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1

Hypercube performance for 2-D seismic finite-difference modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave-equation seismic modeling in two space dimensions is computationally intensive, often requiring hours of supercomputer CPU time to run typical geological models with 500 500 grids and 100 sources. This paper analyzes the performance of ACOUS2D, ...

L. J. Baker

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

3

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

4

A Closer Look at Salt, Faults, and Gas in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico with 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sedimentary wedge of the northern Gulf of Mexico is extensively deformed and faulted by salt tectonics. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data covering a large area (33,800 km2) of the lower Texas continental slope [96 degrees 40'- 93 degrees 40'W; 27 degrees 10N - 26 degrees N] were examined to evaluate the interplay of salt, faults and gas. Seismic interpretation revealed the study area has two different styles of faulting and two different types of salt bodies that vary east to west. The eastern region of the study area has a thin sedimentary section and a massive, nearly continuous salt sheet characterized by minibasins and local salt highs. Faulting in this area appears to be the result of salt tectonism. The western region of the study area has a thick sedimentary wedge, and a few isolated salt diapirs. Long, linear faults are parallel to slope and imply some degree of gravitation sliding. The difference in faulting styles and salt bodies can be attributed to different depositional environments, different styles and amounts of sediment loading and different amounts of salt initially deposited. While there is a widespread occurrence of gas throughout the study area, little evidence of continuous bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), a widely accepted geophysical indicator of gas hydrate, has been found. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) was modeled to provide information on the thickness and variability of the stability zone, and provide a baseline in a search for BSRs. The dataset was analyzed for multiple seismic expressions of BSRs, however only a few small and isolated examples were found. Potential fluid escape structures were seen in the seismic data. Despite the great number of potential features found in the seismic data only seven active seeps were found in a seep study by I. R. MacDonald. Seeps were seen in far less abundance than the number of seeps found offshore Louisiana. This may imply a lack of source offshore Texas.

Nemazi, Leslie A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The Soda Lake geothermal field is an ideal setting to test the applicability of the 3D-3C reflection seismic method because: it is a producing field with a great deal of geologic and drilling data already available; it is in an alluvial valley where the subsurface structures that carry the geothermal fluids have no surface manifestations; and, there are downhole geophysical logs of fractures and permeable zones that can be used to ground-truth the new data.

6

Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Methodology to Derive Radar ReflectivityLiquid Equivalent Snow Rate Relations Using C-Band Radar and a 2D Video Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to derive equivalent radar reflectivity factorliquid equivalent snow rate (ZeSR) power-law relations for snowfall using the C-band King City operational weather radar and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD). The 2DVD ...

Gwo-Jong Huang; V. N. Bringi; Robert Cifelli; David Hudak; W. A. Petersen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

REPROCESSING OF SHALLOW SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA TO IMAGE FAULTS NEAR A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

Shallow seismic reflection data from Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstrates that spectral balancing and tomographic refraction statics can be important processing tools for shallow seismic data. At this site, reprocessing of data which had previously yielded no useable CMP stacked sections was successful after application of these processing techniques.

DOLL, W.E.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

LANDSTREAMER/GIMBALED GEOPHONE ACQUISITION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA NORTH OF THE 200 AREAS HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Landstreamer Seismic Reflection Vender Report by Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Montana Tech of the University of Montana, collected in FY2009 under CHPRC Contract 35789.

REPASKY TE; HYDE ER; LINK CA; SPEECE MA

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

Severson, L.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography  

SciTech Connect

In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Salt Tectonics and Its Effect on Sediment Structure and Gas Hydrate Occurrence in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to investigate mobile salt and its effect on fault structures and gas hydrate occurrence in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data were used to investigate the effects of the salt within an area of 7,577 mi^2 (19,825 km^2) on the Texas continental slope in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The western half of the study area is characterized by a thick sedimentary wedge and isolated salt diapirs whereas the eastern half is characterized by a massive and nearly continuous salt sheet topped by a thin sedimentary section. This difference in salt characteristics marks the edge of the continuous salt sheets of the central Gulf of Mexico and is likely a result of westward decline of original salt volume. Beneath the sedimentary wedge in the western part of the survey, an anomalous sedimentary package was found, that is described here as the diapiric, gassy sediment package (DGSP). The DGSP is highly folded at the top and is marked by tall, diapiric features. It may be either deformed shale or the toe of a complex thrust zone detaching the sedimentary wedge from deeper layers. The dataset was searched for the occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), as they are widely accepted as a geophysical indicator of gas trapped beneath gas hydrate deposits, which are known to occur farther east in the Gulf. Although, many seismic signatures were found that suggest widespread occurrence of gas within the upper sediment column, few BSRs were found. Even considering non-traditional definitions of BSRs, only a few occurrences of patchy and isolated BSRs features were identified. The lack of traditional BSRs is likely the result of geologic conditions that make it difficult to recognize gas hydrate deposits. These factors include: (1) unfavorable layer geometries, (2) flow of warm brines from depth, (3) elevated geotherms due to the thermogenic properties of salt and its varying thickness, and (4) widespread low porosity and permeability sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone.

Lewis, Dan'L 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

NONE

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Heigold, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in Mesozoic crystalline rocks that host a producing geothermal field. The reflection data were processed in two steps that incorporate new seismic imaging methods: (1) Pwave first arrivals in the seismic data were inverted for subsurface acoustic velocities using a non-linear simulated annealing approach; and (2) 2-D Velocity tomograms obtained from the inversions were

26

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2001 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Look for features that are characteristic of the geothermal producing region not originally seen by imaging the Coso Field using seismic Notes During December of 1999, approximately 32 miles of seismic data were acquired as part of a detailed seismic investigation undertaken by the US Navy Geothermal Program Office. Data acquisition was designed to make effective use of advanced data processing methods, which include Optim's proprietary nonlinear velocity optimization technique and pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The velocity models from the 2-D lines were combined

29

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

Toomey, Aoife

2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seismic CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMIC CD Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Background Resource Findings and Recovery Timeline Oil Program ADIS Overview Gas Program ADIS Overview SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

32

ARM - Datastreams - sonicwind2d  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamssonicwind2d Datastreamssonicwind2d Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SONICWIND2D Horizontal wind speed and direction from ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala WS425), 2m above ground on Barrow MET tower Active Dates 2003.10.31 - 2008.09.16 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument ultrasonic wind sensor (SONICWIND) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Horizontal wind Wind direction vector mean deg SonicWD_DU_WVT ( time ) Wind direction vector mean standard deviation deg SonicWD_SDU_WVT ( time ) Horizontal wind Wind speed arithmetic mean m/s SonicWS_S_WVT ( time )

33

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase I will consist of the acquisition, processing and interpretation of two 2-dimensional vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) at strategic positions crossing the range front fault system in the Humboldt House-Rye Patch (HH-RP) geothermal resource area. APEX-HiPoint Reservoir Imaging, Project team partner, will use its borehole seismic technology deploying up to 240 multicomponent phones on a fiber optic wireline system coupled to a high-volume data acquisition system. A vibroseis source will be recorded along the 2D profiles with offsets up to 10,000 feet on either side of the receiver wells, creating a wide horizontal aperture. Using dynamic borehole cooling, the APEX receivers will be deployed in an extended vertical array above and below the interface (and large velocity contrast) between Tertiary valley fill sediments and Triassic and older reservoir rocks, significantly increasing vertical aperture, multiplicity, frequency and signal quality. Optim, Project Team partner, will use its patented nonlinear optimization technique on both borehole and surface data to obtain high resolution velocity models down to target depths, also a "first". HiPoint's patented, time-domain processing techniques will be employed to provide accurate, high-resolution reflection images in a fraction of previous compute times.

34

CHEM2D. 2-D, 3-Phase Chemical Flood Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CHEM2D is a two-dimensional, three-phase, nine component, finite difference chemical flood simulator. It can model primary depletion, waterfloods, polymer floods, and micellar/polymer floods using heterogeneous one or two-dimensional (areal or cross-sectional) reservoir descriptions. This includes the ability to model primary depletion and waterflooding of an undersaturated oil reservoir and a polymer flood in which gels are injected with polymer or cross-linking chemicals are injected. One injection well and up to four production wells are available. The user may specify well performance as either rate or pressure constrained, and both a constant time-step size and a variable time-step size based on extrapolation of concentration changes are available as options. The major physical phenomena modeled in CHEM2D are: adsorption, capillary pressure, capillary trapping, cation exchange, dilution, dispersion, interfacial tension, binary and ternary phase behavior, relative permeability, specific densities, and polymer properties (inaccessible pore volume, non-Newtonian viscosity and shear thinning, and permeability reduction). Components include water, oil, surfactant, polymer, total nonsorbing anions, calcium, alcohol, calcium-surfactant complex, and sodium. Components may partition amongst the aqueous, oleic, and microemulsion phases. An auxiliary program, PHASE, is included to provide the CHEM2D user with a tool for looking directly at the phase behavior of a system. PHASE is the phase behavior calculation of CHEM2D coupled with a driving program for generating ternary phase behavior input data and for writing out tabular results. It can be used to compute phase concentrations and saturations as a function of effective salinity and total component concentrations and phase saturations (relative volumes) as a function of effective salinity for a fixed set of total component concentrations.

Burtch, F.W. [USDOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, OK (United States)

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

36

Knowledge Assisted Visualization: Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present novel techniques for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting information ... Keywords: 2D textures, 3D textures, Illustrative visualization, Knowledge-assisted visualization, Rapid interpretation, Seismic interpretation

Daniel Patel; yvind Sture; Helwig Hauser; Christopher Giertsen; M. Eduard Grller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

38

Towards a bayesian seismotectonic zoning for use in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA)  

SciTech Connect

The mathematical representation of seismic sources is an important part of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. It reflects the association of the seismicity with the tectonically-active geological structures evidenced by seismotectonic studies. Given that most active faults are not characterized well enough, seismic sources are generally defined as areal zones, delimited with finite boundary polygons, within which the geological features of active tectonics and the seismicity are deemed homogeneous (e.g., focal depth, seismicity rate, and maximum magnitude). Besides the lack of data (e.g., narrow range of recorded magnitudes), the application of this representation generates different problems: 1) a large sensitivity of resulting hazard maps on the location of zone boundaries, while these boundaries are set by expert decision; 2) the zoning can not represent any variation in faulting mechanism; 3) the seismicity rates are distributed throughout the zones and we lose the location of the determinant information used for their calculation. We propose an exploratory study for an alternative procedure in area source modeling. First, different data (e.g., geomorphology, geology, fault orientations) will be combined by using automated spatial partitioning (investigation of both supervised and unsupervised methods) in order to obtain several information classes, which may be defined as areal source zones. Then, a given hypocenter belonging to a given ''zone'', from now on called seismicity model, will be expressed by a probability computed from the 2D (spatial) probability density function (pdf) for the active tectonic model used as an a priori and updated with specific data from seismicity catalogs (e.g., focal mechanism) or other new data sources (e.g., geomorphology, subsurface exploration). This hypocenter will thus be allowed to contribute to several models, with weights given by the value of the pdf for each model. The annual rate of occurrence, for a given model, will be calculated by the weighted average of the different hypocenter contributions contained in this model. Future applications will couple the seismicity models to Ground Motion Prediction Equations. In consequence, the results will provide the full spectrum of variability in the hazard and will highlight zones badly constrained and deserving to be more studied.

Le Goff, Boris; Fitzenz, Delphine [CGE, University of Evora (Portugal); Beauval, Celine [LGIT-IRD (France)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Redshift Surveys with 2dF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the 2dF Galaxy and QSO Redshift Surveys now in progress with the Two Degree Field facility at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. We describe the 2dF instrumentation, outline the scientific aims of the surveys and their current status, and present some initial results.

Matthew Colless; Brian Boyle

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

AOCS Official Method Ca 2d-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and Volatile Matter Vacuum Oven Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2d-25 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the moisture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model.

Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

44

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "seismic analyses" - no indication of active/passive, reflection/refraction, etc. ---> "On the contrary, in areas with little or no volcanic activity, assumptions on the nature, size and characteristics of the source of the thermal anomaly are generally much more difficult and hypothetical. In these circumstances, some useful data can be obtained from accurate seismic analyses, together with a seismotectonic and geodynamic

46

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

47

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

AUTORES/AS: D. Mart, R. Carbonell, I. Flecha , I. Palomeras, J. Font-Cap, E. Vzquez-Su,, and A. Prez-Estan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an old abandoned uranium mine. 2D and 3D seismic experiments including VSP, surface seismic reflection

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

51

A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also ... Keywords: Diffusion coefficient (D), Fluid typing, Transverse relaxation time (T2), Two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) logging

Maojin Tan; Youlong Zou; Cancan Zhou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir, the current work was aimed at investigating

53

On Global Regularity of 2D Generalized Magnetohydrodynamic Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study the global regularity of 2D generalized magnetohydrodynamic equations (2D GMHD), in which the dissipation terms are $- \

Tran, Chuong V; Zhai, Zhichun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element  

SciTech Connect

Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah, Jl. Ir.H. Djuanda 95 Ciputat 15412 (Indonesia); MTs NW Nurul Iman Kembang Kerang, Jl. Raya Mataram - Lb.Lombok, NTB (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics,Universitas Negeri Padang, Jl. Prof. Hamka, Padang 25132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Definition: Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reflection Survey Seismic reflection surveys image the structure of the subsurface through the measurement of the two way travel time of reflected artificially-generated elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Seismic Reflection References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Geophysical-Prospecting-Milton-Dobrin/dp/0071004041 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reflection_Survey&oldid=598371" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

57

Electromagnetic wave interactions with 2D arrays of single-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report, for the first time, the scattering, absorption, and reflection characteristics of 2D arrays of finite-length, armchair, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the visible frequency regime. The analysis is based on the Finite-Element-Method ...

Taha A. Elwi; Hussain M. Al-Rizzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model. PACS numbers: 44.10. +I, 05.45.Jn, 05.60.-k, 05.70.Ln The study of heat conduction in models of insulating solids is a rather old and debated problem, and the more general problem is one of understanding the nonequilibrium energy current carrying state of a many body system. The most of the work on heat conduction investigated the process of heat transport in 1D lattices. The different models have been studied for obtaining Fouriers law, several kinds of factors have been taken into account in the models, such as the nonlinearity, on-site potentials, mass disorder and etc. Then the typical 1D lattices Hamiltonian is

Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

Yoshida, Nozomu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 1-13-1, Miyagi (Japan)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

64

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

65

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys Notes Different migration procedures were applied to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data. After carefully preprocessing seismic data, the 2-D and 2.5-D pre-stack depth migration of line 109 in the Coso Geothermal Field shows a well defined reflector at about 16,000 ft depth. Compared to the 2-D pre-stack migrated image, the 2.5-D pre-stack migrated image

66

Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF 2D/3D SEISMIC DATA OVER DHURNAL OIL FIELD, NORTHERN PAKISTAN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The study area, Dhurnal oil field, is located 74 km southwest of Islamabad in the Potwar basin of Pakistan. Discovered in March 1984, the (more)

Afsar, Fatima

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones. References E. L. Majer (2003) 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary

69

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate is a potential energy source that has recently been the subject of much academic and industrial research. The search for deep-water gas hydrate involves many challenges that are especially apparent in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, where the sub-seafloor is a complex structure of shallow salt diapirs and sheets underlying heavily deformed shallow sediments and surrounding diverse minibasins. Here, we consider the effect these structural factors have on gas hydrate occurrence in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon blocks of the Gulf of Mexico. This was accomplished by first mapping the salt and shallow deformation structures throughout the region using a 2D grid of seismic reflection data. In addition, major deep-rooted faults and shallow-rooted faults were mapped throughout the area. A shallow sediment deformation map was generated that defined areas of significant faulting. We then quantified the thermal impact of shallow salt to better estimate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thickness. The predicted base of the GHSZ was compared to the seismic data, which showed evidence for bottom simulating reflectors and gas chimneys. These BSRs and gas chimneys were used to ground-truth the calculated depth of the base of GHSZ. Finally, the calculated GHSZ thickness was used to estimate the volume of the gas hydrate reservoir in the area after determining the most reasonable gas hydrate concentrations in sediments within the GHSZ. An estimate of 5.5 trillion cubic meters of pure hydrate methane in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon was obtained.

Murad, Idris

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

71

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

72

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

IPEEE Seismic Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes results of the seismic portion of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) conducted for each U.S. nuclear plant. Utilities can use trends developed from these results -- together with their individual plant-specific results -- to address future seismic issues on a risk-informed basis.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Seismic Fragility Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Seismic Fragility Applications Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for performing fragility analysis as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA). These cost-effective and practical procedures and the resulting SPRA can support risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications. To download a pdf file of the product description for this report, click here.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

79

2D sigma model approach to 4D instantons  

SciTech Connect

4D self-dual theories are proposed to generalize 2D conformal field theory. The authors identify 4D self-dual gravity as well as self-dual Yang-Mills theory with 2D sigma models valued in infinite-dimensional gauge groups. It is shown that these models possess infinite-dimensional symmetries with associated algebras - CP{sup 1} extensions of respective gauge algebras of 2D sigma models - which generalize the Kac-Moody algebra as well as W{sub {infinity}}. This paper addresses various issues concerning 2D sigma models, twistors and sheaf cohomology. An attempt to connect 4D self-dual theories with 2D conformal field theory is made through sl({infinity}) Toda field theory.

Park, Q.H. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Maryland at College Park, College Park, MD (US))

1992-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

82

Methods for generating and shaping a seismic energy pulse. [Primacord explosive under water  

SciTech Connect

A straight piece of Primacord is suspended in water and detonated by a blasting cap. The primary and surface-reflected pulses are combined to shape the seismic signal by choosing the length and depth of the Primacord and the position of the blasting cap. The effects of the bubble or secondary seismic pulses are reduced because of the elongated bubbles generated.

Itria, O.A.

1975-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Characterization and origins of high-amplitude reflection packets, HARPs, along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) refer to sheet-like sand deposits, showing high-amplitude seismic-reflection character, which are thought to be associated with constructional channel systems. Based on observations of Quaternary deposits from the Amazon Fan, HARPs are interpreted to be related to channel avulsion events. The depositional model from the Amazon Fan suggests when levees fail, sediment gravity flows move through the break into interchannel lows, where lack of confinement results in sheet like sand deposits. Based on 2D and 3D seismic data, HARPs from the Gulf of Mexico not only form from updip channel avulsions, but from additional geological processes. In salt withdrawal minibasins, sediment gravity flows encounter an underfilled depocenter, where lack of confinement results in sheet like deposits. After initial spill into an outboard basin and the development of a graded slope equilibrium profile, slope channel complexes develop as conduits for sediment transport. These depositional processes characterize the "fill and spill" model and can result in the creation of HARP-like deposits. At the toe-of-the Sigsbee Escarpment, turbidity currents flow through nickpoints at the seaward edge of the escarpment and become unconfined, resulting in HARP-like deposition on the abyssal floor. Seismically, these deposits are laterally continuous, have low relief, pinchout downdip, and have internal channelization. Erosive, low-relief, discontinuous channels and a low-relief, flat-bottomed trough cut into the TS-HARP deposits. On the outer fan, at the seaward limit of submarine channels, sediment gravity flows will also become unconfined and deposit HARPs. These HARPs typically consist of shingled sheet-like deposits that may form larger scale mounded features. These observations indicate that HARP-like deposits can form from a variety of depositional processes and in variable depositional settings along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile.

Rains, David Brian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

1 Beyond Graphene - Novel Nanosheets of 2D Crystalline Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

that graphene, a 2D nanosheet form of carbon, can exist as a stable material and exceptional properties that are not observed in 3D or 1D form of carbon are...

85

Seismic Ruggedness of Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relay GERS (Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra) provide utilities with generic seismic capability for more than 100 electrical relays most commonly used in nuclear power plants. The data can be used directly for the assessment of relays in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, "Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Plants" and for the Individual Plant Evaluation for External Events (IPEEE) for resolution of USNRC severe accident policy issues.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Conformal equivalence of 2D dilaton gravity models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behavior of generic, matter-coupled, 2D dilaton gravity theories under dilaton-dependent Weyl rescalings of the metric. We show that physical observables associated with 2D black holes, such as the mass, the temperature and the flux of Hawking radiation are invariant under the action of both Weyl transformations and dilaton reparametrizations. The field theoretical and geometrical meaning of these invariances is discussed.

Mariano Cadoni

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

Entropy of 2D black holes from counting microstates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a microscopical derivation of the entropy of the black hole solutions of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We show that the asymptotic symmetry of two-dimensional (2D) Anti-de Sitter space is generated by a central extension of the Virasoro algebra. Using a canonical realization of this symmetry and Cardy's formula we calculate the statistical entropy of 2D black holes, which turns out to agree, up to a factor $\\sqrt 2$, with the thermodynamical result.

Mariano Cadoni; Salvatore Mignemi

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Spatial Orientation And Distribution Of Reservoir Fractures From Scattered Seismic Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expanded details and additional results are presented using a new method (Willis et al, 2003) for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method ...

Vetri, Laura

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

90

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

91

Validation for 2D/3D registration I: A new gold standard data set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In this article, the authors propose a new gold standard data set for the validation of two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) and 3D/3D image registration algorithms. Methods: A gold standard data set was produced using a fresh cadaver pig head with attached fiducial markers. The authors used several imaging modalities common in diagnostic imaging or radiotherapy, which include 64-slice computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging using Tl, T2, and proton density sequences, and cone beam CT imaging data. Radiographic data were acquired using kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging techniques. The image information reflects both anatomy and reliable fiducial marker information and improves over existing data sets by the level of anatomical detail, image data quality, and soft-tissue content. The markers on the 3D and 2D image data were segmented using ANALYZE 10.0 (AnalyzeDirect, Inc., Kansas City, KN) and an in-house software. Results: The projection distance errors and the expected target registration errors over all the image data sets were found to be less than 2.71 and 1.88 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The gold standard data set, obtained with state-of-the-art imaging technology, has the potential to improve the validation of 2D/3D and 3D/3D registration algorithms for image guided therapy.

Pawiro, S. A.; Markelj, P.; Pernus, F.; Gendrin, C.; Figl, M.; Weber, C.; Kainberger, F.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.; Bergmeister, H.; Stock, M.; Georg, D.; Bergmann, H.; Birkfellner, W. [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, AKH-4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Laboratory of Imaging Technologies, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska Cesta 25, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, AKH-4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); University Clinic of Radiology, Division of Osteoradiology, Medical University of Vienna, AKH-4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Department of Biomedical Research, Medical University Vienna, AKH-4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); University Clinic of Radiotherapy, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, AKH, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, AKH-4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna A-1090 (Austria)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

94

Induced seismicity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

Segall, P.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Develop Seismic Equipment List (SEL) * Perform seismic screening - Perform DOEEH-0545 seismic walkdowns - Perform structural and anchorage seismic analysis to DOEEH-...

96

Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals  

SciTech Connect

Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

K.R. Maskaly

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reservoir imaging using low frequencies of seismic reflections  

GENNADYGOLOSHUBINand CONNIEVANSCHUYVER, University of Houston, Texas, USA VALERIKORNEEV, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, USA

98

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A reflection survey was done to analyze the brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Notes The relationships between upper crustal faults, the brittle-ductile transition zone, and underlying magmatic features imaged by multifold seismic reflection data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Coso geothermal field, which lies within an extensional step-over between dextral faults, is a young, actively developing metamorphic core complex.

99

Drop Axis Ratios from a 2D Video Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from an experiment to measure the drop shapes using a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) are reported. Under calm conditions, drops were generated from a hose located on a bridge 80 m above ground, this height being sufficient to allow drop ...

Merhala Thurai; V. N. Bringi

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

2D Markovian modeling for character recognition and segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processing text components in multimedia contents remains a challenging issue for document indexing and retrieval. More specifically, handwritten characters processing is a very active field of pattern recognition. This paper describes an innovative ... Keywords: 2D dynamic programming, Markov random fields, handwriting recognition

Sylvain Chevalier; Edouard Geoffrois; Franoise Prteux

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Real-time SPECT and 2D ultrasound image registration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a technique for fully automatic, real-time 3D SPECT (Single Photon Emitting Computed Tomography) and 2D ultrasound image registration. We use this technique in the context of kidney lesion diagnosis. Our registration algorithm ...

Marek Bucki; Fabrice Chassat; Francisco Galdames; Takeshi Asahi; Daniel Pizarro; Gabriel Lobo

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Comparative Visual Analysis of 2D Function Ensembles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the development process of powertrain systems, 2D function ensembles frequently occur in the context of multi-run simulations. An analysis has many facets, including distributions of extracted features, comparisons between ensemble members and target ... Keywords: I.3.3 [Computer Graphics]: Picture/Image GenerationLine and curve generation

H. Piringer; S. Pajer; W. Berger; H. Teichmann

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of a 2-D 2-group neutron noise simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a 2-D 2-group neutron noise simulator C. Demazie` re* Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Reactor Physics, SE-412 96 Go¨teborg, Sweden Received 10 May 2003; accepted 27 August 2003 Abstract In this paper, the development of a so-called neutron noise simulator is reported

Demazière, Christophe

104

Interactive image search by 2D semantic map  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this demo, we present a novel interactive image search system, image search by 2D semantic map. This system enables users to indicate what semantic concepts are expected to appear and even how these concepts are spatially distributed in the ... Keywords: color map, concept map, interactive image search

Hao Xu; Jingdong Wang; Xian-Sheng Hua; Shipeng Li

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2D LIDAR Aided INS for Vehicle Positioning in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residual formation and EKF LIDAR aiding methods. Section VIintensity. Utilization of 2D LIDAR in localization has a2D LIDAR Aided INS for Vehicle Positioning in Urban

Zhao, Sheng; Farrell, Jay A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Instantons in the Quantum Framework of 2D Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the non--perturbative features of 2D quantum gravity defined by stochastic regularization of the unstable matrix model showing, first, that the WKB approximation of the well-defined quantum Fokker-Planck hamiltonian corresponds to the semiclassical eigenvalue density of the former. The double scaled potential exhibits an instanton--like behaviour, which is universal and scales, but whose interpretation in terms of pure gravity is still open.

J. Luis Miramontes; Joaquin Sanchez Guillen

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

On the effective shear speed in 2D phononic crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quasistatic limit of the antiplane shear-wave speed ('effective speed') $c$ in 2D periodic lattices is studied. Two new closed-form estimates of $c$ are derived by employing two different analytical approaches. The first proceeds from a standard background of the plane wave expansion (PWE). The second is a new approach, which resides in $\\mathbf{x}$-space and centers on the monodromy matrix (MM) introduced in the 2D case as the multiplicative integral, taken in one coordinate, of a matrix with components being the operators with respect to the other coordinate. On the numerical side, an efficient PWE-based scheme for computing $c$ is proposed and implemented. The analytical and numerical findings are applied to several examples of 2D square lattices with two and three high-contrast components, for which the new PWE and MM estimates are compared with the numerical data and with some known approximations. It is demonstrated that the PWE estimate is most efficient in the case of densely packed stiff inclusions, especially when they form a symmetric lattice, while in general it is the MM estimate that provides the best overall fitting accuracy.

A. A. Kutsenko; A. L. Shuvalov; A. N. Norris; O. Poncelet

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

113

Seismic scaling laws revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at fast speed Local energy balance Gc U Dc slip friction i n i Es = U Gc #12; Main result: Energy Mo= DSL3 D S L Moment Seismic energy ES=¿ D S L3 Es Mo Energy moment ratio #12; Thus Es ~ 105 Mo ~ U Summary of Observed Radiated Energy vs Moment log Mo=1.5 Mw9.6 Beroza et al, 2001 #12

Madariaga, Raúl

114

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

115

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

117

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Mat Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building types including high-rise residential towers, healthcare, and ... bearing pressure for transient loads (wind or seismic ... Tower Seismic Force ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources What links...

119

Induced gravity and entanglement entropy of 2D black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the fact that 2D Newton constant is wholly induced by a conformal field theory, we derive a formula for the entanglement entropy of the anti-de Sitter black hole in two spacetime dimensions. The leading term in the large black hole mass expansion of our formula reproduces exactly the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S_{BH}, whereas the subleading term behaves as ln S_{BH}. This subleading term has the universal form typical for the entanglement entropy of physical systems described by effective conformal fields theories (e.g. one-dimensional statistical models at the critical point).

Mariano Cadoni

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Exact solutions for the 2d one component plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2d one component gas of pointlike charges in a uniform neutralizing background interacting with a logarithmic potential is a common model for plasmas. In its classical equilibrium statistics at fixed temperature (canonical ensemble) it is formally related to certain types of random matrices with Gaussian distribution and complex eigenvalues. In this paper, I present an exact integration of this ensemble for $N$ such particles (or alternatively $N\\times N$ matrices) for all even non-negative temperatures, a significant open problem in statistical physics for several decades. I achieve this exact integration via an exact integration of a related ensemble, the two-dimensional Selberg integral.

Timothy D. Andersen

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seismic reconnaissance of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active seismic methods using high-explosive sources and nondestructive energy sources were used to determine seismic velocities, signal detectability, and subsurface geologic structure in the vicinity of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area. Positions of several faults have been determined. A synthetic seismogram has been created that shows good agreement with recorded reflection records taken near exploratory borehole GT-2.

Kintzinger, P.R.; West, F.G.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

124

Micromachined silicon seismic transducers  

SciTech Connect

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

2D hyperbolic groups induce three-periodic euclidean reticulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stephen Hyde Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences, The Australian]. The *246 hyperbolic group is generated by three reflections, R1, R2, and R3 whose mirror lines bound {R1, R2, R3} gives a unique image, there is a set of relations for the group generated

Hyde, Stephen

127

Reflection Survey (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We believe we have demonstrated two sources that can generate S-waves that are appropriate for evaluating geothermal prospects. The first, a vector-explosive package, has never been available to the seismic industry, and the demonstration of its source pe References M. DeAngelo, B.A. Hardage, J. L. Simmons Jr. (1999) Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Reflection_Survey_(Deangelo,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=388218

128

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "The seismic reflection profiles of the range front structures are difficult to interpret because of he steep dips and 3-d fault zone geometry, in the-classical paper by Okaya and Thompson (1985) the range-bounding fault is not imaged as they proposed. The reflection seismic studies are the most useful of the geophysical techniques also the most expensive. The reflection data are two-dimensional making structural interpretation complicated for the three-dimensional geometry of the basin so that the other structural studied have been critical in correctly interpreting the seismic profiles. There are many

129

Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the

130

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

135

Self-trapping dynamics in a 2D optical lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe theoretical models for the recent experimental observation of Macroscopic Quantum Self-Trapping (MQST) in the transverse dynamics of an ultracold bosonic gas in a 2D lattice. The pure mean-field model based on the solution of coupled nonlinear equations fails to reproduce the experimental observations. It greatly overestimates the initial expansion rates at short times and predicts a slower expansion rate of the cloud at longer times. It also predicts the formation of a hole surrounded by a steep square fort-like barrier which was not observed in the experiment. An improved theoretical description based on a simplified Truncated Wigner Approximation (TWA), which adds phase and number fluctuations in the initial conditions, pushes the theoretical results closer to the experimental observations but fails to quantitatively reproduce them. An explanation of the delayed expansion as a consequence of a new type of self-trapping mechanism, where quantum correlations suppress tunneling even when there are no density gradients, is discussed and supported by numerical time-dependent Density Matrix Renormalization Group (t-DMRG) calculations performed in a simplified two coupled tubes set-up.

Shuming Li; Salvatore R. Manmana; Ana Maria Rey; Rafael Hipolito; Aaron Reinhard; Jean-Flix Riou; Laura A. Zundel; David S. Weiss

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

Zvonarev, P. S. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada); Sur, R. K. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Simulating geomagnetic reversals through 2D Ising systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work 2D Ising systems were used to simulate the reversals of the Earth's magnetic field. Each spin was supposed to be a ring current in the Earth dynamo and the magnetization to be proportional to the field intensity. Given the relative success of some physical few-discs modeling of this system all the simulations were implemented in small systems. The temperature T was used as a tunning parameter. It plays the role of external perturbations. Power laws were obtained for the distribution of times between reversals. When the system size was increased the exponent of the power law asymptotically tended towards values very near -1.5, generally accepted as the right value for this phenomenon. Depending on the proximity of T and Tc the average duration of reversal period changes. In this way it is possible to establish a parallel between the model and more or less well defined periods of the reversal record. Some possible trends for future works are advanced.

Jorge O. O. Franco; Vitor H. A. Dias; Andres R. R. Papa

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

142

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 1989 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the crustul structure of the Coso geothermal system Notes In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeastern most base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these

143

Seismic low-frequency effects from oil-saturated reservoir zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the frequency dependence of seismic reflections from a thin (compared to the dominant wavelength), fluid saturated reservoir for the cases of oil and water saturation. Reflections from a thin, water or oil-saturated layer have increased amplitude and delayed travel time at low frequencies if compared with reflections from a gas-saturated layer. This effect was observed for both ultrasonic lab data and seismic field data. One set of field data revealed high correlation of low frequency processed image for two different production horizons represented by fractured shale and sandstone. Another set was processed for the purpose of contouring of oil/water contact, and reveal very good correlation with available well data. The frequency dependent amplitude and phase reflection properties can be used for detecting and monitoring thin liquid saturated layers.

Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.; Vingalov, Vjacheslav M.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

Wood, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Deangelo, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A 3-D seismic survey was recorded over Rye Patch geothermal field in northwest Nevada by Subsurface Exploration Company (SECO) of Pasadena, California, in 1998 (Fig. 27). This 3-D seismic data acquisition was done under the auspices of a research effort d References M. DeAngelo, B.A. Hardage, J. L. Simmons Jr. (1999) Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Reflection_Survey_At_Rye_Patch_Area_(Deangelo,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=388047"

147

Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Laney, 2005) Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir, the current work was aimed at investigating how the presence of discrete models of fault and fracture zones can be

148

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

149

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation Small Modular Reactors SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Data:Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 Bef2d82a-31eb-4fde-8533-2d38bc6f7da3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Crisp County Power Comm Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Fuel Cost Recovery Schedule- Secondary Distribution Sector: Commercial Description: This schedule is applicable to and becomes a part of each retail rate schedule in which reference is mad to the Fuel Cost Recovery Schedule. This provision applies to both regular and minimum bills. Secondary Distribution Customers= Any customer not defined as a transmission or primary distribution customer.

153

Data:436bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 bd023-2d2d-4202-b859-0b278bb80ef2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Perry, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Residential- All-Electric Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofperryok.com/Files/Codes/City_Code_101211.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

154

Seismic Regionalization In Northeast Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize seismicity in support of nuclear explosion monitoring for the continental regions of northeast Russia, we have been analyzing information obtained from regional seismic network operators. Our goal is to merge catalog, bulletin, waveform, and other ground truth data from several regional networks into a comprehensive data set that we will use for various seismic research projects. To date we have compiled a bulletin from published and unpublished event data of about 200,000 events and over 150,000 arrival times. We have also determined that the Russian regional network catalogs are contaminated with mining-explosion events. Hence, one of our primary efforts is to identify mining events when possible and move them into a separate bulletin from the natural earthquakes. We have extended our preliminary analysis of explosion contamination of Russian seismicity catalogs using temporal analysis into the Irkutsk and Chita districts and the Buryat Republic. Based on analysis of epicenters and origin times reported in Material po Seismichnost' Sibiri for 1970 -- 1993, it is likely that considerable explosion contamination occurs in the gold (Bodaibo, northern Irkutsk Region, and in the Chita region), mica (Vitim, northern Irkutsk Region), and other mining areas (Bushulei, Nerchinsk, and Petrovsk in the Buryat and Chita areas). Explosion contamination is also observed in northernmost Mongolia in the mining and industrial district near Darkhan. Explosions associated with the construction of the Baikal-Amur Mainline Railroad are likely, as was observed in the Amur district; however, the amount of natural seismicity dominates the activity and makes it impossible to resolve the railroad separately. In conjunction with the Magadan Seismic Network operators,...

Kevin Mackey Kazuya; Kazuya Fujita; Lee K. Steck; Hans E. Hartse

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

2D/3D Data Registration and Fusion - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk will introduce the concepts behind data fusion and current algorithms to register 2D/3D data sets obtained using various experimental imaging...

157

Mesh Requirement Investigation for 2D and 3D Aerodynamic Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The accuracy of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to capture the complex flow around a small vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) on 2D and (more)

Naghib Zadeh, Saman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Graphene-like 2D-layered Materials for Nanoelectronics & Sensing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Recently, layered 2D crystals similar to graphene have been ... the best graphene transistors at room temperature, with comparable mobilities.

159

NCNR Quantum Impurities in the 2 D Spin One-Half ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The hope for insight into the physics of high temperature superconductors has generated enormous interest in the case of the two-dimensional (2 D ...

160

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

162

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

163

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

164

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reflective diffraction grating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

NIST Terahertz Reflection Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... b) Superimposed Fourier Transform amplitude and power reflection map ... laser for broadband (0.2-2.5) THz GaAs antenna generation and detection ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

171

Frequency-dependent processing and interpretation (FDPI) of seismic data for identifying, imaging and monitoring fluid-saturated underground reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for identifying, imaging and monitoring dry or fluid-saturated underground reservoirs using seismic waves reflected from target porous or fractured layers is set forth. Seismic imaging the porous or fractured layer occurs by low pass filtering of the windowed reflections from the target porous or fractured layers leaving frequencies below low-most corner (or full width at half maximum) of a recorded frequency spectra. Additionally, the ratio of image amplitudes is shown to be approximately proportional to reservoir permeability, viscosity of fluid, and the fluid saturation of the porous or fractured layers.

Goloshubin, Gennady M. (Sugar Land, TX); Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA)

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reflective Insulation Handbook.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When reflective-foil insulation manufacturers wanted the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to include their products in the Residential Weatherization Program, they lacked conclusive test data to prove that their products met program specifications. Reflective foils lacked widespread acceptance because of uncertainty about their insulation values. BPA discovered that the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was preparing a study to test how well reflective foils reduced horizontal heat flow. Because the insulation value of reflective foils depends upon the direction of heat flow, BPA provided additional funding to test their effectiveness in reducing upward and downward heat flow and to produce this Handbook. The objectives of this study were to develop acceptable test and evaluation methods, produce an initial data base of idealized reflective-foil insulation systems, extend this data base to a limited number of commercially available products to develop and test analytical models to predict thermal performance and develop a Reflective Insulation Handbook for homeowners and insulation contractors. This handbook describes how heat is transferred; the function of an insulation; what reflective insulation is; types of reflective insulation; where it can be used; installation procedures; thermal performance; and useful sources of information. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Desjarlais, Andre O.; Tye, Ronald P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A comparison of line extraction algorithms using 2D range data for indoor mobile robotics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental evaluation of different line extraction algorithms applied to 2D laser scans for indoor environments. Six popular algorithms in mobile robotics and computer vision are selected and tested. Real scan data collected ... Keywords: 2D range data, Line extraction algorithm, Mobile robotics

Viet Nguyen; Stefan Gchter; Agostino Martinelli; Nicola Tomatis; Roland Siegwart

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

Stoffelen, Ad

175

Trace anomaly and Hawking effect in 2D dilaton gravity theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the classical and semiclassical features of generic 2D, matter-coupled, dilaton gravity theories. In particular, we show that the mass, the temperature and the flux of Hawking radiation associated with 2D black holes are invariant under dilaton-dependent Weyl rescalings of the metric. The relationship between quantum anomalies and Hawking radiation is discussed.

Mariano Cadoni

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

2D meets 3D: a human-centered interface for visual data exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is still a controversial debate on the usefulness of 3D user interfaces. Most of the time, 2D metaphors are force-fitted to establish a rich set of functionality. With the aim of shifting the 20-year-old 2D WIMP (windows, icons, menus, and pointing ... Keywords: human-computer interaction, virtual environments, visual data exploration

Sebastian Baumgrtner; Achim Ebert; Matthias Deller; Stefan Agne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Assessment of GPU computational enhancement to a 2D flood model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the computational enhancement of a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) enabled 2D flood model. The objectives are to demonstrate the significant speedup of a new GPU-enabled full dynamic wave flood model and to present the effect ... Keywords: 2D flood model, CUDA, Flood simulation, GPU programming

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; Siddharth Shankar; Eric R. Pardyjak; David R. Judi; Steven J. Burian

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

STUDY OF THE MTC ESTIMATION BY NOISE ANALYSIS IN 2-D HETEROGENEOUS SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and realistic data corresponding to a commercial reactor were axially condensed in 2-D. It was found is investigated. This investigation relies on 2-group diffusion theory, and all the calculations are performed propose here to perform a substantially more advanced study of the same problem in 2-D two-group diffusion

Demazière, Christophe

179

A visibility algorithm for converting 3D meshes into editable 2D vector graphics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artists often need to import and embellish 3D models coming from CAD-CAM into 2D vector graphics software to produce, e.g., brochures or manuals. Current automatic solutions tend to result, at best, in a 2D triangle soup and artists often have to trace ... Keywords: NPR, geometry processing, vector graphics, visibility

Elmar Eisemann; Sylvain Paris; Frdo Durand

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Real-Time 2D NMR Identification of Analytes Undergoing Continuous Chromatographic Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-Time 2D NMR Identification of Analytes Undergoing Continuous Chromatographic Separation Boaz of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra within a single scan. A promising application opened up, with the real-time acquisition of a series of 2D 1 H NMR spectra arising from a mixture of compounds subject

Frydman, Lucio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion provides a detailed model of the Cove Fort geothermal region.

184

Reflection Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Under Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This project consisted of (1) a 3-D surface seismic survey conducted in the fall of 2000, (2) a micro-seismic survey run from November 2000 to April 200 1, and (3) a gravity survey conducted in April and May 2001. The 3-D surface seismic data are still being processed at this time, but initial results indicate that there are two major lineations of high velocity running orthogonal to each other which are presumably related to the fault

185

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

186

GAUSSIAN BEAM IMAGING FOR CONVERTED AND SURFACE REFLECTED ROBERT L. NOWACK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The earthquake seismology community now regularly uses seismic waves from distant sources to illuminate). For exploration geometries in reservoir structures, ghost reflections from the free surface can be used and Claerbout, 1999) For the imaging of receiver function data from distant sources, basic stacking techniques

Nowack, Robert L.

187

Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

Sornette, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service 6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability August 24, 2013 - 3:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). PLATFORM: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 1.x, HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 2.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is reported in versions 2.2.18 and prior and 1.2.18 and prior. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54598 CVE-2013-2353 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate DISCUSSION: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). The vulnerability is caused due to an unspecified error. No further

192

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

194

Data:130918b6-4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 4287-43f2-b2d5-6b848b57a2d9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pontotoc Electric Power Assn Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Service GSA (51 kW -1000 kW) Multi-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.sitemason.com/files/fjDo1q/May%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

195

Data:81a39522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 9522-c0da-49ee-8539-2d51e2d0df10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northcentral Mississippi E P A Effective date: 2011/10/11 End date if known: Rate name: General Service GSA (50 kW - 1000 kW) Sector: Commercial Description: *This rate shall apply to the firm power requirements (where a customer's contract demand is 5,000 kW or less) for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers, and to institutional customers including, without limitation, churches, clubs, fraternities, orphanages, nursing homes, rooming or boarding houses, and like customers. This rate shall also apply to customers to whom service is not available under any other resale rate schedule.

196

Data:86080fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d 0fd2-d7f0-470b-8485-ac01338b1d2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Piedmont Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Lamp Sector: Lighting Description: 1. The Cooperative shall furnish and install a wooden pole if required for the outdoor light, within 150 feet of existing secondary circuits. If an additional wood pole is required, other than for mounting the lighting fixture, there will be a contribution-in-aid of construction of $125.00 per pole. The contribution-in-aid of construction for the decorative post top fixture on the decorative fluted fiberglass pole with a twelve (12) foot mounting height will be $1,125.00. 2.The charge for the purchased power related costs shall be 3.904¢ times the estimated average monthly kWh usage. 3. Consumer requested conversion of an existing, properly operating Security light fixture will require the following one time service charge(s): Conversion of fixture on same pole, same location: $ 36.00 Conversion of fixture requiring removal of a pole: $36.00

197

Data:693e6aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 aec-7e2d-4a28-8b2d-8657bd6c2317 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Long Island Power Authority Effective date: 2012/03/05 End date if known: Rate name: 281 (Large General Service Secondary) Sector: Commercial Description: For monthly-billed Customers, electric use during the last twelve (12) months has equaled or been greater than 2,000 KWH in each of two (2) consecutive monthly billing periods, or b) For bimonthly-billed Customers, electric use during the last twelve (12) months has equaled or been greater than 4,000 KWH in one (1) bimonthly billing period, or c) For Applicants, the Authority estimates their demands at 7 KW or more.

198

Data:E6c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c c26b6e-354f-4fde-9d2d-aeab2d913c5c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2010/03/03 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service Sector: Lighting Description: Availability: Available for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting service to all members where the Cooperative's distribution facilities are located. Not available for part-time or seasonal operation of luminaires. Membership: Each consumer receiving service under this schedule shall be a member of the Cooperative and agrees to comply with the bylaws and abide by all service rules and regulations as adopted by the Cooperative's Board of Directors.

199

Data:909cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e cb0ad-9159-40ad-a117-2d7740c2d61e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nodak Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/05/20 End date if known: Rate name: GS High Density-Single Phase Sector: Industrial Description: Additional Meters (Off-Peak Included) $ 3.60/Meter/Month Available for service to locations in a High Density area. A High Density area is defined as:  An enlargement (generally 160 acres) with 20 or more active locations, or  A cluster of 20 or more active locations, or  A cluster with 10 or more active locations that adjoins an enlargement with 20 or more active locations, or  An area adjacent to an incorporated town with 20 or more active locations. Renewable Energy Market Adjustment $0.003/KWH (Added to All Above Energy Rates) Controlled Water Heater Credit $.00736/KWH Applies to the first 1,000 KWHs each month (October-March)

200

KIVA: a comprehensive model for 2D and 3D engine simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a comprehensive numerical model that represents the spray dynamics, fluid flow, species transport, mixing, chemical reactions, and accompanying heat release that occur inside the cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The model is embodied in the KIVA computer code. The code calculates both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) situations. It is an outgrowth of the earlier 2D CONCHAS-SPRAY computer program. Sample numerical calculations are presented to indicate the level of detail that is available from these simulations. These calculations are for a direct injection stratified charge engine with swirl. Both a 2D and a 3D example are shown.

Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ramshaw, J.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Probabilistic economic evaluation of substation seismic upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology for deciding whether or not to implement seismic design modifications at Southern California Edison's (SCE) Substation facilities. The method considers the potential for substation capability loss resulting from earthquake damage, cost of seismic modification made today, the cost of damage restoration after that modification is made, the cost of doing nothing now, and the site specific earthquake probability. Based on these findings, recommendations for seismic modifications of substation facilities could be made.

Ong, T.L.; Ensign, R.L.; Martin, D.F.; Richter, H.L. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND INDUCED SEISMICITY IN KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For some time the public has asked questions about seismic activity related to hydraulic fracturing and other oil-field related activities. In particular, there is concern that the energy that goes into the subsurface during hydraulic fracturing is sufficient to cause felt earthquakes. The following is a response to those questions. 1) Seismic activity that is related to human activities is generally referred to as induced seismicity or triggered seismicity. Induced seismicity is defined as seismic events attributable to human activities (National Research Council, 2012). The term triggered seismicity is also used to describe situations in which human activities could potentially trigger large and potentially damaging earthquakes (Shemeta et al., 2012). The following discussion uses only the term induced seismicity to refer to seismic activity in which human activity plays a role. 2) Because it uses energy to fracture rocks to release oil or natural gas, hydraulic fracturing does create microseismic events (of a magnitude less than 2.0). Felt earthquake activity (generally greater than a magnitude 3.0) resulting from hydraulic fracturing has been confirmed from only one location in the world (National Research Council, 2012). In the

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

204

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

205

Tentative Framework for Development of Advanced Seismic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3-30 4. Conceptual Reformulation of Seismic Design Parameters ..... ... 4-5 4.4.1 Maximum Considered Earthquake Basis for the RM Factor ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A high-resolution seismic reflection survey was conducted by Utah Geophysical, Inc. (1990) along four widely spaced survey lines normal to range front fault sets. The survey was designed primarily to detect silicified zones or zones of argillic alteration, and faulting, to depths of about 300 meters (1000 feet), as part of the precious metals exploration program. One interpretation of the data showed discrete, high-angle faults

207

Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Simultan eously, we surveyed over 2500 linear km with high-resolution seismic reflection profling that penetrated the upper ~25 m of the lake bottom. References L. A. Morgan, W. C. Shanks, D. A. Lovalvo, S. Y. Johnson, W. J. Stephenson, K. L. Pierce, S. S. Harlan, C. A. Finn, G. Lee, M. Webring, B. Schulze, J. Duhn, R. Sweeney, L. Balistrieri (2003) Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging,

208

Fast 2D non-LTE radiative modelling of prominences I. Numerical methods and benchmark results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of solar prominences require improved radiative modelling capabilities in order to take into account both multi-dimensional - at least 2D - geometry and complex atomic models. This makes necessary the use of very fast numerical schemes for the resolution of 2D non-LTE radiative transfer problems considering freestanding and illuminated slabs. The implementation of Gauss-Seidel and successive over-relaxation iterative schemes in 2D, together with a multi-grid algorithm, is thoroughly described in the frame of the short characteristics method for the computation of the formal solution of the radiative transfer equation in cartesian geometry. We propose a new test for multidimensional radiative transfer codes and we also provide original benchmark results for simple 2D multilevel atom cases which should be helpful for the further development of such radiative transfer codes, in general.

L. Leger; L. Chevallier; F. Paletou

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

210

On O-X mode conversion in 2D inhomogeneous plasma with a sheared magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of an ordinary wave to an extraordinary wave in a 2D inhomogeneous slab model of the plasma confined by a sheared magnetic field is studied analytically.

A Yu Popov

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Geothermal Project...

212

Simulations of a Boreal Grassland Hydrology at Valdai, Russia: PILPS Phase 2(d)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project for the Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) aims to improve understanding and modeling of land surface processes. PILPS phase 2(d) uses a set of meteorological and hydrological data spanning 18 yr (196683)...

C. Adam Schlosser; Andrew G. Slater; Alan Robock; Andrew J. Pitman; Konstantin Ya. Vinnikov; Ann Henderson-Sellers; Nina A. Speranskaya; Ken Mitchell; The PILPS 2(D) Contributors

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the...

214

Some Techniques and Uses of 2D-C Habit Classification Software for Snow Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique has been designed that uses observable properties of images from a 2D-C optical array probe (size, linearity, area, perimeter, and image density) to classify unsymmetrical ice particles into nine habit classes. Concentrations are ...

Edmond W. Holroyd III

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ellipse-Fitting Techniques Applied to 2D-PMS Raindrop Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ellipse-fitting technique is introduced in this paper to process the images of raindrops sampled by a 2D-PMS (Particle Measuring Systems, Inc.) probe. Algorithms to estimate size, shape, and orientation parameters of partial raindrop images ...

Rongrui Xiao; V. Chandrasekar; David Garbrick

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A novel 2-D model approach for the prediction of hourly solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a two-dimensional (2-D) representation of the hourly solar radiation data is proposed. The model enables accurate forecasting using image prediction methods. One year solar radiation data that is acquired and collected between August 1, ...

F. Onur Hocaoglu; Nezih Gerek; Mehmet Kurban

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Computational study and analysis of structural imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic ...

Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Black Holes, q-Deformed 2d Yang-Mills, and Non-perturbative Topological Strings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional Yang-Mills, black holes and topologicalfor the two- dimensional black hole, Nucl. Phys. B 622 (LBNL- 56688 Black Holes, q-Deformed 2d Yang-Mills, and Non-

Aganagic, Mina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Self-assembled Semiconductor 0D, 1D and 2D Quantum Structures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we present how bandgap modulation can be achieved by the introduction of self-assembled 0D, 1D and 2D quantum structures, quantum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

222

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Passive Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Passive Seismic Techniques,...

223

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and...

224

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

225

Shape optimization using reflection lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many common objects have highly reflective metallic or painted finishes. Their appearance is primarily defined by the distortion the curved shape of the surface introduces in the reflections of surrounding objects. Reflection lines are commonly used ...

E. Tosun; Y. I. Gingold; J. Reisman; D. Zorin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

229

Apparatus and method for detecting seismic waves  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an apparatus for transducing seismic signals and a method for placing said apparatus for detecting seismic signals. The apparatus comprises at least one geophone preferably embedded in a polymeric material contained in a tubular member. A lower portion of the tubular member preferably contains ballast. The tubular member is preferably cemented into a borehole.

O' Brien, T.T.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions An investigation of precision and scaling issues in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions An investigation of precision Department of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology 11 March 2009 (1/50) #12;Introduction NMR 2-D Ion precision (2/50) #12;Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions Digital simulation

Raizen, Mark G.

233

Parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data was presented. Classical approach to travel time tomography assumes straight line of seismic rays between sources and receives points and isotropy of geological ... Keywords: inverse problem, master-slave paradigm, seismic anisotropy, seismic tomography

Maciej Dwornik; Anna Pi?ta

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

235

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

236

Integrating 3D and 2D computer generated imagery for the comics medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in 3D computer technology have led to aesthetic experimentation within the comics medium. Comic creators have produced comic books done entirely with 3D models that are then assembled digitally for the printed page. However, in using these 3D objects in a comic format, the creators have developed art styles that do not adhere to the paradigms established by this traditionally 2D medium. More successful results can be achieved by integrating 3D computer generated imagery with traditional 2D imagery, rather than replacing it. This thesis develops a method of combining rendered 3D models with 2D vector graphics to create a comic book art style that is consistent with the traditional medium, while still taking advantage of the new technology.

DeLuna, Ruben

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Polarizer reflectivity variations  

SciTech Connect

On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism.

Ozarski, R.G.; Prior, J.

1980-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological drilling hazards are a major concern in the ics. drilling and development of offshore reservoirs. Some of these hazards may display high amplitudes on seismic profiles and some may be associated with stratigraphic features. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with channel sand deposits may indicate potential accumulations of hydrocarbons in reservoirs. However, shallow hydrocarbon accumulations are rarely of production size. More often, they are potential geological drilling hazards that could inhibit the development of petroleum resources from deeper hydrocarbon-bearing layers. Traditionally, existing and potential geologic hazards are identified by interpretation of high-resolution site survey data, acquired specifically for drilling hazard delineation. This paper describes a new technique for drilling hazard identification using a conventional 3D seismic amplitude dataset. An event coherence calculation program is applied to a 3D seismic dataset to derive seismic attributes sufficient to highlight structural and stratigraphic discontinuities in the area. A resultant 3D difference cube is used to establish fault framework and to detect spatial distribution of channel deposits in the area and their geometries. Superposition of the difference cube on seismic amplitude data allows simultaneous display of structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and reflectivity information. Therefore, it is used for the delineation of channels, which show anomalous amplitudes, identification of their dimensions and spatial locations, and implication of gas-charged sand distribution within the detected channel. The paper gives a detailed description of a workflow, which was found sufficient for delineation of likely gas-charged sand channels, and discusses the ways to adjust the proposed workbox to specific objectives.

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Advanced Methods for Determination of Seismic Fragilities: Seismic Fragilities Using Scenario Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) is an increasingly important means of assessing the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The standard approach for incorporating the seismic hazard into an SPRA is to use the uniform hazard spectra (UHS), which is computed independently at each spectral frequency, resulting in an equal probability of exceeding the ground motion at any frequency. As a result, the UHS may not be representative of an actual earthquake spectrum, and is a potential source of con...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR; VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The main news this reporting period is the confirmed discovery of producing hydrocarbons at the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 demonstration well in Manistee County. This well was spudded in late November, tested and put on production in December 2003. To date it is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. The surface geochemistry sampling at the Springdale demonstration site will be repeated this spring after the well has been on production for several months to see if the anomaly pattern changes. We expect that the anomaly will diminish as the original positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. This is the behavior that we observed at the Bear lake demonstration well reported last quarter.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period two main accomplishments stand out. The Springdale task is in play in the northern Michigan Basin and the geochemical survey work over the Springdale prospect continued to progress. We still need to characterize the play in terms of the type of trap (basal reef diagenetic (?)) and its relation to the well documented pinnacle reef play. Also, we have become aware that Capac Field in the southern reef trend (Figure 1) is a possible analog to Springdale and so will be looking more closely at the literature on that field, particularly the work by Bowers (1987). Future work is directed toward further defining the Springdale project via more wells and examination and characterization of well cuttings. One to two more geochemical surveys are planned, one this spring and a final one in early fall. Based on current oil prices and Springdale production as of January 2005, an ROI, (defined as Total liquids revenue, $5.45m/DOE support, $1.45m) better than 3.75. This does not include gas revenues, which have not yet been calculated.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, plans were finalized for additional surface geochemical sampling in the new Springdale Prospect field demonstration in Manistee County, Michigan. Plans were also developed to acquire additional surface geochemical data in the vicinity of the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan. The main news this reporting period is the continued success in the Springdale demonstration area. The State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 and the State Springdale & Herban 12-16 horizontal demonstration wells in Manistee County, Michigan are both flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which are good wells in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. A third horizontal well, the State Springdale & Wilburn 1-21 HD has been drilled and is waiting on completion. Two more horizontal wells have been permitted in the Springdale area by our industry partner.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Springdale prospect area in Manistee County, Michigan. The samples were taken along the trace of the proposed horizontal wells. The samples are presently being analyzed and the results will be reported in the next quarterly report. The main news this reporting period is that the Springdale prospect area in Manistee County, Michigan, continues to see drilling activity. Our industry partner, Jordan Development Company, LLC, is permitting additional horizontal wells following their success in the prospect area.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III  

SciTech Connect

In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

A principal goal of the Budget Period I was to demonstrate that surface geochemistry could be used to locate bypassed hydrocarbons in old fields. This part of the program was successful. A surface geochemical survey, employing 5 different techniques, was carried out in the Spring and Summer of 2000 and a demonstration well, the State Vernon & Smock 13-23 HD1 (permit number: PN 53945) was drilled in Vernon Township, Isabella County, Michigan in the late fall of 2000. A demonstration well was selected and drilled based on geologic considerations and surface geochemistry. Over 460 soil samples were collected and analyzed over the drill site. A good anomaly was detected near the proposed well site and the demonstration well, the Smock 13-23, was drilled to a depth of 3157 feet by November 17, 2000. Two laterals were drilled, and hydrocarbons were located in a zone approximately 175 feet in length. However, it was determined that the pay zone was too small and difficult reservoir conditions (water production) prevented putting the well in production. The Smock 13-23 was shut in and abandoned January 15, 2001. A post-mortem determined that the main reason the well was not economic was because the zone was nearly completely flushed by earlier recovery operations. The post mortem also revealed the presence of an unmapped shale plug crossing the first lateral. It appears that this shale was detected by the geochemical survey, but its significance was not appreciated at the time. It is possible that sections of the well were faulty, ''porposing'' up and down so as to create water blockages. We are continuing to use the Vernon Field and the demonstration well to calibrate the geochemical data. Eventually, this study may provide a standard site that can be used to test and calibrate geochemical anomalies, something that does not presently exist. A postmortem report on the well, including the geology and geochemistry used to site the well, is presented in Appendix I. Five geochemical techniques have been tested in Phase I. These include surface iodine, microbial, enzyme leaching, soil gas and subsurface iodine. We are most comfortable with the results of the microbial surveys but feel that direct measurement of soil gas is the best method if analytical difficulties can be overcome. The reason the microbial surveys are presently favored is because they provide a logical, consistent picture that is easy to interpret and easy to explain. This in turn is because the microbial anomaly is manifested as an ''apical'' as opposed to an ''edge'' or ''halo'' anomaly. Several lessons were learned during Phase I activities. The main one was that surface geochemistry could locate anomalies over old fields such as Vernon. We also learned that horizontal drilling has advantages and disadvantages in situations such as this. On the plus side, it does provide a means to probe for pockets of bypassed oil, but it is expensive relative to vertical (or slant wells?) and is difficult to control in a narrow pay zone. We tentatively conclude that horizontal wells do not provide a cost-effective solution in this setting and suggest that geochemical anomalies be investigated via a single vertical well or multiple vertical wells.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan; E. Taylor

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, Class Revisit  

SciTech Connect

Continued the fault study to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation was used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well.

Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Harrison, William B.; Quinlan, W.

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

Two major accomplishments resulted from Phase I. One is the success of the surface geochemistry program, which collected over 800 samples from the site of the 1st demonstration well in Vernon Field and has pretty well provided us with the tools to delineate favorable ground from unfavorable. The second is the recent detailed mapping of the Central Michigan Basin that for the first time revealed the presence of at least two major faults that control the location of many of the reservoirs in the Michigan Basin. These faults were located from structure maps obtained by contouring the surface of the Dundee Formation using top picks from 9861 wells in 14 counties. Faults were inferred where the contour lines were most dense (''stacked'').

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, we extended the fault study to include more faults and developed new techniques to visualize the faults. We now have used data from the Dundee Formation to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin and are in the process of reviewing data from other horizons. These faults appear to control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review has been set for March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Smart detection of leaf wilting by 3D image processing and 2D Fourier transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wilting is a common symptom in plants responding to drought stress. Early wilting detection is of high importance for crop precision management. However, it is challenging to develop a reliable measurement technology. This study presents a sensing method ... Keywords: 2D Fourier transform (2DFT), 3D image processing, Laser scanner, Wilting identification, Zucchini

X. Cai; Y. Sun; Y. Zhao; L. Damerow; P. Schulze Lammers; W. Sun; J. Lin; L. Zheng; Y. Tang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Numerical study of 2D heat transfer in a scraped surface heat exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical study of 2D heat transfer in a scraped surface heat exchanger K.-H. Sun a,*, D.L. Pyle heat exchanger with non- Newtonian power law fluids is undertaken. Numerical results are generated of scraped surface heat exchanger design are assessed in the light of the results. ? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All

256

A traceability system incorporating 2D barcode and RFID technology for wheat flour mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wheat flour undergoes several processing steps in its transformation from raw wheat in the mill, which differentiates wheat flour from other farm products. At each step, various wheat sources are combined into one batch of wheat flour. This study primarily ... Keywords: 2D barcode, RFID, Supply chain, Traceability, Wheat flour

Jian-Ping Qian; Xin-Ting Yang; Xiao-Ming Wu; Li Zhao; Bei-Lei Fan; Bin Xing

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gravity modeling of 21/2-D sedimentary basins - a case of variable density contrast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm and associated codes are developed to determine the depths to bottom of a 2^1^/^2-D sedimentary basin in which the density contrast varies parabolically with depth. This algorithm estimates initial depths of a sedimentary basin automatically ... Keywords: Basement, Gravity anomaly, Modeling, Parabolic density profile, Sedimentary basin

V. Chakravarthi; N. Sundararajan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Universality and nonperturbative definitions of 2D quantum gravity from matrix models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The universality of the nonperturbative definition of Hermitian one-matrix models following the quantum stochastic, or d = 1-like stabilization is discussed in comparison with other procedures. The authors also present another alternative definition, which illustrates the need of new physical input for d = 0 matrix models to make contact with 2D quantum gravity at the nonperturbative level.

Miramontes, J.L. (Theory Div., CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)); Guillen, J.S. (Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics)

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Universality and Non-Perturbative Definitions of 2D Quantum Gravity from Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The universality of the non-perturbative definition of Hermitian one-matrix models following the quantum, stochastic, or $d=1$-like stabilization is discussed in comparison with other procedures. We also present another alternative definition, which illustrates the need of new physical input for $d=0$ matrix models to make contact with 2D quantum gravity at the non-perturbative level.

J. Luis Miramontes; Joaquin Sanchez Guillen

1991-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Surface Sampling of a Snowstorm by a 2D-C Probe with and without Aspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2D-C probe was mounted on the front of a truck for operation in a horizontal orientation, as on an aircraft, and also in a vertical orientation using an aspirator. A snowstorm with calm conditions was sampled by alternatively driving the truck ...

Edmond W. Holroyd III

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Orientation Angle Distributions of Drops after an 80-m Fall Using a 2D Video Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note reports on the use of a 2D video disdrometer to estimate the orientation of drops (>2 mm) that were generated artificially and allowed to fall 80 m from a bridge with no obstruction and under calm conditions. This experimental setup ...

Gwo-Jong Huang; V. N. Bringi; M. Thurai

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

2D Gravity with Torsion, Oriented Matroids and 2+2 Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a link between oriented matroid theory and 2d gravity with torsion. Our considerations may be useful in the context of noncommutative phase space in a target spacetime of signature (2+2) and in a possible theory of gravity ramification.

J. A. Nieto; E. A. Leon

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

A 2D nanosphere array for atomic spectroscopy M. Romanelli(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 2D nanosphere array for atomic spectroscopy M. Romanelli(1) , I. Maurin, P. Todorov(2) , Chia boulevard, 1784 Sofia, Bulgaria (3) permanent address: National Central University, Jung-Li City, Taoyuan medium, such as a photonic crystal, with an atomic gas. Here, we discuss the first step of this program

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

CSY3019 -Graphics Programming Assignment 2: Development of 3D graphics software: Java 2D (50%)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSY3019 - Graphics Programming Assignment 2: Development of 3D graphics software: Java 2D (50 and/or strip lights). · User defined or loaded geometry (i.e. not primitive shapes). · The room & Title Page · Table of contents · Introduction · Analysis · Design · Implementation · Testing

Hill, Gary

265

A 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for factoring in polylogarithmic depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We contribute a 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for Shor's algorithm to factor an n-bit number in O(log3 n) depth. Our implementation uses parallel phase estimation, constant-depth fanout and teleportation, and constant-depth ... Keywords: Shor's algorithm, carry-save addition, nearest-neighbor, prime factorization, quantum architecture

Paul Pham, Krysta M. Svore

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Pipelined Fast 2D-DCT Accelerator for FPGA-based SoCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia applications, and in particular the encoding and decoding of standard image and video formats, are usually a typical target for Systemson- Chip (SoC). The bi-dimensional Discrete Cosine Transformation (2D-DCT) is a commonly used frequency ...

Antonino Tumeo; Matteo Monchiero; Gianluca Palermo; Fabrizio Ferrandi; Donatella Sciuto

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Speckle suppression in SAR images using the 2-D GARCH model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel Bayesian-based speckle suppression method for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is presented that preserves the structural features and textural information of the scene. First, the logarithmic transform of the original image is analyzed ... Keywords: 2-D GARCH model, MAP estimation, speckle, statistical modeling, synthetic aperture radar

Maryam Amirmazlaghani; Hamidreza Amindavar; Alireza Moghaddamjoo

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Connected Components for a Fast and Robust 2D Lidar Data Segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a novel segmentation approach applied to a two-dimensional point-cloud extracted by a LIDAR device. The most common approaches perform well in outdoor environments where usually furniture and other objects are rather big and are composed ... Keywords: 2D Lidar Segmentation, Connected Component, Intelligent Vehicles, Point-cloud analysis, Unmanned Ground Vehicle

Daniel Ooro Rubio, Artem Lenskiy, Jee-Hwan Ryu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell ...  

Tom Daley and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have invented a seismic source that can be operated while fluid is being injected or withdrawn from an aquifer or oil well.

270

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provides. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder of an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping. 4 figs.

Hardee, H.C.

1990-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

277

Documentation : a reflective practice approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Center for Reflective Community Practice in MIT's Department of Urban studies is involved in projects helping community organizers working on social change. In order to foster reflection, they are currently utilizing ...

Ouko, Luke Odhiambo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors. The focus of this study is two-fold: (1) the geophone array that was focused over the SPE shot and (2) a high-resolution seismic profile that was recently acquired at the field site. The geophone array was placed radially around the SPE shot in five directions with 100m spacing and out to a distance of 2 km. The high-resolution profile was about 475m in length with station and shot spacing of 5m using a 7000lb mini-vibe as a source. In both data sets, the first arrivals will be used to develop velocity models. For the geophone array, 1-D P-wave velocity models will be developed to determine an average apparent velocity of the Climax Stock. The high-resolution data will be used to develop a 2-D P-wave velocity model along the seismic profile. This is in an effort to elucidate the water table in more detail and provide additional information on the near-surface structure. These results will be used in the overall modeling effort to fully characterize the test bed and develop a physics-based model to simulate seismic energy from the SPE events.

Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Generalization of Lambert's reflectance model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lambert's model for body reflection is widely used in computer graphics. It is used extensively by rendering techniques such as radiosity and ray tracing. For several real-world objects, however, Lambert's model can prove to be a very inaccurate approximation ... Keywords: BRDF, Lambert's model, moon reflectance, reflection models, rough surfaces

Michael Oren; Shree K. Nayar

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

MISMATCHES CREATE REFLECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike low-power, metal-gate CMOS, high-speed 54HC/74HC devices readily drive long cable runs and backplanes. While the family maintains CMOSs traditional noise immunity, you must watch transmission-line effects in such applications. Because of 54HC/74HC high-speed CMOSs short propagation delays and fast rise and fall times, you must understand its transmission-line behavior when driving lines as short as even a foot or two, whether those lines are coaxial cables, twisted pairs or backplanes. Moreover, the devices fast edge rates increase the likelihood of crosstalk among interconnecting cables. Despite the need, however, to take design precautions that minimize adverse effects related to high-speed operation, 54HC/74HC logicunlike slower metal-gate CMOSincludes many features that suit it to driving transmission lines. For example, its symmetrical push-pull outputs result in stiff logic levels, and its high output drive allows fast bit rates. Another advantage of high-speed-CMOS designs is that they dont prove to be as difficult as those based on other high-speed logic families. In general, high-speed CMOS doesnt require the detailed attention to pc-board layout and transmission-line characteristics that Schottky TTL or ECL designs do. Furthermore, controlling unwanted reflections is easier in the CMOS designs, because 54HC/74HC devices electrostatic-protection diodes tend to clamp the reflected voltages to the power-supply levels.

unknown authors

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 ina brine aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Seismic surveys successfully imaged a small scale C02injection (1,600 tons) conducted in a brine aquifer of the Frio Formationnear Houston, Texas. These time-lapse bore-hole seismic surveys,crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquired to monitorthe C02 distribution using two boreholes (the new injection well and apre-existing well used for monitoring) which are 30 m apart at a depth of1500 m. The crosswell survey provided a high-resolution image of the C02distribution between the wells via tomographic imaging of the P-wavevelocity decrease (up to 500 mls). The simultaneously acquired S-wavetomography showed little change in S-wave velocity, as expected for fluidsubstitution. A rock physics model was used to estimate C02 saturationsof 10-20 percent from the P-wave velocity change. The VSP survey resolveda large (-70 percent) change in reflection amplitude for the Friohorizon. This C02 induced reflection amplitude change allowed estimationof the C02 extent beyond the monitor well and on 3 azimuths. The VSPresult is compared with numerical modeling of C02 saturations and isseismically modeled using the velocity change estimated in the crosswellsurvey.

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten,G.M.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The seismic reflection data are very useful and can be site specific when a profile is in the right place, but are sparse, very difficult to interpret correctly, and expensive to collect. The velocity values used are uncertain even though there are several sonic logs for the wells. A VSP, Vertical Seismic Profile, survey would significantly improve the precision of the interpretation References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

283

2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: With the aim of investigating the possibilities of magnetotelluric methods for the exploration of potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) sites in the Upper Rhine valley, a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the winter 2007/08. Despite strong artificial noise, processing using remote referencing and Sutarno phase consistent smoothing

284

Universal 2D Soft Nano-Scale Mosaic Structure Theory for Polymers and Colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A basic concept in chain-particle cluster-motion, from frozen glassy state to melt state, is the 2D soft nano-scale mosaic structure formed by 8 orders of 2D interface excitation (IE) loop-flows, from small to large in inverse cascade and re-arrangement structure in cascade along local one direction. IE has additional repulsive energy and extra vacancy volume. IE results from that the instantaneous synchronal polarized electron charge coupling pair is able to parallel transport on the interface between two neighboring chain-particles with antiparallel delocalization. This structure accords with de Gennes' mosaic structure picture, from which we can directly deduce glass transition temperature, melt temperature, free volume fraction, critical entangled chain length, and activation energy to break solid lattice. This is also the in-herency maximum order-potential structure in random systems.

Jia-lin Wu

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Graphical algorithms and threshold error rates for the 2d colour code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent work on fault-tolerant quantum computation making use of topological error correction shows great potential, with the 2d surface code possessing a threshold error rate approaching 1% (NJoP 9:199, 2007), (arXiv:0905.0531). However, the 2d surface code requires the use of a complex state distillation procedure to achieve universal quantum computation. The colour code of (PRL 97:180501, 2006) is a related scheme partially solving the problem, providing a means to perform all Clifford group gates transversally. We review the colour code and its error correcting methodology, discussing one approximate technique based on graph matching. We derive an analytic lower bound to the threshold error rate of 6.25% under error-free syndrome extraction, while numerical simulations indicate it may be as high as 13.3%. Inclusion of faulty syndrome extraction circuits drops the threshold to approximately 0.1%.

Wang, D S; Hill, C D; Hollenberg, L C L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Graphical algorithms and threshold error rates for the 2d colour code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent work on fault-tolerant quantum computation making use of topological error correction shows great potential, with the 2d surface code possessing a threshold error rate approaching 1% (NJoP 9:199, 2007), (arXiv:0905.0531). However, the 2d surface code requires the use of a complex state distillation procedure to achieve universal quantum computation. The colour code of (PRL 97:180501, 2006) is a related scheme partially solving the problem, providing a means to perform all Clifford group gates transversally. We review the colour code and its error correcting methodology, discussing one approximate technique based on graph matching. We derive an analytic lower bound to the threshold error rate of 6.25% under error-free syndrome extraction, while numerical simulations indicate it may be as high as 13.3%. Inclusion of faulty syndrome extraction circuits drops the threshold to approximately 0.1%.

D. S. Wang; A. G. Fowler; C. D. Hill; L. C. L. Hollenberg

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison of 1D and 2D CSR Models with Application to the FERMI@ELETTRA Bunch Compressors  

SciTech Connect

We compare our 2D mean field (Vlasov-Maxwell) treatment of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects with 1D approximations of the CSR force which are commonly implemented in CSR codes. In our model we track particles in 4D phase space and calculate 2D forces [1]. The major cost in our calculation is the computation of the 2D force. To speed up the computation and improve 1D models we also investigate approximations to our exact 2D force. As an application, we present numerical results for the Fermi{at}Elettra first bunch compressor with the configuration described in [1].

Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Optimization of 2D image reconstruction for positron emission mammography using IDL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clear-PEM system is a prototype machine for Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) under development within the Portuguese PET-Mammography consortium. We have embedded 2D image reconstruction algorithms implemented in IDL within the prototype's image ... Keywords: ART, Computer implementation, Emission tomography, FDG, FOM, FOV, FWHM, GEANT, IDL, Image reconstruction, Iterative algorithms, LOR, MLEM, NCAT, NME, OSEM, PEM, PET, PSF, Positron emission mammography, ROI

N. Oliveira; N. Matela; R. Bugalho; N. Ferreira; P. Almeida

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Symmetries and Conservation Laws for the 2D Ricci Flow Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper aims to study the connection between symmetries and conservation laws for the 2D Ricci flow model. The procedure starts by obtaining a set of multipliers which generates conservation laws. Then, using a general relation which connects symmetries and conservation laws for whatever dynamical system, one determines symmetries related to a chosen multiplier. On this basis, new similarity solutions of the model, not yet discussed in literature, are highlighted.

Rodica Cimpoiasu

2011-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Symmetries and Conservation Laws for the 2D Ricci Flow Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper aims to study the connection between symmetries and conservation laws for the 2D Ricci flow model. The procedure starts by obtaining a set of multipliers which generates conservation laws. Then, using a general relation which connects symmetries and conservation laws for whatever dynamical system, one determines symmetries related to a chosen multiplier. On this basis, new similarity solutions of the model, not yet discussed in literature, are highlighted.

Cimpoiasu, Rodica

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Title Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2010 Authors Victor, Norrefeldt, Thierry Stephane Nouidui, and Gunnar Gruen Conference Name Clima 2010, 10th Rehva World Congress "Sustainable Energy Use in Buildings" Conference Location Antalya, Turkey Abstract This paper presents a new approach to model air flows with a zonal model. The aim of zonal models is to perform quick simulations of the air distribution in rooms. Therefore an air volume is subdivided into several discrete zones, typically 10 to 100. The zones are connected with flow elements computing the amount of air exchanged between them. In terms of complexity and needed computational time zonal models are a compromise between CFDcalculations and the approximation of perfect mixing. In our approach the air flow velocity is used as property of the zones. Thus the distinction between normal zones and jet or plume influenced zones becomes obsolete. The model is implemented in the object oriented and equation based language Modelica. A drawback of the new formulation is that the calculated flow pattern depends on the discretization. Nevertheless, the results show that the new zonal model performs well and is a useful extension to existing models.

292

An improved perturbation approach to the 2D Edwards polymer - corrections to scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a new perturbation calculation in polymer statistics which starts from a ground state that already correctly predicts the long chain length behaviour of the mean square end--to--end distance hR 2 N i , namely the solution to the two dimensional (2D) Edwards model. The hR 2 N i thus calculated is shown to be convergent in N , the number of steps in the chain, in contrast to previous methods which start from the free random walk solution. This allows us to calculate a new value for the leading correction--to--scaling exponent \\Delta. Writing hR 2 N i = AN 2 (1 +BN \\Gamma\\Delta +CN \\Gamma1 + :::), where = 3=4 in 2D, our result shows that \\Delta = 1=2. This value is also supported by an analysis of 2D self--avoiding walks on the continuum. 36.20.Ey, 64.60.Fr Typeset using REVT E X I. INTRODUCTION The central quantity of interest in polymer statistics is the mean square end--to--end distance hR 2 N i for a chain of N links. The excluded volume ef...

S. R. Shannon; T. C. Choy; R. J. Fleming; I An

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fluid effects on seismic waves in hard rocks with fractures and in soft granular media  

SciTech Connect

When fractures in otherwise hard rocks are filled with fluids (oil, gas, water, CO{sub 2}), the type and physical state of the fluid (liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the wave speeds and attenuation properties of seismic waves. The present work summarizes methods of deconstructing theses effects of fractures, together with any fluids contained within them, on wave propagation as observed in reflection seismic data. Additional studies of waves in fluid-saturated granular media show that the behavior can be quite different from that for fractured media, since these materials are typically much softer mechanically than are the fractured rocks (i.e., having a very small drained moduli). Important fluid effects in such media are often governed as much by fluid viscosity as by fluid bulk modulus.

Berryman, James G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

298

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR5741 Proceedings, Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Frames Gaithersburg, MD ...

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Seismic Qualification Case Study for a New Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and compares methods used for the seismic qualification of safety related equipment at nuclear power plants and examines an alternative, hybrid approach. The report investigates the costs and lead times for each seismic qualification approach and also discusses the seismic capacity definitions that result from the application of each qualification approach. The report includes a case study that applies the new approach to the seismic qualification of an inverter.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

302

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geophys. J. Int. (2000) 142, 000000 Nonlinear Bayesian joint inversion of seismic reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Measurements in coaxial transmission lines, Water Resour. Res., 16, 574­582, 1980. van Genuchten, M. T conductivity was reported for the site (a standard deviation of 647 cm/d around a mean of 533 cm of clear acrylic plastic and sealed with rubber o-rings and lining. Prior to use, one side of the tank

Ursin, Bjørn

305

Seismic hazard analysis overview and executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Specific Spectra Project (SSSP) described in this report was a multi-year study funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The main objective of this project was to provide assistance to the NRC by developing estimates of the seismic hazard at the nine oldest nuclear power plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains which were included in the SEP. This volume gives brief overview of the SEP and the SSSP including a discussion of the formal elicitation of expert opinion used to obtain a subjective representation of parameters that affect seismic hazard and the development of the seismic hazard at the nine SEP facilities.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Minichino, C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Southern California Coastal Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this study was to develop probabilistic seismic hazard estimates for the coastal and offshore area of Ventura, Los Angeles and Orange counties for use as a basis for the University of Southern California (USC) to develop physical models of tsunami for the coastal regions and by the California State Lands Commission (SLC) to develop regulatory standards for seismic loading and liquefaction evaluation of marine oil terminals. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) was carried out by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in several phases over a time period of two years, following the method developed by LLNL for the estimation of seismic hazards at Department Of Energy (DOE) facilities, and for 69 locations of nuclear plants in the Eastern United States, for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This method consists in making maximum use of all physical data (qualitative, and quantitative) and to characterize the uncertainties by using a set of alternate spatiotemporal models of occurrence of future earthquakes, as described in the SSHAC, PSHA Guidance Document (Budnitz et al., 1997), and implemented for the NRC (Savy et al., 2002). In general, estimation of seismic hazard is based not only on our understanding of the regional tectonics and detailed characterization of the faults in the area but also on the analysis methods employed and the types of physical and empirical models that are deemed appropriate for the analysis. To develop this understanding, the body of knowledge in the scientific community is sampled in a series of workshops with a group of experts representative of the entire scientific community, including geologists and seismologists from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), members of the South California Earthquake Center (SCEC), and members of academic institutions (University of California Santa-Cruz, Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, and University of Southern California), and members of consulting firms. The purpose of the workshops was to analyze and evaluate existing data and formulate tectonic models that represent all the possible and physically valid models envisioned by the group. The basic input for the PSHA was a set of alternate earthquake source characterizations and a multi-model representation of ground motion attenuation, for adequate representation of the uncertainties. In the first phase, the physical modeling enabled rigorous analysis of uncertainty that arises from a lack of full knowledge in the characterization of both earthquake sources and ground motion. The set of ground motion prediction models included models that were updated to benefit from near field data from the most recent earthquakes (Taiwan and Turkey). The calculation were performed with LLNL computer software that is based on the Cornell, 1968 analytical model, and that propagates the knowledge uncertainties using a Monte-Carlo simulation approach (see, Bernreuter et al., 1989). Although the calculation were performed for rock-site conditions and generic soil sites, only the results for rock are given here. It is assumed that development of design parameters will include a correction of the spectral shape to reflect the site specificity. The results are for the average of the two horizontal components of the ground motion. The PSHA was calculated for thirteen sites, including two sites offshore. These sites are: Catalina Island site 1, Catalina Island site 2, Goleta, Offshore Santa-Monica, Offshore San-Clemente, Port Dume, Palos Verde site 1, Palos Verde site 2, Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles, Port Hueneme, San Pedro Escarpment, and Redondo Canyon. For these thirteen sites, the hazard curves in terms of probability of exceedence of the peak ground acceleration (PGA), was calculated. In addition for Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and a site Offshore, east of San Clemente the (5% damping) uniform hazard response spectra were calculated for five Return Periods (100, 500, 1000, 2000, 10,000 year Return Periods). The detailed results are

Savy, J; Foxall, B

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Southern California Coastal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to develop probabilistic seismic hazard estimates for the coastal and offshore area of Ventura, Los Angeles and Orange counties for use as a basis for the University of Southern California (USC) to develop physical models of tsunami for the coastal regions and by the California State Lands Commission (SLC) to develop regulatory standards for seismic loading and liquefaction evaluation of marine oil terminals. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) was carried out by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in several phases over a time period of two years, following the method developed by LLNL for the estimation of seismic hazards at Department Of Energy (DOE) facilities, and for 69 locations of nuclear plants in the Eastern United States, for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This method consists in making maximum use of all physical data (qualitative, and quantitative) and to characterize the uncertainties by using a set of alternate spatiotemporal models of occurrence of future earthquakes, as described in the SSHAC, PSHA Guidance Document (Budnitz et al., 1997), and implemented for the NRC (Savy et al., 2002). In general, estimation of seismic hazard is based not only on our understanding of the regional tectonics and detailed characterization of the faults in the area but also on the analysis methods employed and the types of physical and empirical models that are deemed appropriate for the analysis. To develop this understanding, the body of knowledge in the scientific community is sampled in a series of workshops with a group of experts representative of the entire scientific community, including geologists and seismologists from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), members of the South California Earthquake Center (SCEC), and members of academic institutions (University of California Santa-Cruz, Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, and University of Southern California), and members of consulting firms. The purpose of the workshops was to analyze and evaluate existing data and formulate tectonic models that represent all the possible and physically valid models envisioned by the group. The basic input for the PSHA was a set of alternate earthquake source characterizations and a multi-model representation of ground motion attenuation, for adequate representation of the uncertainties. In the first phase, the physical modeling enabled rigorous analysis of uncertainty that arises from a lack of full knowledge in the characterization of both earthquake sources and ground motion. The set of ground motion prediction models included models that were updated to benefit from near field data from the most recent earthquakes (Taiwan and Turkey). The calculation were performed with LLNL computer software that is based on the Cornell, 1968 analytical model, and that propagates the knowledge uncertainties using a Monte-Carlo simulation approach (see, Bernreuter et al., 1989). Although the calculation were performed for rock-site conditions and generic soil sites, only the results for rock are given here. It is assumed that development of design parameters will include a correction of the spectral shape to reflect the site specificity. The results are for the average of the two horizontal components of the ground motion. The PSHA was calculated for thirteen sites, including two sites offshore. These sites are: Catalina Island site 1, Catalina Island site 2, Goleta, Offshore Santa-Monica, Offshore San-Clemente, Port Dume, Palos Verde site 1, Palos Verde site 2, Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles, Port Hueneme, San Pedro Escarpment, and Redondo Canyon. For these thirteen sites, the hazard curves in terms of probability of exceedence of the peak ground acceleration (PGA), was calculated. In addition for Port of Long Beach, Port of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and a site Offshore, east of San Clemente the (5% damping) uniform hazard response spectra were calculated for five Return Periods (100, 500, 1000, 2000, 10,000 year Return Periods). The detailed results are

Savy, J; Foxall, B

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Data:8eb70adb-ae0a-4562-a95f-2d85ca432098 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eb70adb-ae0a-4562-a95f-2d85ca432098 eb70adb-ae0a-4562-a95f-2d85ca432098 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GS Sector: Commercial Description: Available to Members of the Cooperative for all non-residential Electric Delivery or Electric Supply and Delivery Service with a maximum average monthly demand of less than 50 KW during the previous twelve (12) months including commercial and small industrial service; churches, schools, office buildings, including public buildings, irrigation systems, and separately metered service, except as may be increased to reflect transformation and other facilities investment required. This will be by contract with a minimum thirty (30) month term. This Schedule is also available for unmetered service to amplifiers, repeaters, and other such electronic equipment of telephone companies, CATV companies, and other Members, as well as traffic signals, directional signals, railroad crossing signals and other such unmetered facilities.

311

Data:21155e69-e7b6-4380-a114-2d0a9a6e57c9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5e69-e7b6-4380-a114-2d0a9a6e57c9 5e69-e7b6-4380-a114-2d0a9a6e57c9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Outdoor Lighting: Security Lights, Unmetered, 100 watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: "Where service is not associated with a metered service, a Customer Charge of $5.00 for residential lights and $10.00 for commercial lights will be added to cover the associated costs of billing and related consumer costs not reflected in the lighting schedule." POLE CHARGES PER MONTH: Poles installed through 2/28/1997: $2.59 monthly charge Poles installed or changed out after 2/28/1997: $4.00 monthly charge

312

A parallel implementation of Strassen's matrix multiplication algorithm for wormhole-routed all-port 2D torus networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new parallel implementation of Strassen's matrix multiplication algorithm is proposed for massively parallel supercomputers with 2D, all-port torus interconnection networks. The proposed algorithm employs a special conflict-free routing pattern for ... Keywords: 2D torus, Fast Matrix Multiplication, Parallel processing, Strassen's matrix multiplication, Torus interconnection networks

Cesur Baransel; Kayhan M. ?mre

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

IP4DI: A software for time-lapse 2D/3D DC-resistivity and induced polarization tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a 2D/3D forward modelling and inversion package to invert direct current (DC)-resistivity, time-domain induced polarization (TDIP), and frequency-domain induced polarization (FDIP) data. Each cell used for the discretization of the 2D/3D problems ... Keywords: Induced polarization, Inversion, Resistivity, Time-lapse

M. Karaoulis, A. Revil, P. Tsourlos, D. D. Werkema, B. J. Minsley

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

1087-8270/99 $10.00 1999 IEEE Hand-Held Windows: Towards Effective 2D Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphics The George Washington University, Washington, DC [gogo | sibert | hahn]@seas.gwu.edu Abstract205 1087-8270/99 $10.00 © 1999 IEEE Hand-Held Windows: Towards Effective 2D Interaction. Windowing within immersive virtual environments is an attempt to apply 2D interface techniques to three

Lindeman, Robert W.

315

10878270/99 $10.00 1999 IEEE HandHeld Windows: Towards Effective 2D Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphics The George Washington University, Washington, DC [gogo | sibert | hahn]@seas.gwu.edu Abstract205 1087­8270/99 $10.00 © 1999 IEEE Hand­Held Windows: Towards Effective 2D Interaction. Windowing within immersive virtual environments is an attempt to apply 2D interface techniques to three

Lindeman, Robert W.

316

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeasternmost base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these approximately 12-mi lines. This was accomplished with the simultaneous operation of two 1024-channel sign bit recording systems while four

317

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

Measurment and Interpretation of Seismic Attenuation for Hydrocarbon Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project is the combined effort of several leading research groups. Advanced theoretical work is being conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Here, the fundamental controls on loss mechanisms are being examined, primarily by use of numerical models of heterogeneous porous media. At the University of California, Berkeley, forward modeling is combined with direct measurement of attenuation. This forward modeling provides an estimate of the influence of 1/Q on the observed seismic signature. Direct measures of losses in Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSPs) indicate mechanisms to separate scattering versus intrinsic losses. At the Colorado School of Mines, low frequency attenuation measurements are combined with geologic models of deep water sands. ChevronTexaco is our corporate cosponsor and research partner. This corporation is providing field data over the Genesis Field, Gulf of Mexico. In addition, ChevronTexaco has rebuilt and improved their low frequency measurement system. Soft samples representative of the Genesis Field can now be measured for velocities and attenuations under reservoir conditions. Throughout this project we have: Assessed the contribution of mechanical compaction on time-lapse monitoring; Developed and tested finite difference code to model dispersion and attenuation; Heterogeneous porous materials were modeled and 1/Q calculated vs. frequency; 'Self-affine' heterogeneous materials with differing Hurst exponent modeled; Laboratory confirmation was made of meso-scale fluid motion influence on 1/Q; Confirmed theory and magnitude of layer-based scattering attenuation at Genesis and at a shallow site in California; Scattering Q's of between 40 and 80 were obtained; Measured very low intrinsic Q's (2-20) in a partially saturated vadose zone VSP; First field study to separate scattering and intrinsic attenuation in real data set; Revitalized low frequency device at ChevronTexaco's Richmond lab completed; First complete frequency dependent measurements on Berea sandstones from dry to various saturations (brine and decane); Frequency dependent forward modeling code is running, and tested on a couple of Cases--derives frequency dependent reflectivity from porosity based logs; Genesis seismic data obtained but is on hold until forward modeling is complete; Boundary and end effects modeled for soft material measurements at CSM; and Numerous papers published or submitted and presentations made.

Michael Batzle; Luca Duranti; James Rector; Steve Pride

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

322

A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new 2D/1D approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

Larsen, Edward

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

CHARACTERIZATION BY SEM OF THE PYROCARBON FIBER COATING IN 2D-SIC/CVI-SIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The previous report examined electrical conductivity (EC) data from RT to 800C for several forms of two-dimensional silicon carbide composite made with a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) matrix (2D-SiC/CVI-SiC), an important quantity needed for the design of an FCI. We found that both in-plane and transverse EC-values for 2D-SiC/CVI-SiC strongly depended on the total thickness of the highly conductive pyrocarbon (PyC) fiber coating and the alignment of the carbon coating network. Furthermore, the transverse EC depended on the degree of interconnectivity of this network. For our EC-modeling efforts we used either nominal coating thickness values provided by the composite fabricator or we made thickness estimates based on a limited number of fiber cross-section examinations using SEM. Because of the importance of using a truly representative coating thickness value in our analysis, we examined numerous new SEM cross-sectional views to reassess the reliability of our limited number of original coating thickness measurements as well as to obtain an estimate of the variation in thickness values for different composite configurations.

Youngblood, Gerald E.

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

RISC-3 Seismic Assessment Guidelines: Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for establishing reasonable confidence that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear plants, categorized as RISC-3 under the 10 CFR 50.69 Risk Informed Safety Categorization Process, will perform their required functions under design basis seismic conditions.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

330

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

GRAV2D: an interactive 2-1/2 dimensional gravity modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GRAV2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2 dimensional gravity data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of gravity intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. GRAV2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. This is a user's guide and documentation for GRAV2D.

Nutter, C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fano Resonance in GaAs 2D Photonic Crystal Nanocavities  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of polarization resolved reflectivity experiments in GaAs air-bridge photonic crystals with L3 cavities. We show that the fundamental L3 cavity mode changes, in a controlled way, from a Lorentzian symmetrical lineshape to an asymmetrical form when the linear polarization of the incident light is rotated in the plane of the crystal. The different lineshapes are well fitted by the Fano asymmetric equation, implying that a Fano resonance is present in the reflectivity. We use the scattering matrix method to model the Fano interference between a localized discrete state (the cavity fundamental mode) and a background of continuum states (the light reflected from the crystal slab in the vicinity of the cavity) with very good agreement with the experimental data.

Valentim, P. T.; Guimaraes, P.S. S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Nanodispositivos Semicondutores - INCT-DISSE (Brazil); Luxmoore, I. J.; Szymanski, D.; Whittaker, D. M.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Vasco, J. P. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Vinck-Posada, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of mud volcanism, mechanisms of formation, types of eruptions and their relationship to the hydrocarbon systems provides important information about subsurface conditions and geological processes within the South Caspian Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each determined mud volcano is constructed. Analysis of different parameters from this database shows that there is a high concentration of mud volcanoes at the southern part of the study area. It is coincides with the distribution of the subsurface structures within the basin. Mud volcanoes with low relief (several tens of meters) are mainly concentrated in the northeast. Conversely, mud volcanoes with large vertical relief (greater than 200 m) are clustered in the southwest part of the basin. Mud volcano development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud flows reveals to the actual activity of the mud volcanoes and it gives valuable information about possible mechanism of mud volcanism within the South Caspian Basin. Previous studies of the onshore mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and the results from current work conclude that mud volcano formation within the South Caspian Basin is mainly controlled by tectonic forces and overpressured sediments. Mud volcano activity is not always related to the Maykop organic reach shale succession. It can occur at shallow depths by pressure breakthrough from any stratigraphic zone.

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Calibration of Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with 1D and 2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudo-random Grating Standard for Calibration of SurfaceBinary Pseudorandom Grating as a Standard Test Surface for2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards Valeriy V. Yashchuk,

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Drop Size Distributions Measured by a 2D Video Disdrometer: Comparison with Dual-Polarization Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of drop size distributions (DSDs) measured in four very different precipitation regimes is presented and is compared with polarimetric radar measurements. The DSDs are measured by a 2D video disdrometer, which is designed to measure ...

Terry J. Schuur; Alexander V. Ryzhkov; Dusan S. Zrni?; Michael Schnhuber

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, SmallerChapter 10 Comprehensive 2D GC Methodologies for the Analysis of Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, Smaller Chapter 10 Comprehensive 2D GC Methodologies for the Analysis of Lipids Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Comprehens

337

Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter was tested with two different reflected pulse trajectories in flowing air at ambient conditions against an orifice meter. The flowmeter was designed to be highly accurate, to require ...

Hoyle, David C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Radar Reflectivity of Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the radar reflectivity factor Z and significant physical cloud parameters are studied from a dataset collected with an instrumented aircraft in non- or very weakly precipitating warm clouds. The cloud droplet populations ...

Henri Sauvageot; Jilani Omar

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ground Reflections and Green Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that green light often observed in association with severe thunderstorms is caused by sunlight being reflected onto the cloud by green vegetation. Colorimetric observations were recorded of green-colored and blue-colored ...

Frank W. Gallagher III

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with a frustrated total internal reflection absorber  

SciTech Connect

Coupling a dielectric compound parabolic concentrator (DCPC) to an absorber across a vacuum gap by means of frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) can theoretically approach the maximum concentration permitted by physical laws, thus allowing higher radiative fluxes in thermal applications. The calculated optical performance of 2-D DCPCs with FTIR absorbers indicates that the ratio of gap thickness to optical wavelength must be /0.22 before the optical performance of the DCPC is superior to that of the nondielectric CPC.

Hull, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2D Joint Inversion Of DC And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and resistivity (dc) surveys are often used in environmental, hydrological and geothermal evaluation. The separate interpretation of those geophysical data sets assuming two-dimensional models frequently produces ambiguous results. The joint inversion of AMT and dc data is advocated by several authors as an efficient method for reducing the ambiguity inherent to each of those

342

Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs A New Discovery Answers an Old Question Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet APRIL 11, 2012 Bookmark and Share Argonne and University of Chicago physicist Sara Haravifard with the instrument on XSD beamline 6-ID-B at the APS used for the high-resolution, high-pressure structural measurements of SCBO at cryogenic temperatures. The fundamental interactions that determine how spins arrange themselves in

343

Diffusivity and Weak Clustering in a Quasi 2D Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a detailed simulation of a quasi-2D dissipative granular gas, kept in a non-condensed steady state via vertical shaking over a rough substrate. This gas shows a weak power-law decay in the tails of its Pair Distribution Functions (PDF's), indicating fractality and therefore a tendency to form clusters over several size scales. This clustering depends monotonically on the dissipation coefficient, and disappears when the sphere-sphere collisions are conservative. Clustering is also sensitive to the packing fraction. This gas also displays the standard nonequilibrium characteristics of similar systems, including non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. The diffusion coefficients are calculated over all the conditions of the simulations, and it is found that diluted gases are more diffusive for smaller restitution coefficients.

J. A. Perera-Burgos; G. Perez-Angel; Y. Nahmad-Molinari

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

McPherson, Allen L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cieren, Emmanuel B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feltman, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leibs, Christopher A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarthy, Colleen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murthy, Karthik S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yijie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simulations of 2D magnetic electron drift vortex mode turbulence in plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations are performed to investigate turbulent properties of nonlinearly interacting two-dimensional (2D) magnetic electron drift vortex (MEDV) modes in a nonuniform unmagnetized plasma. The relevant nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of the MEDV modes are the wave magnetic field and electron temperature perturbations in the presence of the equilibrium density and temperature gradients. The important nonlinearities come from the advection of the electron fluid velocity perturbation and the electron temperature, as well as from the nonlinear electron Lorentz force. Computer simulations of the governing equations for the nonlinear MEDV modes reveal the generation of streamer-like electron flows, such that the corresponding gradients in the direction of the inhomogeneities tend to flatten out. By contrast, the gradients in an orthogonal direction vary rapidly. Consequently, the inertial range energy spectrum in decaying MEDV mode turbulence exhibits a much steeper anisotropic spectral index. The magn...

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Inverse Transformation Optics and Reflection Analysis for Two-Dimensional Finite Embedded Coordinate Transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse transformation optics is introduced, and used to calculate the boundary reflection of a two-dimensional (2D) finite embedded coordinate transformation which is discontinuous at the boundary. For an electromagnetic excitation of particular polarization, many pairs of original medium (in a virtual space) and transformation function can give exactly the same anisotropic medium through a conventional procedure of transformation optics. Non-uniqueness of these pairs is then exploited for the analysis and calculation of the boundary reflection. The reflection at the boundary of the anisotropic transformation medium (associated with vacuum in the virtual space) is converted to the simple reflection between two isotropic media in a virtual space by a new transformation continuous at the boundary. A necessary condition for reflectionless boundary of finite embedded coordinate transformation is found as a special case. The theory is verified numerically with the finite element method.

Zhang, Pu; He, Sailing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

5h Other Seismic Stakeholder InteractionsGlenn Kelly- Appendix 5 Seismic.wpd Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioning plants. During the course of the workshop, presentations by the NRC and the industry concluded that spent fuel pools possess substantial capability beyond their design basis to with stand seismic events but that variations in seismic capacity existed due to plant specific designs and locations. The consensus was that the risk was low enough that precise quantification was not necessary to support exemption requests but that this needed to be confirmed on a plant specific basis with deterministic criteria. It was recommended that a simple spent fuel pool (SFP) vulnerability check list be developed to provide additional assurance that no beyond-design-basis seismic structural vulnerabilities exist at decommissioning plants. Enclosed for your review is the "Seismic Screening Criteria For Assessing Potential Pool Vulnerabilities At Decommissioning Plants." Please contact me at (202) 739-8110 or by e-mail (apn@.nei.org) if you have any questions or if a meeting should be scheduled to discuss the enclosed seismic checklist.

Glenn Kelly Aee Attached; George Hubbard; Aee Attached; Glenn Kelly; Alan Nelson; Alan Nelson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Evaluation of borehole electromagnetic and seismic detection of fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of downhole high-frequency techniques for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. The first method used an electromagnetic wave at 30 to 300 MHz, vhf frequencies. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole vhf radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole. Similar experiments were also conducted using seismic waves at 4.5 to 6 KHz. The transmitter and the receiver in this case were located in separate boreholes. During this experiment, reflections from the slot were obtained only with the transducers oriented for shear wave illumination and detection. These results suggest that a high-frequency shear wave can also be used to detect fractures away from a borehole.

Chang, H.T.; Suhler, S.A.; Owen, T.E.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

350

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

351

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. The data acquisition (which included the use of LBNL's three-component high temperature borehole geophone in well 44-28) was accomplished in August 1998. Initial processed results provided by the subcontractor Subsurface Exploration Co. (SECO) were delivered to TGI in December 1998. After the initial analysis of SECO's results, it was

355

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves.

356

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

357

Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE.

Barlow, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Budnitz, R. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Seismic detection of fractured Devonian shale reservoir. Annual report, July 1985-June 1986  

SciTech Connect

Interpretation of seismic data over the Cottageville gas field in West Virginia reveals the presence of numerous changes in reflection character across the top of the Lower Huron shales. Production from the Lower Huron is fracture-controlled, and some of the more-pronounced changes in amplitude and shape occur in the more-productive areas of the field. Model studies indicate that these changes are related to the development of low-impedance intervals that extend into the overlying shales of the Middle Huron. Analysis of geophysical logs indicates that these differences are not produced by lithologic variability in the shale. Hence, the observed changes in reflection character are believed to be associated with intense fracturing. Studies here suggest that the analysis of seismic data can be combined with other data to reduce the risk associated with exploration and development of Devonian shale gas resources. Final open-flow of gas and geologic structure from >4000 shale gas wells in eastern Kentucky outlines two high-flow areas. Interrelationships between geologic structure and gas flow are direct in one, but they are complex and unresolved in the other. Linear, steep flow gradients and the interrelationships of high-flow to structure confirm the importance of tectonic fracture permeability to shale productivity.

Wilson, T.H.; Shumaker, R.C.; Sims, C.S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Industry Approach to Seismic Severe Accident Policy Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utilities with industry recommended guidelines for cost-effective seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20. Guidance is provided on application of seismic probabilistic risk assessment and seismic margin methods for full-, focused-, and reduced-scope evaluations. It provides strategies for coordinating these evaluations with similar reviews needed for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate tectonics In this paper, we analyse the distributions of number of events (N) and seismic energy (E

Doglioni, Carlo

365

Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations have been demonstrated.

Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 and Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, University of Texas, Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

367

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

368

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

369

Microsoft Word - Calpine EGS_Seismic Eval Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Environmental Impacts of Induced Seismicity at the Calpine Enhanced Geothermal System Project, The Geysers, California prepared for RMT, Inc. 4 West Fourth Avenue,...

370

APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH DOE SEISMICITY PROTOCOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the "Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems". Calpine Corporation and other Geysers geothermal operators have long been...

371

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

372

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

373

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and...

374

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

375

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

376

Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2% in 50 years. Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: Southern California Earthquake Center...

377

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

378

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

379

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

380

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2d reflection seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

382

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

383

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

384

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

385

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. Awardees (Company Institution) OSKI Energy, LLC Awardee Website http:www.oskienergy.com Partner 1 Optim, Inc Partner 2...

386

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design Guidelines Program Plan for New and Existing Buildings FEMA-445 / August 2006 ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Seismic Design of Steel Special Concentrically Braced Frame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. 8 ... Dr. John (Jay) L. Harris, III, managed the project to produce this Technical Brief for EL. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? 5/17/99 Click here to start Table of Contents PPT Slide Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Demand U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996) PPT Slide 1998 Propane Prices Fell with Crude Oil PPT Slide Warm Weather Behind Demand Decline 1998 Warm Weather Kept Demand Down Supply Propane Production Fell in 1998 1998 Propane Net Imports Increased Algeria Was Major Source of ‘98 Import Increase U.S. Chemical Use & Large Storage Attracts Excess Propane Petroleum & Propane Market Over Supply Average Stock Levels: Crude Market & Propane Futures Market Incentives to Build Petroleum Stocks New “Structure” or Cycle? Near-Term Future Large January Draw Did Not Remove Excess How Might Excess Stocks Decline? Near Term U.S. Propane Production

390

Reflection Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 2000, (2) a micro-seismic survey run from November 2000 to April 200 1, and (3) a gravity survey conducted in April and May 2001. The 3-D surface seismic data are still being...

391

A Complete Onium Program with R2D at RHIC II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following on the discovery of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at RHIC, a program of detailed quarkonia measurements is crucial to understanding the nature of deconfinement. Lattice QCD calculations suggest a sequential melting of the quarkonia states in the deconfined medium. Such a melting would lead to a suppression in the measured charmonium and bottomonium yields. However, distinguishing a true suppression from shadowing, absorption, and recombination effects requires detailed measurements of the charmonium states (J/psi, psi', and chi_c) and bottomonium states (Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S)). Also, since measurements are needed not only in A+A, but also in p+p for determining primary yields and in p+A for evaluating absorption, the detector should perform well in all collision environments. To fully realize the program outlined above, a new detector will be required at RHIC-II. We present a proposal for a complete quarkonia program and the abilities of a new detector, R2D, to meet the stated requirements. Comparisons will be made with proposed upgrades to existing RHIC detectors and with the upcoming LHC program.

Richard Witt

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Factorization of Darboux transformations of arbitrary order for 2D Schroedinger type operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove the conjecture formulated by Darboux that every Darboux transformation of arbitrary order d for a second-order differential operator on the plane can be factorized into elementary Darboux transformations of order 1. Our proof is constructive. Previously, we established the same result for the Darboux transformations of order 2; we used invariantization and regularized moving frames for pseudogroups of Olver--Pohjanpelto. In the present paper, we use a different, more algebraic, method. We study the algebraic structure and relations for the mappings involved. In the 1D case, a proof of the analogous statement about factorization of the Darboux transformations for Schroedinger operators had been obtained, in four steps, by Veselov and Shabat, and Bagrov--Samsonov. In that case the factorization is not unique and the relations between different factorizations can be described in terms of Yang--Baxter maps (Adler and Veselov). Any analogs of that for the 2D case studied in this paper, remain an open question.

Ekaterina Shemyakova

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs  

SciTech Connect

The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution ({approx}0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs ({approx}10{sup -4} s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

The 2D AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state. Resource states can arise from ground states of carefully designed two-body interacting Hamiltonians. This opens up an appealing possibility of creating them by cooling. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states are the ground states of particularly simple Hamiltonians with high symmetry, and their potential use in quantum computation gives rise to a new research direction. Expanding on our prior work [T.-C. Wei, I. Affleck, and R. Raussendorf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 070501 (2011)], we give detailed analysis to explain why the spin-3/2 AKLT state on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation. Along the way, we also provide an alternative proof that the 1D spin-1 AKLT state can be used to simulate arbitrary one-qubit unitary gates. Moreover, we connect the quantum computational universality of 2D random graph states to their percolation property and show that these states whose graphs are in the supercritical (i.e. percolated) phase are also universal resources for measurement-based quantum computation.

Tzu-Chieh Wei; Ian Affleck; Robert Raussendorf

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Accretion of low angular momentum material onto black holes: 2D hydrodynamical inviscid case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first phase of our study of slightly rotating accretion flows onto black holes. We consider inviscid accretion flows with a spherically symmetric density distribution at the outer boundary, but with spherical symmetry broken by the introduction of a small, latitude-dependent angular momentum. We study accretion flows by means of numerical 2D, axisymmetric, hydrodynamical simulations. Our main result is that the properties of the accretion flow do not depend as much on the outer boundary conditions (i.e., the amount as well as distribution of the angular momentum) as on the geometry of the non-accreting matter. The material that has too much angular momentum to be accreted forms a thick torus near the equator. Consequently, the geometry of the polar region, where material is accreted (the funnel), and the mass accretion rate through it are constrained by the size and shape of the torus. Our results show one way in which the mass accretion rate of slightly rotating gas can be significantly reduced compared to the accretion of non-rotating gas (i.e., the Bondi rate), and set the stage for calculations that will take into account the transport of angular momentum and energy.

D. Proga; M. C. Begelman

2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electron-impact dissociative excitation and ionization of N{sub 2}D{sup +}  

SciTech Connect

Absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2}D{sup +} producing N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragments were measured in the 5- to 100-eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique. In the 5- to 20-eV region, in which dissociative excitation (DE) is the principal contributing mechanism, N{sub 2}{sup +} production dominates. The N{sub 2}{sup +} + D dissociation channel shows a large resonant-like structure in the DE cross section, as observed previously in electron impact dissociation of triatomic dihydride species [M. Fogle, E. M. Bahati, M. E. Bannister, S. H. M. Deng, C. R. Vane, R. D. Thomas, and V. Zhaunerchyk, Phys. Rev. A 82, 042720 (2010)]. In the dissociative ionization (DI) region, 20- to 100-eV, N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragment production are comparable. The observance of the ND{sup +} and N{sup +} ion fragments indicate breaking of the N - N bond along certain dissociation channels.

Fogle, M.; Bahati, E. M.; Bannister, M. E.; Deng, S. H. M.; Vane, C. R.; Thomas, R. D.; Zhaunerchyk, V. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, Albanova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Title Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2002 Authors Berdahl, Paul, Hashem...

398

Data:159df966-3f77-4aa1-bf8d-a2d0cf85683f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df966-3f77-4aa1-bf8d-a2d0cf85683f df966-3f77-4aa1-bf8d-a2d0cf85683f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Austin, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service with Demand Optional Time of Use Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABLE: In territory serviced by Austin Utilities both inside and outside the established city limits. APPLICABLE: Existing Customers, or to new Customers with demands of 25 kW or more for two (2) months during the period June1 through September 30 whose entire requirements are taken through one meter, under a contract of standard form. (Not applicable to resale, standby or auxiliary service.) CHARACTER OF SERVICE: AC, 60 cycles, 120 Volts or 120/240 Volts, single-phase; 240 Volts, three-phase, three wire; 120/240, 120/208 Volts, or 277/480 Volts, three-phase, four wire. A customer requiring Voltages other than that already established shall be required to provide suitable space for location of Austin Utilities transformers, metering and associated equipment. SPECIAL CONDITIONS: One meter shall be installed to service one class of business. If additional buildings are required for a given business, they shall be interconnected by the customer to obtain one meter. If additional meters and services are requested by the customer, each shall be treated as a separate customer. RATE: Subject to application of Cost Adjustment. Cost Adjustment shall be determined as follows: Costs shall be calculated and all applicable tariff sheets revised as required to reflect actual changes in the cost of electric production. For these purposes, the "Cost of Production" shall mean the cost of fuel and purchased power, less all payments received by the Austin Utilities as reimbursement for power plant availability and/or generation. Costs for the subsequent period shall reflect the costs as may be reasonably anticipated, plus or minus any corrective adjustments from the previous period. All costs for the previous period shall be based upon actual purchases divided by 0.947 (line loss adjustment). The base Cost for the tariffs presently in effect in mills/kWh ($/kWh).

399

Data:Df04ede2-d747-4bc7-a612-0aec1720e95a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4ede2-d747-4bc7-a612-0aec1720e95a 4ede2-d747-4bc7-a612-0aec1720e95a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Austin, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service with Demand > 25 kW Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABLE: In territory serviced by Austin Utilities both inside and outside the established city limits. APPLICABLE: Existing Customers, or to new Customers with demands of 25 kW or more for two (2) months during the period June 1 through September 30 whose entire requirements are taken through one meter, under a contract of standard form. (Not applicable to resale, standby or auxiliary service.) CHARACTER OF SERVICE: AC, 60 cycles, 120 Volts or 120/240 Volts, single-phase; 240 Volts, three-phase, three wire; 120/240, 120/208 Volts, or 277/480 Volts, three-phase, four wire. A customer requiring Voltages other than that already established shall be required to provide suitable space for location of Austin Utilities transformers, metering and associated equipment. SPECIAL CONDITIONS: One meter shall be installed to service one class of business. If additional buildings are required for a given business, they shall be interconnected by the customer to obtain one meter. If additional meters and services are requested by the customer, each shall be treated as a separate customer. RATE: Subject to application of Cost Adjustment. Cost Adjustment shall be determined as follows: Costs shall be calculated and all applicable tariff sheets revised as required to reflect actual changes in the cost of electric production. For these purposes, the "Cost of Production" shall mean the cost of fuel and purchased power, less all payments received by the Austin Utilities as reimbursement for power plant availability and/or generation. Costs for the subsequent period shall reflect the costs as may be reasonably anticipated, plus or minus any corrective adjustments from the previous period. All costs for the previous period shall be based upon actual purchases divided by 0.947 (line loss adjustment). The base Cost for the tariffs presently in effect in mills/kWh ($/kWh).

400

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

Majer, E.L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

Ian B. Burgess; Joanna Aizenberg; Marko Loncar

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

MAG2D: Interactive 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic modeling program (User's Guide and Documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MAG2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of magnetic intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. MAG2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. These subroutines were originally separate batch-mode programs.

Nutter, C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electrical Conductivity of 2D-SiCf/CVI-SiC  

SciTech Connect

Electrical conductivity (EC) data for several plate forms of two-dimensional, silicon carbide composite made with chemical vapor infiltration matrix and with Hi Nicalon{trademark} type S fibers (2D-SiCf/CVI-SiC) were acquired. The composite fibers were coated with pyrocarbon (PyC) of various thicknesses (50 to 310 nm) and an outer thin ({approx}60 {mu}m) SiC 'seal coat' was applied by CVD to the infiltrated plates. The EC was highly anisotropic in the transverse and in-plane directions. In-plane EC ranged from {approx}150 to 1600 S/m, increased slowly with increasing temperature, and depended primarily on the total PyC thickness. High in-plane EC-values occur because it is dominated by conduction along the numerous, continuous PyC fiber coating pathways. Transverse EC ranged from {approx}1 to 60 S/m, and increased strongly with increasing temperature up to 800 C. The transverse EC is controlled by conduction through the interconnections of the carboncoating network within and between fiber bundles, especially at moderate temperatures ({approx}300 to 700 C). Below {approx}300 C, the electrical resistance of the pure SiC seal coat becomes increasingly more important as temperatures are further lowered. Importantly, a '3-layer series' model predicts that transverse EC-values for a standard seal-coated 2DSiCf/ CVI-SiC with a monolayer PyC fiber coating of {approx}50-nm thickness will be <20 S/m for all temperatures up to 800 C, as desired for a flow channel insert in a fusion reactor blanket component.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Shinavski, Robert J.

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D  

SciTech Connect

CORE{sup 2D} V4 is a finite element code for modeling partly or fully saturated water flow, heat transport and multicomponent reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. It can handle coupled microbial processes and geochemical reactions such as acid-base, aqueous complexation, redox, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/exsolution, ion exchange, sorption via linear and nonlinear isotherms, sorption via surface complexation. Hydraulic parameters may change due to mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. Coupled transport and chemical equations are solved by using sequential iterative approaches. A sequential partly-iterative approach (SPIA) is presented which improves the accuracy of the traditional sequential noniterative approach (SNIA) and is more efficient than the general sequential iterative approach (SIA). While SNIA leads to a substantial saving of computing time, it introduces numerical errors which are especially large for cation exchange reactions. SPIA improves the efficiency of SIA because the iteration between transport and chemical equations is only performed in nodes with a large mass transfer between solid and liquid phases. The efficiency and accuracy of SPIA are compared to those of SIA and SNIA using synthetic examples and a case study of reactive transport through the Llobregat Delta aquitard in Spain. SPIA is found to be as accurate as SIA while requiring significantly less CPU time. In addition, SPIA is much more accurate than SNIA with only a minor increase in computing time. A further enhancement of the efficiency of SPIA is achieved by improving the efficiency of the Newton-Raphson method used for solving chemical equations. Such an improvement is obtained by working with increments of log-concentrations and ignoring the terms of the Jacobian matrix containing derivatives of activity coefficients. A proof is given for the symmetry and non-singularity of the Jacobian matrix. Numerical analyses performed with synthetic examples confirm that these modifications improve the efficiency and convergence of the iterative algorithm.

Samper, J.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Test Problem: Tilted Rayleigh-Taylor for 2-D Mixing Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 'tilted-rig' test problem originates from a series of experiments (Smeeton & Youngs, 1987, Youngs, 1989) performed at AWE in the late 1980's, that followed from the 'rocket-rig' experiments (Burrows et al., 1984; Read & Youngs, 1983), and exploratory experiments performed at Imperial College (Andrews, 1986; Andrews and Spalding, 1990). A schematic of the experiment is shown in Figure 1, and comprises a tank filled with light fluid above heavy, and then 'tilted' on one side of the apparatus, thus causing an 'angled interface' to the acceleration history due to rockets. Details of the configuration given in the next chapter include: fluids, dimensions, and other necessary details to simulate the experiment. Figure 2 shows results from two experiments, Case 110 (which is the source for this test problem) that has an Atwood number of 0.5, and Case 115 (a secondary source described in Appendix B), with Atwood of 0.9 Inspection of the photograph in Figure 2 (the main experimental diagnostic) for Case 110. reveals two main areas for mix development; 1) a large-scale overturning motion that produces a rising plume (spike) on the left, and falling plume (bubble) on the right, that are almost symmetric; and 2) a Rayleigh-Taylor driven mixing central mixing region that has a large-scale rotation associated with the rising and falling plumes, and also experiences lateral strain due to stretching of the interface by the plumes, and shear across the interface due to upper fluid moving downward and to the right, and lower fluid moving upward and to the left. Case 115 is similar but differs by a much larger Atwood of 0.9 that drives a strong asymmetry between a left side heavy spike penetration and a right side light bubble penetration. Case 110 is chosen as the source for the present test problem as the fluids have low surface tension (unlike Case 115) due the addition of a surfactant, the asymmetry small (no need to have fine grids for the spike), and there is extensive reasonable quality photographic data. The photographs in Figure 2 also reveal the appearance of a boundary layer at the left and right walls; this boundary layer has not been included in the test problem as preliminary calculations suggested it had a negligible effect on plume penetration and RT mixing. The significance of this test problem is that, unlike planar RT experiments such as the Rocket-Rig (Youngs, 1984), Linear Electric Motor - LEM (Dimonte, 1990), or the Water Tunnel (Andrews, 1992), the Tilted-Rig is a unique two-dimensional RT mixing experiment that has experimental data and now (in this TP) Direct Numerical Simulation data from Livescu and Wei. The availability of DNS data for the tilted-rig has made this TP viable as it provides detailed results for comparison purposes. The purpose of the test problem is to provide 3D simulation results, validated by comparison with experiment, which can be used for the development and validation of 2D RANS models. When such models are applied to 2D flows, various physics issues are raised such as double counting, combined buoyancy and shear, and 2-D strain, which have not yet been adequately addressed. The current objective of the test problem is to compare key results, which are needed for RANS model validation, obtained from high-Reynolds number DNS, high-resolution ILES or LES with explicit sub-grid-scale models. The experiment is incompressible and so is directly suitable for algorithms that are designed for incompressible flows (e.g. pressure correction algorithms with multi-grid); however, we have extended the TP so that compressible algorithms, run at low Mach number, may also be used if careful consideration is given to initial pressure fields. Thus, this TP serves as a useful tool for incompressible and compressible simulation codes, and mathematical models. In the remainder of this TP we provide a detailed specification; the next section provides the underlying assumptions for the TP, fluids, geometry details, boundary conditions (and alternative set-ups), initial conditions, and acceleration history (an

Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Youngs, David L. [AWE

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=401382

412

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401371

413

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401360"

414

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down

415

Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

417

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Application of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Microzonation Procedure in Bulgaria and Validation of the Seismic Input Against Eurocode 8  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake record and the Code for design and construction in seismic regions in Bulgaria have shown that the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria is exposed to a high seismic risk due to local shallow and regional strong intermediate-depth seismic sources. The available strong motion database is quite limited, and therefore not representative at all of the real hazard. The application of the neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment procedure for two main Bulgarian cities has been capable to supply a significant database of synthetic strong motions for the target sites, applicable for earthquake engineering purposes. The main advantage of the applied deterministic procedure is the possibility to take simultaneously and correctly into consideration the contribution to the earthquake ground motion at the target sites of the seismic source and of the seismic wave propagation in the crossed media. We discuss in this study the result of some recent applications of the neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure to the cities of Sofia and Russe. The validation of the theoretically modeled seismic input against Eurocode 8 and the few available records at these sites is discussed.

Ivanka, Paskaleva [CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Mihaela, Kouteva [CLSMEE-BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Franco, Vaccari [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Panza, Giuliano F. [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present an intercomparison of several aerosol modules, sectional and modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acidwater aerosols in this study. Three versions of the sectional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the prescribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs. 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sectional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all situations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signficant impact on modelcalculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol extinction and surface area density calculated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability, with a 20-bin sectional model performing much better than any of the modal models. 1

D. K. Weisenstein; J. E. Penner; M. Herzog; X. Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Drop Shapes and Axis Ratio Distributions: Comparison between 2D Video Disdrometer and Wind-Tunnel Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons of drop shapes between measurements made using 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) and wind-tunnel experiments are presented. Comparisons are made in terms of the mean drop shapes and the axis ratio distributions. Very close agreement of the ...

M. Thurai; V. N. Bringi; M. Szakll; S. K. Mitra; K. V. Beard; S. Borrmann

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Plasma 2D modeling and diagnostics of DLC deposition on PET E. Amanatides, P. Gkotsis, Ch. Syndrevelis, D. Mataras *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensional (2D) emission spectra of short-lived excited species for estimating the uniformity of production substrates was investigated. Images of the a- balmer line of atomic hydrogen in CH4/H2 discharges were and fast way control and optimization of such processes. In this direction, the present work is focused

423

An algorithm for transferring 2D arbitrary hp-refined finite element axially symmetric meshes to three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Petroleum Engineering, The University of Texas in Austin (3) Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, ICES, The University of Texas in Austin Abstract The 2D and 3D fully automatic hp adaptive Finite is solved on the coarse and on the fine mesh. The energy norm (H1 Sobolev space norm) difference between

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

424

Application of the Lattice-Boltzmann method to the modeling of population blob dynamics in 2D porous domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is employed for the simulation of immiscible two-phase flow through a 2D porous domain when the volume fraction of the non-wetting phase is relatively low and thus it flows in the form of disconnected ... Keywords: Blobs, Lattice Boltzmann, Porous media, Two-phase flow

A. G. Yiotis; M. E. Kainourgiakis; E. S. Kikkinides; A. K. Stubos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Abstract --An exact two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model (AM) of slotless permanent magnet (PM) machines in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

machines, one always tries to minimize the magnet thickness, in order to minimize the cost of the motor andAbstract -- An exact two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model (AM) of slotless permanent magnet (PM at no-load operation. The authors show that, for a radial magnetization, there is an optimal magnet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

CSY3019 -Graphics Programming Assignment 2: Development of 2D/3D graphics software: Java 3D (50%)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSY3019 - Graphics Programming Assignment 2: Development of 2D/3D graphics software: Java 3D (50, directional, point and spot lighting (to model windows and/or strip lights). · User defined or loaded geometry. Front Sheet & Title Page · Table of contents · Introduction · Analysis · Design · Implementation

Hill, Gary

427

A two-mesh coupled gas flow-solid interaction model for 2D blast analysis in fractured media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2D coupled two-mesh interaction model for blast gas flow through fractured and fragmented solid media is presented. It is mainly designed to solve blast problems where a complicated set of wide difficult phenomena are involved: shock waves, progressive ... Keywords: Blast, Combined finite/discrete element method, Cracking, Explosion, Fragmentation, Gas-solid interaction

S. Mohammadi; A. Pooladi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examination of seismic data from the deep-water Gulf of Mexico reveals the presence of High-Amplitude Reflection Packets (HARPs). An analog study conducted by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 155 identified and described Amazon Fan HARPs as a stacked, relatively unconfined series of graded turbidites overlain by a channel-levee. HARP seismic facies thin laterally and onlap antecedent bathymetry (preexisting submarine topography). HARP areal extent is controlled by antecedent bathymetry and turbidity flow sediment volumes. Mississippi Fan HARP deposition can be described by three depositional models: the "avulsion" model, the "fill and spill" model, and the "transition" model. The "avulsion" depositional model, developed by Flood et al. (1991), describes avulsion of submarine channel-levees by turbidity flows. Subsequent turbidity flows exit the channel-levee at the avulsion point and are deposited as unchannelized HARPs. The "fill and spill" model, developed by Satterfield and Behrens (1990), describes turbidite deposition in the Gulf of Mexico salt province. Initial stages of the "fill and spill" model accurately describe the seismic geometries of HARPs confined by adjacent salt structures. The "transition" model was developed in this study to describe the Gulf of Mexico HARP seismic geometries seen in the transition zone from the salt province to the abyssal plain. The HARPs described by the "transition" model contain an upslope segment confined by salt structures and a downslope segment confined by antecedent bathymetry. Utilizing seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico and core and well-log data from the Amazon Fan, this study has determined that HARPs and related channel-levees have hydrocarbon play potential. HARP sheet sands, internal HARP channel fill, overlying channel-levee fill, and overbank levee sands are potential reservoir units. Detrital carbonate and hemipelagic shale source rocks are in place in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico. In addition, structurally derived migration pathways combine with percolation as potential migration processes. This study integrates identification and description of HARP seismic facies relationships, current and newly developed depositional models, interpretation of stratigraphic controls, HARP internal reservoir architecture, and determination of HARP hydrocarbon potential in order to predict HARP deposition in the Mississippi Fan and other mud-rich fans worldwide.

Francis, Jason Michael

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do the other modes. A conclusion of the study is that 9-C seismic data contain more rock and fluid information and more sequence and facies information than do 3-C seismic data; 9-C data should therefore be acquired in multicomponent seismic programs whenever possible.

John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description Historically, areas where the Earth surface is covered by an exposed high-velocity rock layer have been locations where conventional, single-component, seismic P-waves have failed to provide usable geological information. The research will use new seismic sources that emphasize shear waves and new seismic data-acquisition technology based on cable-free data recording to acquire seismic research data across two sites covered with surface-exposed highvelocity rocks. Research tasks will involve acquiring, processing, and interpreting both conventional seismic data and multicomponent seismic data. Scientists at BEG will analyze well logs, cores, and reservoir test data to construct geological models of the targeted geology across each study site.

435

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

N Reactor Seismic Task Force analysis and fix summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (SEP) and the Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program (ASEP) were established to implement recommendations made earlier by study groups assessing the safety of N Reactor. The recommendations which dealt with seismic issues were assigned to Safety Enhancement Programs, Defense Reactor Programs for implementation. A Seismic Task Force was assembled to perform the analyses, design the modifications, direct the performance of the work and provide program management of the effort to seismically qualify the facility. This document identifies the reports published by the task force to resolve each of the seismic issues raised by safety assessments. The reports, in turn, provide a list of recommended fixes (Fixes are potential problems, not resolved in the engineering analyses, which require repair, cleanup or modifications to hardware to establish seismic qualification). The purpose of this report is to provide a guide to seismic fixes implemented by the Seismic Task Force. This information is provided in the form of a ``fix log`` which lists fixes according to the report which recommended them and identifies the work authorization (WA), engineering documentation (Design Change, Field Change Notice or Engineering Change Notice) and acceptance dates for each fix. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

De Paoli, Rosa Grazia [Department of Landscape Planning, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Analysis of seismic sloshing of reactor tanks considering submerged components and seismic isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the seismic sloshing response of a large pool-type reactor tank with several deck-mounted components is presented. The main objective of the study is to investigate the effects of internal components on the sloshing response and to determine the sloshing loads on the components. The study shows that the presence of internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequencies of a tank with internal components are considerably higher than those of a tank without internals. The higher sloshing frequencies reduce the sloshing wave height on the free surface but the dynamic pressures of the fluid are increased. The effects of seismic isolation on sloshing response are also presented.

Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

We propose a novel approach to measure short electron bunch profiles at micrometer level. Low energy electrons generated during beam-gas ionization are simultaneously modulated by the transverse electric field of a circularly-polarized laser, and then they are collected at a downstream screen where the angular modulation is converted to a circular shape. The longitudinal bunch profile is simply represented by the angular distribution of the electrons on the screen. We only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration and there is no phase synchronization problem. Meanwhile the required laser power is also relatively low in this setup. Some simulations examples and experimental consideration of this method are discussed. At Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an S-band RF transverse deflector (TCAV) is used to measure the bunch length with a resolution 10 fe