Sample records for 2d reflection seismic

  1. Ultra-Shallow Imaging Using 2D & 3D Seismic Reflection Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the survey design, acquisition, processing, and interpretation of ultra-shallow seismic reflection (USR) data in two and three dimensions. The application of 3D USR ...

  2. Applicability of 2-D Time-Lapse High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Approach to Image Natural Salt-Dissolution and Subsidence in Central Kansas and Improved Post-Processed Vibroseis Data Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Daniel

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of 2-D time-lapse imaging for monitoring natural dissolution of the Hutchinson Salt in eastern Reno County, Kansas was shown to be restricted when comparing high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired ...

  3. The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, John Gjelberg, and M. Eduard Groller, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil of the seismic data prior to interpretation. We improve the annotation of seismic structures by applying novel

  4. Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation -GEY 772/772L Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation - GEY 772/772L ­ Spring 2006 Room TEC 104 Processing, Yilmaz; and Practical Seismic Interpretation, Badley; A Lab Manual of Seismic Reflection the fundamentals of geologic interpretation of 2D and 3D reflection seismic data. The class provides hands

  5. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    4/21/2010 1 GG450 April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI Data Interpretation II Today's material section Chrono- stratigraphic section Relations of strata to boundaries of a depositional sequence Seismic stratigraphic reflection terminations within an idealized seismic sequence Reflection configurations #12

  6. Optimization Online - Constrained optimization in seismic reflection ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Delbos

    2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2004 ... Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos (Frederic.Delbos ***at*** ifp.fr)

  7. Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic reflection tomography is a method for determining a subsurface velocity model from the traveltimes of seismic waves reflecting on geological interfaces.

  8. Seismic Reflection Studies in Long Valley Caldera, Califomia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Ross A.; Deemer, Sharon J.; Smithson, Scott B.

    1991-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic reflection studies in Long Valley caldera, California, indicate that seismic methods may be successfully employed to image certain types of features in young silicic caldera environments. However, near-surface ...

  9. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly...

  10. 2D Seismic Reflection Survey Crump Geyser Geothermal Prospect...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional Info Field Value Author Nevada Geothermal Power Company Maintainer Nicole Smith bureaucode 019:20 Catalog DOE harvestobjectid d542f4da-f04b-4172-ac22-483b3b5ff60a...

  11. 2D Seismic Reflection Survey Crump Geyser Geothermal Prospect Warner

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School20090:

  12. Seismic reflection analysis of the Manson Impact Structure, Iowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

    1996-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Our combined interpretation of new, high-resolution seismic reflection data and reprocessed, but previously published, industrial Vibroseis data indicates that the Manson Impact Structure, Iowa, has an apparent crater ...

  13. High-resolution clinoform characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion Daria Tetyukhina*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    High-resolution clinoform characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion Daria Summary Many important details of potential subsurface reservoirs that we wish to characterize are only propose an automated procedure that adjusts the parameters of a two-dimensional geological model

  14. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill...

  15. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchhill Co., NV A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data...

  16. Salt Tectonics and Its Effect on Sediment Structure and Gas Hydrate Occurrence in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Dan'L 1986-

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to investigate mobile salt and its effect on fault structures and gas hydrate occurrence in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data were used to investigate the effects of the salt within...

  17. An Asymptotic Model of Seismic Reflection from a Permeable Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hilterman, F.J. : Seismic Amplitude Interpretation. Number 4interpretations of some poroelasticity coef?cients. For instance, we demonstrate that the An Asymptotic Model of Seismic

  18. High-resolution reservoir characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion: an example from a Tertiary deltaic clinoform system in the North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    High-resolution reservoir characterization by 2-D model-driven seismic Bayesian inversion the match with the seismic data. This low- parameterization inversion approach thus uses geological shapes of block F3 in the North Sea. Field description Geological setting F3 is a block in the Dutch sector

  19. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  20. Automatic deployment of a 2-D geophone array for efficient ultra-shallow seismic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Steeples, Don W.; Czarnecki, Gerard P.; Sloan, Steven D.; Eslick, Robert C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Data acquisition and preliminary processing strate- 324gies, Geophysics, 63, 1434?1450. 325Burridge, R., J. Graham, K. Shillcutt, R. Hirsh, and D. Kortenkamp (2003), 326Experiments with an EVA assistant Robot, paper presented at 7th Inter- 327national.... Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union. 0094-8276/06/2006GL025902$05.00 LXXXXX 1of4 103 acquire conventional ultra-shallow 3-D seismic data. The 104 method could be adapted to allow robotic shallow seismic 105 surveys in areas where people cannot...

  1. Coherent Atom Optics With Fast Metastable Beams: Metastable Helium Diffraction By 1D and 2D Magnetized Reflection Gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, UMR-CNRS 7538, Universite Paris 13, 99, Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430-Villetaneuse (France); Bocvarski, V. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 - Belgrade-Zemun (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    1D and 2D reflection gratings (Permalloy stripes or dots deposited on silicon), immersed in an external homogeneous static magnetic field, are used to study 1D and 2D diffraction of fast metastable helium atoms He* (23S1). Both the grazing incidence used here and the repulsive potential (for sub-level m = -1) generated by the magnetisation reduce the quenching effect. This periodically structured potential is responsible for the diffraction in the incidence plane as well as for the diffraction in the perpendicular plane.

  2. CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

  3. Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinker, Mary Norris

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Approved as to style and content by: D. A. Fa quiet...

  4. Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinker, Mary Norris

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Approved as to style and content by: D. A. Fa quiet...

  5. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e?ects in gas reservoir monitoring VSP data. In SEG Meeting,seismic data and its application in reservoir pre- diction.data analysis identi?es the most productive spots in the reservoir [

  6. Seismic reflection imaging of underground cavities using open-source software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, R J

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) includes provisions for an on-site inspection (OSI), which allows the use of specific techniques to detect underground anomalies including cavities and rubble zones. One permitted technique is active seismic surveys such as seismic refraction or reflection. The purpose of this report is to conduct some simple modeling to evaluate the potential use of seismic reflection in detecting cavities and to test the use of open-source software in modeling possible scenarios. It should be noted that OSI inspections are conducted under specific constraints regarding duration and logistics. These constraints are likely to significantly impact active seismic surveying, as a seismic survey typically requires considerable equipment, effort, and expertise. For the purposes of this study, which is a first-order feasibility study, these issues will not be considered. This report provides a brief description of the seismic reflection method along with some commonly used software packages. This is followed by an outline of a simple processing stream based on a synthetic model, along with results from a set of models representing underground cavities. A set of scripts used to generate the models are presented in an appendix. We do not consider detection of underground facilities in this work and the geologic setting used in these tests is an extremely simple one.

  7. Characterization of heterogeneous near-surface materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity and seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    multidimensional non- invasive dc resistivity and seismic refraction investigations of the near-surface have and seismic data Luis A. Gallardo1 and Max A. Meju Department of Environmental Science, Lancaster University-gradients of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity as constraints so as to investigate more precisely

  8. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be associated with the presence of high concentrations of CCl{sub 4}. Based on the modeling results three different methods of AVO analysis were preformed on the seismic data: enhanced amplitude stacks, offset range limited stacks, and gradient stacks. Seismic models indicate that the reflection from the contact between the Hanford Fine and the Plio/Pleistocene should exhibit amplitude variations where there are high concentrations of CCl{sub 4}. A series of different scenarios were modeled. The first scenario is the Hanford Fine pores are 100% saturated with CCl{sub 4} and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated with air. In this scenario the reflection coefficients are slightly negative at the small angles of incidence and become increasing more negative at the larger angles of incidence (dim-out). The second scenario is the Hanford Fine pores are saturated with air and Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated with CCl{sub 4}. In this scenario the reflection coefficients are slightly positive at the small angles of incidence and become negative at the large angles of incidence (polarity reversal). Finally the third scenario is both the Hanford Fine and the Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated CCl{sub 4}. In this scenario the reflection coefficients at the small angles of incidence are slightly positive, but much less than background response, and with increasing angle of incidence the reflection coefficients become slightly more positive. On the field data areas where extraction wells have high concentrations of CCl{sub 4} a corresponding dim-out and/or a polarity reversal is noted.

  9. Shallow faults mapped with seismic reflections: Lost River Fault, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubarik, Ali; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stations 132 and 160. Total bedrock dis?lace- ment interpreted along this seismic survey line is approxa- mately 6 m, representing 4 to 6 times more displacement than is observed on either the common offset refraction section or at the surface..., vol. A, U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 85-290, 182-194, 1985. Crone, A. J., and M. N. Macbette, Surface faulting accompa- nying the Borah Peak earthquake, central Idaho, Geology, 12, 664-667, 1984. Crone, A. J., M. N. Macbette, M. G...

  10. Usefulness of the Interface Fresnel zone for simulating the seismic reflected amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Usefulness of the Interface Fresnel zone for simulating the seismic reflected amplitudes Nathalie.favretto@univ-pau.fr 211 route du Bourg, 64230 Beyrie-en-Béarn, France Keywords Fresnel volume, Interface Fresnel zone Abstract The aim of the paper is to emphasize the importance of accounting for the Fresnel volume (FV

  11. Gravity and seismic reflection studies over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordero Ardila, Vladimir Francisco

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and not com- pletely understood f orm. The study of salt domes is important because: (1) more than four-fift'ns or all oil and gas accumulations in fields in the Gulf Coast province have been geologically affected by the growth of the salt domes (Halbouty... to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map of the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, (2) a seismic reflection study in order to obtain a seismic section of the area of investigation, and (3) an analysis and interpretation of these studies to obtain a reasonable model...

  12. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume geometry. The AVO analysis located a major amplitude anomaly, which was tested using a Geoprobe{trademark} direct push system. The Geoprobe{trademark} was equipped with a membrane interface probe (MIP) that was interfaced with a sorbent trap/gas chromatograph (GC) system. Both the Photo Ionization Detector (PID) and Electron Capture Detector (ECD) on the GC exceeded the maximum measurement values through the anomaly. A well was installed to collect a water sample. The concentration of chlorinated solvents in the water sample was in excess of 500 ppm. Other amplitude anomalies located directly under an asphalt road were also tested. Both the PID and ECD were zero. It appears that editing of poor quality near-offset traces during data processing caused these anomalies. Not having the full range of source to receiver offset traces in those areas resulted in a false anomaly during AVO analysis. This phenomenon was also observed at the beginning and end of each seismic profile also for the same reason. Based upon the water samples and MIP probes, it appears that surface seismic and AVO analysis were able to detect the area of highest concentration of DNAPL.

  13. LANDSTREAMER/GIMBALED GEOPHONE ACQUISITION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA NORTH OF THE 200 AREAS HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REPASKY TE; HYDE ER; LINK CA; SPEECE MA

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Landstreamer Seismic Reflection Vender Report by Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Montana Tech of the University of Montana, collected in FY2009 under CHPRC Contract 35789.

  14. A Closer Look at Salt, Faults, and Gas in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico with 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemazi, Leslie A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    'W; 27 degrees 10N - 26 degrees N] were examined to evaluate the interplay of salt, faults and gas. Seismic interpretation revealed the study area has two different styles of faulting and two different types of salt bodies that vary east to west...

  15. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  16. Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rogers

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

  17. Shallow seismic reflection confirmation of Berea gas pool structure and faulting, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergoulopoulos, A.; Coogan, A.H.; Palmer, D.F.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Berea Sandstone is a reservoir for shallow gas in Suffield Township, Portage County, Ohio, in the informally named St. Joseph's Church field. Production of natural gas from the Berea reservoir is from sandstone up to 60 ft (18 m) thick with porosity in the 15-25% range. The field, which is at about 400 ft (720 ft above sea level), lies updip from the Akron-Suffield fault zone and more or less along strike from the Berea gas field in Randolph Township to the southeast. The trap for the gas is anticlinal and overlying Sunbury shale (so called Coffee shale) is the seal. Initial field pressures were about 80-100 psi (552 kPa). A shallow seismic survey of 6 refraction and 26 CDP reflection lines was made, using a six-channel Bison recording unit. Reflections were obtained from depths down to 800 ft through well-documented formations of known lithology, including glacial till (kame and non-kame), Sharon Shale, Sharone Sandstone, Sunbury Shale, Berea Sandstone, Bedford Shale, and Ohio Shale. Correlation of the seismic data with logs from three separate wells drilled with cable tools was used to derive interval velocities for depth control. Seismic reflections from the top of the Berea Sandstone were consistent over the area with depths from wells. Unexpectedly high elevations of the Berea Sandstone on the southern crest of the anticlinal dome lay in a straight line trending east-west. This suggests the presence of a fault with a general east-west strike and vertical displacement of 15-18 ft. Marginal gas production was encountered just north of the plotted fault on a line between the best producing wells on 450-500 ft centers. Better gas-producing wells lie on the downthrown side of the small eastwest fault and close to the fault. The fault is probably one of many in the area and may be a splinter fault of the Akron-Suffield fault zone.

  18. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  19. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  20. Estimation of Impedance Using Seismic Reflection Data Based on Transdimensional Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadi, Sireesh

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Deterministic seismic inversion can obtain optimal results when there is a linear relationship between data and model parameters during local optimization (single optimum solution). For nonlinear geophysical problems and in the presence of multiple...

  1. Seismic reflection imaging of hydrostratigraphic facies in Boise: A tale of three scales Lee M. Liberty, Spencer H. Wood, and Warren Barrash, Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Seismic reflection imaging of hydrostratigraphic facies in Boise: A tale of three scales Lee M Subsurface (CGISS), Boise State University Summary We have acquired, processed and interpreted seismic groundwater studies and to better understand the hydrostratigraphic significance of seismic boundaries. We use

  2. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy This document summarizesDepartmentSeismic

  3. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe CommissionEnergyEnergySeismic Response of Fractures

  4. The Mining Machine as a Seismic Source for In-seam Reflection Mapping Neil Taylor*, Jim Merriam and Don Gendzwill, University of Saskatchewan, Canada; Arnfinn Prugger, Potash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    The Mining Machine as a Seismic Source for In-seam Reflection Mapping Neil Taylor*, Jim Merriam, Canada Summary Mapping the geology around mine zones is a key economic and safety concern at Saskatchewan potash mines. Experiments were carried out to investigate the feasibility of using a mining machine

  5. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Heigold, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  6. Detecting voids in a 0.6 m coal seam, 7 m deep, using seismic reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface collapse over abandoned subsurface coal mines is a problem in many parts of the world. High-resolution P-wave reflection seismology was successfully used to evaluate the risk of an active sinkhole to a main north-south ...

  7. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithologic interpretations of our seismic results are guidedx and z. Interpretation of the 2D seismic velocity models (to aid in interpretation of rock type from seismic velocity.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  9. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  10. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

  11. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  12. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discussed in the Seismic Data Interpretation section below,stations. Seismic Data Interpretation Shell developed anan internal interpretation of twenty 2D seismic lines. LBNL

  13. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for Task 4 site evaluation, Task 5 seismic reflection design and acquisition, and Task 6 seismic reflection processing and interpretation on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. During this reporting period the project had an ASME peer review. The findings and recommendation of the review panel, as well at the project team response to comments, are in Appendix A. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM and the peer review it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. Under the rescope of the project, Task 4 would be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC and not at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at SRS. The project team had already completed Task 4 at the M-area seepage basin, only a few hundred yards away from the DUS site. Because the geology is the same, Task 4 was not necessary. However, a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was conducted in one well to calibrate the geology to the seismic data. The first deployment to the DUS Site (Tasks 5 and 6) has been completed. Once the steam has been turned off these tasks will be performed again to compare the results to the pre-steam data. The results from the first deployment to the DUS site indicated a seismic amplitude anomaly at the location and depths of the known high concentrations of DNAPL. The deployment to another site with different geologic conditions was supposed to occur during this reporting period. The first site selected was DOE Paducah, Kentucky. After almost eight months of negotiation, site access was denied requiring the selection of another site. An alternate, site the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Tasks 4, 5, and 6 will be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station. Task 4 will be executed twice. The project team had almost completed Task 4 at Paducah before access was denied.

  14. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  15. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The Second deployment site is the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12) Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Base upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth the project team has collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and experimental reflection line. At the time of preparing this report VSP data and experimental reflection line data has been collected and has have preliminary processing on the data sets.

  16. Location, Reprocessing, and Analysis of Two Dimensional Seismic Reflection Data on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico, Final Report, September 1, 1997-February 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Taylor, David J.; Huffman, Jr., A. Curtis

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Multichannel surface seismic reflection data recording is a standard industry tool used to examine various aspects of geology, especially the stratigraphic characteristics and structural style of sedimentary formations in the subsurface. With the help of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe and the Bureau of Indian Affairs we were able to locate over 800 kilometers (500 miles) of multichannel seismic reflection data located on the Jicarilla Apache Indian reservation. Most of the data was received in hardcopy form, but there were data sets where either the demultiplexed digital field data or the processed data accompanied the hardcopy sections. The seismic data was acquired from the mid 1960's to the early 1990's. The most extensive seismic coverage is in the southern part of the reservation, although there are two good surveys located on the northeastern and northwestern parts of the reservation. Most of the data show that subsurface formations are generally flat-lying in the southern and western portion of the reservation. There is, however, a significant amount of structure imaged on seismic data located over the San Juan Basin margin along the east-central and northern part of the reservation. Several west to east trending lines in these areas show a highly faulted monoclinal structure from the deep basin in the west up onto the basin margin to the east. Hydrocarbon exploration in flat lying formations is mostly stratigraphic in nature. Where there is structure in the subsurface and indications are that rocks have been folded, faulted, and fractured, exploration has concentrated on structural traps and porosity/permeability "sweet spots" caused by fracturing. Therefore, an understanding of the tectonics influencing the entire section is critical in understanding mechanisms for generating faults and fractures in the Cretaceous. It is apparent that much of the hydrocarbon production on the reservation is from fracture porosity in either source or reservoir sequences. Therefore it is important to understand the mechanism that controls the location and intensity of the fractures. A possible mechanism may be deep seated basement faulting that has been active through time. Examining the basement fault patterns in this part of the basin and their relation to fracture production may provide a model for new plays on the Jicarilla Indian Reservation. There are still parts of the reservation where the subsurface has not been imaged geophysically with either conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional reflection seismic techniques. These methods, especially 3-D seismic, would provide the best data for mapping deep basement faulting. The authors would recommend that 3-D seismic be acquired along the Basin margin located along the eastern edge of the reservation and the results be used to construct detailed fault maps which may help to locate areas with the potential to contain highly fractured zones in the subsurface.

  17. Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Seismic modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Abstract Seismic modelling is a computationally to produce realistic seismic traces intensive problem. A 2D syn- Rosemary Renautt and Johnny equation is the first step in the generation of a synthetic seismogram as an aid in the interpretation

  18. 3-D multichannel seismic reflection study of variable-flux hydrocarbon seeps, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Ryan Douglas

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    3D multi-channel seismic (MCS) data augmented with side-scan sonar (Garden Banks site) to characterize hydrocarbon seep activity and develop an understanding of the processes that led to their formation. Side-scan sonar data provided high resolution...

  19. Structure of Mesozoic oceanic crust in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands from seismic reflection profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    . (1997) and Collier et al. (1998) in the `GRID' study area SW of the Canary islands, placed some 2 have been reported in the `OCEAN' study area between the Canary and Cape Verde islands by McBride et alStructure of Mesozoic oceanic crust in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands from seismic

  20. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  1. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  2. The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49S): Origin and evolution revealed by high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49°S): Origin and evolution revealed by high source in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (49°S). As part of an ongoing study reflection surveys in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (Fig. 1), with 3.5-kHz and boomer

  3. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

  4. Thin films versus 2D sheets in layered structures: graphene and 2D metallic sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo E. Sernelius

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an interface between two media separated by a strictly 2D sheet. We show how the amplitude reflection coefficient can be modeled by that for an interface where the 2D sheet has been replaced by a film of small but finite thickness. We give the relationship between the 3D dielectric function of the thin film and the 2D dielectric function of the sheet. We choose graphene and a 2D metallic sheet as illustrative examples. This approach turns out to be very useful when treating graphene or graphene like sheets in non-planar structures

  5. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W., E-mail: cwdomier@ucdavis.edu; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tobias, B. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present a novel system for rapidly interpret- ing and visualizing seismic volumetric data. First we to seismic data interpretation. Keywords: Seismic interpretation, Seismic horizons, Volume ren- dering hydrocarbons are trapped. In this paper we present a system for rapid interpretation of seismic reflection

  8. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  9. INVERSE SCATTERING OF SEISMIC DATA WITH THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-61-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse scattering of seismic reflection data making use of the generalized Radon transform. Through an extension, the relevant transform attains ...

  10. Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes Daniel Patel Thesis, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, Eduard Gr¨oller The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D of Seismic Data Published in: Vision, Modelling and Visualization (VMV) 2007 Authors: Daniel Patel

  11. Structural and Morphologic Study of Shatsky Rise Oceanic Plateau in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 2D Multichannel Seismic Reflection and Bathymetry Data and Implications for Oceanic Plateau Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinchang

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and shallow flank slopes (<0.5o-1.5o), characterized by lava flows emanating from the volcano center and extending hundreds of kilometers down smooth, shallow flanks to the surrounding seafloor. Ori Massif is another large volcano that is similar, but smaller...

  12. Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T. Mello*, IBM T. J. Watson Res. Center, Stewart A. Levin, Halliburton, Vanessa Lopez, Andrew Conn,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongchao

    Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T physics, and seismic attributes, including seismic amplitude to match seismic data. Introduction a match to seismic data. In particular, we seek to match not just event timing (phase) but also reflection

  13. Spatial Orientation and Distribution of Reservoir Fractures from Scattered Seismic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the details of a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic

  14. dirfield2d.m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % function dirfield2d % This program plots a direction field for an ODE x'=Ax, where A is % a 2x2 matrix, with the option of also plotting solution curves to % initial ...

  15. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RSI has access to two synthetic seismic programs: Osiris seismic modeling system provided by Odegaard (Osiris) and synthetic seismic program, developed by SRB, implementing the Kennett method for normal incidence. Achieving virtually identical synthetic seismic traces from these different programs serves as cross-validation for both. The subsequent experiments have been performed with the Kennett normal incidence code because: We have access to the source code, which allowed us to easily control computational parameters and integrate the synthetics computations with our graphical and I/O systems. This code allows to perform computations and displays on a PC in MatLab or Octave environment, which is faster and more convenient. The normal incidence model allows us to exclude from the synthetic traces some of the physical effects that take place in 3-D models (like inhomogeneous waves) but have no relevance to the topic of our investigation, which is attenuation effects on seismic reflection and transmission.

  16. 2-Dimensional Seismic Refraction Mapping Study of the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Complex from the Brazos, Texas Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gowan, Joshua Smith

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    River. Three seismic lines were surveyed, one across Cottonmouth Creek, and two parallel to the creek on either side. The data from the two parallel lines were processed using the 2-D seismic refraction tomography algorithm of Zelt and Smith...

  17. Seismic Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) Character of Geopressured Transition Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -stack amplitude versus offset behavior of seismic reflections from the eal. Acoustic synthetic seismograms based. Local conductivity logs and regional drilling mud weight compilations estab ish the presence

  18. Impact of seismic resolution on geostatistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Rio, P.; Mavko, G.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic measurements are often incorporated in geostatistical techniques for estimation and simulation of petrophysical properties such as porosity. The good correlation between seismic and rock properties provides a basis for these techniques. Seismic data have a wide spatial coverage not available in log or core data. However, each seismic measurement has a characteristic response function determined by the source-receiver geometry and signal bandwidth. The image response of the seismic measurement gives a filtered version of the true velocity image. Therefore the seismic image we obtain cannot reflect exactly the true seismic velocity at all scales of spatial heterogeneities present in the earth. The seismic response function can be conveniently approximated in the spatial spectral domain using a Born approximation. Our goal is to study how the seismic image response affects the estimation of variograms and spatial scales, and its impact on geostatistical results. Limitations of view angles and signal bandwidth not only smoothes the seismic image, increasing the variogram range, but can also introduce anisotropic spatial structures in the image. We can add value to the seismic data by better characterizing an quantifying these attributes. As an exercise we present example of seismically assisted cosimulation of porosity between wells.

  19. Staged Hybrid Genetic Search for Seismic Data Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Darrell

    Christof Stork yy and Tony Kusuma yy Abstract --- Seismic data interpretation problems are typ­ icallyStaged Hybrid Genetic Search for Seismic Data Imaging Keith E. Mathias, y L. Darrell Whitley, y. Geological exploration em­ ploys seismic reflection surveys to obtain subsurface im­ ages of geologic beds

  20. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly evaluated and identified. This document supersedes the seismic classifications, assignments, and computations in ''Seismic Analysis for Preclosure Safety'' (BSC 2004a).

  1. The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

  2. Seismic event classification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  3. Seismic event classification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  4. April 6, 2010 Seismic Reflection I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    the surface area of a sphere is proportional to the square of the radius, the energy per unit area (energy Geometrical Spreading As waves radiate away from the source, the energy spreads out. The energy of a wave is proportional to the square of the amplitude, so as the energy spreads out, the amplitude decreases, although

  5. ' low-frequency seismic waves in 'fluid-saturated layered rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papers report that reflection of low—frequency seismic. ' waves at a boundary between two ?uid-saturated rocks is not significantly modified by 'the presence of

  6. Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

  7. Coupling: Impact and Implications for High-Resolution Time-Lapse Seismic Surveying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Shelby Lynn

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions with repeat shots has a different effect on surface waves and compressional waves. This observation has potential application to wavefield separation. Acquisition approaches typically used to optimize 2D or 3D high-resolution seismic surveys may...

  8. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  9. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Christine M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Joseph C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark W. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  10. Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective M V de Hoop1@purdue.edu Abstract. A key challenge in the seismic imaging of reflectors using surface reflection data. Introduction 1.1. Seismic Imaging with Arrays ­ Beyond Current Capabilities Much research in modern

  11. 3-D Seismic Methods for Shallow Imaging Beneath Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Brian

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on survey design and acquisition of near-surface 3D seismic reflection and surface wave data on pavement. Increased efficiency for mapping simple subsurface interfaces through a combined use...

  12. Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each...

  13. Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model.

  14. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  15. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  16. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  17. SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    , and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based#12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration

  18. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

  19. Animation : 2D versus 3D and their combined effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au, Kristin C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies the differences in the perception of space and character movement between 2D and 3D animation. 2D animation is defined by elements constructed in a 2D environment while 3D animation by elements constructed ...

  20. Seismic evidence of up to 200 m lake-level change in Southern Patagonia since Marine Isotope Stage 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Seismic evidence of up to 200 m lake-level change in Southern Patagonia since Marine Isotope Stage Laguna Potrok Aike is located north of the Strait of Magellan (south- eastern Patagonia). Seismic, Patagonia, seismic reflection profiles. INTRODUCTION During the past decade, several studies have shown

  1. TWOZONE USERS MANUAL. 2d ed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation, S(24) = IDN * CCM. S(24) = SOLAR FACTOR 'A' *in the calculation IBUF CCM CODE COOLIT AIRINF CCC CCLATsurface, S(22) = BS * CCM. = diffuse ground reflected

  2. The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah, Jl. Ir.H. Djuanda 95 Ciputat 15412 (Indonesia); MTs NW Nurul Iman Kembang Kerang, Jl. Raya Mataram - Lb.Lombok, NTB (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics,Universitas Negeri Padang, Jl. Prof. Hamka, Padang 25132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

  3. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Nur, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection seismic methods are, and will continue to be, the key geophysical tool for imaging these heterogeneities in the subsurface of the earth. However, in spite of great advances in field acquisition techniques and computer processing power, the primary product of conventional seismic work is still only the spatial pattern of reflectivity, which is a measure of velocity variations. Most of the amplitude information goes unused. Although fracture zones may have a reflectivity signature, more often they will not, because of steeply dipping angles, limited offset range in the acquisition, a subtle impedance mismatch, or too thin a fractured zone relative to the wavelength. In fact, there is probably no single seismic attribute that will always tell us what we need to know about fracture zones. Our objective, in the project, is to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative interpretation scheme that exploits the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: anomalous compressional and shear wave velocities; Q and velocity dispersion; increased velocity anisotropy amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response. Our goal is to incorporate four key elements: Acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data. Theoretical studies of the anisotropic signatures of fractured rocks. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity, velocity anisotropy, and attenuation in reservoir and cap rocks. Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating forward modeling.

  4. Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H.L.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth`s subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

  5. Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen R. Novascone

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

  6. 2-D color code quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin G. Fowler

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe in detail how to perform universal fault-tolerant quantum computation on a 2-D color code, making use of only nearest neighbor interactions. Three defects (holes) in the code are used to represent logical qubits. Triple defect logical qubits are deformed into isolated triangular sections of color code to enable transversal implementation of all single logical qubit Clifford group gates. CNOT is implemented between pairs of triple defect logical qubits via braiding.

  7. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  8. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  9. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP...

  10. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  11. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At...

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

  13. Dispositional reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brummans, Boris H. J. M.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis suggests that the studied scholars enact these games to understand a more or less common object of knowledge, but also to constitute a more or less identifiable position in this given social space. Reflection on the ontological complicity between...

  14. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  15. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  16. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  17. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  18. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  19. Splitting of 3d quaternion dimensions into 2d-sells and a "world screen technology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander P. Yefremov

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of basic vectors locally describing metric properties of an arbitrary 2-dimensional (2D) surface is used for construction of fundamental algebraic objects having nilpotent and idempotent properties. It is shown that all possible linear combinations of the objects when multiplied behave as a set of hypercomples (in particular, quaternion) units; thus interior structure of the 3D space dimensions pointed by the vector units is exposed. Geometric representations of elementary surfaces (2D-sells) structuring the dimensions are studied in detail. Established mathematical link between a vector quaternion triad treated as a frame in 3D space and elementary 2D-sells prompts to raise an idea of "world screen" having 1/2 of a space dimension but adequately reflecting kinematical properties of an ensemble of 3D frames.

  20. North Caspian Basin: 2D elastic modeling for seismic imaging of salt and subsalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Zhanar Alpysbaevna

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Caspian Basin (NCB) contains a significant number of major oil fields, some of which are yet to be put into production. The reason why some of these fields are not yet put into production is the exploration challenge that the NCB poses...

  1. Seismic Discontinuities in the Mantle Beneath the Western Pacific: Evidence from ScS Reverberations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagley, Brian

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Earthquakes generate seismic waves that travel through the Earth and can be reflected by changes in density and/or seismic velocity that may relate to changes in the phase or chemical composition of the mantle. To study these discontinuities we use...

  2. Seismic Discontinuities in the Mantle Beneath the Western Pacific: Evidence from ScS Reverberations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagley, Brian

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Earthquakes generate seismic waves that travel through the Earth and can be reflected by changes in density and/or seismic velocity that may relate to changes in the phase or chemical composition of the mantle. To study these discontinuities we use...

  3. New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    #12;New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks, including Buildings Tom Egill Hauksson #12;SCSN: what does it encompass? · ~360 Seismic Stations · ~60 stations from partners SCSN/SCEDC total of ~26 FTE's #12;Crowd Sourced Networks · Current broadband seismic network

  4. Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Geurdes

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

  5. 2D Dirac Materials: From Graphene to Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2D Topological Insulators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .structure for a topological insulator. The Dirac cone fallsband structure for topological insulators. With the Fermi

  6. Spatial Orientation And Distribution Of Reservoir Fractures From Scattered Seismic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the details of a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method is based upon observations we have made from 3D finite ...

  7. Double-beam stacking to infer seismic properties of fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a theory for using 3D beam interference to infer scattering properties of a fractured reservoir using reflected seismic P data. For the sake of simplicity, we use Gaussian beams. The scattering properties are ...

  8. Spatial Orientation And Distribution Of Reservoir Fractures From Scattered Seismic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanded details and additional results are presented using a new method (Willis et al, 2003) for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method ...

  9. Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

  10. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  11. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  12. A statistical study of bright spot reflection parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godwin, David Lee

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cal Study of Bright Spot Reflection Parameters. (December 1981) David Lee Godwin, B. S. , Pepperdine University Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. T. W. Spencer A data set consisting of two seismic lines served as the basis of study... obtained from each of the seismic lines were compared to deter- mine if the presence of commercial quantities of gas could be identified. The measurement process revealed that the interval travel time measurements between the marker horizons...

  13. Evidence of $q$-exponential statistics in Greek seismicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris G. Antonopoulos; George Michas; Filippos Vallianatos; Tassos Bountis

    2014-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the seismicity (global seismic activity) that occurred in Greece between 1976 and 2009 based on the dataset reported in Makropoulos et al., 2012, using concepts of Non-extensive Statistical Physics. By considering the entire and declustered datasets, for which the aftershocks have been removed, we initially investigate the frequency-magnitude distribution and find that both datasets are well approximated by a physical model derived in the framework of Non-extensive Statistical Physics. We then carry out a study of the distribution of interevent times of seismic events for different magnitude thresholds and discover that the data are well approximated by a statistical distribution of the $q$-exponential type that allows us to compute analytically the hazard function of earthquake production. Our analysis thus reveals further evidence that the underlying dynamical process of earthquake birth reflects a kind of nonlinear memory due to long-term persistence of seismic events.

  14. Effect of beta on Seismic Vulnerability Curve for RC Bridge Based on Double Damage Criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Qinghai [CCCC Highway, CO., Ltd. (China); Yuan Wancheng [Bridge Department, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the analysis of seismic vulnerability curve based on double damage criterion, the randomness of structural parameter and randomness of seismic should be considered. Firstly, the distribution characteristics of structure capability and seismic demand are obtained based on IDA and PUSHOVER, secondly, the vulnerability of the bridge is gained based on ANN and MC and a vulnerability curve according to this bridge and seismic is drawn. Finally, the analysis for a continuous bridge is displayed as an example, and parametric analysis for the effect of beta is done, which reflects the bridge vulnerability overall from the point of total probability, and in order to reduce the discreteness, large value of beta are suggested.

  15. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  16. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reservoir permeability based on seismic and log data.seismic reservoir response based on well and 3D seismic datadata analysis we suggest seismic imaging of the reservoir

  17. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

  18. Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Abstract The...

  19. The crustal structure of Carnegie Ridge inferred from gravity and seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Torre, Giorgio Michele

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    to ridge transects along which wide-angle refraction seismic experiments have been conducted. In this study, the long-wavelength crustal structure of Carnegie Ridge between ~81?? W and 89?? W was determined by employing 2-D forward gravity modeling...

  20. High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jason Michael

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of seismic data from the deep-water Gulf of Mexico reveals the presence of High-Amplitude Reflection Packets (HARPs). An analog study conducted by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 155 identified and described ...

  1. 2D Dirac Materials: From Graphene to Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x Graphene Preparation and2008). Chapter 3 Graphene Preparation and CharacterizationPreparation Methods of Atomically-Thin 2D Graphene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. Azimuthal reflectivity inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mshepher

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    D., 2010, Principle stress estimation in shale plays using 3D seismic : GeoCanada. Hudson, J. A., 1981, Wave speeds and attenuation of elastic waves in ...

  3. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock containing a compliant, fluid-filled fracture can be viewed as one case of heterogeneous poroelastic media. When this fracture is subjected to seismic waves, a strong contrast in the elastic stiffness between the fracture itself and the background can result in enhanced grain-scale local fluid flow. Because this flow--relaxing the pressure building up within the fracture--can increase the dynamic compliance of the fracture and change energy dissipation (attenuation), the scattering of seismic waves can be enhanced. Previously, for a flat, infinite fracture, we derived poroelastic seismic boundary conditions that describe the relationship between a finite jump in the stress and displacement across a fracture, expressed as a function of the stress and displacement at the boundaries. In this paper, we use these boundary conditions to determine frequency-dependent seismic wave transmission and reflection coefficients. Fluid-filled fractures with a range of mechanical and hydraulic properties are examined. From parametric studies, we found that the hydraulic permeability of a fracture fully saturated with water has little impact on seismic wave scattering. In contrast, the seismic response of a partially water-saturated fracture and a heterogeneous fracture filled with compliant liquid (e.g., supercritical CO{sub 2}) depended on the fracture permeability.

  4. Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Vernon F.

    Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics Harsh Gupta-3046 USA E-mail: vernon.cormier@uconn.edu Tel: 860-486-3547 Fax: 860-486-3346 #12;SEISMIC VISCOELASTIC ATTENUATION Synonyms Seismic intrinsic attenuation Definitions Linear viscoelastic attenuation. The loss

  5. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  6. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Controllable seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  8. Lossless Wavelet Based Image Compression with Adaptive 2D Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lossless Wavelet Based Image Compression with Adaptive 2D Decomposition Manfred Kopp Technical.kopp@ieee.org WWW: http://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/~kopp/ Abstract 2D wavelets are usually generated from 1D wavelets wavelet functions based on the compression of the coefficients, but needs only the same number of 1D

  9. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral variations in Q for northern Italy relative to California.

  10. Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well...

  11. Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a 3D real data set: the introduction of constraints coming both from well logs and. from geological knowledge allows us to reduce the under-determination of ...

  12. Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt.

  13. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  14. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F. [Aix-Marseille Univ, IUSTI, UMR CNRS 7343, F-13453 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (? ? 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (? ? 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  15. Latest development in seismic texture analysis for subsurface structure, facies, and reservoir characterization: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In exploration geology and geophysics, seismic texture is still a developing concept that has not been sufficiently known, although quite a number of different algorithms have been published in the literature. This paper provides a review of the seismic texture concepts and methodologies, focusing on latest developments in seismic amplitude texture analysis, with particular reference to the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and the texture model regression (TMR) methods. The GLCM method evaluates spatial arrangements of amplitude samples within an analysis window using a matrix (a two-dimensional histogram) of amplitude co-occurrence. The matrix is then transformed into a suite of texture attributes, such as homogeneity, contrast, and randomness, which provide the basis for seismic facies classification. The TMR method uses a texture model as reference to discriminate among seismic features based on a linear, least-squares regression analysis between the model and the data within an analysis window. By implementing customized texture model schemes, the TMR algorithm has the flexibility to characterize subsurface geology for different purposes. A texture model with a constant phase is effective at enhancing the visibility of seismic structural fabrics, a texture model with a variable phase is helpful for visualizing seismic facies, and a texture model with variable amplitude, frequency, and size is instrumental in calibrating seismic to reservoir properties. Preliminary test case studies in the very recent past have indicated that the latest developments in seismic texture analysis have added to the existing amplitude interpretation theories and methodologies. These and future developments in seismic texture theory and methodologies will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the geologic implications of the seismic texture concept and to an improved geologic interpretation of reflection seismic amplitude

  16. Application of the 3D Edge Code EMC3-EIRENE to JET Single Null Configurations by Validating Against 2D Simulations with EDGE2D-EIRENE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of the 3D Edge Code EMC3-EIRENE to JET Single Null Configurations by Validating Against 2D Simulations with EDGE2D-EIRENE

  17. Generation of high quality 2D meshes for given bathymetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colmenero, Jorge, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops and applies a procedure to generate high quality 2D meshes for any given ocean region with complex coastlines. The different criteria used in determining mesh element sizes for a given domain are ...

  18. 3D-2D ASYMPTOTIC ANALYSIS FOR INHOMOGENEOUS THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3D-2D ASYMPTOTIC ANALYSIS FOR INHOMOGENEOUS THIN FILMS plate models, periodic pr* *o- files, and within the context of optimal design for thin films 5. Third application - Optimal design of a thin film 19 6. Final Remarks

  19. Scheduling and 2D placement heuristics for partially reconfigurable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santambrogio, Marco Domenico

    This paper proposes new scheduling and 2D placement heuristics for partially dynamically reconfigurable systems. One specific focus of this work is to deal with applications containing hundreds of tasks grouped in a few ...

  20. Solving the Capacitive Paradox of 2D MXene using Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * DOI: 10.1002aenm.201400815 energy storage applications, such as bat- tery and supercapacitor electrodes. 4,5 These 2D materials are so labeled because, they are produced...

  1. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Seismic Facies Characterization By Scale Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Felix J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years, there has been an ongoing struggle to relate well-log and seismic data due to the inherent bandwidth limitation of seismic data, the problem of seismic amplitudes, and the apparent inability to delineate ...

  3. Depositional setting of the Jurassic Haynesville seismic sequence in the Apalachicola Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic and well data from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico were used to define the seismic stratigraphy, geologic history, and depositional setting of the Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Haynesville sequence in the Apalachicola basin. The data show that Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with Haynesville carbonate deposition downdip. The regional Jurassic seismic stratigraphic framework includes, in ascending order, the Louann Salt Norphlet-Smackover, Haynesville, and Cotton Valley sequences. In the vicinity of Destin dome, wells have penetrated Haynesville sandstones, shales, and anhydrites. These clastics correlate with low amplitude, low-continuity reflections that characterize the Haynesville over a broad area updip. Similar reflections within the overlying (Tithonian-earliest Berriasian) Cotton Valley clastic sequence make seismic definition of the top Haynesville sequence boundary difficult updip. As Haynesville clastics are replaced by carbonates downdip, a high amplitude reflection marks the top of the sequence. Haynesville carbonates conformably overlie (Oxfordian) Smackover carbonates in the basin center, and the lower sequence boundary cannot be defined where disrupted by growth faults associated with early movement of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt. Sigmoid clinoforms document Haynesville shelf margin development Seismic facies also include oblique clinoforms that prograde eastward into the basin from the Southern Platform and Middle Ground Arch. No wells penetrate this facies. Mapping of the seismic facies and correlation with well data suggest a depositional setting for the Haynesville sequence in which influx of terrigenous clastics probably derived from adjacent land areas to the north and northeast filled a broad lagoon behind a carbonate shelf margin.

  4. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  5. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show results of seismic and well log derived attenuation attributes from a deep water Gulf of Mexico data set. This data was contributed by Burlington Resources and Seitel Inc. The data consists of ten square kilometers of 3D seismic data and three well penetrations. We have computed anomalous seismic absorption attributes on the seismic data and have computed Q from the well log curves. The results show a good correlation between the anomalous absorption (attenuation) attributes and the presence of gas as indicated by well logs.

  6. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

  7. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

  8. Overview of seismic panel activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1991, the DOE-EM appointed a Seismic Panel to develop seismic criteria that can be used for evaluation of underground storage tanks containing high level radioactive wastes. The Panel expects to issue the first draft of the criteria report in January 1992. This paper provides an overview of the Panel's activities and briefly discusses the criteria. 3 refs.

  9. Teleseismic transmission and reflection tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdick, Scott A. (Scott Anthony)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of seismic tomography is to determine a model of Earth properties that best explain observed seismic data. In practice, the limitations placed on our observations and computational capabilities force us to make a ...

  10. Quantum Process Tomography by 2D Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo A. Pachon; Andrew H. Marcus; Alan Aspuru-Guzik

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement and signal-to-noise ratio ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter $\\Gamma$ of the doubly-excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  11. Quantum Process Tomography by 2D Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachon, Leonardo A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement and signal-to-noise ratio ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter $\\Gamma$ of the doubly-excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  12. Characterization of 3d topological insulators by 2d invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Roy

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction of non-trivial topological phases in Bloch insulators in three dimensions has recently been experimentally verified. Here, I provide a picture for obtaining the $Z_{2}$ invariants for a three dimensional topological insulator by deforming suitable 2d planes in momentum space and by using a formula for the 2d $Z_{2}$ invariant based on the Chern number. The physical interpretation of this formula is also clarified through the connection between this formulation of the $Z_{2}$ invariant and the quantization of spin Hall conductance in two dimensions.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  14. Finite temperature analysis of a quasi2D dipolar gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ticknor, Christopher

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present finite temperature analysis of a quasi2D dipolar gas. To do this, we use the Hartree Fock Bogoliubov method within the Popov approximation. This formalism is a set of non-local equations containing the dipole-dipole interaction and the condensate and thermal correlation functions, which are solved self-consistently. We detail the numerical method used to implement the scheme. We present density profiles for a finite temperature dipolar gas in quasi2D, and compare these results to a gas with zero-range interactions. Additionally, we analyze the excitation spectrum and study the impact of the thermal exchange.

  15. Seismic Design Expectations Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer to FundPreparedContinuingHearings »Seismic Design

  16. Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: A novel 2D VSP imaging technology and patented processing techniques will be used to create accurate, high-resolution reflection images of a classic Basin and Range fault system in a fraction of previous compute times.

  17. 2D Static Light Scattering for Dairy Based Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2D Static Light Scattering for Dairy Based Applications Jacob Lercke Skytte Kongens Lyngby 2014 Ph information on the microstructure. The second paper makes a direction comparison between the light scattering a recently introduced light scattering tech- nique. The system setup of the technique is highly flexible

  18. Universal topological phase of 2D stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Bombin; Guillaume Duclos-Cianci; David Poulin

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two topological phases are equivalent if they are connected by a local unitary transformation. In this sense, classifying topological phases amounts to classifying long-range entanglement patterns. We show that all 2D topological stabilizer codes are equivalent to several copies of one universal phase: Kitaev's topological code. Error correction benefits from the corresponding local mappings.

  19. EU Guide v 2d January 20141 Finance Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    EU Guide v 2d January 20141 Finance Division Procurement Services The EU Directives on Public purchasing practice and especially where funders require it as part of their grant conditions. In exceptional Andrew Reid (goods and services) or the Director of Estate Management and Building Services (property

  20. 3D-2D ASYMPTOTIC ANALYSIS FOR MICROMAGNETIC THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3D-2D ASYMPTOTIC ANALYSIS FOR MICROMAGNETIC THIN FILMS Classification: 35E99, 35M10, 49J45, 74K35. Keywords: -limit, thin films, micromagnetics, relaxation; 1 1. Introduction In recent years the understanding of thin film behavior has been helped

  1. H_2D^+: a light on baryonic dark matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecilia Ceccarelli; Carsten Dominik

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that the dark halos of galaxies are constituted by cloudlets of cold ( 10^7$ cm^{-3}) molecular gas. Such gas is extremely difficult to detect, because the classical tracers of molecular gas, CO and/or dust grains, have very low abundances and their emission is exceedingly weak. For this reason, the cloudlet hypothesis remains so far substantially unproven. In this Letter we propose a new method to probe the presence of cold H_2 clouds in galactic halos: the ground transition of ortho-H_2D^+ at 372 GHz. We discuss why the H_2D^+ is abundant under the physical conditions appropriate for the cloudlets, and present a chemical model that predicts the H_2D^+ abundance as function of four key parameters: gas density and metallicity, cosmic ray ionization rate and dust grain size. We conclude that current ground-based instruments might detect the ortho-H_2D^+ line emitted by the cloudlets halo, and prove, therefore, the existence of large quantities of dark baryonic matter around galaxies.

  2. Temporal Integration of Seismic Traveltime Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-lapse geophysical measurements and seismic imaging methods in particular are powerful techniques

  3. SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

  4. Reservoir Characterization Using Intelligent Seismic Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    reservoir performance. Field Development #12;- Issues about the data and problems regarding data analysis characterization studies. - Inverse modeling of reservoir properties from the seismic data is known as seismic inversion. SEISMIC LOGS #12;1. Does a relationship exist between seismic data and reservoir characteristics

  5. Classical seismic sequence stratigraphic interpretation of intraslope basin fill: Deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, E.A. [BP Exploration Operating Co., Ltd., Stavanger (Norway)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed interpretation of seismic facies patterns performed within the workstation environment provides an observation based methodology for constructing depositional models of turbidite and other reservoir bearing systems expected in deepwater Nigeria. The increased fidelity of the workstation allows greater detail and accuracy to be imposed onto depositional model construction by vastly improving the discrimination of depositional from structural seismic reflection geometries. In deepwater Nigeria interslope basins, depositional cyclicity is clearly indicated by vertical seismic facies successions in the same way as can be recognized in bed thickness trends from outcrop or well log data. The recognition of the seismic facies successions appears to break the stratigraphy into at least fourth and fifth order scale sequences. Highly {open_quotes}zoomed{close_quotes} instantaneous phase displays enhance the reflection character so that near outcrop scale (resolution less than 50 mters) interpretations of depositional facies can be made. Common seismic facies and geologic interpretation include: (1) low angle erosional surfaces as channel scour or mass wasting detachment; (2) low relief mounds, often in compensation cycle overlapping stacks reflecting compacted channelbelt fill; (3) unidirectional, low angle clinoform sets suggesting laterial accretion within a channel belt or possible contourite mounds; (4) abrupt, shingled blocks illustrating tilted fault blocks of small scale intraformation slumping; and (5) high reflection amplitude and continuous, parallel reflections of pelagic and hemipelagic condensed sections. There are other subtle seismic facies resolvable given the incraesed fidelity of the workstation interpretation. Mapping and translation of these geometries into more robust stratigraphic predictions should have positive impact on exploration and development success.

  6. Integrated system for seismic evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the various features of the Seismic Module of the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures). This system was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and capability of nuclear power plant facilities. The CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the features of the Seismic Module in particular. The development of the Seismic Module of the CARES system is based on an approach which incorporates all major aspects of seismic analysis currently employed by the industry into an integrated system that allows for carrying out interactively computations of structural response to seismic motions. The code operates on a PC computer system and has multi-graphics capabilities. It has been designed with user friendly features and it allows for interactive manipulation of various analysis phases during the seismic design process. The capabilities of the seismic module include (a) generation of artificial time histories compatible with given design ground response spectra, (b) development of Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions associated with the seismic input, (c) deconvolution analysis using vertically propagating shear waves through a given soil profile, and (d) development of in-structure response spectra or corresponding PSD's. It should be pointed out that these types of analyses can also be performed individually by using available computer codes such as FLUSH, SAP, etc. The uniqueness of the CARES, however, lies on its ability to perform all required phases of the seismic analysis in an integrated manner. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  7. annual hanford seismic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the resulting distributions 5. Include the seismic hazard 64 Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity Physics...

  8. alternate seismic support: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the resulting distributions 5. Include the seismic hazard 76 Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity Physics...

  9. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

  10. Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist)...

  11. Interlocked optimization and fast gradient algorithm for a seismic inverse problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metivier, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.metivier@gmail.com [LAGA, Universite Paris XIII, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93000 Epinay-Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} A 2D extension of the 1D nonlinear inversion of well-seismic data is given. {yields} Appropriate regularization yields a well-determined large scale inverse problem. {yields} An interlocked optimization loop acts as an efficient preconditioner. {yields} The adjoint state method is used to compute the misfit function gradient. {yields} Domain decomposition method yields an efficient parallel implementation. - Abstract: We give a nonlinear inverse method for seismic data recorded in a well from sources at several offsets from the borehole in a 2D acoustic framework. Given the velocity field, approximate values of the impedance are recovered. This is a 2D extension of the 1D inversion of vertical seismic profiles . The inverse problem generates a large scale undetermined ill-conditioned problem. Appropriate regularization terms render the problem well-determined. An interlocked optimization algorithm yields an efficient preconditioning. A gradient algorithm based on the adjoint state method and domain decomposition gives a fast parallel numerical method. For a realistic test case, convergence is attained in an acceptable time with 128 processors.

  12. Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  13. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

  14. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  15. 2-D linear motion system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program requires buildings to be decontaminated, decommissioned, and surveyed for radiological contamination in an expeditious and cost-effective manner. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. D and D workers must perform duties high off the ground, requiring the use of manlifts or scaffolding, often, in radiologically or chemically contaminated areas or in areas with limited access. Survey and decontamination instruments that are used are sometimes heavy or awkward to use, particularly when the worker is operating from a manlift or scaffolding. Finding alternative methods of performing such work on manlifts or scaffolding is important. The 2-D Linear Motion System (2-D LMS), also known as the Wall Walker{trademark}, is designed to remotely position tools and instruments on walls for use in such activities as radiation surveys, decontamination, and painting. Traditional (baseline) methods for operating equipment for these tasks require workers to perform duties on elevated platforms, sometimes several meters above the ground surface and near potential sources of contamination. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS significantly improves health and safety conditions by facilitating remote operation of equipment. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS performed well in a demonstration of its precision, accuracy, maneuverability, payload capacity, and ease of use. Thus, this innovative technology is demonstrated to be a viable alternative to standard methods of performing work on large, high walls, especially those that have potential contamination concerns. The Wall Walker was used to perform a final release radiological survey on over 167 m{sup 2} of walls. In this application, surveying using a traditional (baseline) method that employs an aerial lift for manual access was 64% of the total cost of the improved technology. However, for areas over approximately 600 m{sup 2}, the Wall Walker would cost less than the baseline. Using the Wall Walker 2-D LMS, ALARA exposure and worker safety is improved, and there is potential for increased productivity. This innovative technology performed better than the baseline by providing real-time monitoring of the tool or instrument position. Also, the Wall Walker 2-D LMS can traverse any two-dimensional path at constant speeds of up to 18.3 linear meters per minute (60 linear feet per minute). The survey production rate for the innovative technology was about 0.6 m{sup 2}/min (6 ft{sup 2}/min); the baseline production rate was approximately 0.3 m{sup 2}/min (3 ft{sup 2}/min), using the same surveying instrument and maximum scanning rate.

  16. Investigating the point seismic array concept with seismic rotation measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Robert E.; Aldridge, David Franklin

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially-distributed arrays of seismometers are often utilized to infer the speed and direction of incident seismic waves. Conventionally, individual seismometers of the array measure one or more orthogonal components of rectilinear particle motion (displacement, velocity, or acceleration). The present work demonstrates that measure of both the particle velocity vector and the particle rotation vector at a single point receiver yields sufficient information to discern the type (compressional or shear), speed, and direction of an incident plane seismic wave. Hence, the approach offers the intriguing possibility of dispensing with spatially-extended received arrays, with their many problematic deployment, maintenance, relocation, and post-acquisition data processing issues. This study outlines straightforward mathematical theory underlying the point seismic array concept, and implements a simple cross-correlation scanning algorithm for determining the azimuth of incident seismic waves from measured acceleration and rotation rate data. The algorithm is successfully applied to synthetic seismic data generated by an advanced finite-difference seismic wave propagation modeling algorithm. Application of the same azimuth scanning approach to data acquired at a site near Yucca Mountain, Nevada yields ambiguous, albeit encouraging, results. Practical issues associated with rotational seismometry are recognized as important, but are not addressed in this investigation.

  17. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C., Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  19. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Final report, September 1991--January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The approach in this project has been to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative processing and interpretation scheme that exploits, where possible, the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: (1) anomalous compressional and shear wave velocity; (2) Q and velocity dispersion; (3) increased velocity anisotropy; (4) amplitude vs. offset (AVO) response, and (5) variations in frequency content. As part of this the authors have attempted to refine some of the theoretical rock physics tools that should be applied in any field study to link the observed seismic signatures to the physical/geologic description of the fractured rock. The project had 3 key elements: (1) rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, (2) acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data, and (3) interpretation of seismic and well log data. The study site is in a producing field operated by Amoco and Arco at the southern boundary of the Powder River basin in Wyoming. During the winter of 1992--1993 the authors collected about 50 km of 9-component reflection seismic data and obtained existing log data from several wells in the vicinity. The paper gives background information on laboratory studies, seismic field studies of fracture anisotropy, and the problem of upscaling from the laboratory to the field. It discusses fluid effects on seismic anisotropy and a method for predicting stress-induced seismic anisotropy. Then results from the field experiment are presented and discussed: regional geologic framework and site description; seismic data acquisition; shear wave data and validation; and P-wave data analysis. 106 refs., 52 figs.

  20. Seismic anisotropy of fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schoenberg, C. M. Sayers

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of seismic anisotropy to determine the orientation of fracture sets is of ... this assumption of noninteraction does not imply that the ... conventional (2-subscript) condensed 6 x 6 matrix notation,. 11. 6, while ... have simple physical interpretations.

  1. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  2. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  3. A Closer Look at Salt, Faults, and Gas in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico with 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemazi, Leslie A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, William Sager Committee Members, William Bryant Richard Gibson Adam Klaus Head of Department, Piers Chapman.... v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my adviser Dr. W. Sager for his support, and Dr. W. Bryant, Dr. R. Gibson, Dr. A. Klaus, and Dr. M. Lyle, for their help throughout the course of my research. I would also like to thank TGS...

  4. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  5. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  6. ESSDERC, Bucharest, Sep. 19, 2013.Kaustav Banerjee, UCSB 2D Electronics: Graphene and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    ESSDERC, Bucharest, Sep. 19, 2013.Kaustav Banerjee, UCSB 2D Electronics: Graphene and Beyond Electronics? I will use 2D electronic materials: Graphene and Beyond #12;ESSDERC, Bucharest, Sep. 19, 2013.Kaustav Banerjee, UCSB 2D Electronic Materials 2D family tree TMD family Graphene family Other families

  7. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  8. Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Grant

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Norphlet Formation (Bearden and Mink, 1989). Comprehensive high-quality multifold seismic reflection data have not previously been available for detailed seismic stratigraphic analysis in the Destin Dome region. Establishment of a seismic stratigraphic... DD-2 Destin Dome Exxon 162 17 938 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-3 Destin Dome Sun Oil 166 17 608 P, V, G, S, SP, D DD-4 Destin Dome Gulf 360 20 988 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-5 Destin Dome Chevron 422 22 222 V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-6 Destin Dome Sohio...

  9. Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feighner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    support in the interpretation of the seismic and tomographicinterpretation is partially supported by the re- h s flection seismic

  10. Correcting amplitude, time, and phase mis-ties in seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, T.N. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Nunns, A.G. (Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic lines from different vintages frequently mis-tie where they intersect. The mis-ties may stem from different amplitudes, a shift in time, or different wave-let character. The authors can correct these mis-ties to a great extent by applying a scale factor, a static time shift, and a phase rotation to one of the lines. The authors describe algorithms to compute the amplitude, time, and phase differences at each intersection among a series of 2-D seismic lines. They can then use an iterative least-squares technique to derive optimal mis-tie corrections for each line. They include a necessary modification of the least-squares technique for the nonlinear phase data. The various algorithms are stable, fast, and accurate. They have used them in conjunction with an interactive workstation seismic interpretation program for five years. The scalar mis-tie corrections greatly enhance the consistency of the seismic data. The authors show the results of the mis-tie package applied to a 20-line survey consisting of five vintages of seismic data. The resulting mis-tie corrections significantly improve the fit between the 20 lines.

  11. Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschi, Lapo

    Tomography Seismic tomography is the science of interpreting seismic measurements (seismograms) to derive; that is to say, solve the seismological inverse problem. Seismic data and their interpretation Seismic stationsSeismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch) September 14, 2009 Seismic

  12. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrkos, S. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York 13214 (United States); Kalman, G. J. [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  13. Exact solutions for the 2d one component plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy D. Andersen

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2d one component gas of pointlike charges in a uniform neutralizing background interacting with a logarithmic potential is a common model for plasmas. In its classical equilibrium statistics at fixed temperature (canonical ensemble) it is formally related to certain types of random matrices with Gaussian distribution and complex eigenvalues. In this paper, I present an exact integration of this ensemble for $N$ such particles (or alternatively $N\\times N$ matrices) for all even non-negative temperatures, a significant open problem in statistical physics for several decades. I achieve this exact integration via an exact integration of a related ensemble, the two-dimensional Selberg integral.

  14. Black liquor gasification phase 2D final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohl, A.L.; Stewart, A.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers work conducted by Rockwell International under Amendment 5 to Subcontract STR/DOE-12 of Cooperative Agreement DE-AC-05-80CS40341 between St. Regis Corporation (now Champion International) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The work has been designated Phase 2D of the overall program to differentiate it from prior work under the same subcontract. The overall program is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of and providing design data for the Rockwell process for gasifying Kraft black liquor. In this process, concentrated black liquor is converted into low-Btu fuel gas and reduced melt by reaction with air in a specially designed gasification reactor.

  15. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  16. 3D rotational diffusion microrheology using 2D video microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémy Colin; Minhao Yan; Loudjy Chevry; Jean-François Berret; Bérengère Abou

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple way to perform three-dimensional (3D) rotational microrheology using two-dimensional (2D) video microscopy. The 3D rotational brownian motion of micrometric wires in a viscous fluid is deduced from their projection on the focal plane of an optical microscope objective. The rotational diffusion coefficient of the wires of length between 1-100 \\mu m is extracted, as well as their diameter distribution in good agreement with electron microscopy measurements. This is a promising way to characterize soft visco-elastic materials, and probe the dimensions of anisotropic objects.

  17. 2D spectroscopy of double-barred galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Moiseev; J. R. Valdes; V. H. Chavushyan

    2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The first results of the observational program of the study of 2D-kinematics in double-barred galaxies are presented. We show that, for the main part of the sample, the inner bars do not affect the circumnuclear stellar kinematics. Therefore, they are not dynamically decoupled structures. Various types of non-circular gas motion were found in many galaxies. The analysis of the ground-based and HST optical and NIR images reveals mini-spirals in about half of the investigated objects. We suggest that so called ``double-barred galaxies'' are, in fact, galaxies with very different circumnuclear structure.

  18. Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Francois

    Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold Juan--In this research, we consider the supervised learning problem of seismic phase classification. In seismology, knowledge of the seismic activity arrival time and phase leads to epicenter localization and surface

  19. Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity C to apply an approach based on risk for the seismic assessment of existing buildings. In this innovative analytical seismic assessment methods, as the ratio between the capacity and the requirement of the current

  20. Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental techniques (LGIT), LCPC, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble Abstract Seismic vulnerability analysis. This curve is particularly interesting in moderate seismic areas. This methodology is applied to the Grenoble

  1. Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germán A.

    Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

  2. Seismic Attribute Analysis Using Higher Order Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenidge, Janelle Candice

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic data processing depends on mathematical and statistical tools such as convolution, crosscorrelation and stack that employ second-order statistics (SOS). Seismic signals are non-Gaussian and therefore contain information beyond SOS. One...

  3. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, Wayne D.

    2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is intended to enhance the ability to use seismic data for the determination of rock and fluid properties through an improved understanding of the physics underlying the relationships between seismic attributes and formation.

  4. Evaluation of strategies for seismic design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsertikidou, Despoina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current trends in seismic design require a new approach, oriented in satisfying motion related design requirements and limiting both structural and non-structural damage. Seismic isolation and damping devices are currently ...

  5. Seismic imaging using higher order statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karthik

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in seismic resolution beyond typical seismic wavelength will have significant implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Conventional imaging algorithms can be derived as a least squared optimization problem in which...

  6. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  7. SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

  8. Development of a HT Seismic Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program objective is to design; fabricate and field test two high temperature (HT) seismic tools in an EGS application.

  9. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  10. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iannuzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disk galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrised up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the midplane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically-symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second bucklin...

  11. MESH2D GRID GENERATOR DESIGN AND USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j{sub 0}) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations. The overall mesh is constructed from grid zones that are typically then subdivided into a collection of smaller grid cells. The grid zones usually correspond to distinct materials or larger-scale geometric shapes. The structured grid zones are identified through uppercase indices (I,J). Subdivision of zonal regions into grid cells can be done uniformly, or nonuniformly using either a polynomial or geometric skewing algorithm. Grid cells may be concentrated backward, forward, or toward both ends. Figure 1 illustrates the above concepts in the context of a simple four zone grid.

  12. Frequency-dependent processing and interpretation (FDPI) of seismic data for identifying, imaging and monitoring fluid-saturated underground reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, Gennady M. (Sugar Land, TX); Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA)

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying, imaging and monitoring dry or fluid-saturated underground reservoirs using seismic waves reflected from target porous or fractured layers is set forth. Seismic imaging the porous or fractured layer occurs by low pass filtering of the windowed reflections from the target porous or fractured layers leaving frequencies below low-most corner (or full width at half maximum) of a recorded frequency spectra. Additionally, the ratio of image amplitudes is shown to be approximately proportional to reservoir permeability, viscosity of fluid, and the fluid saturation of the porous or fractured layers.

  13. Frequency-dependent processing and interpretation (FDPI) of seismic data for identifying, imaging and monitoring fluid-saturated underground reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying, imaging and monitoring dry or fluid-saturated underground reservoirs using seismic waves reflected from target porous or fractured layers is set forth. Seismic imaging the porous or fractured layer occurs by low pass filtering of the windowed reflections from the target porous or fractured layers leaving frequencies below low-most corner (or full width at half maximum) of a recorded frequency spectra. Additionally, the ratio of image amplitudes is shown to be approximately proportional to reservoir permeability, viscosity of fluid, and the fluid saturation of the porous or fractured layers.

  14. Seismic, shock, and vibration isolation - 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H. (Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)); Mostaghel, N. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on pressure vessels and piping. Topics covered include: Design of R-FBI bearings for seismic isolation; Benefits of vertical and horizontal seismic isolation for LMR nuclear reactor units; and Some remarks on the use and perspectives of seismic isolation for fast reactors.

  15. BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munshi-South, Jason

    BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure Among African Elephants The Elephant's Secret Sense in Namibia as she first develops the hypothesis that elephants can communicate using seismic signals. Science documenting the elephants' listening behavior and responses to seismic cues. However, these scientific

  16. SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

  17. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  18. Vacuum compatible, high-speed, 2-D mirror tilt stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denham; Paul E. (Crockett, CA)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and vacuum compatible magnetic-coil driven tiltable stage that is equipped with a high efficiency reflective coating can be employed as a scanner in EUV applications. The drive electronics for the scanner is fully in situ programmable and rapidly switchable.

  19. Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Jordan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

  20. Reflecting to learn mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating reflective practice and writing to learn mathematics (WTLM) in order ... concern or interest as well as potential explanations for and solutions to ..... teacher, I know I need to be universally good in both language and numbers. ... The PSMTs' reflections also revealed that completing the prompts encouraged them to.

  1. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)] [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Kürklüoglu, Mustafa [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)] [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Lovejoy, John [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)] [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Yaniv, Ziv, E-mail: ZYaniv@childrensnational.org [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 and Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)] [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 and Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the authors' evaluation, the authors conclude that the registration approaches are sufficiently accurate for initializing 2D/3D registration in the OR setting, both when a tracking system is not in use (gesture based approach), and when a tracking system is already in use (AR based approach)

  2. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivers, M. (UC)

    2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  3. Electrical spin injection in 2D semiconductors and topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golub, L. E.; Ivchenko, E. L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a theory of spin orientation by electric current in 2D semiconductors. It is shown that the spin depends on the relation between the energy and spin relaxation times and can vary by a factor of two for the limiting cases of fast and slow energy relaxation. For symmetrically-doped (110)-grown semiconductor quantum wells the effect of current-induced spin orientation is shown to exist due to random spatial variation of the Rashba spin-orbit splitting. We demonstrate that the spin depends strongly on the correlation length of this random spin-orbit field. We calculate the spin orientation degree in two-dimensional topological insulators. In high electric fields when the “streaming” regime is realized, the spin orientation degree weakly depends on the electric field and can reach values about 5%.

  4. HEXAGONAL ARRAY STRUCTURE FOR 2D NDE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziewierz, J.; Ramadas, S. N.; Gachagan, A.; O'Leary, R. L. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a combination of simulation and experimentation to evaluate the advantages offered by utilizing a hexagonal shaped array element in a 2D NDE array structure. The active material is a 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structure incorporating triangular shaped pillars--each hexagonal array element comprising six triangular pillars. A combination of PZFlex, COMSOL and Matlab has been used to simulate the behavior of this device microstructure, for operation around 2.25 MHz, with unimodal behavior and low levels of mechanical cross-coupling predicted. Furthermore, the application of hexagonal array elements enables the array aperture to increase by approximately 30%, compared to a conventional orthogonal array matrix and hence will provide enhanced volumetric coverage and SNR. Prototype array configurations demonstrate good corroboration of the theoretically predicted mechanical cross-coupling between adjacent array elements (approx23 dB).

  5. The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 1 1 INTRODUCTION Last at the contacts is studied. #12;The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 2 complex

  6. Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - Generated Shockwave Treatment of Wound Infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shahzad Neville

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biofilm structure from confocal scanning laser microscopyAngeles Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - GeneratedTHE THESIS Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser-Generated

  7. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We are now entering the final stages of our ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342). We have now developed several techniques to help distinguish economic hydrocarbon deposits from false ''Fizz'' gas signatures. These methods include using the proper in situ rock and fluid properties, evaluating interference effects on data, and doing better constrained inversions for saturations. We are testing these techniques now on seismic data from several locations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we are examining the use of seismic attenuation as indicated by frequency shifts below potential reservoirs. During this quarter we have: Began our evaluation of our latest data set over the Neptune Field; Developed software for computing composite reflection coefficients; Designed and implemented stochastic turbidite reservoir models; Produced software & work flow to improve frequency-dependent AVO analysis; Developed improved AVO analysis for data with low signal-to-noise ratio; and Examined feasibility of detecting fizz gas using frequency attenuation. Our focus on technology transfer continues, both by generating numerous presentations for the upcoming SEG annual meeting, and by beginning our planning for our next DHI minisymposium next spring.

  8. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  10. 2D-GE IMAGE SEGMENTATION BASED ON LEVEL-SETS E.A. Mylona a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, University of

    2D-GE IMAGE SEGMENTATION BASED ON LEVEL-SETS E.A. Mylona a , M.A. Savelonas a , D. Maroulis a , M of protein spots in 2D-GE images. The proposed scheme incorporates a protein spot detection stage based both software packages in terms of segmentation performance. Index Terms--2D-GE Images, Protein Spot

  11. An Improved Ant Colony Optimisation Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoos, Holger H.

    An Improved Ant Colony Optimisation Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem Alena hydrophobic-polar (2D HP) protein folding problem. We present an improved version of our recently proposed Ant search. Overall, the results presented here establish our new ACO algorithm for 2D HP protein folding

  12. An Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoos, Holger H.

    An Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for the 2D HP Protein Folding Problem Alena Shmygelska, Rosal, the two dimensional hydrophobic-polar (2D HP) protein folding problem. We introduce an ant colony algorithm closely approaches that of specialised, state-of-the methods for 2D HP protein folding. 1

  13. Cylindrical 2D ALE simulations of laser interactions with flyer targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    , mass density, v speed, p pressure, e specific internal energy, T temperature, heat conductivity acceleration simulated in 2D. 2 Numerical ALE method with extensions Our 2D ALE code [6] employs conservative 1 April 2006 We have developed 2D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code in the cylindrical r - z

  14. Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review Conf Presco Energy Structural Profile "High-Enthalpy" Targets Existing Wellfield ("medium-enthalpy") Block Model used for Finite-Difference Modeling of Seismic Response 8 |...

  15. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

  16. The Multidimensional Filter Diagonalization Method II. Application to 2D Projections of 2D, 3D, and 4D NMR Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    The Multidimensional Filter Diagonalization Method II. Application to 2D Projections of 2D, 3D signals with up to four independent time variables. Direct projections of the multidimensional time- quency dimension (1). The increase in experiment time is a fair price to pay for the ability to tease out

  17. High resolution seismic survey (of the) Rawlins, Wyoming underground coal gasification area. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngberg, A.D.; Berkman, E.; Orange, A.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1982, a high resolution seismic survey was conducted at the Gulf Research and Development Company's underground coal gasification test site near Rawlins, Wyoming. The objectives of the survey were to utilize high resolution seismic technology to locate and characterize two underground coal burn zones. Seismic data acquisition and processing parameters were specifically designed to emphasize reflections at the shallow depths of interest. A three-dimensional grid of data was obtained over the Rawlins burn zones. Processing included time varying filters, trace composition, and two-dimensional areal stacking of the data in order to identify burn zone anomalies. An anomaly was discernable resulting from the rubble-collapse cavity associated with the burn zone which was studied in detail at the Rawlins 1 and 2 test sites. 21 refs., 20 figs.

  18. Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justin Coleman; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

  19. VAM2D: Variably saturated analysis model in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a two-dimensional finite element model, VAM2D, developed to simulate water flow and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. Both flow and transport simulation can be handled concurrently or sequentially. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. Nonlinear soil moisture characteristics and atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage face), are treated using Picard and Newton-Raphson iterations. Hysteresis effects and anisotropy in the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity can be taken into account if needed. The contaminant transport simulation can account for advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear equilibrium sorption, and first-order degradation. Transport of a single component or a multi-component decay chain can be handled. The transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. This document has been produced as a user's manual. It contains detailed information on the code structure along with instructions for input data preparation and sample input and printed output for selected test problems. Also included are instructions for job set up and restarting procedures. 44 refs., 54 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  1. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM - Belgian State Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Renaissancelaan 30 Avenue de la Renaissance, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium and Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, B (Belgium); Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM - Belgian State Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Renaissancelaan 30 Avenue de la Renaissance, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  2. Duality between Spin networks and the 2D Ising model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin Bonzom; Francesco Costantino; Etera R. Livine

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories which couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  3. Exact Solutions of 2d Supersymmetric Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Gadde; Sergei Gukov; Pavel Putrov

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study dynamics of two-dimensional non-abelian gauge theories with N=(0,2) supersymmetry that include N=(0,2) supersymmetric QCD and its generalizations. In particular, we present the phase diagram of N=(0,2) SQCD and determine its massive and low-energy spectrum. We find that the theory has no mass gap, a nearly constant distribution of massive states, and lots of massless states that in general flow to an interacting CFT. For a range of parameters where supersymmetry is not dynamically broken at low energies, we give a complete description of the low-energy physics in terms of 2d N=(0,2) SCFTs using anomaly matching and modular invariance. Our construction provides a vast landscape of new N=(0,2) SCFTs which, for small values of the central charge, could be used for building novel heterotic models with no moduli and, for large values of the central charge, could be dual to AdS_3 string vacua.

  4. Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Zhongping

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

  5. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOFMAYER,C.H.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

  6. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Section 1 of this first report we will describe the work we are doing to collect and analyze rock physics data for the purpose of modeling seismic attenuation from other measurable quantities such as porosity, water saturation, clay content and net stress. This work and other empirical methods to be presented later, will form the basis for ''Q pseudo-well modeling'' that is a key part of this project. In Section 2 of this report, we will show the fundamentals of a new method to extract Q, dispersion, and attenuation from field seismic data. The method is called Gabor-Morlet time-frequency decomposition. This technique has a number of advantages including greater stability and better time resolution than spectral ratio methods.

  7. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  8. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  9. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  10. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION platform for distributed hybrid testing #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN? Celestina Overview Implementation Validation Next steps #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  11. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental-TA Project #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Partners (Users) · METU Ragueneau · SCHOECK (Germany): Steffen Scheer, Seref Diler #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  12. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION Database: Architecture and implementation #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN Conclusions #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES 3 SERIES Concluding

  13. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  14. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show the fundamental concepts of two different methods to compute seismic energy absorption. The first methods gives and absolute value of Q and is based on computation with minimum phase operators. The second method gives a relative energy loss compared to a background trend. This method is a rapid, qualitative indicator of anomalous absorption and can be combined with other attributes such as band limited acoustic impedance to indicate areas of likely gas saturation.

  15. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  16. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

  17. Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

  18. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, %22weight-drop%22 source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  19. Opportunities for improving regulations governing the seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Support DOE NPH Design AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA...

  20. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

  1. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

  3. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

  4. Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Application of the...

  5. Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI Responses...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI Responses of Nuclear Structures for Different Soil Site Conditions Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI...

  6. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Hazard Analysis AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA...

  7. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East...

  8. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

  10. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

  11. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing...

  12. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure...

  13. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  14. The application of seismic stratigraphic methods on exploration 3D seismic data to define a reservoir model in OPL 210, Deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragnhild, L.; Ventris, P. [Statoil and BP Alliance, Stavanger (Norway); Osahon, G. [Allied Energy Resources (Nig) Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPL 210 lies in deepwater on the northwestern flank of the Niger Delta. The partners in this block are Allied Energy and The Statoil and BP Alliance. The license has a 5 year initial exploration phase and carries a 2 well commitment. At present the database comprises a 1 x 1 km grid of 2D seismic across the block, and 450 sq. km of 3D in an area of special interest. A larger 3D survey is planned for 1995. Little is known about the reservoir in the deep water, but we expect our main target to be ponded slope and basin turbidites. As such the bulk of the shelf well data available has little or no relevance to the play type likely to be encountered. Prior to drilling, seismic stratigraphy has been one of several methods used to generate a consistent predictive reservoir model. The excellent quality and high resolution of the 3D data have allowed identification and detailed description of several distinctive seismic facies. These facies are described in terms of their internal geometries and stacking patterns. The geometries are then interpreted based on a knowledge of depositional processes from analog slope settings. This enables a predictive model to be constructed for the distribution of reservoir within the observed facies. These predictions will be tested by one of the first wells drilled in the Nigerian deepwater in mid 1995.

  15. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  16. Expression of Ligands for the NKG2D Activating Receptor are Linked to Proliferative Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Heiyoun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon NKG2D engagement, the ITAM in DAP12 recruits ZAP70 orcontrast, DAP10 lacks an ITAM, and instead contains a YINM

  17. Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahoon, James

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material Determining transition state geometries in liquidsDetermining transition state geometries in liquids using 2D-are determined by the transition state connecting reactant

  18. On 3D instabilities of 2D time-periodic flows - Department of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Karman vortex street, the 2D periodically shedding wake of a circular cylinder, is the prototypical example. We shall consider this as well as a periodically ...

  19. Seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamchybekov, Murataly; Yegemberdiyeva, Kuliya [Institute of Seismology of National Academy Science Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyzstan)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with that this seismic in the territory of Naryn cascade maybe has its peculiarity in cludding in the territory Toktogul reservoir before of the building of the Toktogul dam, during of the building and after accordingly was decided to consider the seismic in this space of times. The arm of the present paper is estimation seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir for different times: before of the building of the Toktogul dam (1960-1973), during its filling (1974-1980) and since start it's of the uninterruptedly exploitation to present time (1981-2006). The territory in that located the cascade of Naryn River is considered that seismic active in the Central part of the Tien Shan. The tectonic motions are become here intensity. The presence of the large faults is complicating significantly the seismic situation of the study region.

  20. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show some new Q related seismic attributes on the Burlington-Seitel data set. One example will be called Energy Absorption Attribute (EAA) and is based on a spectral analysis. The EAA algorithm is designed to detect a sudden increase in the rate of exponential decay in the relatively higher frequency portion of the spectrum. In addition we will show results from a hybrid attribute that combines attenuation with relative acoustic impedance to give a better indication of commercial gas saturation.

  1. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  2. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  3. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  4. A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Eric M.

    A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults complexity in the rupture process and resulting ground motion. We present a 2D kinematic rupture generator that emulates the strong dependence of earthquake source parameters on local fault geometry observed in dynamic

  5. A 2D Graphics Interface Based on CGI Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    ) standards for device independent driving of graphics hardware, both issued from standardization institutes#12; CGI ++ A 2D Graphics Interface Based on CGI Version 1.0 Dieter W. Fellner Martin Fischer Currently, designers of 2D graphics applications have to deal with several (and unfor­ tunately incompatible

  6. Journal of Computer Graphics Techniques Higher Quality 2D Text Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Journal of Computer Graphics Techniques Higher Quality 2D Text Rendering Vol. 2, No. 1, 2013 http://jcgt.org Higher Quality 2D Text Rendering Nicolas P. Rougier INRIA Figure 1. When displaying text on low technology / Microsoft / native hinting) for crisp rendering or, to privilege glyph shapes (Quartz technology

  7. Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

  8. A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant 3 April 2014 Accepted 20 May 2014 Keywords: Fast multipole BEM 2-D multi-crack problems Constant elements Crack opening displacements Stress intensity factors a b s t r a c t A fast multipole boundary

  9. The following VS tools were compared: 2D OPENBABEL, DAYLIGHT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Dave

    The following VS tools were compared: 2D ­ OPENBABEL, DAYLIGHT2 , MACCS. BCI, MOLPRINT2D3 3D ­ ROCS Software Inc., Cepos Insilico Ltd., Chemical Computing Group, DAYLIGHT, Chemical Information Systems and Digital Chemistry for providing Academic Licences for ROCS, ParaSurf, MOE, DAYLIGHT, and BCI, respectively

  10. Wavelet filtering to study mixing in 2D isotropic turbulence Carsten Beta a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    École Normale Supérieure

    Wavelet filtering to study mixing in 2D isotropic turbulence Carsten Beta a , Kai Schneider b simulation (CVS) filtering, based on an ortho- gonal wavelet decomposition of vorticity, to study mixing in 2; Diffusion; Wavelets 1. Introduction Decaying 2D turbulence is characterized by the emergence of long

  11. Angular momentum and energy structure of the coherent state of a 2D isotropic harmonic oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU Yufeng; HUO Wujun; ZENG Jinyan

    1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular momentum structure and energy structure of the coherent state of a 2D isotropic harmonic oscillator were investigated. Calculations showed that the average values of angular momentum and energy (except the zero point energy) of this nonspreading 2D wave packet are identical to those of the corresponding classical oscillator moving along a circular or an elliptic orbit.

  12. 2D-Zernike polynomials and coherent state quantization of the unit disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Thirulogasanthar; Nasser Saad; G. Honnouvo

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the orthonormality of the 2D-Zernike polynomials, reproducing kernels, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, and ensuring coherent states attained. With the aid of the so-obtained coherent states, the complex unit disc is quantized. Associated upper symbols, lower symbols and related generalized Berezin transforms also obtained. A number of necessary summation formulas for the 2D-Zernike polynomials proved.

  13. Understanding and engineering molecular interactions and electronic transport at 2D materials interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Chih-Jen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2D materials are defined as solids with strong in-plane chemical bonds but weak out-of-plane, van der Waals (vdW) interactions. In order to realize potential applications of 2D materials in the areas of optoelectronics, ...

  14. Fault properties from seismic Q M. H. Worthington1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    ®cally concerned with the analysis and interpretation of some vertical seismic pro®ling (VSP) data from a holeFault properties from seismic Q M. H. Worthington1 and J. A. Hudson2 1 T. H. Huxley School of seismic Q from a North Sea vertical seismic pro®ling data set has revealed an abrupt increase

  15. Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization Thomas H¨ollt King and horizons. However, seismic interpretation and horizon tracing is a difficult and error-prone task, often starts with creating a model of the subsurface structures, the seismic interpretation. A seismic

  16. SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yegian, Mishac

    1 SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian 1 , F. ASCE ABSTRACT Seismic and impedance calculations; assessment of foundation performance under the design seismic loads; and in the case of existing bridges, if deemed necessary, design of seismic retrofit measures. The outcomes of each

  17. Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy in poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy in poroelastic media Juan E. Santos stituto) and R. Mart´inez Corredor (UNLP) Department of Mathematics, University of Calgary, October 2014 Seismic variations of velocity and attenuation of seismic waves. Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy

  18. SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

  19. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  20. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  1. Fracture detection in crystalline rock using ultrasonic reflection techniques: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, S.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was initiated to investigate using ultrasonic seismic reflection techniques to detect fracture discontinuities in a granitic rock. Initial compressional (P) and shear (SH) wave experiments were performed on a 0.9 {times} 0.9 {times} 0.3 meter granite slab in an attempt to detect seismic energy reflected from the opposite face of the slab. It was found that processing techniques such as deconvolution and array synthesis could improve the standout of the reflection event. During the summers of 1979 and 1980 SH reflection experiments were performed at a granite quarry near Knowles, California. The purpose of this study was to use SH reflection methods to detect an in situ fracture located one to three meters behind the quarry face. These SH data were later analyzed using methods similar to those applied in the laboratory. Interpretation of the later-arriving events observed in the SH field data as reflections from a steeply-dipping fracture was inconclusive. 41 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. A bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) is a seismic reflec-tivity phenomenon that is widely accepted as indicating the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    as indicating the base of the gas-hydrate stability zone. The acoustic imped- ance difference between sediments invaded with gas hydrate above the BSR and sediments without gas hydrate, but com- monly with free gas and marine gas hydrate has become so well known since the 1970s that investigators, when asked to define

  3. Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

  4. Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction 1 Seismic Wave of alluvial deposits have a major influence on seismic wave propagation and amplification. However influence seismic wave propagation near the free surface. In this paper, the influence of surface structures

  5. Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables.

  6. Solar Reflectance Index Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouof Energy Projects to ReduceReflectance

  7. Seismic Earth Pressure Development in Sheet Pile Retaining Walls: A Numerical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajeev, P; Sivakugan, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of retaining walls requires the complete knowledge of the earth pressure distribution behind the wall. Due to the complex soil-structure effect, the estimation of earth pressure is not an easy task; even in the static case. The problem becomes even more complex for the dynamic (i.e., seismic) analysis and design of retaining walls. Several earth pressure models have been developed over the years to integrate the dynamic earth pressure with the static earth pressure and to improve the design of retaining wall in seismic regions. Among all the models, MononobeOkabe (M-O) method is commonly used to estimate the magnitude of seismic earth pressures in retaining walls and is adopted in design practices around the world (e.g., EuroCode and Australian Standards). However, the M-O method has several drawbacks and does not provide reliable estimate of the earth pressure in many instances. This study investigates the accuracy of the M-O method to predict the dynamic earth pressure in sheet pile wall. A 2D pl...

  8. Seismicity parameters preceding moderate to major earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Seggern, D.; Alexander, S.S.; Baag, C.

    1981-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic events reported in the bulletins of the two large arrays, LASA and NORSAR, were merged with those from the NEIS bulletin for the period 1970-1977. Using a lower cutoff of m/sub b/ = 5.8, 510 'main shocks' within the P range of LASA or NORSAR were selected for this period; and various seismicity trends prior to them were investigated. A search for definite foreshocks, based on a significantly short time delay to the main shock, revealed that the true rate of foreshock occurrence was less than 20%. Foreshocks are almost exclusively associated with shallow (h<100 km) main shocks. Averaging shows that the seismicity level around the main shock increases somewhat for 10 days before main shocks; this feature peaks in the last 3--4 hours prior to the main shocks. Again by averaging, the seismicity about main shocks is shown to tend with time toward the main shock as its origin time is approached, but the average effect is small (approx.10% change).Using a new variable to track the departures from both spatial and temporal randomness, the Poisson-like behavior of deeper seismicity (>100 km) was demonstrated. For shallow events (<100 km) this variable reveals numerous instances of clustering and spatial-temporal seismic gaps, with little tendency toward a uniformity of behavior prior to main shocks. A statistical test of the validity of seismic precursors was performed for approximately 90 main shock regions which had sufficient seismicity. Using a five-variable vector, (interevent time, interevent distance, magnitude, epicentral distance to main shock, and depth difference relative to main shock) for each event in a 'precursory' time window of 500 days before the main shock and for each event in a 'normal' time window of 500 days before that, the null hypothesis of equal vector means between the two groups was tested. At 90% confidence levels, less than 30% of the main shock regions were thus found to exhibit precursory seismicity changes.

  9. Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

  10. Estimating the amount of gas hydrate and free gas from marine seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, C.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.M.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine seismic data and well-log measurements at the Blake Ridge offshore South Carolina show that prominent seismic bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) are caused by sediment layers with gas hydrate overlying sediments with free gas. The authors apply a theoretical rock-physics model to 2-D Blake Ridge marine seismic data to determine gas-hydrate and free-gas saturation. High-porosity marine sediment is modeled as a granular system where the elastic wave velocities are linked to porosity; effective pressure; mineralogy; elastic properties of the pore-filling material; and water, gas, and gas-hydrate saturation of the pore space. To apply this model to seismic data, the authors first obtain interval velocity using stacking velocity analysis. Next, all input parameters to the rock-physics model, except porosity and water, gas and gas hydrate saturation, are estimated from geologic information. To estimate porosity and saturation from interval velocity, they first assume that the entire sediment does not contain gas hydrate or free gas. Then they use the rock-physics model to calculate porosity directly from the interval velocity. Such porosity profiles appear to have anomalies where gas hydrate and free gas are present (as compared to typical profiles expected and obtained in sediment without gas hydrate of gas). Porosity is underestimated in the hydrate region and is overestimated in the free-gas region. The authors calculate the porosity residuals by subtracting a typical porosity profile (without gas hydrate and gas) from that with anomalies. Next they use the rock-physics model to eliminate these anomalies by introducing gas-hydrate of gas saturation. As a result, they obtain the desired 2-D saturation map. The maximum gas-hydrate saturation thus obtained is between 13% and 18% of the pore space (depending on the version of the model used). These saturation values are consistent with those measured in the Blake Ridge wells (away from the seismic line), which are about 12%. Free-gas saturation varies between 1% and 2%. The saturation estimates are extremely sensitive to the input velocity values. Therefore, accurate velocity determination is crucial for correct reservoir characterization.

  11. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline logging to onshore basalts is underexploited. Full waveform sonic logs and resistivity-based image logs acquired in the 1250 m basalt pilot borehole provide powerful tools for evaluating geomechanics and lithofacies. The azimuth of the fast shear wave is parallel to SH and records the changes through time in basalt flow and tectonic stress tensors. Combined with image log data, azimuthal S-wave data provide a borehole technique for assessing basalt emplacement and cooling history that is related to the development of reservoirs and seals, as well as the orientation of tectonic stresses and fracture systems that could affect CO2 transport or containment. Reservoir and seal properties are controlled by basalt lithofacies, and rescaled P- and S- wave slowness curves, integrated with image logs, provide a tool for improved recognition of subsurface lithofacies.

  13. SMACS. Probabilistic Seismic Analysis System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Mraz, M.J. [EQE Incorporated, San Ramon, CA (United States); Bumpus, S.; Gerhard, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The SMACS (Seismic Methodology Analysis Chain with Statistics) system of computer programs is one of the major computational tools of the U.S. NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). SMACS is comprised of the core program SMAX, which performs the SSI response analyses, five preprocessing programs, and two postprocessors. The preprocessing programs include: GLAY and CLAN, which generate the nominal impedance matrices and wave scattering vectors for surface-founded structures; INSSIN, which projects the dynamic properties of structures to the foundation in the form of modal participation factors and mass matrices; SAPPAC, which projects the dynamic and pseudostatic properties of multiply-supported piping systems to the support locations, and LNGEN, which can be used to generate the multiplication factors to be applied to the nominal soil, structural, and subsystem properties for each of the response calculations in accounting for random variations of these properties. The postprocessors are: PRESTO, which performs statistical operations on the raw data from the response vectors that SMAX produces to calculate best fit lognormal distributions for each response location, and CHANGO, which manipulates the data produced by PRESTO to produce other results of interest to the user. Also included is the computer program SAP4 (a modified version of the University of California, Berkeley SAPIV program), a general linear structural analysis program used for eigenvalue extractions and pseudostatic mode calculations of the models of major structures and subsystems. SAP4 is used to prepare input to the INSSIN and SAPPAC preprocessing programs. The GLAY and CLAN programs were originally developed by J.E. Luco (UCSD) and H.L. Wong (USC).

  14. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  15. 4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

  16. 4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) ...

  17. Non-physical energy in seismic interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Simon James

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-physical arrivals produced by seismic interferometry, the process whereby Green’s functions are synthesized between two points by cross-correlation, crossconvolution or deconvolution, are often considered to provide ...

  18. Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

  19. Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

  20. Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemme, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

  1. Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  2. Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werthmüller, Dieter

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

  3. Decision analysis for seismic retrofit of structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ryan J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of earthquakes as deterministic statements that will not occur for a long time rather than as probabilistic statements about the events (May 2004). Due to the aforementioned concerns regarding the decreased likelihood of building damage from seismic activity...-05, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA. Bai, J.-W., Hueste, M. B., and Gardoni, P. (2007). ?A probabilistic framework for the assessment of structural losses due to seismic events.? J. Struct. Engrg., submitted for review. Bracci, J. M...

  4. Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Voorhis, David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

  5. Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

  6. Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Dziembowski

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

  7. The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors. The focus of this study is two-fold: (1) the geophone array that was focused over the SPE shot and (2) a high-resolution seismic profile that was recently acquired at the field site. The geophone array was placed radially around the SPE shot in five directions with 100m spacing and out to a distance of 2 km. The high-resolution profile was about 475m in length with station and shot spacing of 5m using a 7000lb mini-vibe as a source. In both data sets, the first arrivals will be used to develop velocity models. For the geophone array, 1-D P-wave velocity models will be developed to determine an average apparent velocity of the Climax Stock. The high-resolution data will be used to develop a 2-D P-wave velocity model along the seismic profile. This is in an effort to elucidate the water table in more detail and provide additional information on the near-surface structure. These results will be used in the overall modeling effort to fully characterize the test bed and develop a physics-based model to simulate seismic energy from the SPE events.

  8. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  9. Seismic behavior of structural silicone glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarghamee, M.S.; Schwartz, T.A. [Simpson Gumpertz and Heger Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Gladstone, M. [Dow Corning Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismic events, glass curtain walls undergo racking deformation, while the flat glass lites do not rack due to their high shear stiffness. If the glass curtain wall is not isolated from the building frame by specifically designed connections that accommodate relative motion, seismic racking motion of the building frame will demand significant resiliency of the sealant that secures the glass to the curtain wall framing. In typical four-sided structural silicone glazing systems used in buildings with unbraced moment frames, the magnitude of seismic racking is likely to stress the sealants significantly beyond the sealant design strength. In this paper, the extent of the expected seismic racking motion, the behavior of the structural silicone glazing when subjected to the expected racking motion, and the field performance of a building with four-sided structural silicone glazing during the Northridge earthquake are discussed. The details of a curtain wall design concept consisting of shop-glazed subframes connected to the building frame and the connections that accommodate seismic motion of the subframe relative to the building frame is developed. Specific recommendations are made for the design of the four-sided structural silicone glazing systems for seismic loads.

  10. Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on W. M. Davisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on NSTX W. M. Davisa *, D.M. Mastrovitoa, and this year, one new camera alone can acquire 2GB per pulse. The paper will describe the storage strategies

  11. Higher order global differentiability local approximations for 2-D and 3-D distorted element geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maduri, Rajesh Kumar

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary focus of this thesis is to present a framework to develop higher order global differentiability local approximations for 2-D and 3-D distorted element geometries. The necessity and superiority of higher order global differentiability...

  12. Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

    We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

  13. 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 2-D...

  14. adriano 2d-model tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a 2nd order (toroidal) field may be uniform or has a prescribed gradient. In this test phase, the 2D code is ran Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 Accuracy in Scientific...

  15. Prospects for high thermoelectric figures of merit in 2D systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresselhaus, M.S.; Sun, X.; Cronin, S.B.; Koga, T.; Dresselhaus, G.; Wang, K.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced ZT has been predicted theoretically and observed experimentally in 2D quantum wells, with good agreement between theory and experiment. Advantages of low dimensional systems for thermoelectric applications are described and prospects for further enhancement of ZT are discussed.

  16. 2D-Modelling of pellet injection in the poloidal plane: results of numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2D-Modelling of pellet injection in the poloidal plane: results of numerical tests P. Lalousis developed for computing the expansion of pellet-produced clouds in the poloidal plane. The expansion

  17. Signal Integrity Analysis of a 2-D and 3-D Integrated Potentiostat for Neurotransmitter Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanacevic, Milutin

    for the substrate, power network, and through silicon vias (TSVs). These models are combined integrated implantable systems. I. INTRODUCTION A multichannel potentiostat, integrated with micro and power dissipation. Signal integrity characteristics of a 2- D and 3-D integrated potentiostat

  18. A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samper, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Juncosa R. , Delgado J. and Montenegro L. (2000) CORE 2D : App. Samper, J. , Yang, C. , Montenegro, L. , 2003. CORE 2DSamper, J. , Zhang, G. , Montenegro, L. , 2006a. Coupled

  19. CONTENT-BASED 3D OBJECT RETRIEVAL USING 2D VIEWS Thibault Napoleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahbi, Hichem

    CONTENT-BASED 3D OBJECT RETRIEVAL USING 2D VIEWS Thibault Napol´eon TELECOM ParisTech, CNRS UMR 5141 46 rue Barrault 75013 Paris, France napoleon@telecom-paristech.fr Hichem Sahbi CNRS UMR 5141

  20. Development of an Independent Hip Drive for a 2D Biped Walking Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooney, Craig

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automation Laboratory (ISAL) at the University of Kansas has developed a two dimensional (2D) biped walker, nicknamed the Jaywalker, in order to study the requirements necessary for a bipedal robot to traverse uneven terrain and successfully regain stability...

  1. Compatible, energy and symmetry preserving 2D Lagrangian hydrodynamics in rz-cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shashkov, Mikhail [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wendroff, Burton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burton, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barlow, A [AWE; Hongbin, Guo [ASU

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new discretization for 2D Lagrangian hydrodynamics in rz geometry (cylindrical coordinates) that is compatible, energy conserving and symmetry preserving. We describe discretization of the basic Lagrangian hydrodynamics equations.

  2. A distributional approach to the geometry of 2D dislocations at the mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisbon, University of

    A distributional approach to the geometry of 2D dislocations at the mesoscale Part A: General introduce the meso-scale as defined by some average distance between the dislocations. The laws governing

  3. 2d-LC-MS/MS Method-ORNL Developed for Bacteriophage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    mass spectrometry (2d-LC-MS/MS) method was optimized for bacteriophage by Kristen Corrier undergraduate should be. 4. The mass spectrometer is run in data dependent mode, specific settings should be optimized

  4. Implementation, study and calibration of a modified ASM2d for the simulation of SBR processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sludge Model n. 2d, its new features are the splitting of the nitrification stage in a two-step process for the "train" of the controller. Materials and method In Table 1, the characteristics of the synthetic f

  5. Crustal structure beneath the gravity lineations in the Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Spahr C.

    , Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) study area from seismic refraction data R. Chadwick Holmes,1, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) experiment investigated the velocity in the Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) study area from

  6. Proteomic analysis of E. coli using 2D HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christopher S

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2002 Group: Life Sciences I PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF E. COLI USING 2D HPLC AND MALDI-TOF MASS SPECTROMETRY A Senior Thesis By CHRISTOPHER S. CAMPBELL... April 2002 Group: Life Sciences I ABSTRACT Proteomic Analysis of E. coli Using 2D HPLC and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. Christopher S. Campbell Department of Biochemisty/Biophysics Texac AkM University Fellows Advisor; Dr. James C. Hu Department...

  7. Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors Wendy Niu,1,a) Anna-inorganic perovskite (C6H9C2H4NH3)2PbI4 are produced using micromechanical exfoliation. Mono- and few-layer areas microme- chanical exfoliation of 2D PbI perovskites and explore the few-layer behaviour of such systems

  8. Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Molino; Pierre Rognon; Cyprien Gay

    2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular materials, a phenomenon called dilatancy. We have aready described a geometrical interpretation of elastic dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we complement this work in the regime of less dry 2D GG foams. In particular, we highlight the relatively strong dilatancy effects expected in the regime where we have predicted rapid Plateau border variations.

  9. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oski Energy, LLC,

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

  10. Evidence for extinct subduction zones and spreading centers in the Sulu and Celebes Seas from gravity and seismic refraction data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed, Fakhar Habib

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 38 20 2-D gravity model along the profile V2407 without low-density root under the ridge in the Celebes Sea. 21 A possible model of the structure beneath the mid-Atlantic Ridge from gravity modeling with seismic refraction control (Talwani et al... Ridge for the opening of the Sulu Sea based on gravity modeling that suggests the presence of a low-density root under the Sulu Basin. CHAPTER II GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF THE STUDY AREA The Sulu and the Celebes Seas are located to the southeast...

  11. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

  12. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

  13. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  14. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  15. FireStem2D A Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model for Simulating Tree Stem Injury in Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FireStem2D ­ A Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model for Simulating Tree Stem Injury in Fires, et al. (2013) FireStem2D ­ A Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model for Simulating Tree Stem Injury

  16. Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site.

  17. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fully-saturated rock and at ultrasonic frequencies, the microscopic squirt flow induced between the stiff and soft parts of the pore space by an elastic wave is responsible for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation. In the seismic frequency range, it is the macroscopic cross-flow between the stiffer and softer parts of the rock. We use the latter hypothesis to introduce simple approximate equations for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation in a fully water saturated reservoir. The equations are based on the assumption that in heterogeneous rock and at a very low frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the fully-saturated rock can be estimated by applying a fluid substitution procedure to the averaged (upscaled) dry frame whose effective porosity is the mean porosity and the effective elastic modulus is the Backus-average (geometric mean) of the individual dry-frame elastic moduli of parts of the rock. At a higher frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the saturated rock is the Backus-average of the individual fully-saturated-rock elastic moduli of parts of the rock. The difference between the effective elastic modulus calculated separately by these two methods determines the velocity-frequency dispersion. The corresponding attenuation is calculated from this dispersion by using (e.g.) the standard linear solid attenuation model.

  18. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing is likely to be more intense near faults--sometimes referred to as the damaged zone. Yet another constraint, based on world-wide observations, is that the maximum likely fracture density increases with depth in a well-defined way. Defining these prior constrains has several benefits: they lead to a priori probability distributions of fractures, that are important for objective statistical integration; they limit the number of geologic hypotheses that need to be theoretically modeled; they provide plausible models for fracture distributions below the seismic resolution. The second element was theoretical rock physics modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of traveltime, amplitude, and impedance signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. The suggested workflow is to begin with an elastic earth model, based on well logs, theoretically add fractures to the likely facies as defined by the geologic prior information, and then compute synthetic seismic traces and attributes, including variations in P and S-wave velocities, Poisson's ratio, reflectivity, travel time, attenuation, and anisotropies of these parameters. This workflow is done in a Monte-Carlo fashion, yielding ranges of expected fracture signatures, and allowing realistic assessments of uncertainty to be honored. The third element was statistical integration of the geophysical data and prior constraints to map fracture intensity and orientations, along with uncertainties. A Bayesian framework was developed that allowed systematic integration of the prior constraints, the theoretical relations between fractures and their seismic signatures, and the various observed seismic observations. The integration scheme was successfully applied on an East Texas field site. The primary benefit from the study was the optimization and refinement of practical workflows for improved geophysical characterization of natural fractures and for quantifying the uncertainty of these interpretations. By presenting a methodology for integrating various types of information, the workflow will

  19. Surface Science Letters The 2-D growth of gold on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Enhancement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Surface Science Letters The 2-D growth of gold on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Enhancement of CO online 7 May 2011 Keywords: Graphene Ru(0001) STM 2-D Au CO adsorption IRAS The growth and morphology of two-dimensional (2-D) gold islands on a single-layer graphene supported on Ru(0001) have been studied

  20. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

  1. Seismic Facies Classification And Identification By Competitive Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saggaf, Muhammad M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach based on competitive networks for the classification and identification of reservoir facies from seismic data. This approach can be adapted to perform either classification of the seismic facies based ...

  2. A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of...

  3. Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuh, Sung H.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

  4. Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

  5. Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

  6. Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

  7. First Quarter Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the earthquake data collected from October 2005 to December 2005 from the Hanford Seismic Network

  8. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction. Seismic wave propagation through fractures is an important subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization ...

  9. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization...

  11. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  12. Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada...

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity...

  15. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  16. Knowledge Assisted Visualization Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas, using seismic interpretation, is performed that makes it fit very naturally into the paradigmKnowledge Assisted Visualization Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data Daniel Patel a

  17. Finding hydrocarbons in the classroom using "free" seismic interpretation software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finding hydrocarbons in the classroom using "free" seismic interpretation software WAYNE D Technological Univer- sity, we recently introduced a new course in seismic processing and interpretation of this paper is to pro- vide details of the class assignment in seismic interpretation, and to encourage

  18. STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Douglas C.

    STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

  19. Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

  20. Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling SERIES Workshop: "Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation" 8 - 9 February 2012, Istanbul, Turkey C. Z. Chrysostomou, N. Kyriakides, P. Kotronis, P. Roussis, M. Poljansek, F. Taucer RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic

  1. Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Stuart

    Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora Department of Computer Science of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), primarily through detection and localization of seismic events. We nuclear explosions. A global network of seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound sensors

  2. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  3. Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES) M.N. Fardis University of Patras, Greece SUMMARY: Through the 4-year project SERIES (Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures of their research. It also helps them to enhance their potential, by jointly developing novel seismic testing

  4. Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolini, Umberto

    Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using vector-sensor beamforming the problem of estimating the shape parameters of seismic wavefields in linear arrays. The purpose of the subsurface layers from the seismic wavefields registered by surface sensors. However, only the waves

  5. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  6. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION General Committee Final workshop Ispra (IT), May 30 th, 2013 MAID project : Seismic behavior of L- and T-shaped unreinforced Masonry shear walls including Acoustic Isolation Devices #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

  7. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION, In memory of Prof. Roy Severn #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES · Project Framework · Experimental Campaign · Outcome Outline #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

  8. Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steidl, Gabriele

    Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting S¨oren H¨auser and Jianwei Ma May 15, 2012 We propose a new method for seismic data reconstruction by directional weighted of thousands of meters with a good resolution, the seismic method has become the most commonly used geophysical

  9. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genaud, Stéphane

    1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

  10. LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidsvik, Jo

    LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA MARIT ULVMOEN Department of Mathematical of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data in a 3D reservoir. The inversion relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic data, and it follows the lines

  11. Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidsvik, Jo

    Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data Marit Ulvmoen Summary The focus of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data. The target zone is a 3D reservoir model. The likelihood model relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic

  12. Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

  13. New events discovered in the Apollo lunar seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Peter

    New events discovered in the Apollo lunar seismic data R. C. Bulow, C. L. Johnson,1 and P. M processing tools to revisit the Apollo lunar seismic data set with the goal of extending and further), New events discovered in the Apollo lunar seismic data, J. Geophys. Res., 110, E10003, doi:10

  14. Acquisition and processing pitfall associated with the clipping of near-surface seismic reflection traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Steven D.; Steeples, Don W.; Malin, Peter E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TABLE. 10.1190/1.2807051 W1 The first survey was collected using a .22-caliber rifle firing long- rifle ammunition and a shot interval of 20 cm. The second survey was conducted in the same manner using a .223-caliber rifle with a 55-grain bullet... files acquired at the same source location using #2;a#3; a .22-caliber and #2;b#3; a .223-caliber rifle. #2;a#3; Clipped traces are out to 0.6 m from the source. #2;b#3; The clipping reaches as far as 2.0 m. The data are presented without any filtering...

  15. Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    . Remaining challenges - power supplied by batteries charged by solar panels and wind mill has proven & electronics battery solar panels Field tests Results Deployment on the ice north of Svalbard Test locations

  16. A seismic reflection profile study of lithospheric flexure in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    ., 1994], Tuamotu [Ito et al., 1995], Canary Islands [Watts et al., 1997], La Re´union [Charvis et al Islands M. Y. Ali and A. B. Watts Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK I. Hill the stratigraphic ``architecture'' of the flexural moat that flanks the Cape Verde Islands. The moat region

  17. Shallow seismic reflection profile of the Meers fault, Comanche County, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Paul B.; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .J., The Meers fault tectonic activity in south- western Oklahoma, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG ICR-4852, 1-25, A1-A25, 1987. McLean, R., and Stearns, D.W., Fault analysis in the Wichita Mountains [Abs. ], AAPG Bull. 67, 511-512, 1983. Miller...

  18. Frequency dependent seismic reflection analysis: a path to new direct hydrocarbon indicators for deep water reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Seung Chul

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ://maps.google.com/). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4.2 Before and after the radon demultiple of two CMP gathers near target reservoirs. (a) and (b): before and after at the first CMP. (c) and (d): before and after at the second CMP. Free surface multiples interfere with relatively weaker primaries... the Ursa (deep water, GOM) field data set to preserve amplitude and frequency information. We use move-out based method for demultiple (radon method) and prestack time migration equivalent process (NMO + DMO + FK migration) for imaging. We implement a...

  19. Seismic response of steel suspension bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Astaneh-Asl, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing accurate, realistic numerical simulations of the seismic response of long-span bridges presents a significant challenge to the fields of earthquake engineering and seismology. Suspension bridges in particular represent some of the largest and most important man-made structures and ensuring the seismic integrity of these mega-structures is contingent on accurate estimations of earthquake ground motions and accurate computational simulations of the structure/foundation system response. A cooperative, multi-year research project between the Univ. of California and LLNL was recently initiated to study engineering and seismological issues essential for simulating the response of major structures. Part of this research project is focused on the response of the long-span bridges with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge serving as a case study. This paper reports on the status of this multi-disciplinary research project with emphasis on the numerical simulation of the transient seismic response of the Bay Bridge.

  20. Development of the seismic input for use in the seismic safety margins research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernreuter, D.L.; Chung, D.H.

    1980-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly outlines the overall systems approach being developed for the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. The unique features of the approach being taken to reduce the uncertainty in the seismic input for this program are discussed. These unique features will include extensive use of expert opinion, earthquake rupture simulation studies and the way in which the seismic hazard is incorporated into the overall systems analysis. Some very preliminary results are also given for the Zion site which is the power plant chosen for analysis in Phase I of the program.

  1. Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, D.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF NONLINEAR SEISMIC SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION AND APPLICABILITY TO NEW SYSTEM FRAGILITY CURVES SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it wasn’t the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

  3. Transparent Conducting Electrodes based on 1D and 2D Ag Nanogratings for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical and electrical properties of optically-thin one-dimensional (1D) Ag nanogratings and two-dimensional (2D) Ag nanogrids are studied, and their use as transparent electrodes in organic photovoltaics are explored. A large broadband and polarization-insensitive optical absorption enhancement in the organic light-harvesting layers is theoretically and numerically demonstrated using either single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids or two perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, and is attributed to the excitation of surface plasmon resonances and plasmonic cavity modes. Total photon absorption enhancements of 150% and 200% are achieved for the optimized single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids and double (top and bottom) perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, respectively.

  4. MODELING THE TRANSVERSE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF 2D-SICF/SIC COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hierarchical model was developed to describe the effective transverse thermal conductivity, K effective, of a 2D-SiC/SiC composite made from stacked and infiltrated woven fabric layers in terms of constituent properties and microstructural and architectural variables. The model includes the expected effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance as well as the effects of high fiber packing fractions within individual tows and the non-uniform nature of 2D-fabric layers that include a significant amount of interlayer porosity. Model predictions were obtained for two versions of DuPont 2D-Hi Nicalon(Trademark)/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite, one with a thin (0.110 micron) and the other with a thick (1.040 micron) PyC fiber coating. The model predicts that the matrix porosity content and porosity shape factor have a major influence on K effective(T) for such a composite.

  5. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, K.L. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this reporting period two main accomplishments stand out. The Springdale task is in play in the northern Michigan Basin and the geochemical survey work over the Springdale prospect continued to progress. We still need to characterize the play in terms of the type of trap (basal reef diagenetic (?)) and its relation to the well documented pinnacle reef play. Also, we have become aware that Capac Field in the southern reef trend (Figure 1) is a possible analog to Springdale and so will be looking more closely at the literature on that field, particularly the work by Bowers (1987). Future work is directed toward further defining the Springdale project via more wells and examination and characterization of well cuttings. One to two more geochemical surveys are planned, one this spring and a final one in early fall. Based on current oil prices and Springdale production as of January 2005, an ROI, (defined as Total liquids revenue, $5.45m/DOE support, $1.45m) better than 3.75. This does not include gas revenues, which have not yet been calculated.

  7. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

  9. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

  10. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Springdale prospect area in Manistee County, Michigan. The samples were taken along the trace of the proposed horizontal wells. The samples are presently being analyzed and the results will be reported in the next quarterly report. The main news this reporting period is that the Springdale prospect area in Manistee County, Michigan, continues to see drilling activity. Our industry partner, Jordan Development Company, LLC, is permitting additional horizontal wells following their success in the prospect area.

  11. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, plans were finalized for additional surface geochemical sampling in the new Springdale Prospect field demonstration in Manistee County, Michigan. Plans were also developed to acquire additional surface geochemical data in the vicinity of the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan. The main news this reporting period is the continued success in the Springdale demonstration area. The State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 and the State Springdale & Herban 12-16 horizontal demonstration wells in Manistee County, Michigan are both flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which are good wells in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. A third horizontal well, the State Springdale & Wilburn 1-21 HD has been drilled and is waiting on completion. Two more horizontal wells have been permitted in the Springdale area by our industry partner.

  12. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this reporting period, we extended the fault study to include more faults and developed new techniques to visualize the faults. We now have used data from the Dundee Formation to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin and are in the process of reviewing data from other horizons. These faults appear to control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review has been set for March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer.

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR; VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The main news this reporting period is the confirmed discovery of producing hydrocarbons at the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 demonstration well in Manistee County. This well was spudded in late November, tested and put on production in December 2003. To date it is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. The surface geochemistry sampling at the Springdale demonstration site will be repeated this spring after the well has been on production for several months to see if the anomaly pattern changes. We expect that the anomaly will diminish as the original positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. This is the behavior that we observed at the Bear lake demonstration well reported last quarter.

  14. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, Class Revisit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Harrison, William B.; Quinlan, W.

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Continued the fault study to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation was used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well.

  15. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

  16. Nonlinear Seismic Response Of Single Piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairo, R.; Conte, E.; Dente, G. [University of Calabria, Dipartimento di Difesa del Suolo, Rende (Italy)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method is proposed to analyse the seismic response of single piles under nonlinear soil condition. It is based on the Winkler foundation model formulated in the time domain, which makes use of p-y curves described by the Ramberg-Osgood relationship. The analyses are performed referring to a pile embedded in two-layer soil profiles with different sharp stiffness contrast. Italian seismic records are used as input motion. The calculated bending moments in the pile are compared to those obtained using other theoretical solutions.

  17. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  18. Microstructural Changes in Elastomers Seismic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsanti, Michele [Dipartimento Meccanica e Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita Mediterranea, loc. Feo di Vito 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Today elastomers or rubber materials are present in many seismic devices since they are fundamental tools for energy dissipation. The ground motion effects on the elastomers seismic isolator produces, in addition to horizontal displacements, even rotation respect to the vertical axis. These last effects make torsion action on the devices plane other in all components. We focus our attention on the circular elastomers sheet under warping actions. We observe some material volume fraction in a different phase and the analysis shows the evolution phases linked with inhomogeneous deformation field. Finally it appears, under cyclic loading conditions, a stress-softening phenomenon (i.e. Mullins effects) as correlation to continuum damage mechanism.

  19. Seismic Search for Strange Quark Nuggets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene T. Herrin; Doris C. Rosenbaum; Vigdor L. Teplitz

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to one ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

  20. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  1. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  2. Seismic search for strange quark nuggets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L. [Geology Department, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); Physics Department, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to 1 ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

  3. Study of the 2-d CP(N-1) models at ?=0 and ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Beard; M. Pepe; S. Riederer; U. J. Wiese

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical results for 2-d CP(N-1) models at \\theta=0 and \\pi obtained in the D-theory formulation. In this formulation we construct an efficient cluster algorithm and we show numerical evidence for a first order transition for CP(N-1\\geq 2) models at \\theta = \\pi. By a finite size scaling analysis, we also discuss the equivalence in the continuum limit of the D-theory formulation of the 2-d CP(N-1) models and the usual lattice definition.

  4. Learning to segment texture in 2D vs. 3D : A comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Se Jong

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in Ri. Finally, we get the Gabor energy matrix E(x,y), Orientation response matrix O(x,y), and Frequency response matrix F(x,y). . . . . . . . . . . . 28 11 Generating the 2D input set (2D preprocessing). The procedure used to generate the training data... differences (such as difference in orientation) exist. According to Chubb et al. [10], any first-order (quasi- linear) mechanism cannot detect the boundary that emerges between two textures of equal mean luminance but composed of differently oriented...

  5. Characterization and origins of high-amplitude reflection packets, HARPs, along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rains, David Brian

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    settings (Figurc 1). HARPs have been interpreted to be related to channel avulsion events based on observations of Quaternary deposits from the modern Amazon Fan (Flood et al. , 1991; Flood and Piper, 1997, Hiscott et al. , 1997; Normark et al. , 1997... (Figure 2)(Piper et al. , 1997). Extensive search of industry 2D and 3D seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) indicates that HARPs and associated channel-levees formed on the middle and lower Mississippi Fan and at the toe-of-slope, seaward...

  6. Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, David C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter was tested with two different reflected pulse trajectories in flowing air at ambient conditions against an orifice meter. The flowmeter was designed to be highly accurate, to require ...

  7. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    continuous wavelet transforms to imag- ing of Shatsky Rise plateau using marine seismic data . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Multi-scale analysis the surface roughness of the minerals . . . 6 1.2 Dissertation structure... evolution. Oceanic plateaus are very large igneous provinces in the deep 3 oceans and are generally a result of massive basaltic volcanism. Observations show that the size of these plateaus ranges up to millions of square kilometers, suggest- ing they must...

  8. Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

  9. The visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

    . Then a sweeping algorithm that can build the complex in O(mlog(n)) where n is the size of the visibility graph when a line becomes tangent to three objects. This is shown in the video. The complex is build usingThe visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility Fr

  10. Development of a Hybrid Powered 2D Biped Walking Machine Designed for Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Bryce C.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    has built a three legged 2D biped walking machine to be used as a test stand for studying rough terrain walking. The specific aim of this research is to investigate how biped walkers can best maintain walking stability when acted upon by small...

  11. 2D and 3D high-resolution imaging to reconstruct the microstructure of clay media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2D and 3D high-resolution imaging to reconstruct the microstructure of clay media J.C. Robinet1 & S compacted clay (illite) system, considered to be an analogy for the clay matrix constituting clay-rocks, and three different clayrocks (Callovo-Oxfordian argilites (FR), Opalinus Clay (CH), Boom Clay (BE)). Part

  12. Wake effects characterization using wake oscillator model Comparison on 2D response with experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    forces -- Fext contain the hydrodynamic forces (drag, lift and forces issued from the potential theory oscillators is developed to predict the 2D motion in a transverse plan of two rigid cylinders in tandem. Extended studies have been conduced to describe and explain them for spring mounted uniform cylinders

  13. Full paper / Mmoire Self-assembly of hybrid solids consisting of 2D supramolecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Full paper / Mémoire Self-assembly of hybrid solids consisting of 2D supramolecular networks- selected molecular building blocks may yield designed supramolecular structure in one-pot process. We have been interested in construction of the materials, where two species with different properties coexist

  14. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the 2-D CWT to character- ize the surface of two samples of Fe_(2)O_(3) and three samples of calcite. For a fresh surface of the calcite mineral, a cleavage plane exposed by fracturing, the surface measurements show discrete jumps in height because...

  15. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  16. An Efficient Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Tertiary Structures in the 2D HP Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    , predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been widely genetic algo- rithm for the protein folding problem under the HP model in the two-dimensional square Genetic Algorithm, Protein Folding Problem, 2D HP Model 1. INTRODUCTION Amino acids are the building

  17. 2D Piecewise Algebraic Splines for Implicit Modeling University of Hull

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jie

    -dimensional spline techniques based on nonregular 2D polygons, such as box spline and simplex spline, are generally. In this article, a new type of bivariate spline function is introduced. This newly proposed type of bivariate. Graph. 28, 2, Article 13 (April 2009), 19 pages. DOI = 10.1145/1516522.1516524 http://doi.acm.org/10

  18. Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Zigang Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Datasets Zigang Wang1 and Zhengrong 11794, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, a new feature based rendering algorithm for partial volume is presented. This algorithm utilizes both surface and volume information for the rendering of the partial

  19. Nonlinear interaction of compressional waves in a 2D dusty plasma crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    sound waves is dispersionless [4,9,10], with a speed CL = /k given in Ref. [9]. Here, 2 0 = Q2 /4 0ma3 monolayers [1], electrons on the surface of liquid helium [2], rare gas atoms ab- sorbed on graphite [3 a screened Coulomb repulsion or Yukawa potential. Sound waves, or phonons, in a 2D Yukawa lattice are well

  20. Assisted Teleoperation Strategies for Aggressively Controlling a Robot Arm with 2D Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Assisted Teleoperation Strategies for Aggressively Controlling a Robot Arm with 2D Input Erkang You,hauserk}@indiana.edu Abstract--This paper studies assisted teleoperation techniques for controlling a 6DOF robot arm using click, and overall satisfaction. I. INTRODUCTION Assisted teleoperation allows a user to operate a robot while

  1. Dynamics and control of the system of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Dynamics and control of the system of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and point vortices Zhanhua Ma dynamically interacting with N point vortices in its vicinity [16] is an idealized example of coupled solid from a fluid mechanics viewpoint as well as a dynamics and control viewpoint. The problem has many

  2. Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation So far we have talked about wave propagation in one-dimension. For two or three spatial dimensions, we vectorize our ideas propagation. For surface waves, there is no vertical propagation, and we are only concerned with the two

  3. Factorization of Darboux transformations of arbitrary order for 2D Schroedinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekaterina Shemyakova

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a proof of Darboux's conjecture that every Darboux transformation of arbitrary order of a 2D Schroedinger type operator can be factorized into Darboux transformations of order one. The proof is constructive. The result is obtained in the framework of an algebraic approach to Darboux transformations which is suggested in this paper and is a further improvement of S. Tsarev's earlier idea.

  4. Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

  5. Symmetry reduction and control of the dynamics of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Symmetry reduction and control of the dynamics of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and a point vortex. This dynamic model is an idealized example in an inviscid framework of fully- coupled solid-fluid systems vortex, cylinder, optimal control, reduction, scat- tering #12;Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 4 2 The SMBK model

  6. RENORMALIZED ENERGY EQUIDISTRIBUTION AND LOCAL CHARGE BALANCE IN 2D COULOMB SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENORMALIZED ENERGY EQUIDISTRIBUTION AND LOCAL CHARGE BALANCE IN 2D COULOMB SYSTEMS SIMONA ROTA of the "Coulomb renormalized energy" of Sandier-Serfaty, which corresponds to the total Coulomb interaction point charges with Coulomb pair interaction, in a con- fining potential (minimizers of this energy also

  7. 2d International Littmann Conference Jan. 2006, Aksum, Ethiopia The National Archives and Library of Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anaïs Wion 2d International Littmann Conference ­ Jan. 2006, Aksum, Ethiopia PRE-PRINT The National Archives and Library of Ethiopia: six years of Ethio-French cooperation (2001-2006) Most scholars are aware traditions are a reality that should more often be discussed openly by the scholarly community. In Ethiopia

  8. The svgl toolkit: enabling fast rendering of rich 2D graphics Stephane Conversy1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The svgl toolkit: enabling fast rendering of rich 2D graphics St´ephane Conversy1,2 Jean powerful graphical processors be- come available on mainstream computers, it becomes possible , a graphical toolkit that enables programmers and design- ers of interactive applications to benefit from

  9. 2D Simultaneous Localization And Mapping for Micro Air Vehicles Adrien Angeli1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , heavy weight and high energy consumption. Instead, vision seems to be a good alternative: it is cheap2D Simultaneous Localization And Mapping for Micro Air Vehicles Adrien Angeli1 David Filliat2 St to shift from human-controlled aircrafts to partially-autonomous flying agents. Today, one of the main

  10. Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

  11. Definition RX Evaluate Kernels K-2d K-1d Change By definition undefined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Definition RX Evaluate Kernels K-2d K-1d Change By def·i·ni·tion undefined Adventures in anomaly Alamos National Laboratory Research supported by the United States Department of Energy through the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. #12;Theiler LA-UR-14-24429 Definition

  12. 3D Shape from Silhouette Points in Registered 2D Images Using Conjugate Gradient Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    3D Shape from Silhouette Points in Registered 2D Images Using Conjugate Gradient Method Andrzej version of the conjugate gradient method. We take advantage of the structure of the problem to make polynomial function. The approximate problem is solved using a nonlinear conjugate gradient solver that takes

  13. LNG FEM: GENERATING GRADED MESHES AND SOLVING ELLIPTIC EQUATIONS ON 2-D DOMAINS OF POLYGONAL STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LNG FEM: GENERATING GRADED MESHES AND SOLVING ELLIPTIC EQUATIONS ON 2-D DOMAINS OF POLYGONAL, Minnesota 55455­0436 Phone: 612-624-6066 Fax: 612-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;LNG FEM AND VICTOR NISTOR Abstract. We develop LNG FEM, a software package for graded mesh gen- eration

  14. Estudio de la estabilidad de una familia de toros 2D del Problema Cuasibicircular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelona, Universitat de

    estabilidad est'a asociado al nacimiento de las familias de toros Halo 2D. Para este trabajo se han utilizado QBCP depende de ¯, el par'ametro de masas del sistema Tierra­Luna, a s , la distancia media del Sol al s \\Gamma 1 ' 328900:54 ; ! s = 0:925195985520347 ; tomando las unidades de masa, distancia y tiempo de

  15. Collective Classification for Labeling of Places and Objects in 2D and 3D Range Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    these representations of the environment to improve the human- robot comunication. In this work, we present an approach information to 2D maps. Koenig and Simmons (1998) apply a pre-programmed routine to detect doorways. Althaus and Christensen (2003) use sonar data to detect corridors and doorways. Moreover, Friedman et al. (2007) introduce

  16. Simulation of surface waves with porous boundaries in a 2-D numerical wave tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Weoncheol

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are obtained for an arbitrary 2-D body. The boundary element method is then extended to the problem with porous boundaries. The flow inside porous medium is based on Darcy's rule. Analytic solutions are obtained for the flat porous bottom case and compared...

  17. VISION-BASED CONTROL OF 2D PLANE POISEUILLE FLOW Romeo Tatsambon Fomena and Christophe Collewet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cemagref, INRIA Rennes-Bretagne Atlantique and Universit´e Europ´eenne de Bretagne 17 avenue de Cucill in optimizing shapes or in choosing suitable surfacing. Conversely, in active con- trol an external energy the vision-based control approach to regulate the 2D plane Poiseuille flow around its steady state

  18. Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 -D model for lubricated oil transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 - D model for lubricated oil transportation V acts as a lubricant by coating the wall of the pipeline, thus preventing the oil from adhering is devoted to the numerical simulation of a linearized model for the lubricated trans- portation of heavy

  19. Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Folding in the 2D HP Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Michael

    Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Folding in the 2D HP Model A Parameter Tuning Case Study of a protein, predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been. The protein folding problem in the HP model is to find a conformation (a folded sequence) with the lowest

  20. Ionwater hydrogen-bond switching observed with 2D IR vibrational echo chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Ion­water hydrogen-bond switching observed with 2D IR vibrational echo chemical exchange for review November 8, 2008) The exchange of water hydroxyl hydrogen bonds between anions and water oxygens of anion­ water hydroxyl hydrogen bond switching under thermal equilib- rium conditions as Taw 7 1 ps. Pump

  1. Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy Haruto Ishikawa Contributed by Michael D. Fayer, August 15, 2007 (sent for review July 25, 2007) Neuroglobin (Ngb), a protein energy minimum. myoglobin mutants protein dynamics energy landscape Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently

  2. Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D 25, 2013) The ultrafast structural dynamics inside the bilayers of dilauroyl- phosphatidylcholine was used as a vibrational probe and provided information on spectral diffusion (structural dynam- ics

  3. 2D control of field-driven magnetic bubble movement using Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Dorothée; Seem, Peter R.; Tillette, Marine; Mansell, Rhodri; Cowburn, Russell P.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . Fukushima and S. Yuasa, Nature Phys. 7, 626 (2011) 2D. A. Allwood, G. Xiong, C. C. Faulkner, D. Atkinson, D. Petit and R. P. Cowburn, Science 309, 1688 (2005) 3D. A. Allwood, G. Xiong, M. D. Cooke, C. C. Faulkner,D. Atkin- son, N. Vernier and R. P. Cowburn...

  4. Creative Character Design Based on Combination of 2D and 3D Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salimi Beni, Anahita

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research combines the need for innovation in character design with the idea of combining 2D and 3D characteristics to create an original and appealing character style. The goal has been to benefit from the capabilities of 3D animation while...

  5. Robust and Efficient Adaptive Moving Mesh Solution of the 2-D Euler equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegeling, Paul

    to track individual features of the physi- cal solutions, such as shocks and emerging instabilities [2] in which the difficult choice of a user-defined adaptivity constant in the monitor function lists our conclusions. 2 The 2D Euler equations The two-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics

  6. GREIT: a unified approach to 2D linear EIT reconstruction of lung images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    GREIT: a unified approach to 2D linear EIT reconstruction of lung images Andy Adler1 , John H the distribution of ventilation. However, most clinical and physiological research in lung EIT is done using older algorithm for lung EIT, called GREIT (Graz consensus Reconstruction algorithm for EIT). This paper describes

  7. Plateau border bulimia transition: discontinuities expected in three simple experiments on 2D liquid foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be observable. II. 2D GLASS-GLASS FOAM GEOMETRICAL VADEMECUM In the present section, we shall provide a geometri- cal description and some corresponding results for two- dimensional foams squeezed between two glass liquid foams Pierre Rognon, Fran¸cois Molino, and Cyprien Gay Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, UPR

  8. Plateau border bulimia transition: discontinuities expected in three simple experiments on 2D liquid foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    be observable. II. 2D GLASS-GLASS FOAM GEOMETRICAL VADEMECUM In the present section, we shall provide a geometri- cal description and some corresponding results for two- dimensional foams squeezed between two glass liquid foams Pierre Rognon, Fran#24;cois Molino, and Cyprien Gay #3; Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal

  9. CONSTRAINTS ON SUBDUCTION GEODYNAMICS FROM SEISMIC ANISOTROPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as downwelling limbs of the mantle's convective system, drive the secular cooling of the Earth. Subduction zones 2012; revised 4 March 2013; accepted 6 March 2013; published 12 April 2013. [1] Much progress has been for probing mantle dynamics in subduction systems. Here I review the observational con- straints on seismic

  10. Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

  11. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

  12. Algebraic theory of crystal vibrations: Singularities and zeros in vibrations of 1D and 2D lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iachello; B. Dietz; M. Miski-Oglu; A. Richter

    2015-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for the calculation of the energy dispersion relation (EDR) and density of states (DOS) in one (1D) and two (2D) dimensions is introduced and applied to linear lattices (1D) and square and hexagonal lattices (2D). The (van Hove) singularities and (Dirac) zeros of the DOS are discussed. Results for the 2D hexagonal lattice (graphene-like materials) are compared with experimental data in microwave photonic crystals.

  13. Simulation of production and elastic properties of reservoirs to validate time-lapse seismics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerin, Gilles

    , including the 3D seismic processing and inversion, and the preliminary time- lapse interpretation. We-lapse seismics. 3.1 Introduction Time-lapse, or 4-D, seismic monitoring is an integrated reservoir exploitation technique based on the analysis of successive 3-D seismic surveys. Differences over time in seismic

  14. Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Mohammed Y is required to optimize hydrocarbon production. A rock containing parallel fractures can be seismically to the seismic wavelength. Seismic anisotropy may be detectable from attributes of pre-stack 3-D seismic data

  15. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  16. ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control-concrete composite structures; Material properties variability; Seismic design; capacity design. 1 GENERAL CONTEXT

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: reflected optical wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reflected optical wave New Sandia Mirror Isn't Shiny: Instead It Reflects Infrared Light Using a Metamaterial On December 12, 2014, in Capabilities, Materials Science, News, News &...

  18. 2D Simulations of the Line-Driven Instability in Hot-Star Winds: II. Approximations for the 2D Radiation Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Dessart; S. P. Owocki

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present initial attempts to include the multi-dimensional nature of radiation transport in hydrodynamical simulations of the small-scale structure that arises from the line-driven instability in hot-star winds. Compared to previous 1D or 2D models that assume a purely radial radiation force, we seek additionally to treat the lateral momentum and transport of diffuse line-radiation, initially here within a 2D context. A key incentive is to study the damping effect of the associated diffuse line-drag on the dynamical properties of the flow, focusing particularly on whether this might prevent lateral break-up of shell structures at scales near the lateral Sobolev angle of ca. $1^{\\rm o}$. We first explore nonlinear simulations that cast the lateral diffuse force in the simple, local form of a parallel viscosity. Second, to account for the lateral mixing of radiation associated with the radial driving, we next explore models in which the radial force is azimuthally smoothed over a chosen scale. Third, to account for both the lateral line-drag and the lateral mixing in a more self-consistent way, we explore further a method first proposed by Owocki (1999), which uses a restricted 3-ray approach that combines a radial ray with two oblique rays set to have an impact parameter $p < R_{\\ast}$ within the stellar core. From numerical simulations, we find that, compared to equivalent 1-ray simulations, the high-resolution 3-ray models show systematically a much higher lateral coherence.... (Full abstract in paper)

  19. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. I. Parameter Space Exploration with 2D Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C; Bruderer, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to develop a numerical model for GMC-GMC collisions between nearly magnetically critical clouds. The goal is to determine if, and under what circumstances, cloud collisions can cause pre-existing magnetically subcritical clumps to become supercritical and undergo gravitational collapse. We first develop and implement new photodissociation region (PDR) based heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition, creating a multiphase ISM and allowing modeling of non-equilibrium temperature structures. Then in 2D and with ideal MHD, we explore a wide parameter space of magnetic field strength, magnetic field geometry, collision velocity, and impact parameter, and compare isolated versus colliding clouds. We find factors of ~2-3 increase in mean clump density from typical collisions, with strong dependence on collision velocity and magnetic field strength, but ultimately limited by flux-freezing in 2D geometries. For geometries enabling flow a...

  20. Solving the additive eigenvalue problem associated to a dynamics of a 2D-traffic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadir Farhi

    2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a technical note where we solve the additive eigenvalue problem associated to a dynamics of a 2D-traffic system. The traffic modeling is not explained here. It is available in \\cite{Far08}. It consists of a microscopic road traffic model of two circular roads crossing on one junction managed with the priority-to-the-right rule. It is based on Petri nets and minplus algebra. One of our objectives in \\cite{Far08} was to derive the fundamental diagram of 2D-traffic, which is the relation between the density and the flow of vehicles. The dynamics of this system, derived from a Petri net design, is non monotone and additively homogeneous of degree 1. In this note, we solve the additive eigenvalue problem associated to this dynamics.