into a collection of smaller grid cells. The grid zones usually correspond to distinct materials or larger-scale geometric shapes. The structured grid zones are identified through uppercase indices (I,J). Subdivision of zonal regions into grid cells can be done uniformly, or nonuniformly using either a polynomial or geometric skewing algorithm. Grid cells may be concentrated backward, forward, or toward both ends. Figure 1 illustrates the above concepts in the context of a simple four zone grid.

Flach, G.; Smith, F.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

4D-2D projection of Lorentz-violating Myers-Pospelov QED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the four-dimensional quantum electrodynamics extended with Myers-Pospelov Lorentz-violating dimension-five operators to investigate 4D-2D projection. In projecting out the 4D theory down to a 2D theory, we get analogs of these operators. Namely, we obtain a new two-dimensional theory with corresponding scalar and fermionic 2D Myers-Pospelov Lorentz-violating dimension-three operators. New defect structures can also be found from this new projected-out 2D scalar sector. Furthermore, we also show that this 2D scalar sector can also be radiatively induced through the new 2D fermionic sector.

F. A. Brito; M. S. Guimaraes; E. Passos; P. Sampaio; C. Wotzasek

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Data:11541f4a-fe2d-4bb2-8420-63957cbbce79 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f4a-fe2d-4bb2-8420-63957cbbce79 f4a-fe2d-4bb2-8420-63957cbbce79 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Trico Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Water pumping service-Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: *Subject to tax and wholesale power cost adjustment. Source or reference: http://www.trico.coop/images/TRICO_WP.pdf Source Parent: Comments Energy charge= Power supply charge($0.0968)+ Access charge($0.0358) Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

98

HEXAGONAL ARRAY STRUCTURE FOR 2D NDE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a combination of simulation and experimentation to evaluate the advantages offered by utilizing a hexagonal shaped array element in a 2D NDE array structure. The active material is a 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structure incorporating triangular shaped pillars--each hexagonal array element comprising six triangular pillars. A combination of PZFlex, COMSOL and Matlab has been used to simulate the behavior of this device microstructure, for operation around 2.25 MHz, with unimodal behavior and low levels of mechanical cross-coupling predicted. Furthermore, the application of hexagonal array elements enables the array aperture to increase by approximately 30%, compared to a conventional orthogonal array matrix and hence will provide enhanced volumetric coverage and SNR. Prototype array configurations demonstrate good corroboration of the theoretically predicted mechanical cross-coupling between adjacent array elements (approx23 dB).

Dziewierz, J.; Ramadas, S. N.; Gachagan, A.; O'Leary, R. L. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

2-D tomography with bolometry in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have installed a 48-channel platinum-foil bolometer system on DIII-D achieve better spatial and temporal resolution of the radiated power in diverted discharges. Two 24-channel arrays provide complete plasma coverage with optimized views of the divertor. We have measured the divertor radiation profile for a series of radiative divertor and power balance experiments. We observe a rapid change in the magnitude and distribution of divertor radiation with heavy gas puffing. Unfolding the radiation profile with only two views requires us to treat the core and divertor radiation separately. The core radiation is fitted to a function of magnetic flux and is then subtracted from the divertor viewing chords. The divertor profile is then fit to a 2-D spline as a function of magnetic flux and poloidal angle.

Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Meyer, W.H.; Geer, B.; Behne, D.M.; Hill, D.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Curl Graphics2d immediate mode rendering API  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) 170 thousand lines of code in the Curl language. Morgan McGuire has worked on computer graphics and imaging at Morgan Systems, the NEC Research Institute and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. He is currently ...

McGuire, Morgan, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Improved Ant Colony Optimisation Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Improved Ant Colony Optimisation Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem Alena hydrophobic-polar (2D HP) protein folding problem. We present an improved version of our recently proposed Ant search. Overall, the results presented here establish our new ACO algorithm for 2D HP protein folding

Hoos, Holger H.

102

An Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem Alena Shmygelska, Rosal, the two dimensional hydrophobic-polar (2D HP) protein folding problem. We introduce an ant colony algorithm closely approaches that of specialised, state-of-the methods for 2D HP protein folding. 1

Hoos, Holger H.

103

Exhibit 2D -Refund of Royalties UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhibit 2D - Refund of Royalties UT-B Contracts Div Dec 2005 Page 1 of 1 ex2D-dec05.doc Exhibit 2D Ref: DEAR 970.5227-8 REFUND OF ROYALTIES (Dec 2005) (a) During performance of this subcontract, if any royalties are proposed to be charged to the Company as costs under this subcontract, the Seller agrees

Pennycook, Steve

104

2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM - Belgian State Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Renaissancelaan 30 Avenue de la Renaissance, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium and Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, B (Belgium); Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM - Belgian State Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Renaissancelaan 30 Avenue de la Renaissance, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Camera based texture mapping: 3D applications for 2D images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................4 2.1 Brief History of Norman Dawn....................................................4 2.2 Background of Painting Techniques ............................................9 III STATE... ..........................................................................................................................57 viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Norman Dawn. Glass Shot Setup Illustration...

Bowden, Nathan Charles

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ultra-Shallow Imaging Using 2D & 3D Seismic Reflection Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dome in Brazoria County, Texas, in late 1926 (Weatherby, 1948). A successful discovery well that was drilled based on this information helped the reflection seismograph to gain acceptance. At the time, recording trucks had only one channel...

Sloan, Steven D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Finding 3D Teeth Positions by Using 2D Uncalibrated Dental X-ray Images.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In Dental Radiology very often several radiographs (uncalibrated in position) are taken from the same person. The radiographs do not provide the depth details, and… (more)

Sridhar, Bitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

North Caspian Basin: 2D elastic modeling for seismic imaging of salt and subsalt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

us to illuminate subsalt reef, clastics and complex salt structures despite the 4-km overburden. - Free-surface multiples and guided waves are one of the key processing challenges in NCB, despite relatively shallow (less than 15 m) shelf water....

Bailey, Zhanar Alpysbaevna

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fast DRR generation for 2D to 3D registration on GPUs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) is the most time consuming step on the CPU in intensity based two-dimensional x-ray to three-dimensional (CT or 3D rotational x-ray) medical image registration, which has application in several image guided interventions. This work presents optimized DRR rendering on graphical processor units (GPUs) and compares performance achievable on four commercially available devices. Methods: A ray-cast based DRR rendering was implemented for a 512 Multiplication-Sign 512 Multiplication-Sign 72 CT volume. The block size parameter was optimized for four different GPUs for a region of interest (ROI) of 400 Multiplication-Sign 225 pixels with different sampling ratios (1.1%-9.1% and 100%). Performance was statistically evaluated and compared for the four GPUs. The method and the block size dependence were validated on the latest GPU for several parameter settings with a public gold standard dataset (512 Multiplication-Sign 512 Multiplication-Sign 825 CT) for registration purposes. Results: Depending on the GPU, the full ROI is rendered in 2.7-5.2 ms. If sampling ratio of 1.1%-9.1% is applied, execution time is in the range of 0.3-7.3 ms. On all GPUs, the mean of the execution time increased linearly with respect to the number of pixels if sampling was used. Conclusions: The presented results outperform other results from the literature. This indicates that automatic 2D to 3D registration, which typically requires a couple of hundred DRR renderings to converge, can be performed quasi on-line, in less than a second or depending on the application and hardware in less than a couple of seconds. Accordingly, a whole new field of applications is opened for image guided interventions, where the registration is continuously performed to match the real-time x-ray.

Tornai, Gabor Janos; Cserey, Gyoergy [Faculty of Information Technology, Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Prater u. 50/a, H-1083, Budapest (Hungary); Pappas, Ion [General Electric Healthcare, Akron u. 2, H-2040, Budaoers (Hungary)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4} and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2{angstrom} neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai, New South Wales (Australia). Physics Div.; Smith, G.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Instrumentation Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hyperspectral Imaging: Training Algorithms & Data Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperspectral Imaging: Training Algorithms & Data Generation REU Students: Ping Fung and Carl +exp[-2(( + s))1/2 D / 3]} 1-rlSI +(rl - SI )exp[-2(( + s))1/2 D / 3] Data Generation To apply our possible parameters is impractical, so we generate approximate spectra using a physical model based

Mountziaris, T. J.

112

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Multichannel response analysis on 2D projection views for detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a new two-dimensional (2D) multichannel response (MCR) analysis approach for the detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Methods: With IRB approval and informed consent, a data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts containing biopsy-proven MC clusters was collected in this study. The authors developed a 2D approach for MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) DBT volume. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement processing was first applied to each PV to enhance the potential MCs. The locations of MC candidates were then identified with iterative thresholding. The individual MCs were decomposed with Hermite–Gaussian (HG) and Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) basis functions and the channelized Hotelling model was trained to produce the MCRs for each MC on the 2D images. The MCRs from the PVs were fused in 3D by a coincidence counting method that backprojects the MC candidates on the PVs and traces the coincidence of their ray paths in 3D. The 3D MCR was used to differentiate the true MCs from false positives (FPs). Finally a dynamic clustering method was used to identify the potential MC clusters in the DBT volume based on the fact that true MCs of clinical significance appear in clusters. Using two-fold cross validation, the performance of the 3D MCR for classification of true and false MCs was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the overall performance of the MCR approach for detection of clustered MCs was assessed by free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. Results: When the HG basis function was used for MCR analysis, the detection of MC cluster achieved case-based test sensitivities of 80% and 90% at the average FP rates of 0.65 and 1.55 FPs per DBT volume, respectively. With LG basis function, the average FP rates were 0.62 and 1.57 per DBT volume at the same sensitivity levels. The difference in the two sets of basis functions for detection of MCs did not show statistical significance. Conclusions: The authors' experimental results indicate that the MCR approach is promising for the detection of MCs on PV images. The HG or LG basis functions are both effective in characterizing the signal response of MCs using the channelized Hotelling model. The coincidence counting method for fusion of the 2D MCR in 3D is an important step for FP reduction. Further study is underway to improve the MCR approach for microcalcification detection in DBT.

Wei, Jun, E-mail: jvwei@umich.edu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Chuan; Samala, Ravi [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Data:Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Crisp County Power Comm Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Fuel Cost Recovery Schedule- Secondary Distribution Sector: Commercial Description: This schedule is applicable to and becomes a part of each retail rate schedule in which reference is mad to the Fuel Cost Recovery Schedule. This provision applies to both regular and minimum bills. Secondary Distribution Customers= Any customer not defined as a transmission or primary distribution customer.

116

Data:436bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Perry, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Residential- All-Electric Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofperryok.com/Files/Codes/City_Code_101211.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

117

Fuel Equivalence Ratio Imaging for Methane Jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 2-D fuel/oxygen equivalence ratio imaging system has been developed. The technique exploits the efficient quenching of the fluorescence of organic molecules by molecular oxygen in...

Ni, T Q; Melton, L A

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ccsd00002720, 1D action and partition function for the 2D Ising  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00002720, version 2 ­ 11 Jan 2005 1D action and partition function for the 2D Ising model an alternative method to that developed by B. McCoy and T.T. Wu to obtain some exact results for the 2D Ising is a generalisation of ideas from V.N. Plechko presented for the 2D Ising model in zero #12;eld, based

119

Vanishing heat conductivity limit for the 2D Cahn-Hilliard-Boussinesq system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article studies the vanishing heat conductivity limit for the 2D Cahn-Hilliard-boussinesq system in a bounded domain with non-...

Zaihong Jiang; Jishan Fan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch 2d-4d echocardiography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: arch 2d-4d echocardiography Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Kentucky Children's Heart Center Summary: Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Information Theoretic Integrated Segmentation and Registration of Dual 2D Portal Images and 3D CT Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Koudelka, Fran- cois Meyer, Xenios Papademetris, Suguna Pappu, K. Purosottam, Pengcheng Shi, N. Rajeevan

Duncan, James S.

122

Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations have been demonstrated.

Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 and Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

A FINITE-VOLUME VERSION OF AIZENMAN-HIGUCHI THEOREM FOR THE 2D ISING MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FINITE-VOLUME VERSION OF AIZENMAN-HIGUCHI THEOREM FOR THE 2D ISING MODEL LOREN COQUILLE AND YVAN-neighbor Ising model at inverse temperature 0 are of the form µ+ + (1 - )µ- , where µ+ and µ- are the two-neighbor ferromagnetic (2d n.n.f.) Ising model, with boundary condition and at inverse temperature 0

Velenik, Yvan

124

Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment Brian airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control

Frey, Pascal

125

THE 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A LOGARITHMICALLY SUPERCRITICAL VELOCITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A LOGARITHMICALLY SUPERCRITICAL VELOCITY DURGA KC, DIPENDRA of solutions to a generalized 2D Euler-Boussinesq systems of equations with a logarithmically super- critical Euler- Boussinesq system of equations with a singular velocity t + u · = x1 , t + u · + = 0, u

Wu, Jiahong

126

GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS FOR THE 2D BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM WITHOUT HEAT DIFFUSION AND WITH EITHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS FOR THE 2D BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM WITHOUT HEAT DIFFUSION AND WITH EITHER: 612/626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS FOR THE 2D BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM for the two-dimensional non-diffusive Boussinesq system with viscosity only in the horizontal direction, which

127

Active Ankle Response for a 2-D Biped Robot with Terrain Contact Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Ankle Response for a 2-D Biped Robot with Terrain Contact Sensing By Francis Hitschmann Submitted to the graduate degree program in Mechanical Engineering and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas School... certifies that this is the approved Version of the following thesis: Active Ankle Response for a 2-D Biped Robot with Terrain Contact Sensing Committee: Chairperson* Date Approved...

Hitschmann, Francis Lee

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Design optimization of a 2D prompt-gamma measurement system for proton dose verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To verify in-vivo proton dose distribution, a 2-dimensional (2D) prompt-gamma measurement system, comprised of a multi-hole collimation system, a 2D array of CsI(Tl) scintillators, and a position-sensitive pho...

Han Rim Lee; Jong Hoon Park; Chan Hyeong Kim…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reversible fragile watermarking for locating tampered blocks in 2D vector maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For 2D vector maps, obtaining good tamper localization performance and original content recovery with existing reversible fragile watermarking schemes is a technically challenging problem. Using an improved reversible watermarking method and a fragile ... Keywords: 2D vector map, Authentication, Fragile watermarking, Reversible data hiding, Tamper localization

Nana Wang; Chaoguang Men

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Effect of Quantum Confinement on Thermoelectric Properties of 2D and 1D Semiconductor Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Quantum Confinement on Thermoelectric Properties of 2D and 1D Semiconductor Thin Films A. Bulusu and D. G. Walker1 Interdisciplinary Program in Material Science Vanderbilt University Nashville on device characteristics of 1D and 2D thin film superlattices whose applications include thermoelectric

Walker, D. Greg

131

Combining rails and anchors with laser forcing for selective manipulation within 2D droplet arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional (2D)array format is a standard approachfor implementing a large number of parallel assays arrays of droplets in microchannels has proved more challenging, in part due to the standard methods and operating protocols, leading to different methods to array drops: quasi-2D arrays were formed by winding

Boyer, Edmond

132

Multifractal Fields Simulation Software Matlab functions eps1D and eps2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multifractal Fields Simulation Software Matlab functions eps1D and eps2D Basic Summary A fractal inputs required for eps2D, the first two, lambdat and lambday, are the resolution of the field. Note input is a switch which allows to make the process acausal (switch=0) or causal (switch=0). eps1D works

Lovejoy, Shaun

133

Higher order global differentiability local approximations for 2-D and 3-D distorted element geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: C22 HGDA element,p? = p? = 5 96 4.21 ComparisonofUndistortedandDistorteddiscretizationsversusdegrees of freedom for 2-D Poisson?s equation : C33 HGDA element,p? = p? = 7 97 4.22 ComparisonofCij DistortedHGDAelementsversusdiscretizationlength for 2-D...

Maduri, Rajesh Kumar

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fast 2-D Camera Control, Data Acquisition, and Database Techniques for Edge Studies on NSTX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Scotti1, M. K. Ko3 1Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08540 2 Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO 80301 3 Princeton H.S., Princeton, NJ 08540 Poster P3-01 Abstract Number ???? #12;NSTX-U 9th IAEA TM ­ Fast 2-D Camera Plasma Edge Studies (W. Davis) May 6-10, 2013 Abstract 2 Fast 2-D

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

135

A 2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme. Application to ECG simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme. Application to ECG simulation Y. Coudi`ere Universit-10Oct2008 #12;A 2D/3D DDFV scheme for ECG simulation 1 Introduction Computer models of the electrical-known electrocardiogram (ECG). It gives a non-invasive representation of the cardiac electrical function. Un- derstanding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Final Data Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) has obtained spectra for 245591 sources, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of b_J=19.45. Reliable redshifts were measured for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies are selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey and cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees in three regions: an NGP strip, an SGP strip and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. This paper describes the 2dFGRS final data release of 30 June 2003 and complements Colless et al. (2001), which described the survey and the initial 100k data release. The 2dFGRS database and full documentation are available on the WWW at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/

Matthew Colless; Bruce A. Peterson; Carole Jackson; John A. Peacock; Shaun Cole; Peder Norberg; Ivan K. Baldry; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Nicholas Cross; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Usability evaluation of designed image code interface for mobile computing environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, image code interfaces and designed image codes, which can present visual information such as shapes, colors, text, images, and textures within the image code, have attracted increasing interest for use in mobile computing environments. In this ... Keywords: 2D code, barcode, color-based image code, designed code, image code

Cheolho Cheong; Dong-Chul Kim; Tack-Don Han

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service 6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability August 24, 2013 - 3:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). PLATFORM: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 1.x, HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 2.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is reported in versions 2.2.18 and prior and 1.2.18 and prior. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54598 CVE-2013-2353 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate DISCUSSION: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). The vulnerability is caused due to an unspecified error. No further

139

2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Crossover from 2D to 3D in a Weakly Interacting Fermi Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the transition from two to three dimensions in a low temperature weakly interacting Li6 Fermi gas. Below a critical atom number N2D only the lowest transverse vibrational state of a highly anisotropic oblate trapping potential is occupied and the gas is two dimensional. Above N2D the Fermi gas enters the quasi-2D regime where shell structure associated with the filling of individual transverse oscillator states is apparent. This dimensional crossover is demonstrated through measurements of the cloud size and aspect ratio versus atom number.

P. Dyke; E. D. Kuhnle; S. Whitlock; H. Hu; M. Mark; S. Hoinka; M. Lingham; P. Hannaford; C. J. Vale

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Data:86080fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d 0fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Piedmont Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Lamp Sector: Lighting Description: 1. The Cooperative shall furnish and install a wooden pole if required for the outdoor light, within 150 feet of existing secondary circuits. If an additional wood pole is required, other than for mounting the lighting fixture, there will be a contribution-in-aid of construction of $125.00 per pole. The contribution-in-aid of construction for the decorative post top fixture on the decorative fluted fiberglass pole with a twelve (12) foot mounting height will be $1,125.00. 2.The charge for the purchased power related costs shall be 3.904¢ times the estimated average monthly kWh usage. 3. Consumer requested conversion of an existing, properly operating Security light fixture will require the following one time service charge(s): Conversion of fixture on same pole, same location: $ 36.00 Conversion of fixture requiring removal of a pole: $36.00

142

Data:693e6aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Long Island Power Authority Effective date: 2012/03/05 End date if known: Rate name: 281 (Large General Service Secondary) Sector: Commercial Description: For monthly-billed Customers, electric use during the last twelve (12) months has equaled or been greater than 2,000 KWH in each of two (2) consecutive monthly billing periods, or b) For bimonthly-billed Customers, electric use during the last twelve (12) months has equaled or been greater than 4,000 KWH in one (1) bimonthly billing period, or c) For Applicants, the Authority estimates their demands at 7 KW or more.

143

Data:E6c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2010/03/03 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service Sector: Lighting Description: Availability: Available for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting service to all members where the Cooperative's distribution facilities are located. Not available for part-time or seasonal operation of luminaires. Membership: Each consumer receiving service under this schedule shall be a member of the Cooperative and agrees to comply with the bylaws and abide by all service rules and regulations as adopted by the Cooperative's Board of Directors.

144

Data:909cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nodak Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/05/20 End date if known: Rate name: GS High Density-Single Phase Sector: Industrial Description: Additional Meters (Off-Peak Included) $ 3.60/Meter/Month Available for service to locations in a High Density area. A High Density area is defined as:  An enlargement (generally 160 acres) with 20 or more active locations, or  A cluster of 20 or more active locations, or  A cluster with 10 or more active locations that adjoins an enlargement with 20 or more active locations, or  An area adjacent to an incorporated town with 20 or more active locations. Renewable Energy Market Adjustment $0.003/KWH (Added to All Above Energy Rates) Controlled Water Heater Credit $.00736/KWH Applies to the first 1,000 KWHs each month (October-March)

145

Data:130918b6-4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pontotoc Electric Power Assn Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Service GSA (51 kW -1000 kW) Multi-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.sitemason.com/files/fjDo1q/May%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

146

Data:81a39522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 9522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northcentral Mississippi E P A Effective date: 2011/10/11 End date if known: Rate name: General Service GSA (50 kW - 1000 kW) Sector: Commercial Description: *This rate shall apply to the firm power requirements (where a customer's contract demand is 5,000 kW or less) for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers, and to institutional customers including, without limitation, churches, clubs, fraternities, orphanages, nursing homes, rooming or boarding houses, and like customers. This rate shall also apply to customers to whom service is not available under any other resale rate schedule.

147

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Computational study and analysis of structural imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic ...

Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

2D Multi-class Occupancy Grid Map for a Mobile Security Robot in Urban Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previously developed our 3D sematic perception and mapping technique can provide semantic information of the urban structures. In this paper we propose 2D MOG map to integrate semantic information of the urban st...

Yungeun Choe; Myung Jin Chung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

IEEE P1363.2 / D2001-06-21 Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to IEEE P1363.2/D2001-05-14 (rough draft), namely, inclusion of an elliptic curve group based SRP protocol ........................................................................................................................................ 3 7.2.4 ECPVDGP-SRP........................................................................................................................... 3 7.2.5 ECPEPKGP-SRP

Wang, Yongge

151

Parameter Identification for a Dispersive Dielectric in 2D Electromagnetics: Forward and Inverse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameter Identification for a Dispersive Dielectric in 2D Electromagnetics: Forward and Inverse with a Debye dielectric slab and PML absorbing boundaries. This system assumes that the electric #12;Parameter

152

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

153

2D and 3D Acoustic Source Localization Using the AML Algorithm and ENSBox Nodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networked Sensing 2D and 3D Acoustic Source Localizationhairs, median red square) 3D bearing estimates: (azimuth,1.37,1.52) (2.38,1.82) Node 153 3D AML performance UCLA –

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organelle in a cell, the membrane sets the information and energy gradients necessary for life. Car- bonyl of the carbonyl absorption can be attributed to electric field fluctuations. 2D IR techniques are femtosecond

Mukamel, Shaul

155

Structure of the novel ternary hydrides Li4Tt2D (Tt = Si and Ge)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structures of novel Li4Tt2D (Tt = Si and Ge) ternary hydrides were solved using neutron powder diffraction data. All hydrogen atoms were found to occupy Li6-octahedral interstices.

Wu, H.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme (DDFV) applied to ECG simulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme (DDFV) applied to ECG simulation. DDFV scheme part, the method is used for the resolution of a problem arising in bio-mathematics: the ECG

Coudière, Yves

157

A new 2D FEM analysis of a disc machine with offset rotor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents a new 2-Dimensional Finite Element Method (2D FEM) analysis of a double sided axial field, permanent magnet excited brushless DC motor. The rotor of the machine is free to move in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the shaft. Computed 2D results are compared with 3D FEM analysis and the new analysis method is shown to give close agreement.

Gair, S.; Canova, A. [Napier Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering; Eastham, J.F.; Betzer, T. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Deconfinement in a 2D Optical Lattice of Coupled 1D Boson Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that a two-dimensional (2D) array of 1D interacting boson tubes has a deconfinement transition between a 1D Mott insulator and a 3D superfluid for commensurate fillings and a dimensional crossover for the incommensurate case. We determine the phase diagram and excitations of this system and discuss the consequences for Bose condensates loaded in 2D optical lattices.

A. F. Ho; M. A. Cazalilla; T. Giamarchi

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the Connection Between 2d Topological Gravity and the Reduced Hermitian Matrix Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss how concepts such as geodesic length and the volume of space-time can appear in 2d topological gravity. We then construct a detailed mapping between the reduced Hermitian matrix model and 2d topological gravity at genus zero. This leads to a complete solution of the counting problem for planar graphs with vertices of even coordination number. The connection between multi-critical matrix models and multi-critical topological gravity at genus zero is studied in some detail.

J. Ambjorn; M. G. Harris; M. Weis

1997-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Data:Abf7fa2a-5cca-486d-97bb-a2d8366a0c68 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fa2a-5cca-486d-97bb-a2d8366a0c68 fa2a-5cca-486d-97bb-a2d8366a0c68 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Trico Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2005/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Time of Day pumping service-Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable to water pumping installation of ten horsepower pumps or larger. Subject to tax and wholesale power cost adjustment. Source or reference: http://www.trico.coop/images/TRICO_TODP.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Data:5c8e4730-542a-419d-89ed-2d409acf326d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30-542a-419d-89ed-2d409acf326d 30-542a-419d-89ed-2d409acf326d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Trico Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-90 Watt LPS Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable for lighting public streets,alleys and public parks. Subject to tax and wholesale power cost. Source or reference: http://www.trico.coop/images/TRICO_SL1.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

162

High-resolution 3-D refractive index imaging and Its biological applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a theory of 3-D imaging in partially coherent light under a non-paraxial condition. The transmission cross-coefficient (TCC) has been used to characterize partially coherent imaging in a 2- D and 3-D ...

Sung, Yongjin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

AUTOMATED DETERMINATION OF PROTEIN SUBCELLULAR LOCATIONS FROM 3D FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPE IMAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features (termed SLF for Subcellular Location Features) computed from 2D fluorescence microscope images [4]. We have shown the SLF to accurately represent the complexity in such images by using them

Gordon, Geoffrey J.

164

Delay-dependent robust $$H_\\infty $$ control for 2-D discrete nonlinear systems with state delays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the problem of robust $$H_\\infty $$ control for a class of 2-D (two-dimensional) discrete state delayed systems with sector nonlinearity ... Keywords: $$H_\\infty $$ performance, 2D discrete systems, Exponential stability, State delays

Shipei Huang; Zhengrong Xiang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ccsd-00002720,version2-11Jan2005 1D action and partition function for the 2D Ising  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00002720,version2-11Jan2005 1D action and partition function for the 2D Ising model by B. McCoy and T.T. Wu to obtain some exact results for the 2D Ising model with a general boundary presented for the 2D Ising model in zero field, based on the representation of the Ising model using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Aerospace Sciences Meeting #12;1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2-D Hypersonic Non Galerkin (DG) methods to 2-D hypersonic flow problems. Previous applications of DG method were limited

Roy, Subrata

167

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

168

Plot/SurfW: Plotting Utility for EDGE2D Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a utility that was developed to display EDGE2D results. The utility is focused on results that relate to impurity density, velocity, and particle fluxes in the SOL and divertor. Due to the complicated nature of 2D impurity sources, the concentration of the thermal force near the separatrix and near the divertor entrance, the impurity flow pattern and impurity densities are not necessarily easy to visualize. Thus, we wanted a utility that allowed simple and quick visualization of the impurity behavior. In order to achieve this we overlaid the divertor hardware for plots inside the divertor and we expanded the appearance of the main chamber SOL by plotting distance along the field lines vs. SOL depth with the density (or velocity or flux or other quantity) the false colour. Also, we allowed for the plotted variable to be a function of the other EDGE2D result variables. __________________________________________________

W.M. Davis and J.D. Strachan

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

Transparent Conducting Electrodes based on 1D and 2D Ag Nanogratings for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optical and electrical properties of optically-thin one-dimensional (1D) Ag nanogratings and two-dimensional (2D) Ag nanogrids are studied, and their use as transparent electrodes in organic photovoltaics are explored. A large broadband and polarization-insensitive optical absorption enhancement in the organic light-harvesting layers is theoretically and numerically demonstrated using either single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids or two perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, and is attributed to the excitation of surface plasmon resonances and plasmonic cavity modes. Total photon absorption enhancements of 150% and 200% are achieved for the optimized single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids and double (top and bottom) perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, respectively.

Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Spectra and redshifts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is designed to measure redshifts for approximately 250000 galaxies. This paper describes the survey design, the spectroscopic observations, the redshift measurements and the survey database. The 2dFGRS uses the 2dF multi-fibre spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, which is capable of observing 400 objects simultaneously over a 2-degree diameter field. The source catalogue for the survey is a revised and extended version of the APM galaxy catalogue, and the targets are galaxies with extinction-corrected magnitudes brighter than b_J=19.45. The main survey regions are two declination strips, one in the southern Galactic hemisphere spanning 80deg x 15deg around the SGP, and the other in the northern Galactic hemisphere spanning 75deg x 10deg along the celestial equator; in addition, there are 99 fields spread over the southern Galactic cap. The survey covers 2000 sq.deg and has a median depth of z=0.11. Adaptive tiling is used to give a highly uniform sampling rate of 93% over the whole survey region. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600A-8000A at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0A and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8%, but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS database is available on the WWW at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS

Matthew Colless; G. B. Dalton; S. J. Maddox; W. J. Sutherland; P. Norberg; S. Cole; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. J. Bridges; R. D. Cannon; C. A. Collins; W. J Couch; N. G. J. Cross; K. Deeley; R. DePropris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. A. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. J. Lewis; S. L. Lumsden; D. S. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; I. A. Price; M. Seaborne; K. Taylor

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

Step-Orientation-Dependent Oxidation: From 1D to 2D Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory, we have studied the initial oxidation of Rh(111) surfaces with two types of straight steps, having {100} and {111} microfacets. The one-dimensional (1D) oxide initially formed at the steps acts as a barrier impeding formation of the 2D oxide on the (111) terrace behind it. We demonstrate that the details of the structure of the 1D oxide govern the rate of 2D oxidation and discuss implications for oxidation of nanoparticles.

J. Klikovits; M. Schmid; L. R. Merte; P. Varga; R. Westerström; A. Resta; J. N. Andersen; J. Gustafson; A. Mikkelsen; E. Lundgren; F. Mittendorfer; G. Kresse

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design of cellular VLSI 2-D mesh for large state space viterbi algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Submitted to the OAice of Graduate Studies of Texas A 8t M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Appmved as to style and content by: William Bliss ( Co-chairman of Committee ) Hosame Abu...

Hasan, Saiful

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The amplitudes of fluctuations in the 2dFGRS and the CMB, and implications for galaxy biasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the amplitudes of fluctuations probed by the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and by the latest measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. By combining the 2dFGRS and CMB data we find the linear-theory rms mass fluctuations in 8 Mpc/h spheres to be sigma_8 = 0.73 +-0.05 (after marginalization over the matter density parameter Omega_m and three other free parameters). This normalization is lower than the COBE normalization and previous estimates from cluster abundance, but it is in agreement with some revised cluster abundance determinations. We also estimate the scale-independent bias parameter of present-epoch L_s = 1.9L_* APM-selected galaxies to be b(L_s,z=0) = 1.10 +- 0.08 on comoving scales of 0.02 < k < 0.15 h/Mpc. If luminosity segregation operates on these scales, L_* galaxies would be almost un-biased, b(L_*,z=0) = 0.96. These results are derived by assuming a flat Lambda-CDM Universe, and by marginalizing over other free parameters and fixing the spectral index n=1 and the optical depth due to reionization tau=0. We also study the best fit pair (Omega_m,b), and the robustness of the results to varying n and tau. Various modelling corrections can each change the resulting b by 5-15 per cent. The results are compared with other independent measurements from the 2dFGRS itself, and from the SDSS, cluster abundance and cosmic shear.

Ofer Lahav; Sarah L. Bridle; Will J. Percival; John A. Peacock; George Efstathiou; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren S. Madgwick; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Percolation and number of phases in the 2D Ising model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Percolation and number of phases in the 2D Ising model Hans­Otto Georgii Mathematisches Institut approach of Russo, Aizenman and Higuchi for showing that there exist only two phases in the Ising model to the Ising model on other planar lattices such as the triangular and honeycomb lattice. We can also treat

176

GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS FOR THE 2D BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM WITHOUT HEAT DIFFUSION AND WITH EITHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS FOR THE 2D BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM WITHOUT HEAT DIFFUSION AND WITH EITHER-diffusive Boussinesq system with viscosity only in the horizontal direction, which arises in Ocean dynamics. This work for the Boussinesq system with anisotropic viscosity and zero diffusion. Al- though we follow some of their ideas

Larios, Adam

177

Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: the flat bottom case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: the flat bottom case Georges Sadaka May 14, 2012-parameter family of Boussinesq type systems in two space dimensions which approx- imate the three-dimensional Euler and Mitsotakis have developed a code in finite volumes for the Boussinesq system with variable bottom in 1D ([Dut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Fourier-Galerkin method for 2D solitons of Boussinesq equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a Fourier-Galerkin spectral technique for computing the stationary solutions of 2D generalized wave equations. To this end a special complete orthonormal system of functions in L^2(-~,~) is used for which product formula is available. The ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.Hm, Boussinesq equation, Galerkin spectral method, Solitons

M. A. Christou; C. I. Christov

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

GENERALIZED 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A SINGULAR VELOCITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERALIZED 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A SINGULAR VELOCITY DURGA KC, DIPENDRA REGMI a system of equations generalizing the two-dimensional incompressible Boussinesq equa- tions. The velocity- value problem of this generalized Boussinesq equations when the velocity is "double logarithmically

Wu, Jiahong

180

TRAVELING WAVES IN 2D REACTIVE BOUSSINESQ SYSTEMS WITH NO-SLIP BOUNDARY CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAVELING WAVES IN 2D REACTIVE BOUSSINESQ SYSTEMS WITH NO-SLIP BOUNDARY systems of reactive Boussinesq equations in two di* *men- sional strips that are not aligned Boussinesq systems with no-slip boundary conditions (the fluid flow vanishes at* * the boundary). Much

Constantin, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

LNG FEM: GENERATING GRADED MESHES AND SOLVING ELLIPTIC EQUATIONS ON 2-D DOMAINS OF POLYGONAL STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LNG FEM: GENERATING GRADED MESHES AND SOLVING ELLIPTIC EQUATIONS ON 2-D DOMAINS OF POLYGONAL, Minnesota 55455­0436 Phone: 612-624-6066 Fax: 612-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;LNG FEM AND VICTOR NISTOR Abstract. We develop LNG FEM, a software package for graded mesh gen- eration

182

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercrit- ical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We study) = ei g(s), R. (1.4) The equation has important applications in statistical physics, optics and water

183

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We physics, optics and water waves. For g(s) = s3 , it describes certain limiting behavior of Bose

Zarnescu, Arghir Dani

184

Sorting out Mixtures with 2D NMR Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the resonances. The combination of 2D NMR spectra with full-resolution statistical analysis provides a platform for chemical and biological studies in cellular biochemistry, metabolomics, and chemical ecology. Alignment: Application to Nematode Chemical Ecology.", Analytical Chemistry 83 (5), 1649­1657 (2011). Support: NHMFL

Weston, Ken

185

2D and 3D Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2D and 3D Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths D discrete geodesic paths in discrete domain with obstacles. This allows us to introduce a new geodesic metric in discrete geometry. Keywords: discrete visibility, geodesic path, distance transform, discrete

Boyer, Edmond

186

Quantum Monte Carlo study of a disordered 2D Josephson junction array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Monte Carlo study of a disordered 2D Josephson junction array W.A. Al-Saidi *, D. Stroud reserved. PACS: 74.25.Dw; 05.30.Jp; 85.25.Cp Keywords: Josephson junctions; Quantum Monte Carlo; Disorder 1. Introduction A Josephson junction array (JJA) consists of a collection of superconducting islands connected

Stroud, David

187

Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Folding in the 2D HP Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Folding in the 2D HP Model A Parameter Tuning Case Study of a protein, predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been. The protein folding problem in the HP model is to find a conformation (a folded sequence) with the lowest

Emmerich, Michael

188

A 2D + 3D Rich Data Approach to Scene Understanding Jianxiong Xiao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toward rich representation also opens up new challenges that require a new kind of big data ­ dataA 2D + 3D Rich Data Approach to Scene Understanding by Jianxiong Xiao Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree

Xiao, Jianxiong

189

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of 2D laminar flows past two tandem cylinders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of 2D laminar flows past two tandem cylinders Alberto Mussa the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) colli- sion model to simulate laminar. Introduction In recent years the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) has become a viable means for computational

Luo, Li-Shi

190

A Proposal of QLearning to Control the Attack of a 2D Robot Soccer Simulation Team  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document presents a novel approach to control the attack behavior of a team of simulated soccer playing robot of the Robocup 2D category. The presented approach modifies the behavior of each player only when in the state "controlling the ball". ... Keywords: Simulated robot soccer, machine learning, learning, Q-Learning algorithm

Jose Rodrigo Ferreira Neri; Maicon Rafael Zatelli; Carlos Henrique Farias dos Santos; Joao Alberto Fabro

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Myoglobin-CO Conformational Substate Dynamics: 2D Vibrational Echoes and MD Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myoglobin-CO Conformational Substate Dynamics: 2D Vibrational Echoes and MD Simulations Kusai A over a range of temperatures. The A1 and A3 conformational substates of MbCO are found to have assignments for the MbCO conformational substates. INTRODUCTION Protein dynamics have been the focus of both

Fayer, Michael D.

192

Motion Tasks and Force Control for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a challenging problem of the robotics field with many appli- cations including robotic surface painting, surfaceMotion Tasks and Force Control for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds Xanthi Papageorgiou the end effector of a robotic manipulator across the surface of an object in the workspace

Loizou, Savvas G.

193

Motion Tasks for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds under Input Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a task along a particular surface, such as robotic surface painting, surface cleaning, and surfaceMotion Tasks for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds under Input Constraints Xanthi the end effector of a robotic manipulator, which is constrained in terms of joint rates, on the surface

Tanner, Herbert G.

194

Understanding 2D critical percolation from Harris to Smirnov and beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding 2D critical percolation from Harris to Smirnov and beyond Oded Schramm http? Harris 1960 / Kesten 1980: no for d = 2. Hara & Slade 1990: no if d 19. 5 #12;Specialize to critical;Triangular lattice, site percolation (TG): 8 #12;Triangular lattice, site percolation (TG): 9 #12;The Harris

Narasayya, Vivek

195

Assisted Teleoperation Strategies for Aggressively Controlling a Robot Arm with 2D Input  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assisted Teleoperation Strategies for Aggressively Controlling a Robot Arm with 2D Input Erkang You,hauserk}@indiana.edu Abstract--This paper studies assisted teleoperation techniques for controlling a 6DOF robot arm using click enable novice users to control robot arms successfully in applications such as material handling

Indiana University

196

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic, optoelectronic properties, photovoltaic, exciton 1. Introduction Over the past decade, Hybrid Organic/inorganic Perovskites (HOP) have attracted increasing interest in the field of optoelectronics (Mitzi et al. 1995

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

A 2D/3D Hybrid Geographical Information System Stephen Brooks*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the exploration, presentation and manipulation of geographical data. 3D maps can be used by GIS specialists is a 3D marine GIS that supports real-time input and texture mapped imagery using a simple viewpoint Abstract We present a unique Geographical Information System (GIS) that seamlessly integrates 2D and 3D

Brooks, Stephen

198

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

Fayer, Michael D.

199

2-D TOMOGRAPHY FROM NOISY PROJECTIONS TAKEN AT UNKNOWN RANDOM DIRECTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Fourier-projection slice theorem that relates the 1-D Fourier transform R(f) of the Radon transform2-D TOMOGRAPHY FROM NOISY PROJECTIONS TAKEN AT UNKNOWN RANDOM DIRECTIONS A. SINGER AND H.-T. WU Abstract. Computerized Tomography (CT) is a standard method for obtaining internal struc- ture of objects

Singer, Amit

200

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: voids and hierarchical scaling models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the redshift space reduced void probability function (VPF) for 2dFGRS volume limited galaxy samples covering the absolute magnitude range M_bJ-5logh=-18 to -22. Theoretically, the VPF connects the distribution of voids to the moments of galaxy clustering of all orders, and can be used to discriminate clustering models in the weakly non-linear regime. The reduced VPF measured from the 2dFGRS is in excellent agreement with the paradigm of hierarchical scaling of the galaxy clustering moments. The accuracy of our measurement is such that we can rule out, at a very high significance, popular models for galaxy clustering, including the lognormal distribution. We demonstrate that the negative binomial model gives a very good approximation to the 2dFGRS data over a wide range of scales, out to at least 20h-1Mpc. Conversely, the reduced VPF for dark matter in a LambdaCDM universe does appear to be lognormal on small scales but deviates significantly beyond \\approx 4h-1Mpc. We find little dependence of the 2dFGRS reduced VPF on galaxy luminosity. Our results hold independently in both the north and south Galactic pole survey regions.

D. J. Croton; M. Colless; E. Gaztanaga; C. M. Baugh; P. Norberg; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Spectral Types and Luminosity Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), and the current status of the observations. In this exploratory paper, we apply a Principal Component Analysis to a preliminary sample of 5869 galaxy spectra and use the two most significant components to split the sample into five spectral classes. These classes are defined by considering visual classifications of a subset of the 2dF spectra, and also by comparing to high quality spectra of local galaxies. We calculate a luminosity function for each of the different classes and find that later-type galaxies have a fainter characteristic magnitude, and a steeper faint-end slope. For the whole sample we find M*=-19.7 (for Omega=1, H_0=100 km/sec/Mpc), alpha=-1.3, phi*=0.017. For class 1 (`early-type') we find M*=-19.6, alpha=-0.7, while for class 5 (`late-type') we find M*=-19.0, alpha=-1.7. The derived 2dF luminosity functions agree well with other recent luminosity function estimates.

S. R. Folkes; S. Ronen; I. Price; O. Lahav; M. Colless; S. J. Maddox; K. E. Deeley; K. Glazebrook; J. Bland-Hawthorn; R. D. Cannon; S. Cole; C. A. Collins; W. J. Couch; S. P. Driver; G. Dalton; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; N. Kaiser; I. J. Lewis; S. L. Lumsden; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Number and Luminosity Density of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the bivariate brightness distribution (BBD) for the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) based on a preliminary subsample of 45,000 galaxies. The BBD is an extension of the galaxy luminosity function incorporating surface brightness information. It allows the measurement of the local luminosity density, j_B, and the galaxy luminosity and surface brightness distributions while accounting for surface brightness selection biases. The recovered 2dFGRS BBD shows a strong surface brightness-luminosity relation (M_B~2.4\\mu_e). The luminosity-density is dominated by normal galaxies and the luminosity-density peak lies away from the selection boundaries implying that the 2dFGRS is complete and that luminous low surface brightness galaxies are rare. The final value we derive for the local luminosity-density, inclusive of surface brightness corrections, is: j_B=2.49+/-0.20x10^8 h L_solar Mpc^-3. Representative Schechter function parameters are: M*=-19.75+/-0.05, phi*=2.02+/-0.02x10^-2 and alpha=-1.09+/-0.03. Extending the conventional methodology to incorporate surface brightness selection effects has resulted in an increase in the luminosity-density of 37%.

Nicholas Cross; Simon P. Driver; Warrick Couch; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Gavin Dalton; Kathryn Deeley; Roberto De Propris; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; John A. Peacock; Bruce A. Peterson; Ian Price; Mark Seaborne; Will Sutherland; Helen Tadros; Keith Taylor

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Observation of Magnetically Induced Effective-Mass Enhancement of Quasi-2D Excitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the first measurements of the dispersion relation of a quasi-2D magnetoexciton. We demonstrate that the magnetoexciton effective mass is determined by the coupling between the center-of-mass motion and internal structure and becomes overwhelmingly larger than the sum of the electron and hole masses in high magnetic fields.

L. V. Butov, C. W. Lai, D. S. Chemla, Yu. E. Lozovik, K. L. Campman, and A. C. Gossard

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

Fayer, Michael D.

205

Factorization of Darboux transformations of arbitrary order for 2D Schroedinger operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a proof of Darboux's conjecture that every Darboux transformation of arbitrary order of a 2D Schroedinger type operator can be factorized into Darboux transformations of order one. The proof is constructive. The result was achieved in the framework of an algebraic approach to Darboux transformations which is put forward in this paper.

Ekaterina Shemyakova

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

A 2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme. Application to ECG simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme. Application to ECG simulation Y. Coudi`ere Universit for ECG simulation 1 Introduction Computer models of the electrical activity in the myocardium, the measurement of which on the body surface is the well-known electrocardiogram (ECG). It gives a non

Coudière, Yves

207

An Efficient Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Tertiary Structures in the 2D HP Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been widely genetic algo- rithm for the protein folding problem under the HP model in the two-dimensional square Genetic Algorithm, Protein Folding Problem, 2D HP Model 1. INTRODUCTION Amino acids are the building

Istrail, Sorin

208

A temporal warped 2D psychoacoustic modeling for robust speech recognition system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human auditory system performs better than speech recognition system under noisy condition, which leads us to the idea of incorporating the human auditory system into automatic speech recognition engines. In this paper, a hybrid feature extraction method, ... Keywords: 2D mask, Automatic speech recognition, Simultaneous masking, Temporal masking, Temporal warping

Peng Dai; Ing Yann Soon

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Facile synthesis of five 2D surface modifiers by highly selective photocyclic aromatization and efficient enhancement of oxygen permselectivities of three polymer membranes by surface modification using a small amount of the 2D surface modifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A facile synthesis of novel five 2D (planar) surface modifiers having a triphenylbenzene derivatives as a 2D structure has been achieved by the highly selective photocyclic aromatization reaction. Efficient enhancement of oxygen permselectivities through the three polymer membranes has been achieved by adding a small amount (<5.0 wt%) of the 2D surface modifiers. Among the five 2D surface modifiers, a modifier compound having oligoethylene oxide groups showed the best performance for the enhancement. These improvements were thought to be caused mainly by improvement of the solution selectivity on the membrane surface where the 2D surface modifiers were accumulated. In some of the surface-modified blend membranes, their plots in the P O 2 -? graph were over or close to the upper boundary line by Robeson in 1991. Since all the membranes containing the 2D surface modifiers showed better permselectivities than the corresponding substrate membranes, it is very promising for the future.

Jianjun Wang; Yu Zang; Guanwu Yin; Toshiki Aoki; Hiroyuki Urita; Ken Taguwa; Lijia Liu; Takeshi Namikoshi; Masahiro Teraguchi; Takashi Kaneko; Liqun Ma; Hongge Jia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pull-Push Level Sets: A new term to encode prior knowledge for the segmentation of teeth images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segmentation from 2D images of dental plaster cast models is a difficult problem because it is necessary is a desirable goal.2 In principle, this could be done by studing a 2-D image of a dental plaster cast model of a plaster cast of a dental arch. dealing with merging of different contours into a single one (which

211

3D MPSoC Design Using 2D EDA tools: Analysis of Parameters M. H. Jabbar1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D MPSoC Design Using 2D EDA tools: Analysis of Parameters M. H. Jabbar1,2 , A. M'zah2 , O. Hammami2 , D. Houzet1 1 GIPSA-Lab, Grenoble INP 2 ENSTA Paristech Abstract ­ Design space exploration of 3D MPSoC architecture is reported in this paper analyzing the impact of 2D EDA tools to the 3D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Comparison of 1D and 2D CSR Models with Application to the FERMI@ELETTRA Bunch Compressors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare our 2D mean field (Vlasov-Maxwell) treatment of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects with 1D approximations of the CSR force which are commonly implemented in CSR codes. In our model we track particles in 4D phase space and calculate 2D forces [1]. The major cost in our calculation is the computation of the 2D force. To speed up the computation and improve 1D models we also investigate approximations to our exact 2D force. As an application, we present numerical results for the Fermi{at}Elettra first bunch compressor with the configuration described in [1].

Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: With the aim of investigating the possibilities of magnetotelluric methods for the exploration of potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) sites in the Upper Rhine valley, a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the winter 2007/08. Despite strong artificial noise, processing using remote referencing and Sutarno phase consistent smoothing

214

2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis - Koller, Darcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

2D separated-local-field spectra from projections of 1D experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel procedure for reconstruction of 2D separated-local-field (SLF) NMR spectra from projections of 1D NMR data is presented. The technique, dubbed SLF projection reconstruction from one-dimensional spectra (SLF-PRODI), is particularly useful for uniaxially oriented membrane protein samples and represents a fast and robust alternative to the popular PISEMA experiment which correlates 1H–15N dipole–dipole couplings with 15N chemical shifts. The different 1D projections in the SLF-PRODI experiment are obtained from 1D spectra recorded under influence of homonuclear decoupling sequences with different scaling factors for the heteronuclear dipolar couplings. We demonstrate experimentally and numerically that as few as 2–4 1D projections will normally be sufficient to reconstruct a 2D SLF-PRODI spectrum with a quality resembling typical PISEMA spectra, leading to significant reduction of the acquisition time.

Kresten Bertelsen; Jan M. Pedersen; Niels Chr. Nielsen; Thomas Vosegaard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The clustering of galaxy groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the clustering of galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue. The 2PIGG sample has 29,000 groups with at least two members. The clustering amplitude of the full 2PIGG catalogue is weaker than that of 2dFGRS galaxies, in agreement with theoretical predictions. We have subdivided the 2PIGG catalogue into samples that span a factor of 25 in median total luminosity. Our correlation function measurements span an unprecedented range of clustering strengths, connecting the regimes probed by groups fainter than L* galaxies and rich clusters. There is a steady increase in clustering strength with group luminosity; the most luminous groups are ten times more strongly clustered than the full 2PIGG catalogue. We demonstrate that the 2PIGG results are in very good agreement with the clustering of groups expected in the LCDM model.

Nelson D. Padilla; C. M. Baugh; V. R. Eke; P. Norberg; S. Cole; C. S. Frenk; D. J. Croton; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor.

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Photocurable Oil/Water Interfaces as a Universal Platform for 2-D Self-Assembly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

T shows a situation where thermal energy disperses the particles into a 2-D gas (Figure 2a), v1 shows equilibrium phase separation as depicted by our rule-based growth algorithm, v2 is an RLA simulation (ref 46), and v3 is a DLA simulation (ref 45). ... When exposed to a 365 nm high-pressure mercury lamp at an intensity of 8 mW/cm2, solidification of DDMA was achieved within 1 s. ...

Jason J. Benkoski; Ronald L. Jones; Jack F. Douglas; Alamgir Karim

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

Galerkin Spectral Method for the 2D Solitary Waves of Boussinesq Paradigm Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the 2D stationary propagating solitary waves of the so-called Boussinesq Paradigm equation. The fourth- order elliptic boundary value problem on infinite interval is solved by a Galerkin spectral method. An iterative procedure based on artificial time ('false transients') and operator splitting is used. Results are obtained for the shapes of the solitary waves for different values of the dispersion parameters for both subcritical and supercritical phase speeds.

Christou, M. A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Nicosia (Cyprus); Christov, C. I. [Department of Mathematics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA (United States)

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Fano-type coupling of a bound paramagnetic state with 2D continuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze an effect of a bound impurity state located at a tunnel distance from a quantum well (QW). The study is focused on the resonance case when the bound state energy lies within the continuum of the QW states. Using the developed theory we calculate spin polarization of 2D holes induced by paramagnetic (Mn) delta-layer in the vicinity of the QW and indirect exchange interaction between two impurities located at a tunnel distance from electron gas.

Rozhansky, I. V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St.Petersburg, Russia and Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, FI-53851, Lappeenranta (Finland); Averkiev, N. S. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, FI-53851, Lappeenranta (Finland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

Parameter constraints for flat cosmologies from CMB and 2dFGRS power spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain flat cosmological models with a joint likelihood analysis of a new compilation of data from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). Fitting the CMB alone yields a known degeneracy between the Hubble constant h and the matter density Omega_m, which arises mainly from preserving the location of the peaks in the angular power spectrum. This `horizon-angle degeneracy' is considered in some detail and shown to follow a simple relation Omega_m h^{3.4} = constant. Adding the 2dFGRS power spectrum constrains Omega_m h and breaks the degeneracy. If tensor anisotropies are assumed to be negligible, we obtain values for the Hubble constant h=0.665 +/- 0.047, the matter density Omega_m=0.313 +/- 0.055, and the physical CDM and baryon densities Omega_c h^2 = 0.115 +/- 0.009, Omega_b h^2 = 0.022 +/- 0.002 (standard rms errors). Including a possible tensor component causes very little change to these figures; we set a upper limit to the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r<0.7 at 95% confidence. We then show how these data can be used to constrain the equation of state of the vacuum, and find w<-0.52 at 95% confidence. The preferred cosmological model is thus very well specified, and we discuss the precision with which future CMB data can be predicted, given the model assumptions. The 2dFGRS power-spectrum data and covariance matrix, and the CMB data compilation used here, are available from http://www.roe.ac.uk/~wjp/

Will J. Percival; Will Sutherland; John A. Peacock; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Keith Taylor

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Title Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2010 Authors Victor, Norrefeldt, Thierry Stephane Nouidui, and Gunnar Gruen Conference Name Clima 2010, 10th Rehva World Congress "Sustainable Energy Use in Buildings" Conference Location Antalya, Turkey Abstract This paper presents a new approach to model air flows with a zonal model. The aim of zonal models is to perform quick simulations of the air distribution in rooms. Therefore an air volume is subdivided into several discrete zones, typically 10 to 100. The zones are connected with flow elements computing the amount of air exchanged between them. In terms of complexity and needed computational time zonal models are a compromise between CFDcalculations and the approximation of perfect mixing. In our approach the air flow velocity is used as property of the zones. Thus the distinction between normal zones and jet or plume influenced zones becomes obsolete. The model is implemented in the object oriented and equation based language Modelica. A drawback of the new formulation is that the calculated flow pattern depends on the discretization. Nevertheless, the results show that the new zonal model performs well and is a useful extension to existing models.

236

Excited states of exciton-polariton condensates in 2D and 1D harmonic traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a theoretical description of Bogolyubov-type excitations of exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in semiconductor microcavities. For a typical two-dimensional (2D) BEC we focus on two limiting cases, the weak- and strong-coupling regimes, where a perturbation theory and the Thomas-Fermi approximation, respectively, are valid. We calculate integrated scattering intensity spectra for probing the collective excitations of the condensate in both considered limits. Moreover, in relation to recent experiments on optical modulation allowing localization of condensates in a trap with well-controlled shape and dimensions, we study the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) motion of the BEC in microwires and report the corresponding Bogolyubov excitation spectrum. We show that in the 1D case the characteristic polariton-polariton interaction constant is expressed as g1=3?N/(2Ly) (? is the 2D polariton-polariton interaction parameter in the cavity, N the number of the particles, and Ly the wire cavity width). We reveal some interesting features for 2D and 1D Bogolyubov spectra for both repulsive (?>0) and attractive (?<0) interactions.

C. Trallero-Giner; M. V. Durnev; Y. Núñez Fernández; M. I. Vasilevskiy; V. López-Richard; A. Kavokin

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

237

Conformal anomaly for 2D and 4D dilaton coupled spinors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study quantum dilaton coupled spinors in two and four dimensions. Making a classical transformation of the metric, the dilaton coupled spinor theory is transformed into the minimal spinor theory with another metric and in the 4D case a spinor also in the background of the nontrivial vector field. This makes it possible to calculate 2D and 4D dilaton-dependent conformal (or Weyl) anomalies easily. The anomaly-induced effective action for such spinors is derived. In the 2D case, the effective action reproduces, without any extra terms, the term added by hand in the quantum correction for the Russo-Susskind-Thorlacius model, which is exactly solvable. For the 4D spinor the chiral anomaly which depends explicitly on the dilaton is also found. As some applications we discuss supersymmetric black holes (BH’s) in dilatonic supergravity with Wess-Zumino-type matter and Hawking radiation in the same theory. As another application we investigate spherically reduced Einstein gravity with a 2D dilaton coupled fermion anomaly-induced effective action and show the existence of quantum-corrected Schwarzchild–de Sitter (Nariai) BH’s with multiple horizons.

Peter van Nieuwenhuizen; Shin’ichi Nojiri; Sergei D. Odintsov

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponçot, Agélique

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Studying large-scale structure with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey is the first to observe more than 100,000 redshifts. This allows precise measurements of many of the key statistics of galaxy clustering, in particular redshift-space distortions and the large-scale power spectrum. This paper presents the current 2dFGRS results in these areas. Redshift-space distortions are detected with a high degree of significance, confirming the detailed Kaiser distortion from large-scale infall velocities, and measuring the distortion parameter beta equiv Omega_m^{0.6}/b = 0.43 +- 0.07. The power spectrum is measured to 0.02 h Mpc^{-1}, and is well fitted by a CDM model with Omega_m h = 0.20 +- 0.03 and a baryon fraction of 0.15 +- 0.07. A joint analysis with CMB data requires Omega_m = 0.29 +- 0.05, assuming scalar fluctuations, but no priors on other parameters. Two methods are used to determine the large-scale bias parameter: an internal bispectrum analysis yields b = 1.04 +- 0.11, in very good agreement with the b = 1.10 +- 0.08 obtained from a joint 2dFGRS+CMB analysis, again assuming scalar fluctuations. These figures refer to galaxies of approximate luminosity 2L^*; luminosity dependence of clustering is detected at high significance, and is well described by b/b^* = 0.85 + 0.15(L/L^*).

J. A. Peacock; M. Colless; I. Baldry; C. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. J. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; C. A. Collins; W. Couch; G. B. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. A. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. J. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. J. Maddox; D. Madgwick; P. Norberg; W. Percival; B. A. Peterson; W. J. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Automatic high-fidelity 3D road network modeling based on 2D GIS data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations demand high-fidelity 3D road network models. However, few methods exist for the automatic generation of 3D realistic road networks, especially for those in the real world. On the other hand, vast 2D road network data in various geographical information systems (GIS) have been collected in the past and are used by a wide range of applications. A method that can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models from 2D real road GIS data will significantly reduce both the labor and time cost, and greatly benefit applications involving road networks. Based on a set of carefully selected civil engineering rules for road design, this paper proposes a novel approach that transforms existing road GIS data that contain only 2D road centerline information into high-fidelity 3D road network models. The proposed method consists of several major components, including road GIS data preprocessing, 3D centerline modeling, and 3D geometric modeling. With this approach, basic road elements such as road segments, road intersections and traffic interchanges are generated automatically to compose sophisticated road networks in a seamless manner. Results show that this approach provides a rapid and efficient 3D road modeling method for applications that have stringent requirements on high-fidelity road models.

Jie Wang; Gary Lawson; Yuzhong Shen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PROBABILISTIC HUMAN POSE RECOVERY FROM 2D IMAGES F. Flitti, M. Bennamoun, D. Q. Huynh and R. A. Owens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- imating virtual avatars with the extracted human motion, the analysis of the movement of patients is the training data set as well as the generalization power of the mapping, and can be coupled with generative

Huynh, Du

242

A systematic approach for 2D-image to 3D-range registration in urban environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applicable to models of any type (i.e. 3D point clouds, 3D meshes, CAD, SketchUp, etc.). Our system first

Stamos, Ioannis

243

MOBILITY OF THE 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. STUDY OF THE MOBILITY Ol? AN HYPERCRITICAL TWO-DIMENSIONAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOBILITY OF THE 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. STUDY OF THE MOBILITY Ol? AN HYPERCRITICAL TWO the diffusion coefficient of the two-dimensional hypercritical fluid of methane adsorbed on the graphite basal to measure the dynamical properties of the two-dimensional (2 D) adsorbed fluids pointed out a few years ago

Boyer, Edmond

244

Characterization of heterogeneous near-surface materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity and seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of heterogeneous near-surface materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity and seismic data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(13), 1658, doi electrical resistivity and seismic compressional (P) wave velocity in heterogeneous near-surface materials

Meju, Max

245

35 Cal. 3d 197, *; 673 P.2d 660, **; 197 Cal. Rptr. 783, ***; 1983 Cal. LEXIS 266  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 35 Cal. 3d 197, *; 673 P.2d 660, **; 197 Cal. Rptr. 783, ***; 1983 Cal. LEXIS 266 Note., Defendants and Respondents L.A. No. 31603 Supreme Court of California 35 Cal. 3d 197; 673 P.2d 660; 197 Cal OFFICIAL REPORTS HEADNOTES Classified to California Digest of Official Reports, 3d Series #12;Page 2 35 Cal

Kammen, Daniel M.

246

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Galaxy luminosity functions per spectral type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the optical bj luminosity function of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) for different subsets defined by their spectral properties. These spectrally selected subsets are defined using a new parameter, eta, which is a linear combination of the first two projections derived from a Principal Component Analysis. This parameter eta identifies the average emission and absorption line strength in the galaxy rest-frame spectrum and hence is a useful indicator of the present star formation. We use a total of 75,000 galaxies in our calculations, chosen from a sample of high signal-to-noise ratio, low redshift galaxies observed before January 2001. We find that there is a systematic steepening of the faint end slope (alpha) as one moves from passive (alpha = -0.54) to active (alpha = -1.50) star-forming galaxies, and that there is also a corresponding faintening of the rest-frame characteristic magnitude M* - 5\\log_10(h) (from -19.6 to -19.2). We also show that the Schechter function provides a poor fit to the quiescent (Type 1) LF for very faint galaxies (M - 5log_10(h) fainter than -16.0), perhaps suggesting the presence of a significant dwarf population. The luminosity functions presented here give a precise confirmation of the trends seen previously in a much smaller preliminary 2dFGRS sample, and in other surveys. We also present a new procedure for determining self-consistent K-corrections and investigate possible fibre-aperture biases.

D. S. Madgwick; O. Lahav; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the local E+A galaxy population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We select a sample of low-redshift (z ~ 0.1) E+A galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). The spectra of these objects are defined by strong hydrogen Balmer absorption lines (H-delta, H-gamma, H-beta) combined with a lack of [OII] 3727A emission, together implying a recently-truncated burst of star formation. The E+A spectrum is thus a signpost to galaxies in the process of evolution. We quantify the local environments, clustering properties and luminosity function of the E+A galaxies. We find that the environments are consistent with the ensemble of 2dFGRS galaxies: low-redshift E+A systems are located predominantly in the field, existing as isolated objects or in poor groups. However, the luminosity distribution of galaxies selected using three Balmer absorption lines H-delta-gamma-beta appears more typical of ellipticals. Indeed, morphologically these galaxies are preferentially spheroidal (E/S0) systems. In a small but significant number we find evidence for recent major mergers, such as tidal tails. We infer that major mergers are one important formation mechanism for E+A galaxies, as suggested by previous studies. At low redshift the merger probability is high in the field and low in clusters, thus these recently-formed spheroidal systems do not follow the usual morphology-density relation for ellipticals. Regarding the selection of E+A galaxies: we find that basing the Balmer-line criterion solely on H-delta absorption leads to a significant sub-population of disk systems with detectable H-alpha emission. In these objects the [OII] emission is presumably either obscured by dust or present with a low signal-to-noise ratio, whilst the (H-gamma, H-beta) absorption features are subject to emission-filling.

Chris Blake; Michael Pracy; Warrick Couch; Kenji Bekki; Ian Lewis; Karl Glazebrook; Ivan Baldry; Carlton Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard Ellis; Carlos Frenk; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Peder Norberg; John Peacock; Bruce Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2004-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Magnetic helicity signature produced by cross-field 2D turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying 2D turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane, which eliminates linear kinetic Alfven waves from the system. The normalized magnetic helicity of the initial large-scale fluctuations is zero, while the normalized cross-helicity is not. As the turbulence evolves, it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales, in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution, the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations.

Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Static vacancies on a 2D Heisenberg spin-1/2 antiferromagnet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study static vacancies on a 2D Heisenberg spin-(1/2 lattice at T=0, using linear spin-wave theory (LSW) and exact diagonalizaton. Unexpectedly, quantum fluctuations are reduced on neighbors of an isolated vacancy. Two vacancies are attractive, with lowest energy as nearest neighbors. We find LSW to be surprisingly accurate relative to exact diagonalization, both done on a 4×4 lattice. However, LSW on larger systems gives substantial modification of the 4×4 results for binding and ground-state energies, suggesting the need for larger lattices than previously suspected for reliable numerical estimates.

N. Bulut; D. Hone; D. J. Scalapino; E. Y. Loh

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermometer for the 2D Electron Gas using 1D Thermopower  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measure the temperature of a 2D electron gas in GaAs from the thermopower of a one-dimensional ballistic constriction, using the Mott relation to confirm the calibration from the electrical conductance. Under hot electron conditions, this technique shows that the power loss by the electrons follows a T5 dependence in the Gruneisen-Bloch regime, as predicted for acoustic phonon emission with a screened piezoelectric interaction. An independent measurement using conventional thermometry based on Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations gives a T3 loss rate. We discuss reasons for this discrepancy.

N. J. Appleyard; J. T. Nicholls; M. Y. Simmons; W. R. Tribe; M. Pepper

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Weak localization of dilute 2D electrons in undoped GaAs heterostructures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the resistivity and magnetoresistance of dilute 2D electrons are reported. The temperature dependence of the resistivity can be qualitatively described through phonon and ionized impurity scattering. While the temperature dependence indicates no ln(T) increase in the resistance, a sharp negative magnetoresistance feature is observed at small magnetic fields. This is shown to arise from weak localization. At very low density, we believe weak localization is still present, but cannot separate it from other effects that cause magnetoresistance in the semi-classical regime.

Seamons, John Andrew; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Multipacting Simulation Study for 56 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator using 2D Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A beam excited 56 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Niobium Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) has been proposed to enhance RHIC beam luminosity and bunching. Being a RF cavity, multipacting is expected; therefore an extensive study was carried out with the Multipac 2.1 2D simulation code. The study revealed that multipacting occurs in various bands up to peak surface electric field 50 kV/m and is concentrated mostly above the beam gap and on the outer conductor. To suppress multipacting, a ripple structure was introduced to the outer conductor and the phenomenon was successfully eliminated from the cavity.

Naik,D.; Ben-Zvi, I.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

High-Resolution 2D NMR Spectroscopy of Bicelles To Measure the Membrane Interaction of Ligands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since dipolar couplings correspond to local magnetic fields in the molecule, this class of experiments is referred to as separated local field (SLF) spectroscopy. ... There are several experimental protocols for SLF spectroscopy which differ in the details of the preparation and evolution periods, while in all cases the 13C signal is observed during the detection period t2 as it evolves under the 13C chemical shift interaction and in the presence of 1H decoupling. ... These results are directly transferable to 2D SLF studies of 15N nuclei, where they are typically applied for structural measurements on uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins. ...

Sergey V. Dvinskikh; Ulrich H. N. Dürr; Kazutoshi Yamamoto; Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Magnetic helicity signature produced by cross-field 2D turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying 2D turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane which eliminates linear kinetic Alfvén waves from the system. The normalized magnetic helicity of the initial large-scale fluctuations is zero while the normalized cross-helicity is not. As the turbulence evolves it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Y(4140), X(4260), psi(2D), psi(4S) and tentative psi(3D)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data on B+ --> J/psi phi K+ and the Y(4140) enhancement recently reported by the CDF collaboration [arxiv:0903.2229] are analysed. The threshold behaviour, as well as traces of the X(4260) enhancement, the known c-cbar resonances psi(2D), psi(4S), and a tentative psi(3D) state, as observed in the mass distribution, suggest that the J/psi+phi system has quantum numbers JPC=1--. It is then argued that the Y(4140) enhancement does not represent any kind of resonance, but instead is a natural consequence of the opening of the J/psi+phi channel.

Eef van Beveren; George Rupp

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Migration and Accretion of Protoplanets in 2D and 3D Global Hydrodynamical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planet evolution is tightly connected to the dynamics of both distant and close disk material. Hence, an appropriate description of disk-planet interaction requires global and high resolution computations, which we accomplish by applying a Nested-Grid method. Through simulations in two and three dimensions, we investigate how migration and accretion are affected by long and short range interactions. For small mass objects, 3D models provide longer growth and migration time scales than 2D ones do, whereas time lengths are comparable for large mass planets.

G. D'Angelo; W. Kley; Th. Henning

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

2D Schrödinger Equation with Mixed Potential in Noncommutaive Complex space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain exact solutions of the 2D Schr\\"odinger equation for Hydrogen atom with the lenear and Harmonic Potentials in noncommutative complex space, using the Power-series expansion method. Hence we can say that the Schr\\"odinger equation in noncommutative complex space describes to the particles with spin (1/2)in an external uniform magnitic field. Where the noncommutativity play the role of magnetic field with created the total magnetic moment of particle with spin 1/2, who in turn shifted the spectrum of energy. Such effects are similar to the Zeeman splitting in a commutative space.

Slimane Zaim; Hakim Guelmamene; Abdelkader Bahache

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: A targeted study of catalogued clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out a study of known clusters within the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) observed areas and have identified 431 Abell, 173 APM and 343 EDCC clusters. Precise redshifts, velocity dispersions and new centroids have been measured for the majority of these objects, and this information has been used to study the completeness of these catalogues, the level of contamination from foreground and background structures along the cluster's line of sight, the space density of the clusters as a function of redshift, and their velocity dispersion distributions. We find that the Abell and EDCC catalogues are contaminated at the level of about 10%, whereas the APM catalogue suffers only 5% contamination. If we use the original catalog centroids, the level of contamination rises to approximately 15% for the Abell and EDCC catalogues, showing that the presence of foreground and background groups may alter the richness of clusters in these catalogues. There is a deficiency of clusters at $z \\sim 0.05$ that may correspond to a large underdensity in the Southern hemisphere. From the cumulative distribution of velocity dispersions for these clusters, we derive an upper limit to the space density of $\\sigma > 1000 \\kms$ clusters of $3.6 \\times 10^{-6} \\hdens$. This result is used to constrain models for structure formation; our data favour low-density cosmologies, subject to the usual assumptions concerning the shape and normalization of the power spectrum.

Roberto De Propris; Warrick Couch; Matthew Colless; Gavin Dalton; Chris Collins; Carlton Baugh; Joss-Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Nicholas Cross; Kathryn Deeley; Simon Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard Ellis; Carlos Frenk; Kark Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; John Peacock; Will Percival; Bruce Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Hierarchical galaxy clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the two-degree field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) to test the hierarchical scaling hypothesis: namely, that the $p$-point galaxy correlation functions can be written in terms of the two point correlation function or variance. This scaling is expected if an initially Gaussian distribution of density fluctuations evolves under the action of gravitational instability. We measure the volume averaged $p$-point correlation functions using a counts in cells technique applied to a volume limited sample of 44,931 $L_*$ galaxies. We demonstrate that $L_{*}$ galaxies display hierarchical clustering up to order $p=6$ in redshift space. The variance measured for $L_{*}$ galaxies is in excellent agreement with the predictions from a $\\Lambda$-cold dark matter N-body simulation. This applies to all cell radii considered, $0.3<(R/h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc})<30$. However, the higher order correlation functions of $L_*$ galaxies have a significantly smaller amplitude than is predicted for the dark matter for $R<10h^{-1}$Mpc. This disagreement implies that a non-linear bias exists between the dark matter and $L_*$ galaxies on these scales. We also show that the presence of two rare, massive superclusters in the 2dFGRS has an impact on the higher-order clustering moments measured on large scales.

C. M. Baugh; D. J. Croton; E. Gaztanaga; P. Norberg; M. Colless; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Imaging the high-speed impact of microdrop on solid surface Ho-Young Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and optical imaging system can be used to study the fuel spray behavior in internal combustion engines2 D/ and Re UD/ . Here , , and denote the drop density, the surface tension, and the viscosity

Kim, Ho-Young

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

Zielinski, R. G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Abstract--This tutorial session covers recent developments in methods that utilize 2-D and 3-D imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imagery (e.g., from LADAR, visual, FLIR, acoustic-location) to enable aerial vehicles to autonomously covers methods that utilize 2-D and 3-D imagery (e.g., from LADAR, visual, FLIR, acoustic

Johnson, Eric N.

263

2D representation of life cycle greenhouse gas emission and life cycle cost of energy conversion for various energy resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We suggest a 2D-plot representation combined with life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and life cycle cost for various energy conversion technologies. In general, life cycle ... use life cycle GHG emissions ...

Heetae Kim; Claudio Tenreiro; Tae Kyu Ahn

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2D Joint Inversion Of DC And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and resistivity (dc) surveys are often used in environmental, hydrological and geothermal evaluation. The separate interpretation of those geophysical data sets assuming two-dimensional models frequently produces ambiguous results. The joint inversion of AMT and dc data is advocated by several authors as an efficient method for reducing the ambiguity inherent to each of those

265

A first look at cataclysmic variable stars from the 2dF QSO survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF QSO survey is a spectroscopic survey of 48,000 point-sources selected by colour with magnitudes in the range 18.35 < B < 20.95. Amongst QSOs, white dwarfs, narrow-line galaxies and other objects are some cataclysmic variables (CVs). This survey should be sensitive to intrinsically faint CVs. In the standard picture of CV evolution, these form the majority of the CV population. We present the spectra of 6 CVs from this survey. Four have the spectra of dwarf novae and two are magnetic CVs. We present evidence that suggests that the dwarf novae have period P < 2 h and are indeed intrinsically less luminous than average. However, it is not clear yet whether these systems are present in the large numbers predicted.

T. R. Marsh; L. Morales-Rueda; D. Steeghs; P. Maxted; U. Kolb; B. Boyle; S. Croom; N. Loaring; L. Miller; P. Outram; T. Shanks; R. Smith

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

2D massless QED Hall half-integer conductivity and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from the photon self-energy tensor in a magnetized medium, the 3D complete antisymmetric form of the conductivity tensor is found in the static limit of a fermion system $C$ non-invariant under fermion-antifermion exchange. The massless relativistic 2D fermion limit in QED is derived by using the compactification along the dimension parallel to the magnetic field. In the static limit and at zero temperature the main features of quantum Hall effect (QHE) are obtained: the half-integer QHE and the minimum value proportional to $e^2/h$ for the Hall conductivity . For typical values of graphene the plateaus of the Hall conductivity are also reproduced.

A. Pérez Martínez; E. Rodriguez Querts; H. Pérez Rojas; R. Gaitan; S. Rodriguez Romo

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

4d index to 3d index and 2d topological quantum field theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compute the 4d superconformal index for N=1, 2 gauge theories on S1×L(p,1), where L(p,1) is a lens space. We find that the 4d N=1, 2 index on S1×L(p,1) reduces to a 3d N=2, 4 index on S1×S2 in the large p limit, and to a 3d partition function on a squashed L(p,1) when the size of the temporal S1 shrinks to zero. As an application of our index, we study 4d N=2 superconformal field theories arising from the 6d N=(2,0) A1 theory on a punctured Riemann surface ?, and conjecture the existence of a 2d topological quantum field theory on ? whose correlation function coincides with the 4d N=2 index on S1×L(p,1).

Francesco Benini; Tatsuma Nishioka; Masahito Yamazaki

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

On a 2D hydro-mechanical lattice approach for modelling hydraulic fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 2D lattice approach to describe hydraulic fracturing is presented. The interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical response is described by Biot's theory. The lattice model is applied to the analysis of a thick-walled cylinder, for which an analytical solution for the elastic response is derived. The numerical results obtained with the lattice model agree well with the analytical solution. Furthermore, the coupled lattice approach is applied to the fracture analysis of the thick-walled cylinder. It is shown that the proposed lattice approach provides results that are independent of the mesh size. Moreover, a strong geometrical size effect on nominal strength is observed which lies between analytically derived lower and upper bounds. This size effect decreases with increasing Biot's coefficient.

Grassl, Peter; Gallipoli, Domenico; Wheeler, Simon J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Collision-dependent power law scalings in 2D gyrokinetic turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear gyrokinetics provides a suitable framework to describe short-wavelength turbulence in magnetized laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the electrostatic limit, this system is known to exhibit a free energy cascade towards small scales in (perpendicular) real and/or velocity space. The dissipation of free energy is always due to collisions (no matter how weak the collisionality), but may be spread out across a wide range of scales. Here, we focus on freely-decaying 2D electrostatic turbulence on sub-ion-gyroradius scales. An existing scaling theory for the turbulent cascade in the weakly collisional limit is generalized to the moderately collisional regime. In this context, non-universal power law scalings due to multiscale dissipation are predicted, and this prediction is confirmed by means of direct numerical simulations.

Cerri, S S; Jenko, F; Told, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah, Jl. Ir.H. Djuanda 95 Ciputat 15412 (Indonesia); MTs NW Nurul Iman Kembang Kerang, Jl. Raya Mataram - Lb.Lombok, NTB (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics,Universitas Negeri Padang, Jl. Prof. Hamka, Padang 25132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Heterotic Surface Defects and Dualities from 2d/4d Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with the superconformal indices for 4d N=2 and N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories, which are related by superpotential deformation, we perform the contour integrations and isolate the residue contributions which can be attributed to the surface defects. These defects can be interpreted as the IR limit of dynamical vortices. Given the 2d N=(2,2) and N=(0,2) world sheet theories for these surface defects, we then verify this statement by explicitly computing their elliptic genera and identifying their fugacity parameters through superconformal algebras. We show them precisely match, and the results extend previous prescriptions for inserting surface defects into 4d supersymmetric partition functions to N=1 setting. We also study how 4d N=1 IR dualities descend into the N=(0,2) world sheet theories of their surface defects, and extend the N=(2,2) triality observed earlier to other N=(0,2) surface defects unrelated to dynamical vortices.

Heng-Yu Chen; Hsiao-Yi Chen

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

On choosing a nonlinear initial iterate for solving the 2-D 3-T heat conduction equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2-D 3-T heat conduction equations can be used to approximately describe the energy broadcast in materials and the energy swapping between electron and photon or ion. To solve the equations, a fully implicit finite volume scheme is often used as the discretization method. Because the energy diffusion and swapping coefficients have a strongly nonlinear dependence on the temperature, and some physical parameters are discontinuous across the interfaces between the materials, it is a challenge to solve the discretized nonlinear algebraic equations. Particularly, as time advances, the temperature varies so greatly in the front of energy that it is difficult to choose an effective initial iterate when the nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by an iterative method. In this paper, a method of choosing a nonlinear initial iterate is proposed for iterative solving this kind of nonlinear algebraic equations. Numerical results show the proposed initial iterate can improve the computational efficiency, and also the convergence behavior of the nonlinear iteration.

An Hengbin [High Performance Computing Center, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)], E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn; Mo Zeyao [High Performance Computing Center, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)], E-mail: zeyao_mo@iapcm.ac.cn; Xu Xiaowen [High Performance Computing Center, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)], E-mail: xwxu@iapcm.ac.cn; Liu Xu [Graduate School of China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China)], E-mail: ninad@sohu.com

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs A New Discovery Answers an Old Question Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet APRIL 11, 2012 Bookmark and Share Argonne and University of Chicago physicist Sara Haravifard with the instrument on XSD beamline 6-ID-B at the APS used for the high-resolution, high-pressure structural measurements of SCBO at cryogenic temperatures. The fundamental interactions that determine how spins arrange themselves in

276

Engineered 2D Ising interactions on a trapped-ion quantum simulator with hundreds of spins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of long-range quantum spin correlations underlies a variety of physical phenomena in condensed matter systems, potentially including high-temperature superconductivity. However, many properties of exotic strongly correlated spin systems (e.g., spin liquids) have proved difficult to study, in part because calculations involving N-body entanglement become intractable for as few as N~30 particles. Feynman divined that a quantum simulator - a special-purpose "analog" processor built using quantum particles (qubits) - would be inherently adept at such problems. In the context of quantum magnetism, a number of experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. However, simulations of quantum magnetism allowing controlled, tunable interactions between spins localized on 2D and 3D lattices of more than a few 10's of qubits have yet to be demonstrated, owing in part to the technical challenge of realizing large-scale qubit arrays. Here we demonstrate a variable-range Ising-type spin-spin interaction J_ij on a naturally occurring 2D triangular crystal lattice of hundreds of spin-1/2 particles (9Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap), a computationally relevant scale more than an order of magnitude larger than existing experiments. We show that a spin-dependent optical dipole force can produce an antiferromagnetic interaction J_ij ~ 1/d_ij^a, where a is tunable over 0

Joseph W. Britton; Brian C. Sawyer; Adam C. Keith; C. -C. Joseph Wang; James K. Freericks; Hermann Uys; Michael J. Biercuk; John. J. Bollinger

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the dependence of the strength of galaxy clustering on intrinsic luminosity using the Anglo-Australian two degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). The 2dFGRS is over an order of magnitude larger than previous redshift surveys used to address this issue. We measure the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in a series of volume-limited samples. The projected correlation function is free from any distortion of the clustering pattern induced by peculiar motions and is well described by a power-law in pair separation over the range 0.1 < r /h Mpc < 10. The clustering of L* galaxies in real space is well fit by a correlation length r0 = 4.9 +/- 0.3 /h Mpc and power-law slope gamma = 1.71 +/- 0.06. The clustering amplitude increases slowly with absolute magnitude for galaxies fainter than M*, but rises more strongly at higher luminosities. At low luminosities, our results agree with measurements from the SSRS2 by Benoist et al. However, we find a weaker dependence of clustering strength on luminosity at the highest luminosities. The correlation function amplitude increases by a factor of 4.0 between $M_{b_{J}} -5\\log_{10}h = -18$ and -22.5, and the most luminous galaxies are 3.0 times more strongly clustered than L* galaxies. The power-law slope of the correlation function shows remarkably little variation for samples spanning a factor of 20 in luminosity. Our measurements are in very good agreement with the predictions of the hierarchical galaxy formation models of Benson et al.

P. Norberg; C. M. Baugh; E. Hawkins; S. Maddox; J. A. Peacock; S. Cole; C. S. Frenk; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor; the 2dFGRS Team

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study employed simultaneous neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the relationship between changes in receptor occupancy measured by PET ...

Sander, Christin Yen-Ming

279

Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi-channel seismic (MCS) data were collected over Shatsky Rise to image its upper crustal structure. These data have the potential to improve understanding of the processes of basaltic volcanism and the formation and evolution of oceanic plateaus...

Vuong, Au K

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reflectance and Fluorescence Confocal Microscope for Imaging of the Mouse Colon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fluorescence microscope. 20 3.3 Image Formation To form a 2D image using a point-scanning confocal microscope, the beam must be scanned in two dimensions using scanning mirrors. The PMT records a voltage signal from each point which is assigned... and fluorescence microscope. 20 3.3 Image Formation To form a 2D image using a point-scanning confocal microscope, the beam must be scanned in two dimensions using scanning mirrors. The PMT records a voltage signal from each point which is assigned...

Saldua, Meagan Alyssa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Multibeam Observations of Mine Scour and Burial near Clearwater, Florida, Including a Test of the VIMS 2D Mine Burial Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the VIMS 2D Mine Burial Model by Monica L. Wolfson A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment Comparison of A3 Multibeam Observations to the VIMS 2D Burial Model Comparison of F8 Multibeam Observations to the VIMS 2D Burial Model

New Hampshire, University of

282

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Clustering properties of radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The clustering properties of local, S_{1.4 GHz} > 1 mJy, radio sources are investigated for a sample of 820 objects drawn from the joint use of the FIRST and 2dF Galaxy Redshift surveys. To this aim, we present 271 new bj < 19.45 spectroscopic counterparts of FIRST radio sources to be added to those already introduced in Magliocchetti et al. (2002). The two-point correlation function for the local radio population is found to be entirely consistent with estimates obtained for the whole sample of 2dFGRS galaxies. We estimate the parameters of the real-space correlation function xi(r)=(r/r_0)^{-\\gamma}, r_0=6.7^{+0.9}_{-1.1} Mpc and \\gamma=1.6\\pm 0.1, where h=0.7 is assumed. Different results are instead obtained if we only consider sources that present signatures of AGN activity in their spectra. These objects are shown to be very strongly correlated, with r_0=10.9^{+1.0}_{-1.2} Mpc and \\gamma=2\\pm 0.1, a steeper slope than has been claimed in other recent works. No difference is found in the clustering properties of radio-AGNs of different radio luminosity. These results show that AGN-fuelled sources reside in dark matter halos more massive than \\sim 10^{13.4} M_{\\sun}},higher the corresponding figure for radio-quiet QSOs. This value can be converted into a minimum black hole mass associated with radio-loud, AGN-fuelled objects of M_{BH}^{min}\\sim 10^9 M_{\\sun}. The above results then suggest -at least for relatively faint radio objects -the existence of a threshold black hole mass associated with the onset of significant radio activity such as that of radio-loud AGNs; however, once the activity is triggered, there appears to be no evidence for a connection between black hole mass and level of radio output. (abridged)

Manuela Magliocchetti; Steve J. Maddox; Ed Hawkins; John A. Peacock; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto de Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole A. Jackson; Bryn Jones; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2004-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP...

285

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma in fusion experiments By John Greenwald December 9, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Graphic representation of 2D images of fluctuating electron temperatures in a cross-section of a confined fusion plasma. Graphic representation of 2D images of fluctuating electron temperatures in a cross-section of a confined fusion plasma. A key issue for the development of fusion energy to generate electricity is the ability to confine the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in magnetic devices called tokamaks. This gas is subject to instabilities that cause it to leak from the magnetic fields and halt fusion reactions. Now a recently developed imaging technique can help researchers improve

286

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma in fusion experiments By John Greenwald December 9, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Graphic representation of 2D images of fluctuating electron temperatures in a cross-section of a confined fusion plasma. Graphic representation of 2D images of fluctuating electron temperatures in a cross-section of a confined fusion plasma. A key issue for the development of fusion energy to generate electricity is the ability to confine the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in magnetic devices called tokamaks. This gas is subject to instabilities that cause it to leak from the magnetic fields and halt fusion reactions. Now a recently developed imaging technique can help researchers improve

287

2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Structural and elastic properties of a confined 2D colloidal solid: a molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We implement molecular dynamics simulations in canonical ensemble to study the effect of confinement on a $2d$ crystal of point particles interacting with an inverse power law potential proportional to $r^{-12}$ in a narrow channel. This system can describe colloidal particles at the air-water interface. It is shown that the system characteristics depend sensitively on the boundary conditions at the two {\\it walls} providing the confinement. The walls exert perpendicular forces on their adjacent particles. The potential between walls and particles varies as the inverse power of ten. Structural quantities such as density profile, structure factor and orientational order parameter are computed. It is shown that orientational order persists near the walls even at temperatures where the system in the bulk is in fluid state. The dependence of elastic constants, stress tensor elements, shear and bulk modulii on density as well as the channel width is discussed. Moreover, the effect of channel incommensurability with the triangular lattice structure is discussed. It is shown that incommensurability notably affects the system properties. We compare our findings to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and also to the case with the periodic boundary condition along the channel width. .

M. Ebrahim Foulaadvand; Neda Ojaghlou

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Specification for a Godunov-type Eulerian 2-D Hydrocode, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this code specification is to describe an algorithm for solving the Euler equations of hydrodynamics in a 2D rectangular region in sufficient detail to allow a software developer to produce an implementation on their target platform using their programming language of choice without requiring detailed knowledge and experience in the field of computational fluid dynamics. It should be possible for a software developer who is proficient in the programming language of choice and is knowledgable of the target hardware to produce an efficient implementation of this specification if they also possess a thorough working knowledge of parallel programming and have some experience in scientific programming using fields and meshes. On modern architectures, it will be important to focus on issues related to the exploitation of the fine grain parallelism and data locality present in this algorithm. This specification aims to make that task easier by presenting the essential details of the algorithm in a systematic and language neutral manner while also avoiding the inclusion of implementation details that would likely be specific to a particular type of programming paradigm or platform architecture.

Nystrom, William D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robey, Jonathan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Design and development of a silicon-segmented detector for 2D dose measurements in radiotherapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and protontherapy, require detectors with specific features, usually not available in conventional dosimeters. IMRT dose measurements, for instance, must face non-uniform beam fluences as well as a time-varying dose rate. Two-dimensional detectors present a great interest for dosimetry in beams with steep dose gradients, but they must satisfy a number of requirements and, in particular, they must exhibit high spatial resolution. With the aim of developing a dosimetric system adequate for 2D pre-treatment dose verifications, we designed a modular dosimetric device based on a monolithic silicon-segmented module. State and results of this work in progress are described in this article. The first 441 pixels, 6.29×6.29 cm2 silicon module has been produced by ion implantation on a 50 ?m thick p-type epitaxial layer. This sensor has been connected to a discrete readout electronics performing current integration, and has been tested with satisfactory results. In the final configuration, nine silicon modules will be assembled together to cover an area close to 20×20 cm2 with 3969 channels. In this case, the readout electronics will be based on an ASIC capable to read 64 channels by performing current-to-frequency conversion.

David Menichelli; Mara Bruzzi; Marta Bucciolini; Cinzia Talamonti; Marta Casati; Livia Marrazzo; Mauro Tesi; Claudio Piemonte; Alberto Pozza; Nicola Zorzi; Mirko Brianzi; Antonio De Sio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: higher order galaxy correlation functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure moments of the galaxy count probability distribution function in the two-degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). The survey is divided into volume limited subsamples in order to examine the dependence of the higher order clustering on galaxy luminosity. We demonstrate the hierarchical scaling of the averaged p-point galaxy correlation functions, xibar_p, up to p=6. The hierarchical amplitudes, S_p = xibar_p/xibar_2^{p-1}, are approximately independent of the cell radius used to smooth the galaxy distribution on small to medium scales. On larger scales we find the higher order moments can be strongly affected by the presence of rare, massive superstructures in the galaxy distribution. The skewness S_3 has a weak dependence on luminosity, approximated by a linear dependence on log luminosity. We discuss the implications of our results for simple models of linear and non-linear bias that relate the galaxy distribution to the underlying mass.

D. J. Croton; E. Gaztanaga; C. M. Baugh; P. Norberg; M. Colless; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Substructure Analysis of Selected Low Richness 2dFGRS Clusters of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complementary one-, two-, and three-dimensional tests for detecting the presence of substructure in clusters of galaxies are applied to recently obtained data from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The sample of 25 clusters used in this study includes 16 clusters not previously investigated for substructure. Substructure is detected at or greater than the 99% CL level in at least one test for 21 of the 25 clusters studied here. From the results, it appears that low richness clusters commonly contain subclusters participating in mergers. About half of the clusters have two or more components within 0.5 h^{-1} Mpc of the cluster centroid, and at least three clusters (Abell 1139, Abell 1663, and Abell S333) exhibit velocity-position characteristics consistent with the presence of possible cluster rotation, shear, or infall dynamics. The geometry of certain features is consistent with influence by the host supercluster environments. In general, our results support the hypothesis that low richness clusters relax to structureless equilibrium states on very long dynamical time scales (if at all).

William S. Burgett; Michael M. Vick; David S. Davis; Matthew Colless; Roberto De Propris; Ivan Baldry; Carlton Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Nicholas Cross; Gavin Dalton; Simon Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard Ellis; Carlos Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Edward Hawkins; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Peder Norberg; John A. Peacock; Will Percival; Bruce Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the luminosity function of cluster galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have determined the composite luminosity function (LF) for galaxies in 60 clusters from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The LF spans the range $-22.5

Roberto De Propris; M. Colless; S. Driver; W. Couch; J. Peacock; I. Baldry; C. Baugh; C. Collins; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; N. Cross; G. B. Dalton; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; E. Hawkins; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. S. Madgwick; P. Norberg; W. Percival; B. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS: the group-finding algorithm and the 2PIGG catalogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction of a catalogue of galaxy groups from the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is described. Groups are identified by means of a friends-of-friends percolation algorithm which has been thoroughly tested on mock versions of the 2dFGRS generated from cosmological N-body simulations. The tests suggest that the algorithm groups all galaxies that it should be grouping, with an additional 40% of interlopers. About 55% of the ~190000 galaxies considered are placed into groups containing at least two members of which ~29000 are found. Of these, ~7000 contain at least four galaxies, and these groups have a median redshift of 0.11 and a median velocity dispersion of 260km/s. This 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue represents the largest available homogeneous sample of galaxy groups. It is publicly available on the WWW.

V. R. Eke; C. M. Baugh; S. Cole; C. S. Frenk; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reconstruction of 3-D Figure Motion from 2-D Correspondences David E. DiFranco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results on a number of complex human motion sequences. 1 Introduction Video is the primary archival source a powerful constraint on image motion, simpli- fying the registration task. Representative examples]. As a result of these ambiguities, 3-D kinematic models provide a less powerful constraint during monocular

Rehg, James M.

297

Tiny images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human visual system is remarkably tolerant to degradations in image resolution: in a scene recognition task, human performance is similar whether $32 \\times 32$ color images or multi-mega pixel images are used. With ...

Torralba, Antonio

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Collapsing Estimates and the Rigorous Derivation of the 2d Cubic Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation with Anisotropic Switchable Quadratic Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the 2d and 3d many body Schr\\"odinger equations in the presence of anisotropic switchable quadratic traps. We extend and improve the collapsing estimates in Klainerman-Machedon [24] and Kirkpatrick-Schlein-Staffilani [23]. Together with an anisotropic version of the generalized lens transform in Carles [3], we derive rigorously the cubic NLS with anisotropic switchable quadratic traps in 2d through a modified Elgart-Erd\\"os-Schlein-Yau procedure. For the 3d case, we establish the uniqueness of the corresponding Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy without the assumption of factorized initial data.

Xuwen Chen

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

299

Galaxy ecology: groups and low-density environments in the SDSS and 2dFGRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the observed correlation between galaxy environment and H-alpha emission line strength, using volume-limited samples and group catalogues of 24968 galaxies drawn from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (Mb<-19.5) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mr<-20.6). We characterise the environment by 1) Sigma_5, the surface number density of galaxies determined by the projected distance to the 5th nearest neighbour; and 2) rho1.1 and rho5.5, three-dimensional density estimates obtained by convolving the galaxy distribution with Gaussian kernels of dispersion 1.1 Mpc and 5.5 Mpc, respectively. We find that star-forming and quiescent galaxies form two distinct populations, as characterised by their H-alpha equivalent width, EW(Ha). The relative numbers of star-forming and quiescent galaxies varies strongly and continuously with local density. However, the distribution of EW(Ha) amongst the star-forming population is independent of environment. The fraction of star-forming galaxies shows strong sensitivity to the density on large scales, rho5.5, which is likely independent of the trend with local density, rho1.1. We use two differently-selected group catalogues to demonstrate that the correlation with galaxy density is approximately independent of group velocity dispersion, for sigma=200-1000 km/s. Even in the lowest density environments, no more than ~70 per cent of galaxies show significant H-alpha emission. Based on these results, we conclude that the present-day correlation between star formation rate and environment is a result of short-timescale mechanisms that take place preferentially at high redshift, such as starbursts induced by galaxy-galaxy interactions.

Michael Balogh; Vince Eke; Chris Miller; Ian Lewis; Richard Bower; Warrick Couch; Robert Nichol; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Ivan K. Baldry; Carlton Baugh; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Nicholas Cross; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Percy Gomez; Alex Gray; Edward Hawkins; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Peder Norberg; John A. Peacock; Will Percival; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2004-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: galaxy clustering per spectral type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated the two-point correlation functions in redshift space, xi(sigma,pi), for galaxies of different spectral types in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. Using these correlation functions we are able to estimate values of the linear redshift-space distortion parameter, beta = Omega_m^0.6/b, the pairwise velocity dispersion, a, and the real-space correlation function, xi(r), for galaxies with both relatively low star-formation rates (for which the present rate of star formation is less than 10% of its past averaged value) and galaxies with higher current star-formation activity. At small separations, the real-space clustering of passive galaxies is very much stronger than that of the more actively star-forming galaxies; the correlation-function slopes are respectively 1.93 and 1.50, and the relative bias between the two classes is a declining function of radius. On scales larger than 10 h^-1 Mpc there is evidence that the relative bias tends to a constant, b(passive)/b(active) ~ 1. This result is consistent with the similar degrees of redshift-space distortions seen in the correlation functions of the two classes -- the contours of xi(sigma,pi) require beta(active)=0.49+/-0.13, and beta(passive)=0.48+/-0.14. The pairwise velocity dispersion is highly correlated with beta. However, despite this a significant difference is seen between the two classes. Over the range 8-20 h^-1 Mpc, the pairwise velocity dispersion has mean values 416+/-76 km/s and 612+/-92 km/s for the active and passive galaxy samples respectively. This is consistent with the expectation from morphological segregation, in which passively evolving galaxies preferentially inhabit the cores of high-mass virialised regions.

D. S. Madgwick; E. Hawkins; O. Lahav; S. Maddox; P. Norberg; J. Peacock; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS: the luminous content of the groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue of ~29000 objects is used to study the luminous content of galaxy systems of various sizes. Mock galaxy catalogues constructed from cosmological simulations are used to gauge the accuracy with which intrinsic group properties can be recovered. A Schechter function is found to be a reasonable fit to the galaxy luminosity functions in groups of different mass in the real data. The characteristic luminosity L* is larger for more massive groups. However, the mock data show that the shape of the recovered luminosity function is expected to differ from the true shape, and this must be allowed for when interpreting the data. The variation of halo mass-to-light ratio with group size is studied in both these wavebands. A robust trend of increasing M/L with increasing group luminosity is found in the 2PIGG data. From groups with L_bj=10^{10}Lsol to those 100 times more luminous, the typical bj-band M/L increases by a factor of 5, whereas the rf-band M/L grows by a factor of 3.5. These trends agree well with the simulations, which also predict a minimum M/L on a scale corresponding to the Local Group. Our data indicate that if such a minimum exists, then it must occur at L<~10^{10}Lsol, below the range accurately probed by the 2PIGG catalogue. According to the mock data, the bj M/Ls of the largest groups are expected to be approximately 1.1 times the global value. Assuming that this correction applies to the real data yields an estimate of Omega_m=0.26+/-0.03 (statistical).

V. R. Eke; C. S. Frenk; C. M. Baugh; S. Cole; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: stochastic relative biasing between galaxy populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the clustering of galaxies depends on galaxy type.Such relative bias complicates the inference of cosmological parameters from galaxy redshift surveys, and is a challenge to theories of galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper we perform a joint counts-in-cells analysis on galaxies in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, classified by both colour and spectral type, eta, as early or late type galaxies. We fit three different models of relative bias to the joint probability distribution of the cell counts, assuming Poisson sampling of the galaxy density field. We investigate the nonlinearity and stochasticity of the relative bias, with cubical cells of side 10Mpc \\leq L \\leq 45Mpc (h=0.7). Exact linear bias is ruled out with high significance on all scales. Power law bias gives a better fit, but likelihood ratios prefer a bivariate lognormal distribution, with a non-zero `stochasticity' - i.e. scatter that may result from physical effects on galaxy formation other than those from the local density field. Using this model, we measure a correlation coefficient in log-density space (r_LN) of 0.958 for cells of length L=10Mpc, increasing to 0.970 by L=45Mpc. This corresponds to a stochasticity sigma_b/bhat of 0.44\\pm0.02 and 0.27\\pm0.05 respectively. For smaller cells, the Poisson sampled lognormal distribution presents an increasingly poor fit to the data, especially with regard to the fraction of completely empty cells. We compare these trends with the predictions of semianalytic galaxy formation models: these match the data well in terms of overall level of stochasticity, variation with scale, and fraction of empty cells.

Vivienne Wild; John A. Peacock; Ofer Lahav; Edward Conway; Steve Maddox; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; D. Madgwick; P. Norberg; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: luminosity functions by density environment and galaxy type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to measure the dependence of the bJ-band galaxy luminosity function on large-scale environment, defined by density contrast in spheres of radius 8h-1Mpc, and on spectral type, determined from principal component analysis. We find that the galaxy populations at both extremes of density differ significantly from that at the mean density. The population in voids is dominated by late types and shows, relative to the mean, a deficit of galaxies that becomes increasingly pronounced at magnitudes brighter than M_bJ-5log10h <-18.5. In contrast, cluster regions have a relative excess of very bright early-type galaxies with M_bJ-5log10h < -21. Differences in the mid to faint-end population between environments are significant: at M_bJ-5log10h=-18 early and late-type cluster galaxies show comparable abundances, whereas in voids the late types dominate by almost an order of magnitude. We find that the luminosity functions measured in all density environments, from voids to clusters, can be approximated by Schechter functions with parameters that vary smoothly with local density, but in a fashion which differs strikingly for early and late-type galaxies. These observed variations, combined with our finding that the faint-end slope of the overall luminosity function depends at most weakly on density environment, may prove to be a significant challenge for models of galaxy formation.

Darren J. Croton; Glennys R. Farrar; Peder Norberg; Matthew Colless; John A. Peacock; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Near Infrared Galaxy Luminosity Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine the 2MASS extended source catalogue and the 2dFGRS to produce an IR selected galaxy catalogue with 17,173 measured redshifts. We use this extensive dataset to estimate the J and K-band galaxy luminosity functions. The LFs are fairly well fit by Schechter functions with J: M*-5log h= -22.36+/-0.02, alpha= -0.93+/-0.04, Phi=0.0104+/-0.0016 h^3/Mpc^3 and K: M*-5log h= -23.44+/-0.03, alpha=-0.96+/-0.05, Phi=0.0108+/-0.0016 h^3/Mpc^3 (2MASS Kron magnitudes). These parameters assume a cosmological model with Omega=0.3 and Lambda=0.7. With datasets of this size, systematic rather than random errors are the dominant source of uncertainty in the determination of the LF. We carry out a careful investigation of possible systematic effects in our data. The surface brightness distribution of the sample shows no evidence that significant numbers of low surface brightness or compact galaxies are missed by the survey. We estimate the present-day distributions of B-K and J-K colours as a function of absolute magnitude and use models of the galaxy stellar populations, constrained by the observed optical and infrared colours, to infer the galaxy stellar mass function. Integrated over all galaxy masses, this yields a total mass fraction in stars (in units of the critical mass density) of Omega_*.h= (1.6+/-0.24)/10^3 for a Kennicutt IMF and Omega_*.h= (2.9+/-0.43)/10^3 for a Salpeter IMF. These values agree with those inferred from observational estimates of the star formation history of the universe provided that dust extinction corrections are modest.

Shaun Cole; Peder Norberg; Carlton Baugh; Carlos Frenk; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Nicholas Cross; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard Ellis; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; John Peacock; Bruce Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

305

Test Problem: Tilted Rayleigh-Taylor for 2-D Mixing Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'tilted-rig' test problem originates from a series of experiments (Smeeton & Youngs, 1987, Youngs, 1989) performed at AWE in the late 1980's, that followed from the 'rocket-rig' experiments (Burrows et al., 1984; Read & Youngs, 1983), and exploratory experiments performed at Imperial College (Andrews, 1986; Andrews and Spalding, 1990). A schematic of the experiment is shown in Figure 1, and comprises a tank filled with light fluid above heavy, and then 'tilted' on one side of the apparatus, thus causing an 'angled interface' to the acceleration history due to rockets. Details of the configuration given in the next chapter include: fluids, dimensions, and other necessary details to simulate the experiment. Figure 2 shows results from two experiments, Case 110 (which is the source for this test problem) that has an Atwood number of 0.5, and Case 115 (a secondary source described in Appendix B), with Atwood of 0.9 Inspection of the photograph in Figure 2 (the main experimental diagnostic) for Case 110. reveals two main areas for mix development; 1) a large-scale overturning motion that produces a rising plume (spike) on the left, and falling plume (bubble) on the right, that are almost symmetric; and 2) a Rayleigh-Taylor driven mixing central mixing region that has a large-scale rotation associated with the rising and falling plumes, and also experiences lateral strain due to stretching of the interface by the plumes, and shear across the interface due to upper fluid moving downward and to the right, and lower fluid moving upward and to the left. Case 115 is similar but differs by a much larger Atwood of 0.9 that drives a strong asymmetry between a left side heavy spike penetration and a right side light bubble penetration. Case 110 is chosen as the source for the present test problem as the fluids have low surface tension (unlike Case 115) due the addition of a surfactant, the asymmetry small (no need to have fine grids for the spike), and there is extensive reasonable quality photographic data. The photographs in Figure 2 also reveal the appearance of a boundary layer at the left and right walls; this boundary layer has not been included in the test problem as preliminary calculations suggested it had a negligible effect on plume penetration and RT mixing. The significance of this test problem is that, unlike planar RT experiments such as the Rocket-Rig (Youngs, 1984), Linear Electric Motor - LEM (Dimonte, 1990), or the Water Tunnel (Andrews, 1992), the Tilted-Rig is a unique two-dimensional RT mixing experiment that has experimental data and now (in this TP) Direct Numerical Simulation data from Livescu and Wei. The availability of DNS data for the tilted-rig has made this TP viable as it provides detailed results for comparison purposes. The purpose of the test problem is to provide 3D simulation results, validated by comparison with experiment, which can be used for the development and validation of 2D RANS models. When such models are applied to 2D flows, various physics issues are raised such as double counting, combined buoyancy and shear, and 2-D strain, which have not yet been adequately addressed. The current objective of the test problem is to compare key results, which are needed for RANS model validation, obtained from high-Reynolds number DNS, high-resolution ILES or LES with explicit sub-grid-scale models. The experiment is incompressible and so is directly suitable for algorithms that are designed for incompressible flows (e.g. pressure correction algorithms with multi-grid); however, we have extended the TP so that compressible algorithms, run at low Mach number, may also be used if careful consideration is given to initial pressure fields. Thus, this TP serves as a useful tool for incompressible and compressible simulation codes, and mathematical models. In the remainder of this TP we provide a detailed specification; the next section provides the underlying assumptions for the TP, fluids, geometry details, boundary conditions (and alternative set-ups), initial conditions, and acceleration history (an

Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Youngs, David L. [AWE

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our interactive modeling for Gaussian beam modeling in two-dimensional, triangulated complex geologic structure, has been generalized to include transmission losses at interfaces, and density and Q-characterization of attenuation in layers. Also, multiple reflections and the option to model data from VSP acquisition geometry have been included. Shortcomings when the structure contains first-order discontinuities, however, limit the full geologic complexity that presently can be modeled by the Gaussian beam method. Other studies of wave filtering that arises for waves propagating nearly parallel to bedding reveal the importance of tunneling evanescent filtering on the propagating wavelet. Likewise, for reflections from steep interfaces, we have developed a dip-divergence correction to compensate for shortcomings in the conventional divergence correction for energy spreading. A new direction this past year, which we will be pursuing in the year ahead is analysis of errors in migration and dip-moveout (DMO) that arise when conventional imaging processing, which ignores anisotropy, is applied to data acquired where the subsurface is transversely isotropic. We are also developing approaches for taking anisotropy into account in these important imaging processes. Similarly, we have developed an efficient approach to performing DMO on P-SV-mode-converted data. Our interests in taking anisotropy into account have led us to study the importance of anisotropy in the overburden on reflection amplitude variations with offset (AVO).

Larner, K.; Hale, D.; Bleistein, N.; Cohen, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements with a Piperidine Nitroxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements, and that it is coupled to the interfacial water via hydrogen bonding with H2O. In view of this postulate, the viscosity into the dynamic characteristics of aqueous interfaces. Thus, parameters such as the viscosity of water

Majda, Marcin

308

Diffusive motions in 2D phases of ethane adsorbed on graphite J. P. Coulomb and M. Bienfait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

89 Diffusive motions in 2D phases of ethane adsorbed on graphite J. P. Coulomb and M. Bienfait and translational mobility of a simple rod-like molecule, i.e. ethane (C2H6) adsorbed on graphite (0001), has been is made of molecules standing up on the adsorbing surface. With increasing temperature, a rotational

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

A convergent 2D finite-difference scheme for the Dirac-Poisson system and the simulation of graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a convergent finite-difference scheme of second order in both space and time for the 2D electromagnetic Dirac equation. We apply this method in the self-consistent Dirac-Poisson system to the simulation of graphene. The model is justified ... Keywords: Beam splitter, Dirac equation, Dirac-Poisson system, Finite differences, Graphene, Veselago lens

D. Brinkman; C. Heitzinger; P. A. Markowich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A 2D finite element with through the thickness parabolic temperature distribution for heat transfer simulations including welding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The arc welding process involves thermal cycles that cause the appearance of undesirable residual stresses. The determination of this thermal cycle is the first step to a thermomechanical analysis that allows the numerical calculation of residual stresses. This study describes the formulation of a 2D finite element with through the thickness parabolic temperature distribution, including an element estabilization procedure. The 2D element described in this paper can be used to perform thermal analysis more economically than 3D elements, especially in plates, because the number of degrees of freedom through the thickness will always be three. A numerical model of a tungsten arc welding (GTAW) setup was made based on published experimental results. Size and distribution of the heat source input, thermal properties dependent on temperature, surface heat losses by convection and latent heat during phase change were considered. In parallel the same setup was modeled using ANSYS software with 3D elements (SOLID70) to compare against 2D numerical results. The results obtained by 2D model, 3D model and experimental data showed good agreement.

Darlesson Alves do Carmo; Alfredo Rocha de Faria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A numerical study on the effects of 2d structured sinusoidal elements on fluid flow and heat transfer at microscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational fluid dynamics Microchannel Minichannel Surface roughness Roughness elements Heat transfer Fluid to achieve enhancement in heat transfer with relatively low cooling fluid flow rate [1]. In spite of havingA numerical study on the effects of 2d structured sinusoidal elements on fluid flow and heat

Kandlikar, Satish

312

Elasticurves: Exploiting Stroke Dynamics and Inertia for the Real-time Neatening of Sketched 2D Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elasticurves: Exploiting Stroke Dynamics and Inertia for the Real-time Neatening of Sketched 2D of Toronto {ythiel, karan, ravin}@dgp.toronto.edu Figure 1: Input strokes are drawn in red, with drawing speed indicated by the spacing of green input points (a). The input stroke in (a) is neatened using

Toronto, University of

313

Conformational Switching between Protein Substates Studied with 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conformational Switching between Protein Substates Studied with 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy. Three conformational substates have been identified for the carbonmonoxy form of myoglobin (Mb vibrational echo chemical exchange experiments are used to observed switching between two of these substates

Fayer, Michael D.

314

Motion Tasks for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds Xanthi Papageorgiou, Savvas G. Loizou and Kostas J. Kyriakopoulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including robotic surface painting, surface cleaning, surface inspection, etc. Our main motivation comesMotion Tasks for Robot Manipulators on Embedded 2-D Manifolds Xanthi Papageorgiou, Savvas G. Loizou of a robotic manipulator across the surface of an object in the workspace. Three typical tasks are considered

Loizou, Savvas G.

315

NEUTRONS AND 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. NEUTRON SCATTERING FROM 36ArAND 4HeFILMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEUTRONS AND 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. NEUTRON SCATTERING FROM 36ArAND 4HeFILMS K. CARNEIRO Physics. - The technique of neutron scattering is well established as a unique tool to investigate the details technique to physisorbed phases is quite natural. But on the other hand since neutron scattering, compared

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

COLD ATOMS AND CREATION OF NEW STATES OF MATTER: BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES, KAPITZA STATES, AND '2D MAGNETIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLD ATOMS AND CREATION OF NEW STATES OF MATTER: BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES, KAPITZA STATES, AND '2D MAGNETIC HYDROGEN ATOMS' LENE VESTERGAARD HAU, B. D. BUSCH, CHIEN LIU, MICHAEL M. BURNS, AND J. A, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (Invited papers of the Twentieth International Conference on the Physics

Hau, Lene Vestergaard

317

Simulating the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). We have simulated these signals in a 2-dimensional electrostatic particle transform, ion cyclotron resonance, mass spectrometry, FTICR-MS, FTMS, 2D, electrostatic, particle-in-cell, PIC, simulation #12;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to first acknowledge my Lord God's hand throughout

Hart, Gus

318

Prognostic Significance and Normal Values of 2D Strain to Assess Right Ventricular Systolic Function in Chronic Heart Failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Function in Chronic Heart Failure Short Title: RV dysfunction and prognosis in CHF Soulef Guendouz, MD1 Journal 2012;76(1):127-36" #12;2 ABSTRACT Aims: Chronic heart failure (CHF) has a poor prognosis. Our aims or emergent transplantation or emergent ventricular assist-device implantation or acute heart failure. RV-2D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Exploring the structure and chemical activity of 2-D gold islands on graphene moire/Ru(0001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring the structure and chemical activity of 2-D gold islands on graphene moire/Ru(0001) Ye Xu May 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c1fd00030f Au deposited on Ru(0001)-supported extended, continuous graphene. These Au islands conform to the corrugation of the underlying graphene and display commensurate moire

Goodman, Wayne

320

Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

3D Periodic Human Motion Reconstruction from 2D Motion Sequences Zonghua Zhang and Nikolaus F. Troje  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 3D Periodic Human Motion Reconstruction from 2D Motion Sequences Zonghua Zhang and Nikolaus F@psyc.queensu.ca Abstract In this report, we present and evaluate a method of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) periodic set of 3D data, we construct a linear, morphable representation. Using this representation a low

Troje, Nikolaus

322

A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations Lin Lin Chao Yang Jianfeng Lu Lexing Ying § Weinan E with local interaction. Calculations of this type are useful for several applications, including electronic with distributed memory. 1 Introduction In some scientific applications, we need to calculate a subset

Yang, Chao

323

COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF SCRAMJET COMBUSTORS - A COMPARISON BETWEEN QUASI-ONE DIMENSIONAL AND 2-D NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustors. The combustor configurations at DLR and NASA's SCHOLAR Supersonic Combustor have been used as test cases for the 1-D and 2-D simulations. Comparisons between the published 3-D computational and experimental results and quasi-one-dimensional and 2...

Tourani, Chandraprakash Chandra

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Closer Look at Salt, Faults, and Gas in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico with 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sedimentary wedge of the northern Gulf of Mexico is extensively deformed and faulted by salt tectonics. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data covering a large area (33,800 km2) of the lower Texas continental slope [96 degrees 40'- 93 degrees 40...

Nemazi, Leslie A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Towards evaluating the map literacy of planners in 2D maps and 3D models in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Towards evaluating the map literacy of planners in 2D maps and 3D models in South Africa, Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Metereology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 2 GIScience Center, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Abstract South Africa is faced

�öltekin, Arzu

326

2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell been also developed for different reforming reactors: solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)7 , membrane reformer1 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

Boyer, Edmond

327

Context DDFV Scheme Numerical analysis ECG Simulation 2D/3D DDFV scheme for anisotropic-heterogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context DDFV Scheme Numerical analysis ECG Simulation 2D/3D DDFV scheme for anisotropic Numerical analysis ECG Simulation Authors : Laboratoire de math´ematiques Jean Leray, Universit´e de Nantes Pays de l'Adour : · Charles Pierre #12;Context DDFV Scheme Numerical analysis ECG Simulation Outline

Pierre, Charles

328

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The b_J-band galaxy luminosity function and survey selection function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use more than 110500 galaxies from the 2dF galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS) to estimate the b_J-band galaxy luminosity function at redshift z=0, taking account of evolution, the distribution of magnitude measurement errors and small corrections for incompletenessin the galaxy catalogue. Throughout the interval -16.5>M- 5log h>-22, the luminosity function is accurately described by a Schechter function with M* -5log h =-19.66+/-0.07, alpha=-1.21+/-0.03 and phistar=(1.61+/-0.08) 10^{-2} h^3/Mpc^3, giving an integrated luminosity density of rho_L=(1.82+/-0.17) 10^8 h L_sol/Mpc^3 (assuming an Omega_0=0.3, Lambda_0=0.7 cosmology). The quoted errors have contributions from the accuracy of the photometric zeropoint, large scale structure in the galaxy distribution and, importantly, from the uncertainty in the appropriate evolutionary corrections. Our luminosity function is in excellent agreement with, but has much smaller statistical errors than an estimate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data when the SDSS data are accurately translated to the b_J-band and the luminosity functions are normalized in the same way. We use the luminosity function, along with maps describing the redshift completeness of the current 2dFGRS catalogue, and its weak dependence on apparent magnitude, to define a complete description of the 2dFGRS selection function. Details and tests of the calibration of the 2dFGRS photometric parent catalogue are also presented.

P. Norberg; S. Cole; C. Baugh; C. Frenk; I. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; N. Cross; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; J. Peacock; B. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

Method and apparatus of a portable imaging-based measurement with self calibration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable imaging-based measurement device is developed to perform 2D projection based measurements on an object that is difficult or dangerous to access. This device is equipped with self calibration capability and built-in operating procedures to ensure proper imaging based measurement.

Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Image interpolation and denoising for division of focal plane sensors using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image interpolation and denoising for division of focal plane sensors using Gaussian Processes Elad acquisition as most digital cameras are composed of a 2D grid of heterogeneous imag- ing sensors. Current of focal plane polariza- tion sensors. The sensors capture only partial information of the true scene

Columbia University

332

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute) maximum for f on D if for all x 2 D, f ./ f .x/. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute the maximum value. Minimum is defined similarly. Definition 0.2. Let f W D ! R as above. The function f. The function f is said to be bounded if it is bounded both above and below. Now let D be a subset of R (the

Goodman, Fred

333

The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can be assessed using UTE bicomponent analysis. Long T2{sup *} components are affected more by long T2 saturation and IR pulses, and short T2{sup *} components are affected more by fat saturation pulses.

Li, Shihong [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States) [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yancheng Medical College, Jiangsu (China); The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China); Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States)] [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang, E-mail: jiangdu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Hua, Yanqing [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhou, Yi [The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)] [The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Calculation of spatial response of 2D beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on MAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) turbulence diagnostic on MAST is to be upgraded in June 2010 from a one-dimensional trial system to a two-dimensional imaging system (8 radialx4 poloidal channels) based on a newly developed avalanche photodiode array camera. The spatial resolution of the new system is calculated in terms of the point spread function to account for the effects of field-line curvature, observation geometry, the finite lifetime of the excited state of the beam atoms, and beam attenuation and divergence. It is found that the radial spatial resolution is {approx}2-3 cm and the poloidal spatial resolution {approx}1-5 cm depending on the radial viewing location. The absolute number of detected photons is also calculated, hence the photon noise level can be determined.

Ghim, Young-chul [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Field, A. R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [KFKI RMKI, Association EURATOM/HAS, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Data:F67587ac-8a2d-424b-98dc-89827d848535 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac-8a2d-424b-98dc-89827d848535 ac-8a2d-424b-98dc-89827d848535 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Davenport, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/11/15 End date if known: Rate name: Highway Lighting HPS 250 Watt (Nonwood/Enclosed) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to public authorities, other than municipalities, for public high way and roadway lighting in the retail distribution service territory of the District. Source or reference: www.nppd.com/my-account/rates-2/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

336

Data:23185bde-2d89-48e6-8162-3405d3473514 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bde-2d89-48e6-8162-3405d3473514 bde-2d89-48e6-8162-3405d3473514 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Hemingford, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal General Service (October 2013) Sector: Commercial Description: To municipally-owned buildings and facilities where kW Demand does not exceed 100 kW for three (3) consecutive months. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

337

Data:32608375-da2d-4506-8df3-952a80eb1638 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-da2d-4506-8df3-952a80eb1638 -da2d-4506-8df3-952a80eb1638 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Avista Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting - MV-L&S (30ftpole) 7000L Sector: Lighting Description: Public Purposes Rider = base rate x %2.85. Source or reference: http://www.avistautilities.com/services/energypricing/wa/elect/Pages/default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

338

Data:565dea25-5744-48e6-9536-b3b2d3370283 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dea25-5744-48e6-9536-b3b2d3370283 dea25-5744-48e6-9536-b3b2d3370283 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Connecticut Light & Power Co Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 18- CONTROLLED WATER HEATING ELECTRIC SERVICE (Bundled Service) Sector: Residential Description: AVAILABLE only for controlled water heating electric service to any customer other than residential, except as noted herein. Controlled storage electric water heaters shall meet the Company's specifications. These units shall be installed and wired for control in accordance with the Company's specifications. This rate is available for solar water heating used in conjunction with a storage unit which meets the Company's specifications.

339

Data:B3176bfb-d152-401d-bef2-d90685908894 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

76bfb-d152-401d-bef2-d90685908894 76bfb-d152-401d-bef2-d90685908894 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/10/26 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering Discount Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0844 per kilowatt-hour.

340

Data:381deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delmarva Power Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OL "HPS" 250 Watt (Enclosed) (Customer Owned w/o maintenance) 109 kW Sector: Lighting Description: http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DEMasterTariff.pdf Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

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341

Data:4c99020a-0655-4729-bad2-d3164c1df476 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

020a-0655-4729-bad2-d3164c1df476 020a-0655-4729-bad2-d3164c1df476 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Eastern Illinois Elec Coop Effective date: 2010/04/27 End date if known: Rate name: SINGLE-PHASE - SMALL USE RATE SCHEDULE NO. 18 Sector: Commercial Description: Available upon application to all member/owners who agree to allow the Cooperative to interrupt all electric service for the period of time specified for all uses, including lighting, heating, and power, subject to established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Service under this schedule to permanent installations requiring more than 75 kVA of transformer capacity or

342

Data:37252122-40ad-4070-b882-f855962a2d39 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-40ad-4070-b882-f855962a2d39 2-40ad-4070-b882-f855962a2d39 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (South Carolina) Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential - RE Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.duke-energy.com/pdfs/SCScheduleRE.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

343

Data:652772cc-2d84-447b-b110-ac79da390064 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cc-2d84-447b-b110-ac79da390064 cc-2d84-447b-b110-ac79da390064 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Morganton, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Senior Citizens- Morganton Housing Authority Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Needs%20V2/Attachments/212/Morganton%20NC.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

344

Data:55774f5d-8637-4679-8d2d-735b373eb330 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-8637-4679-8d2d-735b373eb330 d-8637-4679-8d2d-735b373eb330 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Louisville Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: LS - Contemporary 50000 lumens Fixture Only Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.lge-ku.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

345

Data:Dfecd643-330d-4927-8554-2e2d91d61583 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dfecd643-330d-4927-8554-2e2d91d61583 Dfecd643-330d-4927-8554-2e2d91d61583 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Utility District No 2 Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation and Crop Pumping Service Rate Sector: Description: Service under this schedule shall be available to irrigation and pumping facilities used in conjunction with farming and/or crop production. Five year minimum contract agreement required. The basic charge and annual horsepower charge are pro-rated over a 12 month billing period and billed monthly. Energy usage is read twice per year (January and July) and billed within 30 days of the read.

346

Data:2271071d-2d5a-49f7-beed-9609e88bd9eb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-2d5a-49f7-beed-9609e88bd9eb d-2d5a-49f7-beed-9609e88bd9eb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northeast Nebraska P P D Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule L - 400W HPS Flood Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.nnppd.com/billing/rates/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

347

Structure of Bright 2MASS Galaxies: 2D Fits to the Ks-band Surface Brightness Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unprecedented sky coverage and photometric uniformity of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) provides a rich resource for obtaining a detailed understanding of the galaxies populating our local (z<0.1) Universe. A full characterization of the physical structure of nearby galaxies is essential for theoretical and observational studies of galaxy evolution and structure formation. We have begun a quantified description of the internal structure and morphology of 10,000 bright (102D surface brightness profiles using GIM2D. From our initial Monte Carlo tests on 77 galaxies drawn at random from the RC3, we find that the model derived structural parameter errors due to sky uncertainies are typically less than 10%.

Daniel H. McIntosh; Ari H. Maller; Neal Katz; Martin D. Weinberg

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Computation of neutron fluxes in clusters of fuel pins arranged in hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For computations of fluxes, we have used Carvik's method of collision probabilities. This method requires tracking algorithms. An algorithm to compute tracks (in 2D and 3D) has been developed for seven hexagonal geometries with cluster of fuel pins. This has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. The flux distribution in cluster of pins has been computed by using this code. For testing the results, they are compared when possible with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. Tracks are plotted in the NXT module by using MATLAB, these plots are also presented here. Results are presented with increasing number of lines to show the convergence of these results. We have numerically computed volumes, surface areas and the percentage errors in these computations. These results show that 2D results converge faster than 3D results. The accuracy on the computation of fluxes up to second decimal is achieved with fewer lines. (authors)

Prabha, H.; Marleau, G. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Stn. CV, P.O. Box 6079, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Introduction The cloud-resolving model (CRM) has recently emerged as a useful tool to develop improved representations of convections, clouds, and cloud-radiation interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In particular, the fine spatial resolution allows the CRM to more realistically represent the detailed structure of cloud systems, including cloud geometric and radiative properties. The CRM simulations thus provide unique and comprehensive datasets, based on which more realistic GCM

350

Data:3cefa30a-fa2c-4291-9071-2d407ad22157 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cefa30a-fa2c-4291-9071-2d407ad22157 cefa30a-fa2c-4291-9071-2d407ad22157 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Seasonal Agricultural Service Sector: Commercial Description: Service is for agricultural production, processing or other use directly related to agriculture and no more than 20% of the total annual energy is consumed during the billing months of June-Sept. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 2 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Minimum monthly bill: $500 + ($8.00 * Billing kW) + PCA + ECCR

351

Data:9bdf2d28-2c28-4026-adb9-dd6567952019 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bdf2d28-2c28-4026-adb9-dd6567952019 bdf2d28-2c28-4026-adb9-dd6567952019 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cotton Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Service High Density-Three Phase Sector: Industrial Description: * Available for commercial customers up to 50 kVA of transformer capacity Subject to power cost adjustment and tax adjustment Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Kelly # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

352

Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Morales, Eugenia T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lin, Yong

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Robust Hypothesis Tests for Detecting Statistical Evidence of 2D and 3D Interactions in Single-Molecule Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A variety of experimental techniques have improved the 2D and 3D spatial resolution that can be extracted from \\emph{in vivo} single-molecule measurements. This enables researchers to quantitatively infer the magnitude and directionality of forces experienced by biomolecules in their native cellular environments. Situations where such forces are biologically relevant range from mitosis to directed transport of protein cargo along cytoskeletal structures. Models commonly applied to quantify single-molecule dynamics assume that effective forces and velocity in the $x,y$ (or $x,y,z$) directions are statistically independent, but this assumption is physically unrealistic in many situations. We present a hypothesis testing approach capable of determining if there is evidence of statistical dependence between positional coordinates in experimentally measured trajectories; if the hypothesis of independence between spatial coordinates is rejected, then a new model accounting for 2D (3D) interactions should be considered to more faithfully represent the underlying experimental kinetics. The technique is robust in the sense that 2D (3D) interactions can be detected via statistical hypothesis testing even if there is substantial inconsistency between the physical particle's actual noise sources and the simplified model's assumed noise structure. For example, 2D (3D) interactions can be reliably detected even if the researcher assumes normal diffusion, but the experimental data experiences "anomalous diffusion" and/or is subjected to a measurement noise characterized by a distribution differing from that assumed by the fitted model. The approach is demonstrated on control simulations and on experimental data (IFT88 directed transport in the primary cilium).

Christopher P. Calderon; Lucien E. Weiss; W. E. Moerner

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simulation and analysis of a multi-order imaging Fabry–Perot interferometer for the study of thermospheric winds and temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe an analysis procedure for estimating the thermospheric winds and temperatures from the multi-order two-dimensional (2D) interferograms produced by an imaging Fabry–Perot...

Makela, Jonathan J; Meriwether, John W; Huang, Yiyi; Sherwood, Peter J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

356

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The bias of galaxies and the density of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the bispectrum of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and use it to measure the bias parameter of the galaxies. This parameter quantifies the strength of clustering of the galaxies relative to the mass in the Universe. By analysing 80 million triangle configurations in the wavenumber range 0.1 < k < 0.5 h/Mpc (i.e. on scales roughly between 5 and 30 Mpc/h) we find that the linear bias parameter is consistent with unity: b_1=1.04 pm 0.11, and the quadratic (nonlinear) bias is consistent with zero: b_2=-0.054 pm 0.08. Thus, at least on large scales, optically-selected galaxies do indeed trace the underlying mass distribution. The bias parameter can be combined with the 2dFGRS measurement of the redshift distortion parameter beta = Omega_m^{0.6}/b_1, to yield Omega_m = 0.27 pm 0.06 for the matter density of the Universe, a result which is determined entirely from this survey, independently of other datasets. Our measurement of the matter density of the Universe should be interpreted as Omega_m at the effective redshift of the survey (z=0.17).

Licia Verde; Alan F. Heavens; Will J. Percival; Sabino Matarrese; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. S. Madgwick; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Holography: 2D or not 2D?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As was recently pointed out by Cadoni, a certain class of two-dimensional gravitational theories will exhibit a (black hole) thermodynamic behavior that is reminiscent of a free field theory. In the current Rapid Communication, a direct correspondence is established between these two-dimensional models and the strongly curved regime of (arbitrary-dimensional) anti–de Sitter gravity. On this basis, we go on to speculatively argue that two-dimensional gravity may ultimately be utilized for identifying and perhaps even understanding holographic dualities.

A.J.M. Medved

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Doppler Imaging of Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doppler Imaging produces 2D global maps of rotating objects using high-dispersion spectroscopy. When applied to brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets, this technique can constrain global atmospheric dynamics and/or magnetic effects on these objects in un- precedented detail. I present the first quantitative assessment of the prospects for Doppler Imaging of substellar objects with current facilities and with future giant ground-based telescopes. Observations will have the greatest sensitivity in K band, but the H and L bands will also be useful for these purposes. To assess the number and availability of targets, I also present a compilation of all measurements of photometric variability, rotation period (P), and projected rotational velocity (v sin i) for brown dwarfs and exoplanets. Several bright objects are already accessible to Doppler Imaging with currently available instruments. With the development of giant ground-based telescopes, Doppler Imaging will become feasible for many dozens of brown dwarfs and...

Crossfield, Ian J M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Spitzer c2d Survey of Nearby Dense Cores. X. Star Formation in L673 and CB188  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

L673 and CB188 are two low-mass clouds isolated from large star-forming regions that were observed as part of the Spitzer Legacy Project "From Molecular Clouds to Planet Forming disks" (c2d). We identified and characterized all the young stellar objects (YSOs) of these two regions and modeled their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to examine whether their physical properties are consistent with values predicted from the theoretical models and with the YSO properties in the c2d survey of larger clouds. Overall, 30 YSO candidates were identified by the c2d photometric criteria, 27 in L673 and 3 in CB188. We confirm the YSO nature of 29 of them and remove a false Class III candidate in L673. We further present the discovery of two new YSO candidates, one Class 0 and another possible Class I candidate in L673, therefore bringing the total number of YSO candidates to 31. Multiple sites of star formation are present within L673, closely resembling other well-studied c2d clouds containing small groups such as B59 and L1251B, whereas CB188 seems to consist of only one isolated globule-like core. We measure a star formation efficiency (SFE) of 4.6%, which resembles the SFE of the larger c2d clouds. From the SED modeling of our YSO sample we obtain envelope masses for Class I and Flat spectrum sources of 0.01-1.0 M ?. The majority of Class II YSOs show disk accretion rates from 3.3 ? 10–10 to 3 ? 10–8 M ? yr–1 and disk masses that peak at 10–4 to 10–3 M ?. Finally, we examined the possibility of thermal fragmentation in L673 as the main star-forming process. We find that the mean density of the regions where significant YSO clustering occurs is of the order of ~105 cm–3 using 850 ?m observations and measure a Jeans Length that is greater than the near-neighbor YSO separations by approximately a factor of 3-4. We therefore suggest that other processes, such as turbulence and shock waves, may have had a significant effect on the cloud's filamentary structure and YSO clustering.

Anastasia E. Tsitali; Tyler L. Bourke; Dawn E. Peterson; Philip C. Myers; Michael M. Dunham; Neal J. Evans II; Tracy L. Huard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. X. STAR FORMATION IN L673 AND CB188  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

L673 and CB188 are two low-mass clouds isolated from large star-forming regions that were observed as part of the Spitzer Legacy Project 'From Molecular Clouds to Planet Forming disks' (c2d). We identified and characterized all the young stellar objects (YSOs) of these two regions and modeled their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to examine whether their physical properties are consistent with values predicted from the theoretical models and with the YSO properties in the c2d survey of larger clouds. Overall, 30 YSO candidates were identified by the c2d photometric criteria, 27 in L673 and 3 in CB188. We confirm the YSO nature of 29 of them and remove a false Class III candidate in L673. We further present the discovery of two new YSO candidates, one Class 0 and another possible Class I candidate in L673, therefore bringing the total number of YSO candidates to 31. Multiple sites of star formation are present within L673, closely resembling other well-studied c2d clouds containing small groups such as B59 and L1251B, whereas CB188 seems to consist of only one isolated globule-like core. We measure a star formation efficiency (SFE) of 4.6%, which resembles the SFE of the larger c2d clouds. From the SED modeling of our YSO sample we obtain envelope masses for Class I and Flat spectrum sources of 0.01-1.0 M{sub sun}. The majority of Class II YSOs show disk accretion rates from 3.3 x 10{sup -10} to 3 x 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and disk masses that peak at 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3} M{sub sun}. Finally, we examined the possibility of thermal fragmentation in L673 as the main star-forming process. We find that the mean density of the regions where significant YSO clustering occurs is of the order of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} using 850 {mu}m observations and measure a Jeans Length that is greater than the near-neighbor YSO separations by approximately a factor of 3-4. We therefore suggest that other processes, such as turbulence and shock waves, may have had a significant effect on the cloud's filamentary structure and YSO clustering.

Tsitali, Anastasia E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn E.; Myers, Philip C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dunham, Michael M.; Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Huard, Tracy L., E-mail: atsitali@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dpeterson@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: at306@soton.ac.u, E-mail: mdunham@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: thuard@astro.umd.ed [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Filtered Backprojection for the Reconstruction of a High-Resolution (4,2)D CH3-NH NOESY Spectrum on a 29 kDa Protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are available. In addition, it accumulates intensity from all projections to realize the full sensitivity/amide NOESY spectrum of the 29 kDa human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) from 2D projections. For a (4,2)D 12, 2005; E-mail: peizhou@biochem.duke.edu Projection-reconstruction (PR) NMR has recently been intro

Richardson, David

362

Intro Integrals of Motion and S Matrix Computation of Masses and S Matrix of Magnetic Critical Ising Model Conclusion Solving 2D Magnetic Ising Model at T = Tc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ising Model Conclusion Solving 2D Magnetic Ising Model at T = Tc Using Scattering Theory Jihye Seo High, Harvard University Solving 2D Magnetic Ising Model at T = Tc Using Scattering Theory 1 / 28 #12;Intro Integrals of Motion and S Matrix Computation of Masses and S Matrix of Magnetic Critical Ising Model

363

Damage Spreading in a 2D Ising Model with SwendsenWang Dynamics Haye Hinrichsen 1;2 , Eytan Domany 1 and Dietrich Stauffer 3;4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Spreading in a 2D Ising Model with Swendsen­Wang Dynamics Haye Hinrichsen 1;2 , Eytan Domany K¨oln, Germany (printed: February 10, 1998) Damage spreading for 2D Ising cluster dynamics to be a useful tool [4] to investigate the dynamics of Ising models. Two replicas of the same system, which

Domany, Eytan

364

Adaptive Multiresolution Denoising Filter for 3D MR Images Pierrick Coup1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Multiresolution Denoising Filter for 3D MR Images Pierrick Coupé1 , José V. Manjon2 method has been applied on a T1-w MR image of 170x256x256 voxels acquired on a 1.5T Philips Gyroscan , Montserrat Robles2 , D. Louis Collins1 . 1 McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montréal Neurological Institute

Boyer, Edmond

365

A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source, dosimetric evaluation k{sub user} factor determined by photon beam of energy of 300 kVp was used. The maximum mean difference between ion chamber array measured and TPS calculated was 3.7%. Comparisons of dose distribution for different test plans have shown agreement with >94.5% for {gamma} {<=}1. Dosimetric QA can be performed with the 2D ion chamber array to confirm primary source strength calibration is properly updated in both the TPS and treatment delivery console computers. The MatriXX Evolution ionization chamber array has been found to be reliable for measurement of both absolute dose and relative dose distributions for the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source.

Yewondwossen, Mammo, E-mail: mammo.yewondwossen@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Power-spectrum analysis of the final dataset and cosmological implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a power spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221,414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in CDM models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial $n_{s}=1$ spectrum, $h=0.72$ and negligible neutrino mass, the preferred parameters are $\\Omega_{M} h = 0.168 \\pm 0.016$ and a baryon fraction $\\Omega_{b} /\\Omega_{M} = 0.185\\pm0.046$ (1$\\sigma$ errors). The value of $\\Omega_{M} h$ is $1\\sigma$ lower than the $0.20 \\pm 0.03$ in our 2001 analysis of the partially complete 2dFGRS. This shift is largely due to the signal from the newly-sampled regions of space, rather than the refinements in the treatment of observational selection. This analysis therefore implies a density significantly below the standard $\\Omega_{M} =0.3$: in combination with CMB data from WMAP, we infer $\\Omega_{M} =0.231\\pm 0.021$. (Abridged.)

S. Cole; W. J. Percival; J. A. Peacock; P. Norberg; C. M. Baugh; C. S. Frenk; I. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; N. J. G. Cross; G. Dalton; V. R. Eke; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; A. Jenkins; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Image Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

369

Global Existence of Solutions to the 2D subcritical dissipative Quasi-Geostrophic equation and persistency of the initial regularity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we prove that if the initial data $\\theta_0$ and its Riesz transforms ($\\mathcal{R}_1(\\theta_0)$ and $\\mathcal{R}_2(\\theta_0)$) belong to the space $(\\overline{S(\\mathbb{R}^2))}^{B_{\\infty}^{1-2\\alpha ,\\infty}}$, where $\\alpha \\in ]1/2,1[$, then the 2D Quasi-Geostrophic equation with dissipation $\\alpha$ has a unique global in time solution $\\theta$. Moreover, we show that if in addition $\\theta_0 \\in X$ for some functional space $X$ such as Lebesgue, Sobolev and Besov's spaces then the solution $\\theta$ belongs to the space $C([0,+\\infty [,X).$

Ramzi May; Ezzeddine Zahrouni

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Tensile behavior of a 2D woven C/SiC composite at ambient and elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2D reinforced composite of carbon fibers in a SiC-CVI processed matrix was tested under monotonic tension at various temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1600{degrees}C in an inert atmosphere. Up to 1000{degrees}C, the mechanical behavior remained elastic-damageable and changes proved to be essentially governed by the progressive vanishing of the processing-related thermal residual stresses. Beyond this temperature, irreversible residual strains (i.e. unrecovered upon compression) were observed whereas the tensile behavior became increasingly time-temperature dependent. The mechanisms responsible for such a behavior are reported and discussed.

Camus, G.; Barbier, J.E. [Laboratorie des Composites Thermostructuraux, Pessac (France)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Performance of Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau Sampling for the 2D Ising Model: A Brief Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a brief performance study of the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm, a recently proposed parallel realization of Wang-Landau sampling, using the 2D Ising model as a test case. The simulation time is found to scale inversely with the square root of the number of subwindows (and thus number of processors) used to span the global parameter space. We also investigate the time profiles for random walkers in dierent subwindows to complete iterations, which will aid the development of and adaptive load-balancing scheme.

Zhao, Yiwei [Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK); Cheung, Siu Wun [Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK); Li, Ying Wai [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

2D Schrödinger Equation with Singular Even-Power and Inverse-Power Potentials in Non Commutative Complex space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain exact solutions of the 2D Schr\\"odinger equation with the Singular Even-Power and Inverse-Power Potentials in non-commutative complex space, using the Power-series expansion method. Hence we can say that the Schr\\"odinger equation in non-commutative complex space describes to the particles with spin (1/2)in an external uniform magnitic field. Where the noncommutativity play the role of magnetic field with created the total magnetic moment of particle with spin 1/2, who in turn shifted the spectrum of energy. Such effects are similar to the Zeeman splitting in a commutative space.

Slimane Zaim; Abdelkader Bahache

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Discharge characteristics of lithium/sulfur dioxide (LiSO{sub 2}) ``D`` cells (SAFT America Inc.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data which was generated during a series of discharge tests performed on Lithium/Sulfur Dioxide (LiSO{sub 2}) ``D`` cells manufactured by SAFT America Inc., Cockeysville, Maryland. The discharge tests were run using five different load conditions and six temperature regimes. This report contains graphs depicting cell discharge curves (cell voltage versus time). Test results indicate that the cells performed most consistently at temperatures between 0{degrees} and 60{degrees}C and at 10 mA loads. 1 ref., 43 figs.

Pitre, L.J. Jr.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effects of spin on the dynamics of the 2D Dirac oscillator in the magnetic cosmic string background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work the dynamics of a 2D Dirac oscillator in the spacetime of a magnetic cosmic string is considered. It is shown that earlier approaches to this problem have neglected a $\\delta$ function contribution to the full Hamiltonian, which comes from the Zeeman interaction. The inclusion of spin effects leads to results which confirm a modified dynamics. Based on the self-adjoint extension method, we determined the most relevant physical quantities, such as energy spectrum, wave functions and the self-adjoint extension parameter by applying boundary conditions allowed by the system.

Fabiano M. Andrade; Edilberto O. Silva

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Effects of spin on the dynamics of the 2D Dirac oscillator in the magnetic cosmic string background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work the dynamics of a 2D Dirac oscillator in the spacetime of a magnetic cosmic string is considered. It is shown that earlier approaches to this problem have neglected a $\\delta$ function contribution to the full Hamiltonian, which comes from the Zeeman interaction. The inclusion of spin effects leads to results which confirm a modified dynamics. Based on the self-adjoint extension method, we determined the most relevant physical quantities, such as energy spectrum, wave functions and the self-adjoint extension parameter by applying boundary conditions allowed by the system.

Andrade, Fabiano M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

EMSL - Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes

377

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

Steeples, Don W.

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Data:45924338-4973-402e-a2d1-b606bc45234a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-4973-402e-a2d1-b606bc45234a 8-4973-402e-a2d1-b606bc45234a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cleveland, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: area lighting 250 w hps floodlight Sector: Lighting Description: area lighting,250 w hps,floodlight maximum 112 kwh per lamp Source or reference: http://www.cpp.org/CPP%20RRR%20ORDINANCE%20as%20of%2011-14-06.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

379

Data:05507387-3cce-4b2d-8c43-c403890669f2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

387-3cce-4b2d-8c43-c403890669f2 387-3cce-4b2d-8c43-c403890669f2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Turlock Irrigation District Effective date: 2009/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule FO Farm Service - Irrigation Pumping Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability This schedule applies to: 1) pumping of subsurface water for drainage or irrigation which is not eligible to be served with electricity sold to the District by the City and County of San Francisco pursuant to Section 9(l) of the Federal Raker Act; or 2) pumping from natural waterways or District facilities. This schedule is applicable on an annual basis only. On Season: Connected Load Charge, per HP: $ 3.00 Energy Charge per kWh $ 0.1061 Off Season: Energy Charge, per kWh $ 0.2002

380

Data:17153197-8f95-4112-9d06-043c2d204777 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3197-8f95-4112-9d06-043c2d204777 3197-8f95-4112-9d06-043c2d204777 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Pend Oreille Cnty Effective date: 2011/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: COMMERCIAL SERVICE- UNMETERED Sector: Commercial Description: Available to customers who have commercial equipment authorized to be located on District poles and fixtures rated less than 15 amps 120V (8 amps 240V) or 1500 watt nameplate. Some typical equipment might include cable TV amplifiers, sign lighting, traffic signals, wireless radios, etc. Placement of such unmetered equipment on District poles and fixtures must be approved by the District in advance of field deployment. The District reserves an absolute right to change or revoke the terms, conditions, and rates for unmetered commercial service, in which event the customer(s) may receive service under the provisions of the Commercial Service rate schedule.

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381

Data:D9d0063f-6181-486b-9758-2d004798888e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d0063f-6181-486b-9758-2d004798888e d0063f-6181-486b-9758-2d004798888e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Wilson, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Medium General Service CP Rate (CP-MGS-90) Sector: Industrial Description: "This schedule is available for electric service used by a non-residential customer with either a contract demand that equals or exceeds 30 kW or whenever the maximum registered or computed 15-minute demand equals or exceeds 30 kW in two or more of the preceding 12 months, but less than 500 kW with the following exceptions: this schedule is not available for breakdown, standby, or supplementary service unless used in conjunction with the applicable standby or generation service rider for a continuous period of not less than one year, for resale service, or for any new customer with a contract demand in excess of 500 kW or for any seasonal customer."

382

Data:Abc741bf-375d-4c2d-85e6-d13134962efc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abc741bf-375d-4c2d-85e6-d13134962efc Abc741bf-375d-4c2d-85e6-d13134962efc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Ocmulgee Electric Member Corp Effective date: 1999/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE LP-13 LARGE POWER SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: To all electric service of one standard secondary voltage required on consumer's premises, and whose transformer capacity exceeds 50 kVA, delivered at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage. No service rendered hereunder may be resold nor transmitted to other premises, either directly or indirectly, without the express consent of the Corporation, and then only upon the condition that the energy resold is not sub-metered.

383

Data:270d2431-5e45-4366-9364-0788cebbca2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

31-5e45-4366-9364-0788cebbca2d 31-5e45-4366-9364-0788cebbca2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oconomowoc Utilities Effective date: 2007/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0598 per kilowatt-hour.

384

Linear Lower Bounds for $?_c(p)$ for a Class of 2D Self-Destructive Percolation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The self-destructive percolation model is defined as follows: Consider percolation with parameter $p > p_c$. Remove the infinite occupied cluster. Finally, give each vertex (or, for bond percolation, each edge) that at this stage is vacant, an extra chance $\\delta$ to become occupied. Let $\\delta_c(p)$ be the minimal value of $\\delta$, needed to obtain an infinite occupied cluster in the final configuration. This model was introduced some years ago by van den Berg and Brouwer. They showed that, for the site model on the square lattice (and a few other 2D lattices satisfying a special technical condition) that $\\delta_c(p)\\geq\\frac{(p-p_c)}{p}$. In particular, $\\delta_c(p)$ is at least linear in $p-p_c$. Although the arguments used by van den Berg and Brouwer look quite rigid, we show that they can be suitably modified to obtain similar linear lower bounds for $\\delta_c(p)$ (with $p$ near $p_c$) for a much larger class of 2D lattices, including bond percolation on the square and triangular lattices, and site percolation on the star lattice (or matching lattice) of the square lattice.

J. van den Berg; B. N. B. de Lima

2007-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and spectral type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and spectral type using the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). Spectral types are assigned using the principal component analysis of Madgwick et al. We divide the sample into two broad spectral classes: galaxies with strong emission lines (`late-types'), and more quiescent galaxies (`early-types'). We measure the clustering in real space, free from any distortion of the clustering pattern due to peculiar velocities, for a series of volume-limited samples. The projected correlation functions of both spectral types are well described by a power law for transverse separations in the range 2 < (sigma/Mpc/h) < 15, with a marginally steeper slope for early-types than late-types. Both early and late types have approximately the same dependence of clustering strength on luminosity, with the clustering amplitude increasing by a factor of ~2.5 between L* and 4 L*. At all luminosities, however, the correlation function amplitude for the early-types is ~50% higher than that of the late-types. These results support the view that luminosity, and not type, is the dominant factor in determining how the clustering strength of the whole galaxy population varies with luminosity.

P. Norberg; C. M. Baugh; E. Hawkins; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; O. Lahav; S. Cole; C. S. Frenk; I. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor; the 2dFGRS Team

2002-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Data Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data image refers to the sum of all information 74/100,000 available in all datasets linked to a specific name; to all those who have access to databases that name is actually the data image of the real person...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Abstract--This tutorial session covers recent results using methods that utilize 2-D and 3-D imagery (e.g., from LADAR,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imagery (e.g., from LADAR, visual, FLIR, acoustic-location) to enable aerial vehicles to autonomously results using methods that utilize 2-D and 3-D imagery (e.g., from LADAR, visual, FLIR, acoustic

Johnson, Eric N.

390

An Assessment of the Impact of Antishattering Tips and Artifact Removal Techniques on Bulk Cloud Ice Microphysical and Optical Properties Measured by the 2D Cloud Probe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recent study showed that the ratio of the number of distribution functions derived from 2D cloud probes (2DCs) with standard tips to those with antishatter tips used during the 2008 Indirect and Semidirect Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and ...

Robert C. Jackson; Greg M. McFarquhar

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Application of a 2-D particle tracking model to simulate entrainment of winter flounder larvae at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 2-D random walk model, developed by Dimou (1989) as part of this research project, was used to simulate entrainment at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station of winter flounder larvae hatched within Niantic River.

Dimou, Nadia K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fault-tolerant Routing for Irregular Faulty Patterns in 2D-Mesh without Virtual Savio S.H. Tse, Jipeng Zhou, and Francis C.M. Lau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. One disadvantage of wormhole routing relative to store-and-forward routing is that it tends to support. Fukushima et al. [7] proposed a routing control algorithm for non-virtual channel router of irregular 2D

Lau, Francis C.M.

393

Salt Tectonics and Its Effect on Sediment Structure and Gas Hydrate Occurrence in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was undertaken to investigate mobile salt and its effect on fault structures and gas hydrate occurrence in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data were used to investigate the effects of the salt within...

Lewis, Dan'L 1986-

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Kinetics and thermochemistry of the reaction C/sub 2/D/sub 6/ + Cl /r equilibrium/ C/sub 2/D/sub 5/ + DCl. The heat of formation of the C/sub 2/D/sub 5/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 5/ radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bimolecular rate constant for the title reaction has been measured with the very low pressure reactor technique (VLPR) at 295 K. The rate constant at room temperature (295 K) was found to be k/sub 1/ = (8.30 /plus minus/ 0.7) /times/ 10/sup /minus/12/ cm/sup 3//(molecule/center dot/s). The value of K/sub 1/, i.e., equilibrium constant at room temperature, was found to be (4.70 /plus minus/ 0.3) /times/ 10/sup 2/. From third law calculations at 295 K /delta/H/sub f//degree/(C/sub 2/D/sub 5/) = (24.30 /plus minus/ 0.4) kcal/mol and DH/degree/(C/sub 2/D/sub 5/-D) = 102.8 /plus minus/ 0.4 kcal/mol. With use of known zero-point energy differences DH/degree/(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/-H) can be calculated from this as 100.4 kcal/mol and /delta/H/sub f//degree/(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) = 28.3 kcal/mol in excellent agreement with recent data. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Parmar, S.S.; Benson, S.W.

1989-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: correlation functions, peculiar velocities and the matter density of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed analysis of the two-point correlation function, from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). We estimate the redshift-space correlation function, xi(s), from which we measure the redshift-space clustering length, s_0=6.82+/-0.28 Mpc/h. We also estimate the projected correlation function, Xi(sigma), and the real-space correlation function, xi(r), which can be fit by a power-law, with r_0=5.05+/-0.26Mpc/h, gamma_r=1.67+/-0.03. For r>20Mpc/h, xi drops below a power-law as is expected in the popular LCDM model. The ratio of amplitudes of the real and redshift-space correlation functions on scales of 8-30Mpc/h gives an estimate of the redshift-space distortion parameter beta. The quadrupole moment of xi on scales 30-40Mpc/h provides another estimate of beta. We also estimate the distribution function of pairwise peculiar velocities, f(v), including rigorously the effect of infall velocities, and find that it is well fit by an exponential. The accuracy of our xi measurement is sufficient to constrain a model, which simultaneously fits the shape and amplitude of xi(r) and the two redshift-space distortion effects parameterized by beta and velocity dispersion, a. We find beta=0.49+/-0.09 and a=506+/-52km/s, though the best fit values are strongly correlated. We measure the variation of the peculiar velocity dispersion with projected separation, a(sigma), and find that the shape is consistent with models and simulations. Using the constraints on bias from recent estimates, and taking account of redshift evolution, we conclude that beta(L=L*,z=0)=0.47+/-0.08, and that the present day matter density of the Universe is 0.3, consistent with other 2dFGRS estimates and independent analyses.

E. Hawkins; S. Maddox; S. Cole; O. Lahav; D. Madgwick; P. Norberg; J. Peacock; I. Baldry; C. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. Ellis; C. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; B. Jones; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; W. Percival; B. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radio sources in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey - II. Local radio luminosity functions for AGN and star-forming galaxies at 1.4 GHz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have cross-matched the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) with the first 210 fields observed in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), covering an effective area of 325 square degrees (about 20% of the final 2dFGRS area). This yields a set of optical spectra of 912 candidate NVSS counterparts, of which we identify 757 as genuine radio IDs - the largest and most homogeneous set of radio-source spectra ever obtained. The 2dFGRS radio sources span the redshift range z=0.005 to 0.438, and are a mixture of active galaxies (60%) and star-forming galaxies (40%). About 25% of the 2dFGRS radio sources are spatially resolved by NVSS, and the sample includes three giant radio galaxies with projected linear size greater than 1 Mpc. The high quality of the 2dF spectra means we can usually distinguish unambiguously between AGN and star-forming galaxies. We have made a new determination of the local radio luminosity function at 1.4 GHz for both active and star-forming galaxies, and derive a local star-formation density of 0.022+/-0.004 solar masses per year per cubic Mpc. (Ho=50 km/s/Mpc).

Elaine M. Sadler; Carole A. Jackson; Russell D. Cannon; Vincent J. McIntyre; Tara Murphy; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

Region and volume dependencies in spectral line width assessed by H 2D MR chemical shift imaging in the monkey brain at 7 T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

down to 50 Al being able to quantify up to nine metabolites in vivo with good reliability. Measured correlated with improved spectral quality -- can only be achieved when voxel volumes are significantly. Introduction Localized and spatially resolved MR spectroscopy, such as single-voxel spectroscopy (e.g., STEAM

Jegelka, Stefanie

398

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 22, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2003 1395 Gradient-Based 2-D/3-D Rigid Registration of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data sets. The goal is to enable surgeons to use preopera- tive plans and computed tomography (CT of a patient preoperative computed tomography (CT) to its intraoperative situation with a few fluoroscopic X that appear in both data sets are aligned. Registration is an essential step in most computer-aided surgery

Joskowicz, Leo

399

Data:79b2d411-caf5-4222-861e-1551687759d8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:79b2d411-caf5-4222-861e-1551687759d8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Adams Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2013/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Schedule L (FL1) Sector: Lighting Description: The rate schedule is applicable for area and street lighting service to homes, businesses, municipal local and state government bodies, public authorities, residential subdivision of permanent or mobile homes for security lighting and for lighting of streets, highways, parks and similar places.

400

Experimental and 2D simulation study of the single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFETs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of the 2D simulator MEDICI as a tool for Single Event Burnout (SEB) comprehension is investigated. Simulation results are compared to experimental currents induced in an N channel power MOSFET by the ions from a [sup 252]Cf source. Current measurements have been carried out with a specially designed circuit. Simulations allow to analyze separately the effects of the ion impact and of the electrical environment parameters on the SEB phenomenon. Burnout sensitivity is found to be increased by increasing supply voltage, ion's LET and by decreasing load charge. These electrical tendencies are validated by experiments. Burnout sensitivity is also found to be sensitive to the ion impact position. The current shapes variations for given electrical parameters can be related to LET or ion impact position changes. However, some experimental current shapes are not reproduced by simulations.

Roubaud, F.; Dachs, C.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. (Univ. Montpellier 2 (France). Centre d'Electronique); Tastet, P. (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A new upper limit on the total neutrino mass from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain f_nu = Omega_nu / Omega_m, the fractional contribution of neutrinos to the total mass density in the Universe, by comparing the power spectrum of fluctuations derived from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with power spectra for models with four components: baryons, cold dark matter, massive neutrinos and a cosmological constant. Adding constraints from independent cosmological probes we find f_nu < 0.13 (at 95% confidence) for a prior of 0.1< Omega_m <0.5, and assuming the scalar spectral index n=1. This translates to an upper limit on the total neutrino mass and m_nu,tot < 1.8 eV for "concordance" values of Omega_m and the Hubble constant. Very similar results are obtained with a prior on Omega_m from Type Ia supernovae surveys, and with marginalization over n.

O. Elgaroy; O. Lahav; W. J. Percival; J. A. Peacock; D. S. Madgwick; S. L. Bridle; C. M. Baugh; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. P. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; P. Norberg; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The environmental dependence of galaxy star formation rates near clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the equivalent width of the H-alpha emission line for 11006 galaxies brighter than M_b=-19 (LCDM) at 0.052dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF), in the fields of seventeen known galaxy clusters. The limited redshift range ensures that our results are insensitive to aperture bias, and to residuals from night sky emission lines. We use these measurements to trace mustar, the star formation rate normalized to Lstar, as a function of distance from the cluster centre, and local projected galaxy density. We find that the distribution of mustar steadily skews toward larger values with increasing distance from the cluster centre, converging to the field distribution at distances greater than ~3 times the virial radius. A correlation between star formation rate and local projected density is also found, which is independent of cluster velocity dispersion and disappears at projected densities below ~1 galaxy (brighter than M_b=-19) per Mpc^2. This characteristic scale corresponds approximately to the mean density at the cluster virial radius. The same correlation holds for galaxies more than two virial radii from the cluster centre. We conclude that environmental influences on galaxy properties are not restricted to cluster cores, but are effective in all groups where the density exceeds this critical value. The present day abundance of such systems, and the strong evolution of this abundance, makes it likely that hierarchical growth of structure plays a significant role in decreasing the global average star formation rate. Finally, the low star formation rates well beyond the virialised cluster rule out severe physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping of disk gas, as being completely responsible for the variations in galaxy properties with environment.

Ian Lewis; Michael Balogh; Roberto De Propris; Warrick Couch; Richard Bower; Alison Offer; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Ivan Baldry; Carlton Baugh; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Nicholas Cross; Gavin Dalton; Simon Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard Ellis; Carlos Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Edward Hawkins; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren Madgwick; Peder Norberg; John Peacock; Will Percival; Bruce Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Colloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D Structures. Challenges of Nucleation, Growth, Composition, Particle Shape, Size Control and their Influence on Activity and Selectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which are all in the nanoparticle size range and toto the 2D and 3D nanoparticle arrays that are composed ofColloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D

Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An active learning approach to the physics of medical imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an experimentally oriented medical imaging course where the students record, process and analyse 3D data of an unknown piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue hidden in agar in order to estimate the tissue types present in a selected 2D slice. The recorded planar X-ray, CT, MRI, ultrasound and SPECT images show the tissue in very different ways. The students can only estimate the tissue type by studying the physical principles of the imaging modalities. The true answer is later revealed by anatomical photographs obtained from physical slicing. The paper describes the phantoms and methods used in the course. Sample images recorded with the different imaging modalities are provided. Challenges faced by the students are outlined. Results of the course show high increase in competencies as judged from graded reports, low course drop-out rate, high pass-rate at the exam, high student participation and large student satisfaction.

Jens E. Wilhjelm; Michael Johannes Pihl; Markus Nowak Lonsdale; Mikael Jensen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data and (c) mash the in plane projections, i.e. 2D data, with the projection data from the first oblique angles, which are then used to reconstruct the preliminary image in the 3D Reprojection Projection algorithm. The author presents reconstructed images of point sources and extended sources in both 2D and 3D. The images show that the camera is anticipated to eliminate radial elongation and produce artifact free and essentially spatially isotropic images throughout the entire FOV. It has a resolution of 1.50 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the center, 2.25 {+-}0.75 mm FWHM in the bulk of the FOV, and 3.00 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the edge and corners of the FOV.

Virador, Patrick R.G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Augmented geophysical data interpretation through automated velocity picking in semblance velocity images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Velocity picking is the problem of picking velocity-time pairs based on a coherence metric between multiple seismic signals. Coherence as a function of velocity and time can be expressed as a 2D color semblance velocity image. Currently, humans pick ...

J. Ross Beveridge; Charlie Ross; Darrell Whitley; Barry Fish

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

1064 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: FUNDAMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, VOL. 46, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 1999 AER Image Filtering Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 9, SEPTEMBER 1999 AER Image Filtering Architecture for Vision-Processing Systems Teresa Serrano for the realization of real-time two-dimensional (2-D) image filtering in an address- event-representation (AER on another approach, whose popularity has grown recently, which is known as address even representation (AER

Barranco, Bernabe Linares

408

History Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History Images History Images Los Alamos History in Images Los Alamos has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people of the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to many of the nation's most crucial security challenges. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Back in the day Back in the day LA bridge in Los Alamos LA bridge in Los Alamos 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award Louis Rosen Louis Rosen Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio TA-18 TA-18 Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area

409

Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

P-wave traveltime and polarization tomography of VSP data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......posteriori errors in anisotropic parameters are obtained...Velocity anisotropy of shales and depth estimation...two basic types of anisotropic symmetry (Bush...particulary in shales (lithologic anisotropy...TIV layers, the anisotropic parameters E =0...the limestone-shale sample listed by......

Soazig Le Bégat; Véronique Farra

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Determination Of The Orientation Of Open Fractures From Hydrophone VSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open fractures are of interest in many areas such as ground water contamination, hazardous waste disposal, oil and gas recovery, and geothermal energy extraction. In

Lee, Jung Mo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Orbital evolution of colliding star and pulsar winds in 2D and 3D: dimensionality, resolution, and grid size effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure formed by the shocked winds of a massive star and a non-accreting pulsar in a binary system suffers periodic and random variations of orbital and non-linear dynamical origin. The characterization of the evolution of the two-wind interaction region is necessary to understand the non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. For the first time, we simulate in 3D the interaction of isotropic stellar and relativistic pulsar winds along one full orbit, on scales well beyond the binary size. We also investigate the impact of grid resolution and size. We carry out, with the code PLUTO, relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3D of the interaction of a slow dense wind and a mildly relativistic wind along one full orbit, up to ~100 times the binary size. The 2-dimensional simulations are carried out with equal and larger grid resolution and size than in 3D. The simulations in 3D confirm previous results in 2D, showing a strong shock induced by Coriolis forces that terminates the pulsar wind in ...

Bosch-Ramon, V; Perucho, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ROXA: a new multi-frequency selected large sample of blazars with SDSS and 2dF optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Although Blazars are a small fraction of the overall AGN population they are expected to be the dominant population of extragalactic sources in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands and have been shown to be the largest contaminant of CMB fluctuation maps. So far the number of known blazars is of the order of several hundreds, but the forthcoming AGILE, GLAST and Planck space observatories will detect several thousand of objects of this type. Aims. In preparation for these missions it is necessary to identify new samples of blazars to study their multi-frequency characteristics and statistical properties. Methods. We compiled a sample of objects with blazar-like properties via a cross-correlation between large radio (NVSS, ATCAPMN) and X- ray surveys (RASS) using the SDSS-DR4 and 2dF survey data to spectroscopically identify our candidates and test the validity of the selection method. Results. We present the Radio - Optical - X-ray catalog built at ASDC (ROXA), a list of 816 objects among which 510 are...

Turriziani, S; Giommi, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Kinetics and mechanisms of oxidation of 2D woven C/SiC composites; 1: Experimental approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation behavior of a 2D woven C/SiC composite partly protected with a SiC seal coating and heat-treated (stabilized) at 1,600 C in inert gas has been investigated through an experimental approach based on thermogravimetric analyses and optical/electron microscopy. Results of the tests, performed under flowing oxygen, have shown that the oxidation behavior of the composite material in terms of oxidation kinetics and morphological evolutions is related to the presence of thermal microcracks in the seal coating as well as in the matrix. Three different temperature domains exist. At low temperatures (< 800 C), the mechanisms of reaction between carbon and oxygen control the oxidation kinetics and are associated with a uniform degradation of the carbon reinforcement. At intermediate temperatures, (between 800 and 1,100 C), the oxidation kinetics are controlled by the gas-phase diffusion through a network of microcracks in the SiC coatings, resulting in a nonuniform degradation of the carbon phases. At high temperatures (> 1,100 C), such diffusion mechanisms are limited by sealing of the microcracks by silica; therefore, the degradation of the composite remains superficial. The study of the oxidation behavior of (i) the heat-treated composite in a lower oxygen content environment (dry air) and (ii) the as-processed (unstabilized) composite in dry oxygen confirms the different mechanisms proposed to explain the oxidation behavior of the composite material.

Lamouroux, F.; Camus, G. (UMR 47, Pessac (France). Lab. des Composites Thermostructuraux); Thebault, J. (Societe Europeenne de Propulsion, Saint Medard-en-Jalles (France))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Vacancy association energy in scandium doped ceria: 45Sc MAS NMR and 2D exchange spectroscopy study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oxygen vacancy exchange between Sc ions in 0.5% Sc-doped ceria Sc0.005Ce0.995O0.9975 is investigated by means of 2D exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). 45Sc NMR spectrum of Sc-doped ceria contains two peaks—one corresponding to Sc ions coupled with an oxygen vacancy (Sc-7), and the other corresponding to Sc ions in a regular lattice site surrounded by eight oxygen ions (Sc-8). The vacancy exchange between these two Sc sites generates the cross-peaks in the EXSY spectrum. Relative amplitudes of the cross-peaks provide direct values of the exchange frequency at a given temperature. Arrhenius analysis of the exchange frequency gives the activation energy Ea = 1.18 eV for the vacancy hopping between Sc sites. Most of this energy barrier is due to association energy which binds the vacancy to Sc3 +. Large dopant–vacancy association energy in Sc doped ceria is demonstrated by 45Sc NMR spectrum of La/Sc doubly doped sample, ScxLaxCe1 ? 2xO2 ? x, x = 0.005, where the only line of Sc-7 site shows that all vacancies are bound by Sc3 + ions.

Reio Põder; Juhan Subbi; Helgi Kooskora; Ivo Heinmaa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The utility of phase alternated pulses for the measurement of dipolar couplings in 2D-SLF experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The measurement of hetero-nuclear dipolar coupling using two-dimensional separated local field (SLF-2D) NMR experiments is a powerful technique for the determination of the structure and dynamics of molecules in the solid state and in liquid crystals. However, the experiment is sensitive to a number of factors such as the Hartmann–Hahn match condition, proton frequency off-set and rf heating. It is shown here that by the use of phase alternated pulses during spin-exchange the effect of rf mismatch on the dipolar coupling measurement can be compensated over a wide range of off-sets. Phase alternation together with time and amplitude modulation has also been considered and incorporated into a pulse scheme that combines spin exchange with homonuclear spin decoupling based on magic sandwich sequence and named as SAMPI4. Such time and amplitude averaged nutation experiments use relatively low rf power and generate less sample heating. One of these schemes has been applied on liquid crystal samples and is observed to perform well and yield spectra with high resolution.

Bibhuti B. Das; N. Sinha; K.V. Ramanathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: constraints on cosmic star-formation history from the cosmic spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first results on the history of star formation in the Universe based on the `cosmic spectrum', in particular, the volume-averaged, luminosity-weighted, stellar absorption line spectrum of present day galaxies from the 2dFGRS. This method is novel in that unlike previous studies it is not an estimator based on total luminosity density. The cosmic spectrum is fitted with models of population synthesis, tracing the history of star formation prior to the epoch of the observed galaxies, using a method we have developed which decouples continuum and spectral-line variations and is robust against spectrophotometric uncertainties. The cosmic spectrum can only be fitted with models incorporating chemical evolution and indicates there was a peak of star-formation rate in the past of at least three times the current value and that the increase back to z=1, assuming it scales as (1+z)^beta, has a strong upper limit of beta1: e.g., if beta>2 then the SFR for 11. Our results are consistent with the best-fit results from compilations of cosmic SFR estimates based on UV luminosity density, which give 1.8

I. K. Baldry; K. Glazebrook; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; E. Hawkins; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. S. Madgwick; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Spherical Harmonics analysis of fluctuations in the final catalogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the result of a decomposition of the 2dFGRS galaxy overdensity field into an orthonormal basis of spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions. Galaxies are expected to directly follow the bulk motion of the density field on large scales, so the absolute amplitude of the observed large-scale redshift-space distortions caused by this motion is expected to be independent of galaxy properties. By splitting the overdensity field into radial and angular components, we linearly model the observed distortion and obtain the cosmological constraint Omega_m^{0.6} sigma_8=0.46+/-0.06. The amplitude of the linear redshift-space distortions relative to the galaxy overdensity field is dependent on galaxy properties and, for L_* galaxies at redshift z=0, we measure beta(L_*,0)=0.58+/-0.08, and the amplitude of the overdensity fluctuations b(L_*,0) sigma_8=0.79+/-0.03, marginalising over the power spectrum shape parameters. Assuming a fixed power spectrum shape consistent with the full Fourier analysis produces very similar parameter constraints.

Will J. Percival; Daniel Burkey; Alan Heavens; Andy Taylor; Shaun Cole; John A. Peacock; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The power spectrum and the matter content of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey has now measured in excess of 160000 galaxy redshifts. This paper presents the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution, calculated using a direct FFT-based technique. We argue that, within the k-space region 0.02

Will J. Percival; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; John A. Peacock; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

The nature of the relative bias between galaxies of different spectral type in 2dFGRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the relative bias between early- and late-type galaxies in the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). Our analysis examines the joint counts in cells between early- and late-type galaxies, using approximately cubical cells with sides ranging from 7h^{-1}Mpc to 42h^{-1}Mpc. We measure the variance of the counts in cells using the method of Efstathiou et al. (1990), which we find requires a correction for a finite volume effect. We fit lognormal models to the one-point density distribution and develop methods of dealing with biases in the recovered variances resulting from this technique. We directly fit deterministic models for the joint density distribution function, f(delta_E,delta_L), to the joint counts in cells using a maximum likelihood technique. Our results are consistent with a scale invariant relative bias factor on all scales studied. Linear bias is ruled out on scales less than l=28h^{-1}Mpc. A power-law bias model is a significantly better fit to the data on all but the largest scales studied; the relative goodness of fit of this model as compared to that of the linear bias model suggests that any nonlinearity is negligible for l>~40h^{-1}Mpc, consistent with the expectation from theory that the bias should become linear on large scales. (abridged)

E. Conway; S. Maddox; V. Wild; J. A. Peacock; E. Hawkins; P. Norberg; D. S. Madgwick; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; B. Jones; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; W. Percival; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d vsp imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

2-D X-Ray Focusing by Circular Phase Bragg-Fresnel Lenses at a Bragg Angle Close to ?/2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional focusing of hard X-rays has been accomplished for the first time by means of a phase Bragg-Fresnel lens with efficiency close to 40%. Images of the radiation region of a conventional X-ray tube...

V. V. Aristov; Yu. A. Basov; A. A. Snigirev; M. Belakhovsky…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Geometric and electronic properties of Cs structures on III-V (110) surfaces: From 1D and 2D insulators to 3D metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the structural and electronic properties of Cs adsorbed on room-temperature GaAs and InSb (110) surfaces as observed with scanning tunneling microscopy. Cs initially forms long one-dimensional (1D) zigzag chains on both surfaces. Additional Cs adsorption on GaAs(110) results in the formation of a 2D overlayer consisting of five-atom Cs polygons arranged in c(4×4) superlattice. The tunneling gap measured over these insulating structures narrows with the transition from 1D to 2D, with metallic characteristics observed following saturation with a second Cs overlayer.

L. J. Whitman; Joseph A. Stroscio; R. A. Dragoset; R. J. Celotta

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

Characterization of a novel 2D array dosimeter for patient-specific quality assurance with volumetric arc therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In this study, the authors are evaluating a new, commercially available 2D array that offers 3D dose reconstruction for patient specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA).Methods: The OCTAVIUS 4D system and its accompanying software (VERISOFT) by PTW were evaluated for the accuracy of the dose reconstruction for patient specific pretreatment IMRT QA. OCTAVIUS 4D measures the dose plane at the linac isocenter as the phantom rotates synchronously with the gantry, maintaining perpendicularity with the beam, by means of an inclinometer and a motor. The measurements collected during a volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery (VMAT) are reconstructed into a 3D dose volume. The VERISOFT application is used to perform the analysis, by comparing the reconstructed dose against the 3D dose matrix from the treatment planning system (TPS) that is computed for the same geometry and beam arrangement as that of the measurement. In this study, the authors evaluated the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm of this new system using a series of tests. Using the Octavius 4D phantom as the patient, dose distributions for various field sizes, beam orientations, shapes, and combination of fields were calculated using the Pinnacle3, TPS, and the respective DICOMRT dose was exported to the VERISOFT analysis software. Measurements were obtained by delivering the test treatment plans and comparisons were made based on gamma index, dose profiles, and isodose distribution analysis. In addition, output factors were measured and the dose linearity of the array was assessed. Those measurements were compared against measurements in water using a single, calibrated ionization chamber as well as calculations from Pinnacle for the same delivery geometries.Results: The number of voxels that met the 3%/3 mm criteria for the volumetric 3D gamma index analysis ranged from 92.3% to 98.9% for all the patient plans that the authors evaluated. 2D gamma analysis in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes produced similar results to those in the 3D gamma analysis. The new detector system does not require an angular dependence correction because it rotates in synchrony with the gantry and the detector array maintains a constant SAD while always perpendicular to the beam axis. Output factors were within 2% when compared to ionization chamber measurements and Pinnacle calculations. Similar agreement was observed when testing the MU linearity (for MU values above 2) as well as dose rate effect.Conclusions: The OCTAVIUS 4D system has some unique characteristics that can potentially improve the patient specific pretreatment IMRT QA data collection and analysis. The ability of the software to reconstruct from the measurements the true 3D dose distribution in the phantom, provides a unique perspective for the medical physicist that evaluates a patient's QA plan.

Stathakis, Sotirios; Myers, Pamela; Esquivel, Carlos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Magnetotransport theory in quantum dots: 3D-0D and 2D-0D tunneling and angular momentum selection rules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of magnetotransport through quantum dots is presented. The model allows one to analyze tunneling both from bulk-like contacts and from 2D accumulation layers. The fine features in the I-V characteristics due to the quantum dot states are known to be shifted to different voltages depending upon the value of the magnetic field. While this effect is also well reproduced by our calculations, in this work we concentrate on the amplitude of each current resonance as a function of the magnetic field. Such amplitudes show oscillations reflecting the variation of the density of states at the Fermi energy in the emitter. Furthermore the amplitude increases as a function of the magnetic field for certain features while it decreases for others. In particular, we demonstrate that the behavior of the amplitude of the current resonances is linked to the value of the angular momentum of each dot level through which tunneling occurs. We show that a selection rule on the angular momentum must be satisfied. As a consequence, tunneling through specific dot states is strongly suppressed and sometimes prohibited altogether by the presence of the magnetic field. This will allow to extract from the experimental curves detailed information on the nature of the quantum-dot wave functions involved in the electronic transport. Furthermore, when tunneling occurs from a two-dimensional accumulation layer to the quantum dot, the presence of a magnetic field hugely increases the strength of some resonant features. This effect is predicted by our model and, to the best of our knowledge, has never been observed.

B. Jouault; M. Boero; G. Faini; J. C. Inkson

1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

ROXA: a new multi-frequency selected large sample of blazars with SDSS and 2dF optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Although Blazars are a small fraction of the overall AGN population they are expected to be the dominant population of extragalactic sources in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands and have been shown to be the largest contaminant of CMB fluctuation maps. So far the number of known blazars is of the order of several hundreds, but the forthcoming AGILE, GLAST and Planck space observatories will detect several thousand of objects of this type. Aims. In preparation for these missions it is necessary to identify new samples of blazars to study their multi-frequency characteristics and statistical properties. Methods. We compiled a sample of objects with blazar-like properties via a cross-correlation between large radio (NVSS, ATCAPMN) and X- ray surveys (RASS) using the SDSS-DR4 and 2dF survey data to spectroscopically identify our candidates and test the validity of the selection method. Results. We present the Radio - Optical - X-ray catalog built at ASDC (ROXA), a list of 816 objects among which 510 are confirmed blazars. Only 19% of the candidates turned out to be certainly non-blazars demonstrating the high efficiency of our selection method. Conclusions. Our catalog includes 173 new blazar identifications, or about 10% of all presently known blazars. The relatively high flux threshold in the X-ray energy band (given by the RASS survey) preferentially selects objects with high fx / fr ratio leading to the discovery of new High Energy Peaked BL Lac (HBLs). Our catalog therefore includes many new potential targets for GeV-TeV observations.

S. Turriziani; E. Cavazzuti; P. Giommi

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

Superclusters of galaxies in the 2dF redshift survey. III. The properties of galaxies in superclusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use catalogues of superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to study the properties of galaxies in superclusters. We compare the properties of galaxies in high and low density regions of rich superclusters, in poor superclusters and in the field, as well as in groups, and of isolated galaxies in superclusters of various richness. We show that in rich superclusters the values of the luminosity density smoothed on a scale of 8 \\Mpc are higher than in poor superclusters: the median density in rich superclusters is $\\delta \\approx 7.5$, in poor superclusters $\\delta \\approx 6.0$. Rich superclusters contain high density cores with densities $\\delta > 10$ while in poor superclusters such high density cores are absent. The properties of galaxies in rich and poor superclusters and in the field are different: the fraction of early type, passive galaxies in rich superclusters is slightly larger than in poor superclusters, and is the smallest among the field galaxies. Most importantly, in high density cores of rich superclusters ($\\delta > 10$) there is an excess of early type, passive galaxies in groups and clusters, as well as among those which do not belong to groups or clusters. The main galaxies of superclusters have a rather limited range of absolute magnitudes. The main galaxies of rich superclusters have larger luminosities than those of poor superclusters and of groups in the field. Our results show that both the local (group/cluster) environments and global (supercluster) environments influence galaxy morphologies and their star formation activity.

M. Einasto; J. Einasto; E. Tago; E. Saar; L. J. Liivam"agi; M. J~oeveer; G. H"utsi; P. Hein"am"aki; V. M"uller; D. Tucker

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ray tracing of multiple transmitted/reflected/converted waves in 2-D/3-D layered anisotropic TTI media and application to crosswell traveltime tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......waves in 2-D/3-D layered anisotropic TTI media and application...reflections (or conversions) in anisotropic media, we have extended the...case Next we consider a 3-D anisotropic TTI medium of extent 10km...is 50 m. The uniform Clay Shale model (Thomsen 1986), was......

Chao-Ying Bai; Guo-Jiao Huang; Xiao-Ling Li; Bing Zhou; Stewart Greenhalgh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Large-scale 2D electronics based on single-layer MoS[subscript 2] grown by chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2D nanoelectronics based on single-layer MoS[subscript 2] offers great advantages for both conventional and ubiquitous applications. This paper discusses the large-scale CVD growth of single-layer MoS[subscript 2] and ...

Wang, H.

431

Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are ?0.2 ± 0.2, ?1.5 ± 1.1, and ?0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the variances of MP error in SI direction explained by target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations are 9% with the 2D method, 74.4% with the 3D method, and 27% with the 4D method. The EX/SD detection errors are both < 1.0 mm for the 2D method and < 2.0 mm for the 4D method. Conclusions: The 2D method provides the most accurate MP detection regardless of the motion pattern variations, while its performance is limited by the accuracy of target identification in the projection images. The 3D method causes the largest error in MP determination, and its accuracy significantly depends on target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations. The 4D method provides moderate MP detection results, while its accuracy relies on a regular motion pattern. In addition, the 2D and 4D methods both provide accurate measurement of the motion SD/EX, providing extra information for motion management.

Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn–Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the \\{DSDs\\} in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was indicated by smaller Dm values in the morning hours than their counterparts in the evening. Rainfall type dependence and diurnal variation of DSD lead to significant variation of Z–R relations so that they must be considered to increase the accuracy of Z–R conversion from weather radar in this region. Consistent with the previous study, lack of seasonal DSD variability was also found in this work that would be due to significant local convective and orographic effect at this region throughout the year. However, Dm values in our result were larger than the typical orographic DSD.

Marzuki; Walter L. Randeu; Toshiaki Kozu; Toyoshi Shimomai; Hiroyuki Hashiguchi; Michael Schönhuber

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anatomical feature #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Types of Data to be Registered Anatomic CT, MRI, US DigitizedRSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion

Pelizzari, Charles A.

435

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

436

2D?3D polycatenated and 3D?3D interpenetrated metal–organic frameworks constructed from thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and rigid bis(imidazole) ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks, namely, [Zn(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (2), and ([Cd{sub 2}(µ{sub 3}-tdc){sub 2}(µ-dimb){sub 2}]·(H{sub 2}O)){sub n}(3). These MOFs were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal (TG, DTA, DTG and DSC), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. Moreover, these coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: In this study, hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. These coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complexes 1 and 2 display polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework. • Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework. • Complex 1 adsorbs the highest amount of H{sub 2} at 100 bar and 298 K. • Complexes display blue fluorescent emission bands.

Erer, Hakan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eski?ehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eski?ehir (Turkey); Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer, E-mail: yesilel@ogu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eski?ehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eski?ehir (Turkey); Ar?c?, Mürsel [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eski?ehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eski?ehir (Turkey); Keskin, Seda [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koç University, ?stanbul (Turkey); Büyükgüngör, Orhan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Ondokuz May?s University, 55139 Samsun (Turkey)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2 D of the crystal structure from real-space projections obtained by illuminating the sample with white x rays. This approach was applied to the pattern of the directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays

Korecki, Pawe³

438

2D Au@PNiPAM microgel arrays suitable for photonic devices with thermally controlled interparticle gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core-shell Au@pNIPAM nanocomposites are assembled through a simple and inexpensive approach where drops of bulk nanoparticle solution are left to dry on ITO surfaces at fixed and finely tuned temperatures. Interparticle distances are determined by the length of the thermoresponsive PNiPAM shell which acts as mechanical spacer. Structural characterization is performed through microscope imaging techniques and we quantify the pair and orientational correlation functions characteristic to each array at each deposition temperature. The elasticity of the polymer shell at each temperature is considered as microgels are softer at temperatures below PNiPAM's LCST. In a second step, previously prepared Au@PNiPAM arrays are exposed to atmospheric plasma. Plasma reacts and degrades the PNiPAM shell, being non-invasive to Au cores which remain at their original array positions.

J. Clara-Rahola; R. Contreras Caceres; A. Fernandez-Barbero

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. VII. CHEMISTRY AND DYNAMICS IN L43  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the Spitzer Space Telescope and molecular line observations of nine species toward the dark cloud L43. The Spitzer images and molecular line maps suggest that it has a starless core and a Class I protostar evolving in the same environment. CO depletion is seen in both sources, and DCO{sup +} lines are stronger toward the starless core. With a goal of testing the chemical characteristics from pre- to protostellar stages, we adopt an evolutionary chemical model to calculate the molecular abundances and compare with our observations. Among the different model parameters we tested, the best-fit model suggests a longer total timescale at the pre-protostellar stage, but with faster evolution at the later steps with higher densities.

Chen, Jo-Hsin; Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1083 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Astrophysical Research Center for the Structure and Evolution of the Cosmos, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Bourke, Tyler L., E-mail: jhchen@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: jelee@sejong.ac.k, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.ed [Harvard-Smithonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Data:7252ec6a-fc32-4567-802e-2d637abcf1e5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

52ec6a-fc32-4567-802e-2d637abcf1e5 52ec6a-fc32-4567-802e-2d637abcf1e5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cimarron Electric Coop Effective date: 2005/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Optional Large Power (LP-3) Sector: Industrial Description: Available to industrial consumers using 1,000 kW or greater demand per month and taking at primary voltage, with service under term contract and service is taken at one location through one meter. No standby or auxiliary service permitted. These charges are in addition to the wholesale charges for power as paid by the cooperative to its supplier (WFEC).

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441

Data:67593b22-1802-4031-b635-d587f7d31b2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b22-1802-4031-b635-d587f7d31b2d b22-1802-4031-b635-d587f7d31b2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Santee Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Public Street Lighting Service (Enclosed (100 Watt) (Sodium Vapor)) Sector: Commercial Description: This Schedule is available for the purpose of lighting dedicated public streets, highways, parks or public places for municipal, county, state and federal governments in all territory served by the Cooperative. Dedicated Poles 30' Wood = $ 2.00 35' Wood = $ 4.00 40' Wood = $ 5.00 45' Wood = $ 6.00 30' to 45' Fiberglass or Metal Pole = $ 16.17

442

Data:1891c95e-2d08-4015-90f8-3d621922c71f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2d08-4015-90f8-3d621922c71f 2d08-4015-90f8-3d621922c71f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City Utilities of Springfield Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: 2013/10/01 Rate name: General Lighting Sector: Lighting Description: Service under this rate shall be available within the corporate limits of the City of Springfield, Missouri, and the adjacent territory served by City Utilities for commercial and industrial single-phase power requirements. Availability is subject to the General Terms and Conditions Governing Electric Service and the Utility Service Rules and Regulations.

443

Data:A47b4b43-2d26-4146-9f47-d8f406576e5c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b43-2d26-4146-9f47-d8f406576e5c b43-2d26-4146-9f47-d8f406576e5c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lea County Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/08/30 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service - 1000 Mh Lamp Sector: Lighting Description: Available system wide to all security, street, and signal lighting. Additional charge if transformer is required - $3.23 monthly. Additional charge if service and pole are required - $1.08. Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

444

Data:067e43a4-6b2d-4da3-8035-846b89f300b6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e43a4-6b2d-4da3-8035-846b89f300b6 e43a4-6b2d-4da3-8035-846b89f300b6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Sylvania, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Electric -Multi Unit Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: Rate Binder# 2 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

445

Data:27bf793f-2cf9-4912-8449-c7c2d538c552 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bf793f-2cf9-4912-8449-c7c2d538c552 bf793f-2cf9-4912-8449-c7c2d538c552 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service--Schedule L-1 HP Sodium Vapor Lamp-Area Lighting Luminaire (250w) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to Members, governments, agencies, public and private organizations desiring Electric Delivery or Electric Supply and Delivery Services through unmetered services for roadway and area lighting. Source or reference: http://www.delaware.coop/my-services/residential/billing/rates

446

Data:E79ed68e-2d7e-4de6-8429-df334d5c5e12 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed68e-2d7e-4de6-8429-df334d5c5e12 ed68e-2d7e-4de6-8429-df334d5c5e12 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lake Country Power Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cycled/Interruptible Air Conditioning Cycled Air (metered) Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.lakecountrypower.coop/index.php Source Parent: Comments During control periods, unites are "cycled" in 15 minute intervals. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

447

Data:Cfee8abd-5bf9-4095-8d4d-cbaffdd3a2d0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cfee8abd-5bf9-4095-8d4d-cbaffdd3a2d0 Cfee8abd-5bf9-4095-8d4d-cbaffdd3a2d0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Wheatland, Wyoming (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power- Laramie River Sector: Industrial Description: Service to Basin Grayrocks Industrial Pumping Station, within the service territory of the Association, subject to the rules and regulations of the Association and of Regulatory Authorities. Source or reference: http://psc.state.wy.us/htdocs/tariffs/wy_whe1/0001a.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

448

Data:F0962e52-2d20-4de3-9d8f-19278ad138fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62e52-2d20-4de3-9d8f-19278ad138fb 62e52-2d20-4de3-9d8f-19278ad138fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Randolph Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL23 - 7000L - MV Fixture only Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available to municipalities in which the Cooperative serves or in which the Cooperative is permitted to serve under existing laws. RATE - MONTHLY Service under this schedule is for all night street lighting service using existing poles of the Cooperative's system, connected to the existing overhead lines, and using brackets not to exceed twelve feet.

449

Data:1b0b2ed1-9327-4e17-b9c2-d7ee48348473 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-9327-4e17-b9c2-d7ee48348473 -9327-4e17-b9c2-d7ee48348473 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delmarva Power Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OL "HPS" 100 Watt (Enclosed) (Customer W/o maintenance) 49 kW Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DEMasterTariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

450

Data:Ee3c3718-cd2d-4367-b0c5-d08f8e44218c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18-cd2d-4367-b0c5-d08f8e44218c 18-cd2d-4367-b0c5-d08f8e44218c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slinger Utilities Effective date: 2007/01/05 End date if known: Rate name: General Service- Single-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: This rate will be applied to single-phase customers. This includes commercial, institutional, government, farm, and other customers. The monthly Maximum Measured Demand of customers served on this rate shall not exceed 50 kilowatts for three or more months in a consecutive 12-month period. This rate is subject to the following Adjustments and Riders:

451

Data:88d6420e-52ba-41ca-9d2d-1557a86217f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d6420e-52ba-41ca-9d2d-1557a86217f4 d6420e-52ba-41ca-9d2d-1557a86217f4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Fairview, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Sector: Industrial Description: *This schedule is available to any general service customer whose load exceeds 7,500 KWh per month in the on-peak season or who has 50 KVA or more of transformation capacity allocated to meet his electric load with the exception of grain mills and elevators. Source or reference: http://www.fairviewok.org/id91.html Source Parent:

452

Data:0fb41aa7-2d7e-43c5-ba4a-269423148375 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1aa7-2d7e-43c5-ba4a-269423148375 1aa7-2d7e-43c5-ba4a-269423148375 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bangor Hydro-Electric Co Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: High-Pressure Sodium- 150 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Service under this rate is available for street and area lighting service installations, maintenance and use of energy, and traffic control lighting service provided the customer furnishes the equipment. Customers taking service under this rate schedule are responsible for paying both Distribution Service and Stranded Cost. Source or reference: http://www.bangorhydro.com/residential/rates/rates-schedules.aspx

453

Data:E296ebae-1f2d-404d-99b9-665022a86c3d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ebae-1f2d-404d-99b9-665022a86c3d ebae-1f2d-404d-99b9-665022a86c3d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cuming County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2011/12/14 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Residential Rate Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: Ilinois State University Rate binder # 10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

454

Data:8d98df9f-ba79-475e-9fa4-e36fdd2d08bf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df9f-ba79-475e-9fa4-e36fdd2d08bf df9f-ba79-475e-9fa4-e36fdd2d08bf No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nebraska Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 W High Pressure Sodium Wood Sector: Lighting Description: To all night street lighting service (dusk to daylight) from the overhead systems conforming to the District's standard specifications. Wood; Open Refractor Electricity is provided through the Village, which obtains electric power from Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) Source or reference: http://www.nppd.com/assets/municipalstreetlightingservice.pdf

455

Data:Eecb9a2d-0106-4e24-a644-73412f968a12 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eecb9a2d-0106-4e24-a644-73412f968a12 Eecb9a2d-0106-4e24-a644-73412f968a12 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Consumers Energy Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Nonmetered Memb Owns Coop Repairs HPS 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.consumersenergy.coop/programs.php?pn=Security%20Lights&pl=securitylights Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

456

Data:982a1454-aa93-4ab1-a5cd-76205b2d6aa6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa93-4ab1-a5cd-76205b2d6aa6 aa93-4ab1-a5cd-76205b2d6aa6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jefferson Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2010/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: STREET LIGHTING SERVICE ( 100W HPS - Traditional ) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either high pressure sodium (HPS) or metal halide (MH), and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications. Applicability Demand (kW)

457

Data:5c28eedb-ca45-443c-b1e7-fb2d74ba7908 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eedb-ca45-443c-b1e7-fb2d74ba7908 eedb-ca45-443c-b1e7-fb2d74ba7908 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of South Sioux City, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial and Industrial Non Demand- Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: To any commercial or industrial customer for all purposes. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

458

Data:1576d36b-80ed-416b-a7b4-a52fffeb7b2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80ed-416b-a7b4-a52fffeb7b2d 80ed-416b-a7b4-a52fffeb7b2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Loup River Public Power Dist Effective date: 2013/01/15 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.loup.com/customersvc/rates.asp Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

459

Data:E399b20c-1600-4059-ab26-da6d829a2d89 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-1600-4059-ab26-da6d829a2d89 c-1600-4059-ab26-da6d829a2d89 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: C & L Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2012/09/24 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service - 400 Watt HPS/MH Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

460

Data:973e22d1-2380-4a67-b2d0-5b7e51216472 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e22d1-2380-4a67-b2d0-5b7e51216472 e22d1-2380-4a67-b2d0-5b7e51216472 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Belmont, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2007/03/12 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street and Security Lighting Service: 175 W MV(ornamental) Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to municipal street light lighting. The Utility will furnish, install, and maintain street lighting units. Commitment to Community Program Rider: 2.0% of the total electric bill. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=440

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461

Data:2b653ddc-9b6d-41b8-9524-866c0e2d48ea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ddc-9b6d-41b8-9524-866c0e2d48ea ddc-9b6d-41b8-9524-866c0e2d48ea No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Danville, Virginia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/08/28 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Rental Lighting Service- Standard Security Lights- (100W HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Available for outdoor lighting of yards, walkways and other areas. Lights to be served hereunder shall be at locations that are easily and economically accessible to Utility equipment and personnel for construction and maintenance. Source or reference: http://www.danville-va.gov/DocumentCenter/View/8181