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1

nuclear electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear electricity nuclear electricity Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited"

2

Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

6

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

7

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

8

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

9

Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

McCulloch, Reginald W. (Knoxville, TN); Morgan, Jr., Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dial, Ralph E. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow. 10 refs., 1 tab.

Difilippo, F.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

12

Economics of Nuclear and Renewable Electricity Energy Science Coalition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear energy arose as a ‘spin-off ’ from nuclear weapons. Its use grew rapidly during the 1960s, nurtured by huge subsidies and the belief that nuclear electricity would soon become ‘too cheap to meter’. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the end of 2009 there were 438 operating nuclear power reactors in the world, total

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants ...

14

Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

Haratyk, Geoffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: July 25, 2013 Data for : May 2013 Next Release: August 2013 Contacts: Michael Mobilia Phone: 202-287-6318 E-mail:...

16

Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

Forsberg, C.W.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Nuclear Electric Generating Stations, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clearance and tagging programs at nuclear electric generating facilities serve to protect personnel from injury and to protect equipment from damage. These programs are thus of vital importance from both a worker safety standpoint and an operations and maintenance cost standpoint. This guideline presents a clearance and tagging approach, developed with broad industry input, that nuclear electric generating companies can use as a basis for comparison with their own programs.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Commercial Nuclear Electric Power in the United States: Problems and Prospects  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article briefly reviews the origins of commercial nuclear electric power, the efforts to dispose of high-level nuclear waste, the costs of building and operating nuclear electric power plants, and other energy-related developments pertinent to the future of nuclear electric power.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear electric dipole moment of 3He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

Stetcu, Ionel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friar, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hayes, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, C P [UNIV WISCONSIN; Navratil, P [LIVERMORE NAT LAB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Quantum read-out and fast initialization of nuclear spin qubits with electric currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spin qubits have the longest coherence times in the solid state, but their quantum read-out and initialization is a great challenge. We present a theory for the interaction of an electric current with the nuclear spins of donor impurities in semiconductors. The theory yields a sensitivity criterion for quantum detection of nuclear spin states using electrically detected magnetic resonance, as well as an all electrical method for fast nuclear spin qubit initialization.

Noah Stemeroff; Rogerio de Sousa

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electric power transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)  

SciTech Connect

The original study of transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC), which was completed in September 1975, was updated in June 1978. The present 1983 revision takes cognizance of recent changes in the electric power situation of the PNW with respect to: (1) forecasts of load growth, (2) the feasibility of early use of 1100 kV transmission, and (3) the narrowing opportunities for siting nuclear plants in the region. The purpose of this update is to explore and describe additions to the existing transmission system that would be necessary to accommodate three levels of generation at HNEC. Comparisons with a PNW system having new thermal generating capacity distributed throughout the marketing region are not made as was done in earlier versions.

Harty, H.; Dowis, W.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV  

SciTech Connect

Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nuclear-Renewables Energy System for Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Geoffrey Haratyk; Charles W. Forsberg

27

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

28

Nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connectors and methods of connecting electrical conductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connection comprises an insulated, sheathed instrument lead having electrical conductors extending from one end thereof to provide two exposed lead wires, a watertight cable having electrical conducting wires therein and extending from one end of the cable to provide two lead wires therefrom, two butt splice connectors each connecting the ends of respective ones of the lead wires from the instrument lead and cable, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing positioned over each butt splice connector and an adjacent portion of a respective lead wire from the cable and heat shrunk into position, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing on the end portion of the instrument lead adjacent the lead wires therefrom and heat shrunk thereon and a length of outer heat shrinkable plastic tubing extending over the end portion of the instrument lead and the heat shrinkable tubing thereon and over the butt splice connectors and a portion of the cable adjacent the cable lead lines, the outer heat shrinkable tubing being heat shrunk into sealing position on the instrument lead and cable.

Powell, J.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

31

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Application Studies  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This portion describes the studies of advanced applications of nuclear reactors that were performed, including various types of aircraft, missiles, space vehicles, ships, and portable power plants.

Comassar, S.

1962-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Determination of the nuclear-induced electrical conductivity in a nuclear-driven MHD device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continual need for more efficient energy conversion techniques for space, sea, and terrestrial systems has renewed interest in nuclear-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion. The concept of nuclear-driven MHD energy conversion utilizes a flow seeded with a neutron absorbing species. The energy released in neutron absorption or fission processes is used to ionize the flow and enhance electrical conductivity. Research into the use of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He mixtures in the 1960`s and 1970`s suggested the enhancement is insufficient for MHD purposes. However, new calculations suggest a region of conditions not previously considered may provide significant conductivity enhancement. Specifically, at densities less than standard atmospheric density and neutron flux greater than 1{times}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}s, conductivity greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable. These calculations also suggest conductivity`s of several hundred mho/m may be possible for an achievable range of conditions. Additionally, the nuclear-induced conductivity is strongly density dependent and weakly temperature dependent. Therefore, higher flow velocities, and hence higher power densities than those used in traditional MHD channels utilizing thermal ionization are possible. In order to confirm these promising calculations, a series of experiments has been proposed.

Bitteker, L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overview of nuclear MHD power conversion for multi-megawatt electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of recent research findings on space applications of nuclear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power for generation of multi klb f electric thrust at thousands of seconds of specific impulse is presented. The high operating temperatures of the nuclear MHD system and potential for direct coupling of the output power to the electric thruster system are characterizing features that allow for design of ultracompact and ultralight nuclear electric propulsion systems. Order of magnitude figures for some mission-critical parameters are collated from various engineering analyses. Specific mass and specific impulse values highlight the inherent benefits of further research and development investment in MHD power.

Blair M. Smith; Travis W. Knight; Samim Anghaie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nuclear electric propulsion : assessing the design of Project Prometheus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high fuel efficiency of electric propulsion makes it a viable alternative for long-distance space travel. Project Prometheus was a NASA-led project that sought to demonstrate that distant electric propulsion missions ...

Goycoolea, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A “Better, Safer, Cheaper” Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for “split?sprint” human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study

John S. Clark; Jeffrey A. George; Leon P. Gefert; Michael P. Doherty; Robert J. Sefcik

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy and environmental advantages of cogeneration with nuclear and coal electrical utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electrical-utility cogeneration from nuclear energy and coal is examined for improving regional energy-resource utilization efficiency and environmental performance. A case study is presented for a large and diverse hypothetical region which ... Keywords: coal, cogeneration, combined heat and power, efficiency, emissions, nuclear energy

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Finnish and French plants under construction –, but rising fossil fuel and CO2 prices are reviving interest in nuclear power. A potential nuclear power renaissance in liberalised electricity markets will face a number of hurdles associated... with the CO2 price in Europe. The attractiveness of carbon free technologies such as nuclear plant for a power producer is reinforced by the additional cost placed on fossil fuel generation technologies by climate policies and CO2 emissions pricing...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Decarbonizing the Electric Sector: Combining Renewable and Nuclear Energy using Thermal Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both renewable and nuclear energy can provide significant contributions to decarbonizing the electric sector. However, a grid employing large amounts of wind and solar energy requires the balance of the system to be highly flexible to respond to the increased variability of the net load. This makes deployment of conventional nuclear power challenging both due to the technical challenges of plant cycling and economic limits of reduced capacity factor. In the United States nuclear power plants generally provide constant, base load power and are most economic when operated at constant power levels. Operating nuclear power plants in load-following modes decreases the plants' annual energy output and increases the levelized cost of energy, decreasing economic competitiveness. One possible solution is to couple thermal energy storage to nuclear power plants. This would enable the reactor to remain at nearly constant output, while cycling the electrical generator in response to the variability of the net load. This paper conceptually explores combinations of wind, solar, and nuclear that can provide a large fraction of a system's electricity, assuming the use of thermal energy storage that would allow nuclear power to provide load following and cycling duty while operating at a constant reactor power output.

Denholm, P.; King, J.; Kutscher, C.; Wilson, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Aerothermodynamics, Comprehensive Technical Report, Direct Air Cycle, General Electric's Air Craft Nuclear Propulsion Program  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume summarizes the methods and techquies developed for use in the thermal design of nuclear reactors associated with that program.

Noyes, R.N.

1961-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pacific gas electric: 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. Incentive nuclear regulation spurs financial comeback  

SciTech Connect

Incentive agreements for Diablo Canyon nuclear plant helped spur Pacific Gas Electric Co.'s financial comeback. Consistent nuclear plant capacity factors above 80 percent contributed 38 percent of 1992 PG E earnings per share. This, plus aggressive cost cutting and reorganization, industry leading demand-side management, environmental measures and a rate refund and freeze are among the reasons Electric Light Power magazine names Pacific Gas Electric Co. the 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. San Francisco-based PG E is the 25th utility to receive the annual award for investor-owned electric utilities. PG E employees strive to create the kind of environment that can address increasing industry competitiveness. Rather than just doing their jobs, people consistently challenge each other to do their jobs better, trying to anticipate the changes of tomorrow and the next millennium.

Hoske, M.T.; Beaty, W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Aging Management Guidelines for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants -- Electrical and Mechanical Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the application process for license renewal, nuclear utilities must perform an evaluation to confirm that they have appropriately considered aging effects on plant components within the scope of the License Renewal Rule. This report provides guidelines for managing relevant degradation mechanisms applicable to electrical and mechanical penetrations in nuclear power plants. Use of these guidelines will provide utilities with a basis for verifying that effective methods for managing age-related ...

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems  

SciTech Connect

The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Joint electric power alternatives study. Appendix G. Joint parallel nuclear alternatives study for Russia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Parallel Nuclear Alternatives Study for Russia (JPNAS) is a parallel study to the Joint Electric Power Alternatives Study (JEPAS). The JPNAS assessed the costs of enhancing the safety level of Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs), decommissioning of RBMK-1000 and first generation VVER-440 units, completion of NPP construction, NPP repowering into fossil fuel plants, and construction of new generation NPPs. In the framework of the JEPAS, the JPNAS provides data on the nuclear sector which is needed to formulate an integrated resources plan and schedule for investments for the development of Russia`s power sector.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Table of Nuclear Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Moments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ma25 ZP A327 157 (87) 4492 295 ps 5- +2.6(5) IPAD 1974He13 PR C10 919 (74) 20 Ca 41 0 1.0x10 5 y 7 Research NP Nuclear Physics NuoC Nuovo Cimento NuoCL Nuovo Cimento Letters OptL Optics Letters ORNL Oak) +0.822567(3) [2H] N ZNat 23a 1202 (68)/PL A25 440 (67)/ ORNL-1775 (54) -0.00083(8) st [7Li] MB,R CPL

52

Nuclear electric dipole moment of {sup 3}He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

Stetcu, I.; Friar, J. L.; Hayes, A. C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Liu, C.-P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Navratil, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-414, California 94551 (United States)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electric dipole-forbidden nuclear transitions driven by super-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric dipole-forbidden transitions of nuclei interacting with super-intense laser fields are investigated considering stable isotopes with suitable low-lying first excited states. Different classes of transitions are identified, and all magnetic sublevels corresponding to the near-resonantly driven nuclear transition are included in the description of the nuclear quantum system. We find that large transition matrix elements and convenient resonance energies qualify nuclear M1 transitions as good candidates for the coherent driving of nuclei. We discuss the implications of resonant interaction of intense laser fields with nuclei beyond the dipole approximation for the controlled preparation of excited nuclear states and important aspects of possible experiments aimed at observing these effects.

Adriana Pálffy; Jörg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM TO SELECTED PORTIONS OF THE NUCLEAR HVAC SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design requirement probability of 0.01 or less in a 4-hour period ensures that the nuclear heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in the primary confinement areas of the Dry Transfer Facilities (DTFs) and Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) is working during a Category 1 drop event involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) assemblies (BSC 2004a , Section 5.1.1.48). This corresponds to an hourly HVAC failure rate of 2.5E-3 per hour or less, which is contributed to by two dominant causes: equipment failure and loss of electrical power. Meeting this minimum threshold ensures that a Category 1 initiating event followed by the failure of HVAC is a Category 2 event sequence. The two causes for the loss of electrical power include the loss of offsite power and the loss of onsite power distribution. Thus, in order to meet the threshold requirement aforementioned, the failure rate of mechanical equipment, loss of offsite power, and loss of onsite power distribution must be less than or equal to 2.5E-3 per hour for the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF. The loss of offsite power occurs at a frequency of 1.1E-5 per hour (BSC 2004a, Section 5.1.1.48). The purpose of this analysis is to determine the probability of occurrence of the unavailability of the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF due to loss of electrical power. In addition, this analysis provides insights on the contribution to the unavailability of the HVAC system due to equipment failure. The scope of this analysis is limited to finding the frequency of loss of electrical power to the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF.

N. Ramirez

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market  

SciTech Connect

Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

75,000 KILOWATTS OF ELECTRICITY BY NUCLEAR FISSION AT THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

For presentation at ASCE Convention in Reno, Nevada on Thursday, June 23, 1860. A description of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facslity is presented. The history of the project, program participants, site description, component development program, reaetor building, reactor structure, reactor core, sodium systems, instrumentation and control, fuel and component handling, auxsilary sustems, special design features, and advantages of sodium graphite reactor systems are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Gronemeyer, F.C.; Merryman, J.W.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

REACTOR AND SHIELD PHYSICS. Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle, Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program.  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume describes the experimental and theoretical work accomplished in the areas of reactor and shield physics.

Edwards, W.E.; Simpson, J.D.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.  

SciTech Connect

In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

Smith, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shao, Xuan-Min [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Keeley R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

70

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis shows that the station electric distribution system has the capacity and capability to supply voltage to the Class 1E equipment with their design ratings for the worst case loading condition.

Selan, J.C.

1981-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, Program Summary and References  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes sumarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume discusses the background to the General Electric program, and summarizes the various direct-air-cycle nuclear test assemblies and power plants that were developed. Because of the requirements of high performance, low weight, and small size, vast improvements in existing technology were required to meet the flight objectives. The technological progress achieved during the program is also summarized. The last appendix contains a compilation of the abstracts, tables of contents, and reference lists of the other twenty volumes.

Thornton, G.; Rothstein, A.J.

1962-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

Frischauf, Norbert [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Koudelka, Otto [Institute of Communication Networks and Satellite Communication, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 12/I, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

75

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on synchronous stability of the electric power system  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the synchronous stability of the electric power transmission and distribution systems are evaluated. The various modes of coupling of EMP to the power system are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on those perturbations affecting the synchronous stability of the transmission system. A brief review of the fundamental concepts of the stability problem is given, with a discussion of the general characteristics of transient analysis. A model is developed to represent single sets as well as repetitive sets of multiple faults on the distribution systems, as might be produced by EMP. The results of many numerical stability calculations are presented to illustrate the transmission system's response from different types of perturbations. The important parameters of both multiple and repetitive faults are studied, including the dependence of the response on the size of the perturbed area, the fault density, and the effective impedance between the fault location and the transmission system. Both major load reduction and the effect of the opening of tie lines at the time of perturbation are also studied. We conclude that there is a high probability that EMP can induce perturbations on the distribution networks causing a large portion of the transmission network in the perturbed area to lose synchronism. The result would be an immediate and massive power failure. (auth)

Manweiler, R.W.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system in conjunction with the offsite power sources has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analyses demonstrated that for the worst case conditions established, the Class 1E equipment will automatically start and continue to operate within the equiment design voltage rating.

Selan, J.C.

1981-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

79

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Investment in nuclear generation in a restricted electricity market : an analysis of risks and financing options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the late 1970s, the US electric power industry has been undergoing major changes. The electric utility industry had mainly consisted of highly regulated, vertically integrated, local monopolies, providing customers ...

Berger, Raphael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

82

Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California  

SciTech Connect

During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Testing of T-odd, P-even interactions by nonpolarized neutron transmission through a nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new possibility for the study of time-reversal violation is described. It consists in measurement of nonpolarized neutron transmission through nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field

V. G. Baryshevsky

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

85

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advisory system for the diagnosis of lost electric output in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhancement of efficiency is world-wide trend to survive under intense competition. In recent years, the efficiency in the power industry is also one of the important topics. In case of nuclear power plants(NPPs), the period and quality of maintenance ... Keywords: Advisory system, Bayesian network, Diagnosis, Nuclear power plant, Regression, Turbine cycle

Gyunyoung Heo; Soon Heung Chang; Seong Soo Choi; Gwang Hee Choi; Moon Hak Jee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The portfolio diversification value of nuclear power in liberalized electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key difference between a regulated and a liberalized electricity market is the establishment of a competitive generation marketplace via spot markets, day-ahead auctions, and over-the-counter trading activity. In a ...

Bean, Malcolm (Malcolm K.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modelling the Effects of Nuclear Fuel Reservoir Operation in a Competitive Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many countries, the electricity systems are quitting the vertically integrated monopoly organization for an operation framed by competitive markets. In such a competitive regime one can ask what the optimal management ...

Lykidi, Maria

90

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guidance for Developing an Electric Motor Specialist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The people responsible for electric motors in the power industry are known by various titlesmotor specialist, component engineer, motor technician, and electrical technician, to name a few. Although motor duties and responsibilities are often spread across several departmentssuch as maintenance, operations, engineering, and procurementit is up to the motor specialist to ensure that motor health and reliability are maintained. This report presents a tiered approach to developing the necessary skills and k...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out beforeDose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out before 1968,of the dose from nuclear weapons test fallout. As indicated

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Correlation Between Aging and Seismic Qualification for Nuclear Plant Electrical Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shake-table tests indicate that aging has no effect on the performance of several common electrical components during or after earthquakes. These findings suggest that some components can be exempted from the costly artificial aging that in some cases is required for seismic qualification.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

95

Electrical and electronic subsystems of a nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system is designed specifically for use at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Fuel Services Facility at West Valley, New York. This system sends a television and photographic camera into the space between the walls of a double-shell nuclear waste tank to obtain images of the inner and outer walls at precisely known locations. The system is capable of inspecting a wall section 14 ft wide by 27 ft high. Due to the high temperature and radiation of the annulus environment, the operating life for the inspection device is uncertain, but is expected to be at least 100 h, with 1000 R/h at 82/sup 0/C. The film camera is shielded with 1/2 in. of lead to minimize radiation fogging of the film during a 25-min picture taking excursion. The operation of the inspection system is semiautomated with remote manual prepositioning of the camera, followed by a computer controlled wall scan. This apparatus is currently set up to take an array of contiguous pictures, but is adaptable to other modes of operation.

Evenson, R.J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

97

Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources.

Selan, J.C.

1982-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for the Replacement of Large Electric Motors at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to prepare a primary source of guidance for a project manager who is coordinating a team of plant personnel tasked with replacing a large electric motor. The report provides a generic process that describes interfaces and key steps necessary to ensure that the motor is evaluated and replaced in the most cost-effective and efficient means possible. The report also provides guidance regarding the typical composition of the project team and demonstrates how performance of their...

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOR 100-KW ELECTRIC AND 400-KW HEAT CAPACITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptional design study was made of a lowpower ''package'' reactor plant for the production of 100 kw of electrical power and 400 kw of heat at remote Arctic installations. The power plant steam generator is proposed to be an unmanned, heterogeneous, boilingtype reactor capable of continuous operation for extended periods. The design is based on data derived from experiments with boiling-type reactors conducted by Argorne at the Reactor Testing Station, Arco, Idaho.

Treshow, M.; Snider, A.R.; Shaftman, D.H.

1955-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Plant Engineering: Electrical Cable Test Applicability Matrix for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When assessing cable degradation or failure assessment, using the correct test and assessment methodology is critical to obtaining the correct answer. Many in-plant and laboratory tests exist. Some apply to the cable types used in nuclear plants. Some apply only to distribution cables. Most have pertinence to only one issue or even one cable design. This report provides a correlation between specific cable problems and the appropriate tests that may be used to resolve the issue. The report starts with su...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applies, not only to the nuclear reactor, but also to otherdetailed de- sign of nuclear reactor power s tations is vgreat importance in nuclear reactor accidents. 3.2 Increase

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

Brewer, Jeffrey D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Coatings to Prevent Diffusion of Fission Products into Turbine Materials Used in High Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Electric Genera ting Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes EPRI activities relating to turbine blade coatings to prevent diffusion of fission products into turbine materials used in high temperature gas cooled nuclear electric generating stations. Specifically, this report describes activities that have identified candidate coatings and methodologies for evaluating the effectiveness of these coatings.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Participation of the Nuclear Power Plants in the New Brazilian Electric Energy Market  

SciTech Connect

A new regulation framework has been established for the Brazilian electric energy market by a law put into effect on March 15,2004. The main overall goals of this new regulation are: to allow the lowest possible tariffs for end users, while providing the necessary economic incentives for the operation of present installations (generating plants, transmission lines, distribution networks) and the expansion of the system; long-term planning of the extension of the installations required to meet the demand growth; separation of the generation, transmission and distribution activities by allocating them into different companies; new contracts between generating and distribution companies must result from bidding processes based on lowest-tariff criteria; and energy from new generating units required to meet the demand growth must be contracted by all distributing companies integrated to the National Interconnected Grid, in individual amounts proportional to their respective markets.

Mathias, S.G.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

SNMSP II: A system to fully automate special nuclear materials accountability reporting for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The USNRC requires each licensee who is authorized to possess Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) to prepare and submit reports concerning SNM received, produced, possessed, transferred, consumed, disposed of, or lost. These SNM accountability reports, which need to be submitted twice a year, contain detailed information on the origin, quantity, and type of SNM for several locations. The amount of detail required makes these reports very time consuming and error prone when prepared manually. Yankee Atomic is developing an IBM PC-based computer code that fully automates the process of generating SNM accountability reports. The program, called SNMSP II, prints a number of summaries including facsimiles of the NRC/DOE-741, 742, 742C, and RW-859 reports in a format that can be submitted directly to the NRC/DOE. SNMSP II is menu-driven and is especially designed for people with little or no computer training. Input can be either from a mainframe-based corporate data base or manually through user-friendly screens. In addition, extensive quality assurance features are available to ensure the security and accuracy of the data. This paper discusses the major features of the code and describes its implementation at Yankee.

Pareto, V.; Venegas, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

109

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Power's Development in Japan for a Zero-Carbon Electricity Generation System by 2100  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education, Economics, and Sustainability / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Qi Zhang; Keiichi N. Ishihara; Benjamin McLellan; Tetsuo Tezuka

111

A New Mixed Fossil/Nuclear Energy System for the Production of Electricity with Zero Emission of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Economic

W. Seifritz

112

NuclearScienceandEngineeringLaboratory Sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computational and visualization tools for application in nuclear power, nuclear security, nonproliferation of nuclear power to the electric grid. In the nuclear security, nonproliferation, and safeguards areas, ongoi

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

113

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Recommended Practice for Evaluating Interchangeability for National Electric Manufacturing Association Frame Motor Replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has a standardized system for designating electric motors. The NEMA system uses a frame size number and letter designation that describes the mounting dimensions, including foot hole mounting pattern, shaft diameter, shaft height, and other details; however, all design characteristicssuch as overall length, height, conduit box extension, and so onmust be evaluated to ensure proper form, fit, and function. The T-frame motor might be the most highly st...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

118

Executive Director for Operations UPDATE OF ISSUES RELATED TO NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS IN RESPONSE TO RESTRUCTURING OF THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with an update of electric utility deregulation and restructuring issues regarding the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their facilities safely. BACKGROUND: On October 24, 1997, the staff sent to the Commission SECY-97-253, "Policy Options for Nuclear Power Reactor Financial Qualifications in Response to Restructuring of the Electric Utility Industry. " In that paper, the staff discussed three options for the Commission's consideration regarding possible approaches that the NRC could use in assessing the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their plants safely. (The impact of deregulation and restructuring on decommissioning funding assurance is being addressed in a separate rulemaking, which was published in the Federal Register on September 10, 1997. A final rule is scheduled to be sent to the Commission by June 30, 1998.) In response to SECY-97-253, the Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum on January 15, 1998, and directed the staff to maintain the existing financial qualifications framework as discussed in Option 2 of SECY-97-253 and to "develop a coherent, efficient plan that would allow timely confirmation of the status of licensees (i.e., whether they meet the definition of 'electric utility')as deregulation actions are finalized by States. " In response, on April 16, 1998, the

L. Joseph Callan /s; Robert S. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Atoms to electricity  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for some 12 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1982. In the 1990's, it is expected to become second only to coal as a source of our electric power, almost doubling its present contribution to our national electricity supply. 14 references, 40 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of plutonium from a nuclear weapon to nuclear reactor fuel requires an evaluation of the residual gallium as a potential corrosive material within an operating nuclear fuel element. Homogeneous trace levels of gallium may remain following conversion and have the potential to migrate along the thermal gradient within the fuel and concentrate at the cladding-fuel contact zone. A system to investigate this material transport phenomenon was constructed using small diameter (0.18 inch), indirect electric heaters to simulate the centerline temperatures of operating nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor. The heater was inserted into annular surrogate fuel pellets containing depleted uranium, cerium oxide and trace quantities (10 ppm) of gallium to perform an initial study of the gallium migration using non-plutonium fuels and evaluate the performance of the simulation system. Heat was removed from the operating heaters by using an innovative liquid metal heat exchanger. The heaters were of a new design and were required to operate at a nominal temperature of 1000?C and for a minimum of 5000 hours. An evaluation of the expected heater lifetime and the thermal simulation system was needed in order to justify the high expense of a proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration and the small sample size. Results from the operation of the simulation system and lifetime data indicate the current heater design is capable of producing the required temperatures and thermal gradients normally found in operating nuclear fuels. However, a design weakness in the heaters resulted in an unacceptably high failure rate of the heaters. The heaters were determined to have a reliability of 0.83 % at 5000 hours of operation with a Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) of 485 hours. The current heater design would require some modification and further testing prior to beginning a full scale test using prototypic MOX fuel pellets.

O'Kelly, David Sean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating ... electric power companies have announced the retirement of five nuclear reactors at four power plants.

122

Electric Power Monthly – December 2009 Data issue  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0226 (2009/12) Electric Power Monthly December 2009 With Data for September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and ...

123

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guide for the Performance of OnSite and Vendor Shop Inspections of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry is experiencing a loss of expertise as its workforce ages. Compounding the problem is that many plants find that there is limited time to train new workers. Periodically, station and corporate motor specialists are asked to perform inspections of on-site motors to maintain a level of equipment reliability or to perform inspections for customers at vendor motor shops. This report should prove valuable during visual inspections of electric motors.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regula- tion.Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for Light Water Reactor

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Reg- ulation.Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licen- sing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Standard

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

128

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCÓN, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

129

Electric dipole moments of Hg, Xe, Rn, Ra, Pu, and TlF induced by the nuclear Schiff moment and limits on time-reversal violating interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the atomic electric dipole moments (EDMs) induced in ^{199}Hg, ^{129}Xe, ^{223}Rn, ^{225}Ra, and ^{239}Pu by their respective nuclear Schiff moments S. The results are (in units 10^{-17}S(e {fm}^{3})^{-1}e cm): d(^{199}Hg)=-2.8, d(^{129}Xe)=0.38, d(^{223}Rn)=3.3, d(^{225}Ra)=-8.5, d(^{239}Pu)=-11. We have also calculated corrections to the parity- and time-invariance-violating (P,T-odd) spin-axis interaction constant in TlF. These results are important for the interpretation of atomic and molecular experiments on EDMs in terms of fundamental P,T-odd parameters.

V. A. Dzuba; V. V. Flambaum; J. S. M. Ginges; M. G. Kozlov

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Evaluation Emergency Planning for Nuclear PowerPotential Definition of Nuclear Emergencies Developingan Emergency Plan . . . . Regulatory Review of Utilities!

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. ... More Tables on Pennsylvania's Electricity Profile: Formats; Table 2.

133

Baldrige Award Recipients--Westinghouse Electric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electric utilities operating nuclear power plants install fuel ... areas identified with statistical techniques and ... The Specialty Metals Plant, near Pittsburgh ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

Iselin, L.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

136

Modeling and simulation in analyzing geological repositories for high level nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is very often used to generate electricity. But first the energy must be released from atoms which can be done in two ways: nuclear fusion and nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to produce electrical energy. Electrical ... Keywords: modeling, nuclear energy, nuclear waste, nuclear waste storage, simulation

Dietmar P. F. Möller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

140

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 8.1 Nuclear Energy Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"Operable Nuclear Reactors," at end of section. • Nuclear electricity net generation totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

142

Lesson 6- Atoms to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers inside the reactor, fission control and electricity generation.

143

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the worldÂ’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

144

Electric sales and revenue 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electric sales and revenue 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

147

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to ElectricalRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyenergy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from a nuclear

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

Philip E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

150

NUCLEAR PROPULSION--AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear energy in the space programs is discussed. Nuclear rocket development is reviewed, and the Nevada rocket development station, nuclear electric propulsion and power generation, and advanced research projects are discussed. (J.R.D.)

Finger, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

152

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

154

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A two-year update on the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors and the progress being made in overcoming barriers to national

155

Nuclear Fission Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and about 250 kg of 239Pu. Some 40% of the energy produced in the course of a nuclear fuel cycle comes from 239Pu. Since about 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

156

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

157

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20555. u. S. Nuclear U. S. NRC. Reactor Safety Study: AnNUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 101. "Report on Current Activities NRC and the Federal Interagency

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-and RelatedStandards for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing worldÂ’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

162

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, ...

164

Georgia Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) Georgia Nuclear Energy Financing Act (Georgia) Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility...

165

The future of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs. (DWL)

Zeile, H.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electrical aspects of rainout  

SciTech Connect

Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

Rosenkilde, C.E.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nuclear Energy-Depend On It Helping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Depend On It Helping to Power America for More Than Five Decades Past, Present, and Future ... The United States introduced nuclear energy into our domestic electricity production in 1957 and now produces approximately 20 percent of our total electricity and 70 percent of our low-carbon electricity from nuclear energy, according to the Energy Information Administration. More than 100 U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors provide reliable, affordable electricity in 31 states. Nuclear energy can help meet our Nation's need for dependable electricity into the future. The use of nuclear power is increasing around the world: z 29 countries worldwide operate a total of 437 nuclear reactors for electricity generation, with 55 new nuclear reactors under construction in 14 countries.

171

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

172

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

173

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NP-263, October 1976. Edison Electric Institute, "Report onREGULATION Data from the Edison Electric Institute annualpower plants. However, the Edison Electric Institute, in its

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTAGES COMPONENT NUCLEAR REACTOR General Primary CoolingAsh Disposal Trouble NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESconsisting of a Nuclear units use a reactor in which burner

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been restricted core. Nuclear tests are not scheduled untilnuclear NRC, the non-nuclear tests are proceedingInstitute test reactor - megawatts - megawatts - Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section. 4 Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear ... as well as financial and environmental ... Demand-Side Management ...

183

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Philippines is still interested in nuclear power generation as a means of coping with its acute electricity

Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

186

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

197

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

198

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

199

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: CZT, etching, gamma-ray response, internal electric fields, microstructural properties, nuclear detectors, photoluminescence, precipitates

R. B. James; B. Brunett; J. Heffelfinger; J. Van Scyoc; J. Lund; F. P. Doty; C. L. Lingren; R. Olsen; E. Cross; H. Hermon; H. Yoon; N. Hilton; M. Schieber; E. Y. Lee; J. Toney; T. E. Schlesinger; M. Goorsky; W. Yao; H. Chen; A. Burger

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

205

Reference: Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station- Preconditioning of Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, Fuel Systems, and other Engine and Electrical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is twofold. First, to inform the NRC that Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station will not dispute the Non-Cited Violation (50-254/01-05-04; 50-265/01-05-04) of 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, Criterion XI, "Test Control, " described in the referenced NRC report. The station similarly concurs that the risk significance was very low (Green). Senior station management and station personnel understand the importance of scheduling and performing Technical Specifications required surveillances such that unacceptable preconditioning does not occur. The instances identified in the referenced NRC report have been entered into the station's corrective action program and corrective actions have been implemented or are scheduled for implementation. Second, given the importance of this subject and based upon our review of the NRC integrated inspection report, the station is providing an update on several of the issues discussed in section three, "Units 1 and 2 Emergency Diesel Generator Timed Test Preconditioning Concerns. " This is intended to update the NRC and supplement our shared understanding of the issues. The following specific points are provided: August 8, 2001 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Today, nuclear energy is the largest...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today, nuclear energy is the largest non-carbon electricity production method in use, but the nation must effectively address economic and waste management concerns to enable its...

208

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this work. Today, nuclear energy represents the single largest source of, carbon-free baseload energy, accounting for nearly 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

209

Electric trade in the United States 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Trade in the United States 1990 (ELECTRA) is the third in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data. The second report contained data for 1988. This report provides information on the industry during 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Subject Areas. Electrical ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

California Electric Energy Crisis - Electricity Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Information Available Formats; Status of Electric Industry Restructuring Activity in California: html: California State Electricity Profil ...

212

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevent serious damage to the nuclear fuel, since it is thetransportation: for nuclear plants, fuel handling is carriedSpecific Fossil Fuel Geothermal Nuclear Solid Waste Disposal

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

REGULATION AND SYSTEM INTERDEPENDENCE: EFFECTS ON THE SITING OF CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL ENERGY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Going to SQecific End Uses Hydroelectricity 100% electricity58% transportation Hydroelectricity ! Nuclear Geothermalsupply relied on hydroelectricity, the severe droughts,

Kooser, J.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

nuclear | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear nuclear Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited" Rate this dataset

216

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

217

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

219

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which steam is raised. nuclear fuel generates heat that isattention to nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, and these areFor all the fossil-fuel and nuclear (However, categories,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive transformers; and electrical test components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers ... Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels Office of Oil and Gas ... Risk management will become an ...

225

Electrical Cable Testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge ...  

... useful to determine the location of defect sites in critical but inaccessible electrical cabling systems in aging aircraft, ships, nuclear power ...

226

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

227

Evaluation of Peak Heat Release Rates in Electrical Cabinet Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to reanalyze the peak heat release rates (HRRs) from fires occurring in electrical cabinets of nuclear power plants.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

229

Nuclear & Uranium - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional Formats Nuclear Overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. PDFXLS Annual statistics on nuclear generating units, power plants operations, and uranium. › Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2010 › PDF XLS Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium Overview, 1949-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Additional Formats U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates › Release Date: July 2010 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has updated its estimates of uranium reserves for year-end 2008. This represents the first revision of the estimates since 2004. PDF

230

Electric sales and revenue: 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Microsoft PowerPoint - Why Nuclear Energy New Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world's energy needs * There are 441 nuclear reactors in operation in 31 countries * These plants generate electricity for nearly a billion people, and account for 17% of the world's electricity production * The U.S. has 103 operating reactors producing 20% of the nation's electricity * Illinois leads all states with the highest share of nuclear (51%) * Technology significantly developed at Argonne forms the basis of all nuclear energy systems used worldwide Nuclear power is reliable and economical * In 2001, U.S. nuclear plants produced electricity for 1.68 cents per kilowatt-hour on average, second only to hydroelectric power among baseload generation options * U.S. nuclear power plant performance has steadily

232

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Capacity Planning submodule  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The NEMS produces integrated forecasts for energy markets in the United States by achieving a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand. Currently, for each year during the period from 1990 through 2010, the NEMS describes energy supply, conversion, consumption, and pricing. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The supply of electricity is a conversion activity since electricity is produced from other energy sources (e.g., fossil, nuclear, and renewable). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. The EMM consists of four main submodules: Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP), Electricity Fuel Dispatching (EFD), Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP), and Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM). The ECP evaluates changes in the mix of generating capacity that are necessary to meet future demands for electricity and comply with environmental regulations. The EFD represents dispatching (i.e., operating) decisions and determines how to allocate available capacity to meet the current demand for electricity. Using investment expenditures from the ECP and operating costs from the EFD, the EFP calculates the price of electricity, accounting for state-level regulations involving the allocation of costs. The LDSM translates annual demands for electricity into distributions that describe hourly, seasonal, and time-of-day variations. These distributions are used by the EFD and the ECP to determine the quantity and types of generating capacity that are required to insure reliable and economical supplies of electricity. The EMM also represents nonutility suppliers and interregional and international transmission and trade. These activities are included in the EFD and the ECP.

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electric machine  

SciTech Connect

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the worldÂ’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

237

World nuclear outlook 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

World nuclear outlook 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

240

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and...

242

Electric moped  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two electrically powered mopeds were designed and built. These vehicles offer single-person transportation which is convenient, quiet, low-cost, smooth, and pollution-free. The first moped has a 12 volt electrical system. The second has a 24 volt electrical system. They both have top speeds of about 20 miles per hour. They both use transistorized speed controls and deep-discharge, lead-acid batteries. These mopeds were put through a 750 mile test program. In this program, the 12 volt bike had an average range of nine miles. The 24 volt bike, with a smaller battery capacity, had an average range of six miles.

Ferschl, M.S.

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

243

Steam electric plant factors, 1978. [48 states  

SciTech Connect

Fossil-fuel steam electric generation increased 5.8% in 1977 to 1,612.2 million MWh as compared to 1976. Thirty-four new fossil-fuel steam electric units and 7 new nuclear units became operational in 1977. Detailed data are reported for 748 plants, accounting for more than 99% of the total steam generation capacity, in the contiguous US.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports ‹ See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

245

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions -Fuel is cheep -High energy density (1 ton U = 16 abundant elements found in natural crustal rocks) Nuclear Power CONS -High capital cost due to meeting if there is a movement towards electric cars? -What if the high capital costs of a nuclear power plant were invested

Toohey, Darin W.

246

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section 5, Shield; Section 6, Turbomachinery; Section 7. Control System  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

248

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

249

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

250

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

251

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

252

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

253

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

254

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

255

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

256

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

257

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

258

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

259

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.Fuel and Geo- thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of growth of population around power plant These arenuclear power plants (3000 MWt electrical). of growth in

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the feasibility of integrating a nuclear power plant with Steam- Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD), an oil region enhance the feasibility of using nuclear power plants to meet the energy needs [5]. Both mining Electricity A second production scenario is the cogeneration of thermal power and electricity to meet the #12

264

DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Index (click to jump links) Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Nuclear Power Electricity from Renewable Sources Electricity Alternative Cases Electricity Sales Electricity Use Is Expected To Grow More Slowly Than GDP As generators and combined heat and power plants adjust to the evolving structure of the electricity market, they face slower growth in demand than in the past. Historically, demand for electricity has been related to economic growth; that positive relationship is expected to continue, but the ratio is uncertain. Figure 67. Population gross domestic product, and electricity sales, 1965-2025 (5-year moving average annual percent growth). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

266

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Home...

267

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

268

Nuclear Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2002 September 30, 2002 NERAC Fall 2002 Meeting Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Major Program Developments Major Program Developments 6 June 2002: Department selects three U.S. electric utilities (Dominion Energy, Entergy, and Exelon) to participate in joint government/ industry projects to demonstrate NRC's Early Site Permit (ESP) process and seek NRC approval by mid-decade 6 July 2002: Secretary Abraham announces transition of management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to Nuclear Energy and revitalization of its nuclear R&D mission 6 September 2002: Generation IV International Forum reaches agreement on six advanced reactor and fuel cycle technologies for joint development Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

269

Nuclear Power: a Hedge against Uncertain Gas and Carbon Prices?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High fossil fuel prices have rekindled interest in nuclear power. This paper identifies specific nuclear characteristics making it unattractive to merchant generators in liberalised electricity markets, and argues that non-fossil fuel technologies...

Roques, Fabien A; Nuttall, William J; Newbery, David; de Neufville, Richard

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity.

Leuze, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

272

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

273

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

274

Japan depends significantly on nuclear power to meet its ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... the contribution of nuclear power to electricity production is more stable at 19% to 20%.

275

Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The electrical output of the nuclear power plant fleet can be increased either by constructing new plants or by 'uprating' operating plants.

276

Dilemmas of Nuclear Materials and Technology: From Los Alamos ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the form of nuclear weapons, governments have acquired the capacity to destroy civilization; on the other hand, in the form of electricity-generating plants,  ...

277

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The documents reviewed are:...

278

Some political issues related to future special nuclear materials production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Government must take action to assure the future adequate supply of special nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Existing statutes permit the construction of advanced defense production reactors and the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel for the production of special materials. Such actions would not only benefit the US nuclear reactor manufacturers, but also the US electric utilities that use nuclear reactors.

Peaslee, A.T. Jr.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear Chemistry Beta decay of 71,73  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 Nuclear Chemistry Beta decay of 71,73 Co: probing single-parti- cle states approaching doubly of primary interest are the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and nuclear electric quadrupole moment. The dipole/or neutrons in the nucleus. The dipole moment provides information on the nuclear quantum structure

Mantica, Paul F.

280

Electric trade in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitating recovery from disruptions to energy supply. MajorElectricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization on the nation's energy delivery system Superconductors are important to meeting the nation's energy needs

282

PERSPECTIVES OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organizers of this meeting have asked me to present perspectives of nuclear physics. This means to identify the areas where nuclear physics will be expanding in the next future. In six chapters a short overview of these areas will be given, where I expect that nuclear physics will develop quite fast: (1) Quantum Chromodynamics and effective field theories in the confinement region. (2) Nuclear structure at the limits. (3) High energy heavy ion collisions. (4) Nuclear astrophysics. (5) Neutrino physics. (6) Test of physics beyond the standard model by rare processes. After a survey over these six points I will pick out a few topics where I will go more in details. There is no time to give for all six points detailed examples. I shall discuss the following examples of the six topics mentionned above: (1) The perturbative chiral quark model and the nucleon ?-term. (2) VAMPIR (Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic model spaces and with realistic forces) as an example of the nuclear structure renaissance. (3) Measurement of important astrophysical nuclear reactions in the Gamow peak. (4) The solar neutrino problem. As examples for testing new physics beyond the standard model by rare processes I had prepared to speak about the measurement of the electric neutron dipole moment and of the neutrinoless double beta decay. But the time is limited and so I have to skip these points, although they are extremely interesting.

Amand Faessler

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electric Power Monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear Energy | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Argonne has contributed to the development of civilian nuclear power for over 50 years. Our scientists and engineers conduct research in advanced nuclear energy systems, nonproliferation and national security, and environmental management. Nuclear energy is the largest generator of carbon-free electricity in use today, and it will play an increasing role in worldwide power generation as advanced reactor designs and improved fuel-cycle technologies are brought into commercial application. Nearly every commercial reactor in operation today was developed from Argonne research. Building on this heritage, we are supporting the reliable, safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide - and fostering its increased use in the future by incorporating science and engineering

287

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

288

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel and Geo­ thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.produces thermal energy, from the nuclear power plant, whichthermal, or the study "large" plants about one about 1000 sixth MW size of current The large nuclear power plants (

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

290

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 runoff - co;il pile Geothermal wells Waste Disposal: WaterLiquid-Dominated Fields Geothermal Nuclear Water EmissionsOil 1. 2. 3. L 3 Gas Geothermal Nuclear Section 1.3 Noise

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electricity Transmission, A Primer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the electric power system, 2) gives electricity customers flexibility to diversify the mix of fuels that produces their electricity by giving them access to power plants, 3)...

293

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) “Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom,” The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (2002) “Why Did Electricity Prices Fall in England &Why Did British Electricity Prices Fall After 1998? ,”The Fall in British Electricity Prices: Market Rules, Market

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

298

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

299

Electric trade in the United States 1990. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Trade in the United States 1990 (ELECTRA) is the third in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data. The second report contained data for 1988. This report provides information on the industry during 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr. Sonja Haber 6 of 13

302

Electric Power Monthly, June 1990  

SciTech Connect

The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

1990-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

304

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric vehicle testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicle Testing (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INLCON-05-00693 HEV & EV Testing...

305

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Electricity, Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together diverse groups of experts...

306

Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electric trade in the United States 1992  

SciTech Connect

This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

309

Renewable and nuclear heresies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Renewables are not green. To reach the scale at which they would contribute importantly to meeting global energy demand, renewable sources of energy, such as wind, water and biomass, cause serious environmental harm. Measuring renewables in watts per square metre that each source could produce smashes these environmental idols. Nuclear energy is green. However, in order to grow, the nuclear industry must extend out of its niche in baseload electric power generation, form alliances with the methane industry to introduce more hydrogen into energy markets, and start making hydrogen itself. Technologies succeed when economies of scale form part of their conditions of evolution. Like computers, to grow larger, the energy system must now shrink in size and cost. Considered in watts per square metre, nuclear has astronomical advantages over its competitors.

Jesse H. Ausubel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

312

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

313

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

314

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, Robert (Dublin, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Electric Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and businesses is a critical necessity for everyday life and economic vitality. The Energy Department works to keep the grid secure from cyber and physical attacks; partners with states and other stakeholders to plan more resilient infrastructure that can better withstand extreme weather events; and supports efforts to

319

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations Wednesday, September 19 - Plenary Session September 19, 2012 Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company September 19, 2012 A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Presenter: Honorable William C. Ostendorff, Commissioner US Nuclear Regulatory Commission September 19, 2012 International Perspective on Fukushima Accident Presenter: Miroslav Lipár, Head, Operational Safety Section, Department of

320

Electric Resistance Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage...

322

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: September 2011 Highlights: September 2011 Cooler temperatures drove down retail sales of electricity in the Southeast compared to September 2010. Fossil steam generation decreased in much of the United States, except in the ERCOT portion of Texas where total generation increased from September, 2010. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 18% from September 2010. Key Indicators Sept. 2011 % Change from Sept. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 336,264 -3% Residential Retail Price (cents/Kwh) 12.26 2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 324,357 -1% Cooling Degree-Days 184 -6% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/mmBtu) 4.04 0% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 144,439 -11% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 76,765 -3% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 702,589 -2% Nuclear Outages (MW) 9,227 70%

323

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: January 2012 Highlights: January 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during January 2012. Coal-fired generation decreased in every region of the United States when compared to January 2011. Coal stocks recovered due to decreased consumption this January compared to the same month of 2011. Key Indicators Jan 2012 % Change from Jan. 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 340,743 -6.4% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.43 4.4% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 310,859 -6.5% Heating Degree-Days 751 -21.4% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 2.75 -40.3% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 181,621 10.2% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 70,595 -21.7% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 676,045 19.9% Nuclear Outages (MW) 9,567 2.1%

324

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Vertical Integration in Restructured Electricity Markets: Measuring Market Efficiency and Firm Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Natural Gas and Oil Nuclear Quantity Supplied (MWh)Units Oil Units Panel B: Summer of 1999 Variable QuantityQuantity demanded hourly a Price of: Electricity a Electricity (Q weighted) Natural Gas b Oil

Mansur, Erin T.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test. Description/Summary: ... Details. Type of software: Virtual concrete electrical conductivity test. Authors: ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

329

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

330

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

EIA - Electricity Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

333

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

334

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

335

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time – usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear

339

Natural gas use in the electric power sector is growing - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, ... the Nation's fleet of natural gas combined-cycle power plants is contributing significantly more to baseload electricity needs.

340

USLCI Database_Electricity, at Grid, US, 2008 Gate to gate life...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of fuels used for utility electricity generation in US.  Fuels include biomass, coal, petroleum, geothermal, natural gas, nuclear, solar, hydroelectric and wind energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electrical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by the Office of Health, Safety and Security and is available to all DOE components and their contractors. 2. Specific comments (recommendations, additions, deletions, and any pertinent data) to enhance this document should be sent to: Patrick Tran

344

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1000 was designed by Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and has been formally approved by NRC. See, and show that the member has authorized the organization to intervene on his or her behalf. Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station), CLI-00-20, 52 NRC 151, 163 (2000). B. Ruling

Laughlin, Robert B.

345

Corrosion in the Nuclear Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The U.S. nuclear industry generates approximately 20% of the electricity needs primarily from reactors designed and built over 30 years ago. Safety concerns continue to plague the industry. Severe cracks found at one nuclear power reactor (ca 2001) and the boric acid...

346

Electric trade in the United States, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

349

Electric Power Monthly, September 1995: With data for June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Electric power monthly: April 1996, with data for January 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 64 tabs.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Role of Renewable Energy in a Sustainable Electric Generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) Widely Available and Deployed After 2020 None Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Nuclear Generation 12.5 GWe by 2030 64 GWe by 2030

352

Integrating Expanded Wind into the Nation's Electrical Grid  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

on coal and natural gas and nuclear power and then on carbon reduction, emissions and water uses in the electric sector. So anybody who has kind of followed this space certainly...

353

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

354

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and about 250 kg of 239 Pu. Some 40% of the energy produced in the course of a nuclear fuel cycle comes from 239 Pu. Since about 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

355

The Washington Post, April 16, 2006 Going Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with their starring roles in "The China Syndrome," a fictional evocation of nuclear disaster in which a reactor nuclear reactors quietly delivering just 20 percent of America's electricity. Eighty percent of the people nuclear reactor program. (And although hundreds of uranium mine workers did die from radiation exposure

Bilbao Arrese, Jesús Mario

356

NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, engineering, construction. operation, transmission and distribution of nuclear electricity, decommissioning from $O.Ol/kWh ($1982) at l%/yr to $O.O165/kWh in year 50, decommissioning and nuclear waste reserved Copyright 0 1988 Pergamon Journals Ltd THE NET-ENERGY YIELD OF NUCLEAR POWER GENETYNER SR,~ ROBERT

McDonald, Kirk

357

Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform  

SciTech Connect

Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

Turpin, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Washington Post, April 16, 2006 Going Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with their starring roles in "The China Syndrome," a fictional evocation of nuclear disaster in which a reactor nuclear reactors quietly delivering just 20 percent of America's electricity. Eighty percent of the people Lovelock, father of the Gaia theory, believes that nuclear energy is the only way to avoid catastrophic

Bilbao Arrese, Jesús Mario

359

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

360

The Electricity Industry In Spain Edward Kahn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

import of natural gas from Algeria. The 1994 electricity reform legislation mandated the creation, and the peculiar situation of nuclear power. In the future, natural gas will increase its role in Spain Energia (MIE), Protocolo de Intenciones para el Uso del Gas Natural en la Generacion de Energia Electrica

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical Metrology. Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid. Contact. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

363

List of Geothermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 1258 Geothermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-1000) CSV (rows 1001-1258) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 401 Certification (Vermont) Environmental Regulations Vermont Utility Industrial Biomass/Biogas Coal with CCS Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Small Hydroelectric Nuclear Yes APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

364

Nuclear Energy  

Nuclear Energy Environmental Mgmt. Study Objectives: Respond to the pressing need to refine existing corrosion models: Predict performance in wide range of environments

365

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

366

Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos

W. C. Haxton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2012

368

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

369

Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electrical Safety" (DOE )-HDBK-1092-2004 Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, "Labor" , Chapter 17

Wechsler, Risa H.

370

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The...

371

Electricity in the Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity in the Body Name: SEAN Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: OUR BRAINS SEND ELECTRICAL IMPULSES RIGHT. IS IT BASICALLY SAME AS NORMAL ELECTRICITY? IS IT LIKE...

372

Matter & Energy Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Electricity Energy Technology Computers & Math Distributed Computing Computer Science Science & Society Energy Issues Environmental Policies Reference Electric power transmission Distributed generation Electric power Grid computing ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) -- A new study

Hines, Paul

373

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2001-2011 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from...

374

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings in their electricity bill. While these consumerssavings in their electricity bill. A potential argumentsurplus S(s) minus the electricity bill: E j [S(s) ? p j D

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

New trends in efficient production and distribution of electrical energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is absolutely necessary for an advanced society. In this context use of classical combustibles (coal, petroleum, nuclear) is limited, e.g. by sources exhaustion. Some other undesired phenomena are commented and the solution - use of ... Keywords: digital control, electrical energy strategy, renewable energy

Mihai Octavian Popescu; Claudia Laurenta Popescu

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sustainable Electricity | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Electricity SHARE Sustainable Electricity Outdoor power line accelerated testing. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program...

377

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

DOE handbook electrical safety  

SciTech Connect

Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

380

State electricity profiles, March 1999  

SciTech Connect

Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document combines the material previously included in the Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Briefing Book for the Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting (Electric Power Research Institute report 1023444) with the annual I&C Research Plan, replacing the latter document. This document contains key information on the I&C program and its projects, including: 1. A program executive summarya high-level document on the key activities of the I&C base program as well as its three supplemental groups 2. A consolidate...

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

An electrically powered binary star?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for stellar binary systems consisting of a magnetic and a non-magnetic white-dwarf pair which is powered principally by electrical energy. In our model the luminosity is caused by resistive heating of the stellar atmospheres due to induced currents driven within the binary. This process is reminiscent of the Jupiter-Io system, but greatly increased in power because of the larger companion and stronger magnetic field of the primary. Electrical power is an alternative stellar luminosity source, following on from nuclear fusion and accretion. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to account for the observed X-ray luminosity of the 9.5-min binary RX J1914+24, and provides an explanation for its puzzling characteristics.

Kinwah Wu; Mark Cropper; Gavin Ramsay; Kazuhiro Sekiguchi

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 8, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

384

Electric:SpaceCharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Electric:SpaceCharge. Prev, 6.4.1. Material Properties, Next. Name. Electric:SpaceCharge — Spatial charge density. Details. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:30 - 3:40 pm Welcome and Opening Comments Kevin Kolevar, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Linda Stuntz, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee...

386

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

387

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy....

388

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

389

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

390

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

391

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

393

Electricity Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CorrectionUpdate November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas...

394

California's electricity crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

EIA Energy Kids - Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The energy sources we use to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor non-renewable.

396

Electrical Safety Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety and electrical safety awareness within the APS. The committee shall implement policies and practices adopted by the ANL Electrical Safety Committee and shall assist the ANL...

397

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

398

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

399

Advanced safeguards for the nuclear renaissance  

SciTech Connect

The global expansion of nuclear energy provides not only the benefit of carbon-neutral electricity, but also the potential for proliferation concern as well. Nuclear safeguards implemented at the state level (domestic) and at the international level by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are essential for ensuring that nuclear materials are not misused and are thereby a critical component of the increased usage of nuclear energy. In the same way that the 1950's Atoms for Peace initiative provided the foundation for a robust research and development program in nuclear safeguards, the expansion of nuclear energy that is underway today provides the impetus to enter a new era of technical development in the safeguards community. In this paper, we will review the history of nuclear safeguards research and development as well future directions.

Miller, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power in the British Electricity Spot Market. ” American805. Catherine Wolfram. “Electricity Markets: Should thePower in Wholesale Electricity Markets. ” The Electricity

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Basics: Electric Resistance Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance...

402

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent...

404

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electrical Energy and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric energy is an integral element of today's economy and the standard quality of life. The availability of energy at an affordable cost has always been of basic concern because of the intimate relationship of energy to our societal development and progress. Balancing the beneficial aspects of energy use (generation, transmission, distribution, utilization, and development) against its undesirable environmental effects and concerns is one of the major concerns. Fossil fuel plants create air pollution while nuclear plants create radioactive wastes and disposal problems. This paper briefly summarizes current environmental concerns. Particular emphasis in this paper is given to air pollution, solid waste, and land pollution and its effect on human health and concerns.

Parate, N. S.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nuclear hadrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variable for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon?nucleon and delta?nucleon interactions are reviewed

D. F. Geesaman

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University of Delaware, ECE Spring 2008 C. Honsberg Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts: new movement towards cities · 1.5 billion people without access to electricity #12;ELEG620: Solar a generator; can also use a turbine or other types of engines · Nuclear, solar thermal, coal, gas ­ Other capacity Nuclear: Cost, waste Solar thermal: Useful for low-grade heat; electricity use limited to desert

Honsberg, Christiana

408

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

410

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

411

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

414

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

415

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

"1. Bath County","Pumped Storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" Virginia" "1. Bath County","Pumped Storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003 "2. North Anna","Nuclear","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1864 "3. Possum Point","Gas","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1733 "4. Chesterfield","Coal","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1639 "5. Surry","Nuclear","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1638 "6. Yorktown","Coal","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1141 "7. Tenaska Virginia Generating Station","Gas","Tenaska Virginia Partners LP",927 "8. Clover","Coal","Virginia Electric & Power Co",865

418

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP will build on the recent advances made by the President and Congress to stimulate new nuclear plant construction in the U.S. This will be accomplished by demonstrating the success of the streamlined regulations for siting, constructing and operating new nuclear plants through the Nuclear Power 2010 program, and by implementing incentives enacted through the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005). At 20 percent of the total electricity supply in the nation, nuclear power is the second largest source of domestic electricity, while seventy percent comes from fossil burning fuels (coal, natural gas, and oil). Increasing the amount of

419

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

420

Electrical Safety - Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Analysis Office of Analysis Operating Experience Committee Safety Alerts Safety Bulletins Annual Reports Special Operations Reports Safety Advisories Special Reports Causal Analysis Reviews Contact Us HSS Logo Electrical Safety Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences 2013 September 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences August 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences July 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences June 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences May 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences April 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences March Electrical Safety Occurrence February Electrical Safety Occurrence January Electrical Safety Occurrence 2012 December Electrical Safety Occurrence November Electrical Safety Occurrence October Electrical Safety Occurrence September Electrical Safety Occurrence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the “thickness” of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative [NEI 07-07] at the direction of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). International nuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to ensure appropriate management of on-site groundwater and protection of the public and environment. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Resergence of U.S. Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

Over the past quarter century, things have not gone well for the nuclear industry. First came the Three Mile Island accident in America in 1979, then the disaster at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine in 1986. In Japan, Tokyo Electric Power, the world's largest private electricity company, shut its 17 nuclear reactors after it was caught falsifying safety records to hide cracks at some of its plants in 2002. In addition, the attacks on September 11, 2001 were a sharp reminder that the risks of nuclear power generation were not only those inherent in the technology. But lately, prospects have brightened for the nuclear industry. Nuclear power is an important source of electricity in many countries. In 2003, 19 countries depended on nuclear power for at least 20 percent of their electricity generation. As of March 2005, there were 441 nuclear power reactors in operation around the world, and another 25 were under construction. Five new nuclear power plants began operation in 2004 - one each in China, Japan, and Russia and two in Ukraine. In addition, Canada?s Bruce 3 reactor was reconnected to the grid. Five nuclear power plants were permanently shut down in 2004 - one in Lithuania and four in the United Kingdom. Nuclear power is expected to see a revival in the next decade given the availability of uranium and the prospect of emission-free power generation, Also, with conventional energy sources such as oil and gas likely to see severe depletion over the next 30 years, the price of conventional power generation is set to rise significantly, which would put nuclear power generation in focus again. The report provides an overview of the opportunities for nuclear power in the U.S. electric industry and gives a concise look at the challenges faced by nuclear power, the ability of advanced nuclear reactors to address these challenges, and the current state of nuclear power generation. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of U.S. Nuclear Power including its history, the current market environment, and the future of nuclear power in the U.S.; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in nuclear power; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of new nuclear power plants; a description of nuclear power technology including existing reactors, as well as 3rd and 4th generation reactor designs; a review of the economics of new nuclear power projects and comparison to other generation alternatives; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting nuclear power development; profiles of the key reactor manufacturers participating in the U.S. nuclear power market; and, profiles of the leading U.S. utilities participating in the U.S. nuclear power market.

none

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, Nuclear energy offers a viable solution to the increasing demand for electricity, global warming, air pollution, and dependence on imported oil. However ...

426

Nuclear power plant outages above seasonal norm in spring of 2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Like most electric generators, nuclear reactor operators typically schedule maintenance in the spring and the fall to help ensure that the reactors are available to ...

427

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electric car Gasoline car  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares of an electric vehicle? Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares preferences. · Identification of population segments with a strong interest for electric cars. · Forecasting

429

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

499, [OECD 2003] OECD. Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants:maintenance, and ultimate decommissioning of electric poweremissions during the decommissioning of hydroelectric power

Horvath, Arpad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

432

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

433

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

434

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

435

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

436

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

437

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

438

Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

439

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

440

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

442

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios 2009/11/30­12/01 István Maros Electricity Portfolio #12;Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Outline 1 Introduction 2 Computational Efficiency 3 Electricity Portfolio Approximate

443

New Modes of Nuclear Excitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical approach based on density functional theory supplemented by a microscopic multi-phonon model which is applied for investigations of pygmy resonances and other excitations of different multipolarities in stable and exotic nuclei. The possible relation of low-energy modes to the properties of neutron or proton skins is systematically studied in isotonic and isotopic chains. The fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic response functions is analyzed and compared to experimental data. Their relevance to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nuclear Chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear chirality is a novel manifestation of spontaneous symmetry breaking resulting from an orthogonal coupling of angular momentum vectors in triaxial nuclei. Three perpendicular angular momenta can form two systems of opposite handedness; the time reversal operator

Krzysztof Starosta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

447

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

448

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

449

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

electric customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation systems with specific types of energy efficient equipment. These rebates include efficient central air...

450

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Atkins-Duffin, C E

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Renewable energy for domestic electricity production and prediction of short-time electric consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern interest in renewable energy development is linked to concerns about exhaustion of fossil fuels and environmental, social and political risks of extensive use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. It is a form of energy development with a focus ... Keywords: Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps, Photovoltaic Solar Cells, Short-Time Electric Consumption, Time Series, Windmills

Stéphane Grieu; Frédérik Thiery; Adama Traoré; Monique Polit

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermodynamics of combined-cycle electric power plants Harvey S. Leffa)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the fuel. In 2010, U.S. Department of Energy data shows a net generation of 3:97 Ã? 1012 kWh of electrical an average thermal efficiency of about 0.34 for U.S. electricity generating plants. With clever use fossil fuel, nuclear, and geothermal electric power plants. For example, a plant with combustion

453

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

454

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

455

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

456

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

457

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

458

Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

460

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Nuclear Short, timely articles with graphs about recent nuclear energy issues and trends Monthly Reports Monthly Energy Review - Nuclear Section Released: November 25, 2013 Recent statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors. Electricity Monthly Update Released: November 22, 2013 Provides analysis and of the highlights of the data included in the Electric Power Monthly publication and presents tables of electricity generation, fuel consumption for generation, fossil fuel stocks, and average retail sales and prices of electricity. The EMU is published at the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for electricity › chart showing U.S. electricity generation by fuel, all sectors Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Quarterly uranium production data › image chart of Quarterly uranium production as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly, 3rd Quarter 2013, October 31, 2013. Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without building

462

Role of nuclear power in the Philippine power development program  

SciTech Connect

The reintroduction of nuclear power in the Philippines is favored by several factors such as: the inclusion of nuclear energy in the energy sector of the science and technology agenda for national development (STAND); the Large gap between electricity demand and available local supply for the medium-term power development plan; the relatively lower health risks in nuclear power fuel cycle systems compared to the already acceptable power systems; the lower environmental impacts of nuclear power systems compared to fossil fuelled systems and the availability of a regulatory framework and trained personnel who could form a core for implementing a nuclear power program. The electricity supply gap of 9600 MW for the period 1993-2005 could be partly supplied by nuclear power. The findings of a recent study are described, as well as the issues that have to be addressed in the reintroduction of nuclear power.

Aleta, C.R. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institite, Quezon City (Philippines)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

464

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

465

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

466

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

467

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

468

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

469

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

470

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

471

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

472

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

473

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

474

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

475

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

476

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

477

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

478

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

479

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

480

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "214-767-2200 nuclear electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

482

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

483

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

484

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

485

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

486

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

487

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

488

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

489

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

490

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

491

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

492

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

493

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

494

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

495

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

496

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

497

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

498

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

499

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

500

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.