National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 202-586-3141 suparna ray

  1. A Comprehensive Ontology for Knowledge Representation in the Internet of Things Wei Wang, Suparna De

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wang

    A Comprehensive Ontology for Knowledge Representation in the Internet of Things Wei Wang, Suparna-mail: {K.Moessner}@surrey.ac.uk Abstract--Semantic modeling for the Internet of Things has become of a comprehensive description ontology for knowledge representation in the domain of Internet of Things and discuss

  2. Wei Wang, Suparna De, Gilbert Cassar, Klaus Moessner Knowledge Representation in the Internet of Things: Semantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wang

    for interoperating among different systems and applications in the Internet of Things (IoT). However, current work through an IoT service discovery method. Key words: Internet of Things, Knowledge Representation, Ontology of them being connected to the Internet. The IoT will have the intercon- nection of the objects or things

  3. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

  4. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  5. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Tarun K

    2013-12-09

    the idea of modeling ray tubes with an additional ray in the center to facilitate parallelism. The parallel wavefront construction algorithm is applied to wide range of models such as simple synthetic models that enable us to study various aspects...

  6. Ray J. Corey- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ray Corey currently serves as the Assistance Manager for Safety and Environment at the DOE Richland Operations office (RL).

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Waxman

    2000-04-11

    Ultra-high-energy, >10^19 eV, cosmic-ray and high energy, ~10^14 eV, neutrino production in GRBs is discussed in the light of recent GRB and cosmic-ray observations. Emphasis is put on model predictions that can be tested with operating and planned cosmic-ray and neutrino detectors, and on the prospects of testing for neutrino properties.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

  9. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Mészáros

    2012-04-12

    Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

  11. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  12. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  13. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  14. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Thompson

    2001-01-03

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meszaros

    2006-05-30

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

  16. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  17. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  18. Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli #12;Overview · Light Transfer Optical Models · Math behind Direct Volume Ray Casting · Demonstration · Transfer Functions · Details of our Application · References #12;What is Volume Ray Casting? · Volume Ray Casting is construction of 3D volume using stack of 2D

  19. Cosmic ray recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco Ferrari; Ewa Szuszkiewicz

    2006-01-08

    Cosmic rays represent one of the most fascinating research themes in modern astronomy and physics. After almost a century since their discovery, a huge amount of scientific literature has been written on this topic and it is not always easy to extract from it the necessary information for somebody who approaches the subject for the first time. This has been the main motivation for preparing this article, which is a concise and self-contained review for whoever is interested in studying cosmic rays. The priority has been given here to well established facts, which are not at risk to get obsolete in a few years due to the fast progress of the research in this field. Also many data are presented, which are useful to characterize the doses of ionizing radiation delivered to organisms living on the Earth due to cosmic rays. The technical terms which are often encountered in the scientific literature are explained in a separate appendix.

  20. X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    2010-12-15

    In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

  1. Gamma ray bursts in their historic context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2004-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts In Their Historic Context Virginia TrimbleMD 20742 USA Abstract. Gamma ray bursts remained essentiallyalso applies to the gamma ray bursts. First, an observation

  2. X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Electromagnetic Relations Radioactivity and Radiation Protection Useful Formulas CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home in PDF format Data Booklet Authors CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home Privacy and Security Notice Please

  3. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  4. X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tavani

    1997-03-24

    We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

  5. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  6. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiener, Juergen [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  7. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  8. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  9. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-Ray

  10. High energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos from AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukio Tomozawa

    2008-02-03

    The author reviews a model for the emission of high energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays and neutrinos from AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) that he has proposed since 1985. Further discussion of the knee energy phenomenon of the cosmic ray energy spectrum requires the existence of a heavy particle with mass in the knee energy range. A possible method of detecting such a particle in the Pierre Auger Project is suggested. Also presented is a relation between the spectra of neutrinos and gamma-rays emitted from AGN. This relation can be tested by high energy neutrino detectors such as ICECUBE, the Mediterranean Sea Detector and possibly by the Pierre Auger Project.

  11. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  12. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  13. Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea

    2006-09-22

    Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

  14. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2010-01-08

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  15. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  16. Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a new perspective! {... Unraveling some mysteries and adding new Radio Op0cal X-ray Short ( energy -ray photons... ... accompained by a considerable long las0ng emission

  17. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  18. SciTech Connect: "gamma ray bursts"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gamma ray bursts" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "gamma ray bursts" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data:...

  19. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-04-30

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  20. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, Charles J. (San Francisco, CA); Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

  1. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Aramo

    2005-09-06

    The paper describes methods used for the detection of cosmic rays with energies above 10^18 eV (UHECR, UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays). It had been anticipated there would be a cutoff in the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays around 3 10^19 eV induced by their interaction with the 2.7 K primordial photons. This has become known as the GZK cutoff. However, several showers have been detected with estimated primary energy exceeding this limit.

  2. X-ray fluorescence mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-Ray

  3. X-ray Spectral Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Strohmayer; E. E. Fenimore; T. Murakami; A. Yoshida

    1997-12-18

    We summarize the spectral characteristics of a sample of 22 bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2 - 400 keV range, providing a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low energy slope, a bend energy, and a high energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Observatory. However, below 20 keV we find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of our burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. There is a correlation (Pearson's r = -0.62) between the low energy slope and the bend energy. We find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma-rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for our sample is 24%.

  4. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  5. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, T

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Briggs

    1999-10-20

    The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

  7. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank D. Smith Jr

    1993-02-10

    Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances $\\sim 1000$ AU. (Katz \\cite{JK92}) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. \\cite{JK87} CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or confirm?) the speculative hypothesis that GRB = CETI.

  9. Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rourke, Colin

    Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonori Totani

    1999-04-13

    We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

  11. Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift to GLASTto GLAST Bing ZhangBing ZhangGehrels, et al), et al) #12;Gamma-ray bursts: the mostGamma-ray bursts: the most violent explosions fireball central photosphere internal external shocks engine (shocks) (reverse) (forward) gamma-ray UV

  12. Calculating both S waves in weakly anisotropic structures using coupling ray theory along a single ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    ­wave splitting can be observed. Coupling ray theory for S waves Traditionally, there are two different high-frequency. The coupling­ray­theory equation is solved along a refer- ence rays. From the point of view of the high­frequency equation. For other choices of reference rays, the high­frequency limit of the coupling ray theory at fixed

  13. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  14. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  15. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-01-24

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  16. And the remaining 22 photons: The development of gamma ray and gamma ray burst astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2005-01-01

    goblins and cosmic gamma ray bursts. Astrophysics and Spacelinear alignments of gamma-ray burst sources. Journal of theE.E. (eds. ), 1992. Gamma Ray Bursts. Cambridge, Cambridge

  17. Selected Results from Ground-Based Cosmic Ray and Gamma-Ray Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Magnussen

    1998-05-13

    Selected results from the HEGRA experiment on charged Cosmic Rays and on very high energy gamma-rays are presented. The MAGIC Telescope is presented as an outlook to the future of Gamma-Ray astronomy.

  18. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  19. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  20. Cosmic rays & Neutrinos Historical development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    Cosmic rays & Neutrinos Historical development Mumbai, 14/12/12 Tom Gaisser 1 #12; Inven@on of neutrinos, 1930 Mumbai, 14/12/12 Tom Gaisser 2 ETH@) : 1956 Mumbai, 14/12/12 Tom Gaisser 3 25 years from inven@on to experimental

  1. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  2. Soft X-ray microflares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzoeva, I K

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray solar bursts are studied. Weak bursts with powers up to 10-8 W/m2 were detected. All the events were confirmed by GOES observations. Parameters of these microflares are determined. A physical mechanism for the low-intensity solar events is discussed.

  3. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  4. Gravitational waves versus X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R., E-mail: fe.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090227B, allows us to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short GRB.

  5. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  6. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  7. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Oldaker, Mark E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  8. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  9. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  10. Seismic ray method: Recent developments Vlastislav

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    of seismology and seismic exploration for oil. This article outlines the basic features of the seismic raySeismic ray method: Recent developments Vlastislav #20; Cerven#19;y, Lud#20;ek Klime#20;s;#16; II 1401, 141 31 Praha 4, Czech Republic, E-mail: ip@ig.cas.cz Abstract The seismic ray method has

  11. -Ray Emission Processes September 11, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Nancy

    -Ray Emission Processes September 11, 2001 References: Diehl, R. 2000, "Gamma-Ray Production/integ_objenum.html#astronomy Murthy and Wolfendale 1993, Gamma-Ray Astronomy, 2nd ed. (Cambridge) 18 #12;1. Continuous processes (a and Absorption Processes," preprint, http://astro.estec.esa.nl/SA-general/Projects/ Integral

  12. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by the HETE-2 and localize Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in wide field of view. HETE-2 have been localized about 20 GRBs per year hours after the burst. 1. The High Energy Transient Explorer 2 Gamma-ray burst (GRB) is the most

  13. SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    #12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration, and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based

  14. The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, Daniel Alan

    2011-01-01

    of a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.1Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraints1.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

  15. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  16. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  17. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-06

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. The small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurementmore »technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.« less

  18. Cosmic Rays at the Knee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-08-25

    Several kinds of measurements are combined in an attempt to obtain a consistent estimate of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic radiation through the knee region. Assuming that the knee is a signal of the high-energy end of a galactic cosmic-ray population, I discuss possible signatures of a transition to an extra-galactic population and how they might be detected.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts from Minijets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv; Arnon Dar

    1994-07-14

    Striking similarities exist between high energy gamma ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). They suggest that GRBs are generated by inverse Compton scattering from highly relativistic electrons in transient jets. Such jets may be produced along the axis of an accretion disk formed around stellar black holes (BH) or neutron stars (NS) in BH-NS and NS-NS mergers and in accretion induced collapse of magnetized white dwarfs (WD) or neutron stars in close binary systems. Such events may produce the cosmological GRBs. Transient jets formed by single old magnetized neutron stars in an extended Galactic halo may produce a local population of GRBs. Here we show that jet production of GRBs by inverse Compton scattering can explain quite simply the striking correlations that exist between various temporal features of GRBs, their duration histogram, the power spectrum of their complex multipeak light curves, their power-law high energy spectra and other features of GRBs. Some additional predictions are made including the expected polarization of gamma-rays in the bursts.

  20. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  1. X-ray emission from O stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2008-02-01

    Young O stars are strong, hard, and variable X-ray sources, properties which strongly affect their circumstellar and galactic environments. After ~1 Myr, these stars settle down to become steady sources of soft X-rays. I use high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and MHD modeling to show that young O stars like theta-1 Ori C are well explained by the magnetically channeled wind shock scenario. After their magnetic fields dissipate, older O stars produce X-rays via shock heating in their unstable stellar winds. Here too I use X-ray spectroscopy and numerical modeling to confirm this scenario. In addition to elucidating the nature and cause of the O star X-ray emission, modeling of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of O supergiants provides strong evidence that mass-loss rates of these O stars have been overestimated.

  2. Quantum chaos in systems with ray splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couchman, L. (Acoustics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)); Ott, E.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr. (Laboratory for Plasma Research, Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States))

    1992-11-15

    We consider wave systems in which rays split on reflection from sharp boundaries. Examples include the Schroedinger equation with the potential changing discontinuously across a surface, electromagnetic waves in a region with a discontinuous dielectric constant, elastic media with a clamped or free boundary, etc. By introducing a Monte Carlo treatment of the rays, it is possible to define chaotic rays via the standard Lyapunov number criterion. Numerical implementation of the Monte Carlo ray technique is carried out for the example of elastic media, and is utilized to investigate the extent to which these systems are globally ergodic. It is suggested that results from previous extensive work on quantum chaos without ray splitting can be extended to these ray splitting problems. In particular, we indicate a generalization of the Gutzwiller trace formula to cover ray splitting.

  3. Interpolation of raytheory travel times within ray cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Interpolation of ray­theory travel times within ray cells Petr Bulant & LudŸek KlimeŸs Department title: Interpolation within ray cells Summary 3­D ray tracing followed by interpolation of the computed on the decomposition of the model volume into ray cells, and on further interpolation within the individual ray cells

  4. DELAYED GeVTeV PHOTONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCING HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppi, Paolo

    DELAYED GeV­TeV PHOTONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCING HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS ELI WAXMAN A scenario in which cosmic rays (CRs) above 1020 eV are produced by cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs provide information on the IGMF structure. Subject headings: cosmic rays -- gamma rays: bursts -- magnetic

  5. PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS FROM THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS August 15; accepted 2005 December 19 ABSTRACT With the successful launch of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst component is consistent with the tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray bursts and/or the X-ray flares

  6. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  7. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  8. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A., E-mail: cswenson@astro.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ?1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ?50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of ?t/t ? 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  9. Gamma Ray Burst Central Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd A. Thompson

    2008-07-04

    I review aspects of the theory of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engines. I focus on the requirements of any model; these include the angular momentum of the progenitor, the power, Lorentz factor, asymmetry, and duration of the flow, and both the association and the non-association with bright supernovae. I compare and contrast the collapsar and millisecond proto-magnetar models in light of these requirements. The ability of the latter model to produce a flow with Lorentz factor ~100 while simultaneously maintaining a kinetic luminosity of ~10^50 ergs/s for a timescale of ~10-100 s is emphasized.

  10. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  11. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingInImaging and

  12. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 ?m FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore »data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  13. Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2007-06-08

    Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

  14. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  15. Energetics of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez; David Band; Tsvi Piran

    2001-03-16

    We determine the distribution of total energy emitted by gamma-ray bursts for bursts with fluences and distance information. Our core sample consists of eight bursts with BATSE spectra and spectroscopic redshifts. We extend this sample by adding four bursts with BATSE spectra and host galaxy R magnitudes. From these R magnitudes we calculate a redshift probability distribution; this method requires a model of the host galaxy population. From a sample of ten bursts with both spectroscopic redshifts and host galaxy R magnitudes (some do not have BATSE spectra) we find that the burst rate is proportional to the galaxy luminosity at the epoch of the burst. Assuming that the total energy emitted has a log-normal distribution, we find that the average emitted energy (assumed to be radiated isotropically) is $ = 1.3^{+1.2}_{-1.0} \\times 10^{53}$ ergs (for H$_0$ = 65 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, $\\Omega_m=0.3$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.7$); the distribution has a logarithmic width of $\\sigma_\\gamma=1.7^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$. The corresponding distribution of X-ray afterglow energy (for seven bursts) has $ = 4.0^{+1.6}_{-1.8} \\times 10^{51}$ergs and $\\sigma_X = 1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. For completeness, we also provide spectral fits for all bursts with BATSE spectra for which there were afterglow searches.

  16. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  17. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  18. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-06-23

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  19. Gamma-ray irradiated polymer optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, C.-C.; Wei, T.-Y.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, W.-S.; Wei, Y.-Y.

    2008-01-14

    Optical waveguides fabricated by gamma-ray irradiation on polymer through a gold mask are presented. The gamma-ray induced index change is found almost linearly dependent on the dose of the irradiation. And the measured propagation losses are low enough for practical application. Due to the high penetrability of gamma ray, uniform refractive index change in depth can be easily achieved. Moreover, due to large-area printing, the uniformity of waveguide made by gamma-ray irradiation is much better than that by e-beam direct writing.

  20. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Gendre

    2008-07-24

    Gamma-ray bursts are violent events occurring randomly in the sky. In this review, I will present the fireball model, proposed to explain the phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. This model has important consequences for the production and observation at Earth of gravitational waves, high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and high energy photons, and the second part of this review will be focused on these aspects. A last section will briefly discuss the topic of the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard candles and possible cosmological studies.

  2. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  3. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  4. G. Ray Satchler | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ray Satchler (1976) March 05, 2014 For research extending the theoretical description of direct nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, as one of the first theorists to implement...

  5. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-RayX-RayX-RayX-Ray

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  7. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2237 Transition Radiation Detectors for Cosmic Rays Near the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2237 Transition Radiation Detectors for Cosmic Rays Near detector areas of several square meters. X-ray transition radiation detectors (TRDs) appear to provide of the TRD does not satu- rate for Lorentz factors less than 105 . We have designed detectors to meet

  8. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

    2014-03-28

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  9. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2293 Search for Extremely High Energy Gamma Rays with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    their directions of incidence points back to their points of production. The highest gamma ray energies identified28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2293 Search for Extremely High Energy Gamma Rays, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany (2) Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe

  10. ON THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-09-20

    Recently, many correlations between the prompt {gamma}-ray emission properties and the X-ray afterglow properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been inferred from a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of more than 650 GRBs measured with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (Swift/XRT) during the years 2004-2010. We show that these correlations are predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs. They result from the dependence of GRB observables on the bulk motion Lorentz factor and viewing angle of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates. Moreover, despite their different physical origins, long GRBs (LGRBs) and short-hard bursts (SHBs) in the CB model share similar kinematic correlations, which can be combined into triple correlations satisfied by both LGRBs and SHBs.

  11. CLOAKED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichler, David, E-mail: eichler.david@gmail.com [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be'er-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-06-01

    It is suggested that many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultrarelativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include (1) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and (2) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an exposed GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells.

  12. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  13. IsoRay Medical William A. Cavanagh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to surgical resection Low dose rate (LDR) Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) with Temporary CesiumIsoRay Medical William A. Cavanagh Vice President of Research and Development IsoRay Medical March experiences that inserting radioactive materials into tumors revealed that radiation caused cancers to shrink

  14. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  15. Ray Trygstad Associate Chair, Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Ray Trygstad Associate Chair, Department of Information Technology and Management Date: 3.27.15 From: Ray Trygstad To: Information Technology and Management Students and Faculty Subj: Information Technology and Management Curriculum Revisions The following revisions to curricula in Information Technology

  16. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  17. X-rays from Hot Subdwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mereghetti, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the high sensitivity of the instruments on board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, it has become possible to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs. The small but growing sample of hot subdwarfs detected in X-rays includes binary systems, in which the X-rays result from wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low mass stars provide information which can be useful also for our understanding of the winds of more luminous and massive early-type stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems.

  18. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  19. GRB 050117: SIMULTANEOUS GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SWIFT SATELLITE Joanne E. Hill,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer performed its first autonomous, X-ray follow-up to a newly detected GRB from the XRT position. Subject headingg: gamma rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer (Gehrels et al. 2004) was launched on 2004 November 20 to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) over

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

  1. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De- tection- liminary data taking started in November 2002. 1. Introduction Gamma-ray bursts observed with space Tcherenkovlightfromoneshower Few 100MeV gamma-rays Fig. 1. In an imaging telescope, -ray bursts should appear as a Cherenkov

  2. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

    2012-10-20

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  3. A history of gamma ray bursts and other astronomical conundrums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    2006-01-01

    V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts: 30 Years of Discovery,”V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts,” Ed. C. Ho et al. ,A History of Gamma Ray Bursts and Other Astronomical

  4. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aune, Taylor

    2012-01-01

    of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-Ancient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,A. Olson. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

  5. Cosmic ray penetration in diffuse clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morlino, G; Krause, J

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are a fundamental source of ionization for molecular and diffuse clouds, influencing their chemical, thermal, and dynamical evolution. The amount of cosmic rays inside a cloud also determines the $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by hadronic collisions between cosmic rays and cloud material. We study the spectrum of cosmic rays inside and outside of a diffuse cloud, by solving the stationary transport equation for cosmic rays including diffusion, advection and energy losses due to ionization of neutral hydrogen atoms. We found that the cosmic ray spectrum inside a diffuse cloud differs from the one in the interstellar medium (ISM) for energies smaller than $E_{br}\\approx 100$ MeV, irrespective of the model details. Below $E_{br}$, the spectrum is harder (softer) than that in the ISM if the latter is a power law $\\propto p^{-s}$ with $s$ larger (smaller) than $\\sim0.42$. As a consequence also the ionization rate due to CRs is strongly affected. Assuming an average Galactic spectrum similar to the one infe...

  6. CONTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY-LOUD RADIO GALAXIES' CORE EMISSIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fermi gamma-ray satellite has recently detected gamma-ray emissions from radio galaxy cores. From these samples, we first examine the correlation between the luminosities...

  7. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  8. Giant AGN Flares and Cosmic Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Andrei Gruzinov

    2008-09-15

    We predict a new class of very intense, short-duration AGN flares capable of accelerating the highest energy cosmic rays, resulting from the tidal disruption of a star or from a disk instability. The rate and power of these flares readily explains the observed flux and density statistics of UHECRs. The photon bursts produced by the predicted AGN flares are discussed; they may soon be detectable. Observations are shown to exclude that continuous jets of powerful Active Galactic Nuclei are the sole source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays; the stringent requirements for Gamma Ray Bursts to be the source are delineated.

  9. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  10. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  11. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Mészáros; Katsuaki Asano; Kohta Murase; Derek Fox; He Gao; Nicholas Senno

    2015-06-08

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  13. Nucleosynthesis in gamma-ray bursts outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Lemoine

    2002-06-19

    It is shown that fusion of neutrons and protons to He-4 nuclei occurs in gamma-ray burst outflows in a process similar to big-bang nucleosynthesis in the early Universe. Only the surviving free neutrons can then decouple kinematically from the charged fluid so that the multi-GeV neutrino signal predicted from inelastic nuclear n-p collisions is significantly reduced. It is also argued that a sizeable fraction of ultra-high energy cosmic rays accelerated in gamma-ray bursts should be He-4 nuclei.

  14. X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-RayX-ray

  15. Dark Matter Signals In Cosmic Rays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo Dado; Arnon Dar

    2009-03-10

    The flux of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation (GBR) does not confirm that the excess in the flux of cosmic ray electrons between 300-800 GeV, which was measured locally with the ATIC instrument in balloon flights over Antartica, is universal as expected from dark matter annihilation. Neither does the increase with energy of the fraction of positrons in the cosmic ray flux of electrons in the 10-100 GeV range that was measured by PAMELA imply a dark matter origin: It is consistent with that expected from the sum of the two major sources of Galactic cosmic rays, non relativistic spherical ejecta and highly relativistic jets from supernova explosions.

  16. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  17. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments and Methods X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods Print To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

  18. Detecting cosmic rays of the highest energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Vannucci

    2001-06-06

    Charged cosmic rays have been measured up to macroscopic energies. Concerning neutrinos, the detection is still limited to terrestrial ones (apart from supernova production). A new way to search for extragalactic neutrinos is discussed.

  19. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

  20. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  1. Can gamma-ray bursts constrain quintessence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Di Girolamo; R. Catena; M. Vietri; G. Di Sciascio

    2005-04-27

    Using the narrow clustering of the geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies released by gamma-ray bursts, we investigate the possibility of using these sources as standard candles to probe cosmological parameters such as the matter density Omega_m and the cosmological constant energy density Omega_Lambda. By simulating different samples of gamma-ray bursts, we find that Omega_m can be determined with accuracy ~7% with data from 300 sources. We also show that, if Omega = 1 is due to a quintessence field, some of the models proposed in the literature may be discriminated from a Universe with cosmological constant, by a similar-sized sample of gamma-ray bursts.

  2. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  3. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

    1993-02-12

    We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

  5. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  6. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  7. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  8. Cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Tatischeff

    2008-07-25

    Galactic cosmic rays are widely believed to be accelerated in expanding shock waves initiated by supernova explosions. The theory of diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays is now well established, but two fundamental questions remain partly unanswered: what is the acceleration efficiency, i.e. the fraction of the total supernova energy converted to cosmic-ray energy, and what is the maximum kinetic energy achieved by particles accelerated in supernova explosions? Recent observations of supernova remnants, in X-rays with the Chandra and XMM-Newton satellites and in very-high-energy gamma rays with several ground-based atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, have provided new pieces of information concerning these two questions. After a review of these observations and their current interpretations, I show that complementary information on the diffusive shock acceleration process can be obtained by studying the radio emission from extragalactic supernovae. As an illustration, a nonlinear model of diffusive shock acceleration is applied to the radio light curves of the supernova SN 1993J, which exploded in the nearby galaxy M81. The results of the model suggest that most of the Galactic cosmic rays may be accelerated during the early phase of interaction between the supernova ejecta and the wind lost from the progenitor star.

  9. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrova, Tz. B., E-mail: lina.petrova@nrl.navy.mil; Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17}?W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  10. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    2002-05-19

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

  11. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently...

  12. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Baerwald; Mauricio Bustamante; Walter Winter

    2014-07-07

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space -- unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  13. Lag-luminosity relation in gamma-ray burst X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margutti, R.

    2010-10-15

    In strict analogy to prompt pulses, X-ray flares observed by Swift-XRT in long Gamma-Ray Bursts define a lag-luminosity relation: L{sub p,iso}{sup 0.3-10} k{sup eV} {infinity}t{sub lag}{sup -0.95{+-}0.23}. The lag-luminosity is proven to be a fundamental law extending {approx}5 decades in time and {approx}5 in energy. This is direct evidence that GRB X-ray flares and prompt gamma-ray pulses are produced by the same mechanism.

  14. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  15. Interpolation of raytheory travel times within ray cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Interpolation of ray­theory travel times within ray cells Petr Bulant & LudŸek KlimeŸs Department techniques. Several methods based on de­ composition of the model volume into ray cells, and on further interpolation within individual ray cells, were introduced. In the wavefront tracing method (Vinje et al. 1996a

  16. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  17. Pyroelectric crystal-based X-ray diffractometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Louis Edward

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use of an Amptek Cool-X X-ray Generator for an instructional tool in the physics of x-rays, as well as a source for x-rays for crystal diffraction experiments. The x-ray source is a solid-state two-phase ...

  18. Gamma Rays from Clusters and Groups of Galaxies: Cosmic Rays versus Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesla E. Jeltema; John Kehayias; Stefano Profumo

    2009-05-22

    Clusters of galaxies have not yet been detected at gamma-ray frequencies; however, the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly known as GLAST, could provide the first detections in the near future. Clusters are expected to emit gamma rays as a result of (1) a population of high-energy primary and re-accelerated secondary cosmic rays (CR) fueled by structure formation and merger shocks, active galactic nuclei and supernovae, and (2) particle dark matter (DM) annihilation. In this paper, we ask the question of whether the Fermi telescope will be able to discriminate between the two emission processes. We present data-driven predictions for a large X-ray flux limited sample of galaxy clusters and groups. We point out that the gamma ray signals from CR and DM can be comparable. In particular, we find that poor clusters and groups are the systems predicted to have the highest DM to CR emission at gamma-ray energies. Based on detailed Fermi simulations, we study observational handles that might enable us to distinguish the two emission mechanisms, including the gamma-ray spectra, the spatial distribution of the signal and the associated multi-wavelength emissions. We also propose optimal hardness ratios, which will help to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. Our study indicates that gamma rays from DM annihilation with a high particle mass can be distinguished from a CR spectrum even for fairly faint sources. Discriminating a CR spectrum from a light DM particle will be instead much more difficult, and will require long observations and/or a bright source. While the gamma-ray emission from our simulated clusters is extended, determining the spatial distribution with Fermi will be a challenging task requiring an optimal control of the backgrounds.

  19. May 1999 POV-Ray 3.1g User Documentation Page 1 Persistence of Vision TM Ray-Tracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    May 1999 POV-Ray 3.1g User Documentation Page 1 Persistence of Vision TM Ray-Tracer POV-Ray TM Version 3.1g User's Documentation May 1999 Copyright 1999 POV-Team TM POV-Ray TM is based on DKBTrace 2

  20. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X

  1. Time correlation of cosmic-ray-induced neutrons and gamma rays at sea level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Time correlation of cosmic-ray-induced neutrons and gamma rays at sea level G. Miloshevsky n , A and evaporation processes of air nuclei are time-correlated. The occurrence of their counts in a fixed time interval is not a random (Poisson) distribution, but rather time-correlated bursts of counts

  2. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of Ultra­High Energy Cosmic Rays HEINO: The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New

  3. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  4. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  5. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4041 Long-Term Cosmic Ray Intensities: Physical Reconstruc-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    model of the heliosphere, we calculate the expected differential spectra and integral intensity of galactic cosmic rays at the Earth's orbit since 1610. The calculated cosmic ray integral intensity. (2000) have recently calculated the open solar magnetic flux for the last 400 years from sunspot data

  6. X-ray Point Source Populations Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morihana, Kumiko; Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of the X-ray astronomy, which is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra Bulge Field (Revnivtsev et al., 2009,2011), we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard band continuum and Fe K\\alpha line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-...

  7. Diffuse ?-ray emission from galactic pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calore, F. [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F., E-mail: f.calore@uva.nl, E-mail: mattia.dimauro@to.infn.it, E-mail: donato@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino University and INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-11-20

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are old fast-spinning neutron stars that represent the second most abundant source population discovered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). As guaranteed ?-ray emitters, they might contribute non-negligibly to the diffuse emission measured at high latitudes by Fermi-LAT (i.e., the Isotropic Diffuse ?-Ray Background (IDGRB)), which is believed to arise from the superposition of several components of galactic and extragalactic origin. Additionally, ?-ray sources also contribute to the anisotropy of the IDGRB measured on small scales by Fermi-LAT. In this manuscript we aim to assess the contribution of the unresolved counterpart of the detected MSPs population to the IDGRB and the maximal fraction of the measured anisotropy produced by this source class. To this end, we model the MSPs' spatial distribution in the Galaxy and the ?-ray emission parameters by considering observational constraints coming from the Australia Telescope National Facility pulsar catalog and the Second Fermi-LAT Catalog of ?-ray pulsars. By simulating a large number of MSP populations through a Monte Carlo simulation, we compute the average diffuse emission and the anisotropy 1? upper limit. We find that the emission from unresolved MSPs at 2 GeV, where the peak of the spectrum is located, is at most 0.9% of the measured IDGRB above 10° in latitude. The 1? upper limit on the angular power for unresolved MSP sources turns out to be about a factor of 60 smaller than Fermi-LAT measurements above 30°. Our results indicate that this galactic source class represents a negligible contributor to the high-latitude ?-ray sky and confirm that most of the intensity and geometrical properties of the measured diffuse emission are imputable to other extragalactic source classes (e.g., blazars, misaligned active galactic nuclei, or star-forming galaxies). Nevertheless, because MSPs are more concentrated toward the galactic center, we expect them to contribute significantly to the ?-ray diffuse emission at low latitudes. Because, along the galactic disk, the population of young pulsars overcomes in number that of MSPs, we compute the ?-ray emission from the whole population of unresolved pulsars, both young and millisecond, in two low-latitude regions: the inner Galaxy and the galactic center.

  8. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  9. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  10. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  11. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  12. X-ray Clusters at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Gioia

    1997-11-30

    As the largest gravitationally bound structures known, clusters provide clear constraints on the formation of structure and on the composition of the universe. Despite their extreme importance for cosmology the number of clusters at high redshift (z > 0.75) is rather small. There are only a few X-ray emitting examples reported and a handful of optically-selected ones. These clusters can provide stringent constrains on theories of large scale structure formation, if they are massive enough. I will review the status of these distant X-ray selected clusters. These objects are of special importance because their X-ray emission implies that they are massive, comparable to low redshift examples, and their existence is problematic for some theories of structure formation.

  13. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  14. CAN ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS COME FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS? COSMIC RAYS BELOW THE ANKLE AND GALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichler, David [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be'er-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Pohl, Martin [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-09-10

    The maximum cosmic-ray energy achievable by acceleration by a relativistic blast wave is derived. It is shown that forward shocks from long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the interstellar medium accelerate protons to large enough energies, and have a sufficient energy budget, to produce the Galactic cosmic-ray component just below the ankle at 4 x 10{sup 18} eV, as per an earlier suggestion. It is further argued that, were extragalactic long GRBs responsible for the component above the ankle as well, the occasional Galactic GRB within the solar circle would contribute more than the observational limits on the outward flux from the solar circle, unless an avoidance scenario, such as intermittency and/or beaming, allows the present-day local flux to be less than 10{sup -3} of the average. Difficulties with these avoidance scenarios are noted.

  15. Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

  16. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Jay P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Gehrels, Neil [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Scargle, Jeffrey D. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  17. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela V. Olinto

    1999-11-09

    The surprising lack of a high energy cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum at the highest energies together with an apparently isotropic distribution of arrival directions have strongly challenged most models proposed for the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Young neutron star winds may be able to explain the mystery. We discuss this recent proposal after summarizing the observational challenge and plausible acceleration sites. Young neutrons star winds differ from alternative models in the predictions for composition, spectrum, and angular distribution which will be tested in future experiments.

  18. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  19. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  20. Gamma-Ray Burst observations with Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Omodei, Nicola; Vianello, Giacomo; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    After seven years of science operation, the Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Over 1600 GRBs have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Large Area Telescope above 30 MeV. We will give an overview of these observations, presenting the common properties in the GRB temporal and spectral behavior at high energies. We will also highlight the unique characteristics of some individual bursts. The main physical implications of these results will be discussed, along with open questions regarding GRB modeling in their prompt and temporally-extended emission phases.

  1. A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

    2005-08-08

    We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Frail

    2003-11-12

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  3. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  4. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging inX-Ray

  5. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  6. Green's functions for transmission of X-rays and gamma-rays through cold media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Magdziarz; A. A. Zdziarski

    1996-07-03

    Using a Monte Carlo method, we study Compton scattering and absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays in cold media. We consider transmission of X/gamma-rays through a shell of an arbitrary optical depth, for which we derive energy-dependent Green's functions. Fitting the Green functions with simple analytical formulae is in progress. We also present a simple treatment of the effect of absorption on Green's functions for Compton scattering, which allow to treat media with an arbitrary ionization state and chemical composition. Our transmission Green's functions allow to treat Thomson-thick absorbers, e.g. molecular tori of Seyfert 2s.

  7. X-ray Spectral Diagnostics of Gamma-Ray Burst Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frits Paerels; Erik Kuulkers; John Heise; Duane A. Liedahl

    2000-04-13

    Recently, the detection of discrete features in the X-ray afterglow spectra of GRB970508 and GRB970828 was reported. The most natural interpretation of these features is that they are redshifted Fe K emission complexes. The identification of the line emission mechanism has drastic implications for the inferred mass of radiating material, end hence the nature of the burst site. X-ray spectroscopy provides a direct observational constraint on these properties of gamma-ray bursters. We briefly discuss how these constraints arise, in the context of an application to the spectrum of GRB970508.

  8. CRIME - cosmic ray interactions in molecular environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Julian; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Molecular clouds act as targets for cosmic rays (CR), revealing their presence through either gamma-ray emission due to proton-proton interactions, and/or through the ionization level in the cloud, produced by the CR flux. The ionization rate is a unique tool, to some extent complementary to the gamma-ray emission, in that it allows to constrain the CR spectrum especially for energies below the pion production rate ($\\approx 280$ MeV). Here we study the effect of ionization on $H_2$ clouds due to both CR protons and electrons, using the fully relativistic ionization cross sections, which is important to correctly account for the contribution due to relativistic CRs. The contribution to ionization due to secondary electrons is also included self-consistently. The whole calculation has been implemented into a numerical code which is publicly accessible through a web-interface. The code also include the calculation of gamma-ray emission once the CR spectrum

  9. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  10. Seismic ray theory Vlastislav Cerveny 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    to the methods most frequently used in seismology and seismic exploration for forward and inverse modelling play an important role in contemporary seismology and seismic exploration. Consequently, it has alsoSeismic ray theory Vlastislav Cerven´y 1 ) and Ivan Psenc´ik 2 ) 1 ) Charles University, Faculty

  11. Gamma-Ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alice K. Harding

    2000-12-12

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

  12. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  13. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  14. March 5, 2003 Dr. Ray Orbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as well as other burning plasma research activities. 2. The study of future energy systems is a central and technological breadth in the program. The Secretary of Energy renewed this emphasis in his recent announcementMarch 5, 2003 Dr. Ray Orbach Director, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000

  15. High redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01

    Ten years of operations of the Swift satellite have allow us to collect a small sample of long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) at redshift larger than six. I will review here the present status of this research field and discuss the possible use of GRBs as a fundamental new tool to explore the early Universe, complementary to quasar and galaxy surveys.

  16. THE GEODESIC RAY TRANSFORM ON RIEMANNIAN SURFACES ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-24

    non-even with respect to the direction, then that system is solvable for a pair of conjugate ..... Introduce the measure d? = ??, ??d VolH(p)d?p(?) on H. Then one ...... Microlocal analysis of the geodesic X-ray transform. private communication.

  17. RAY PRESERVING METRICS AND APPLICATIONS JAIGYOUNG CHOE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choe, Jaigyoung

    of the two-dimensional hyper- bolic plane H2 (-2 ) with Gauss curvature -2 RAY PRESERVING METRICS AND APPLICATIONS JAIGYOUNG CHOE 1. INTRODUCTION Let be an m-dimensional as the union of the line segments from p to q, over all q . And for a k-dimensional submanifold N Rn

  18. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  19. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  20. Gamma-ray bursts: a Centauro's cry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. K. Silagadze

    2003-06-30

    A new candidate for the gamma-ray bursts central engine is proposed: if in some energetic cosmic event a macroscopic amount of bubbles of the disoriented chiral condensate can be formed, then their subsequent decays will produce a relativistic fireball without the baryon loading problem. The neutron star to strange star transition is considered as a candidate example of such cosmic event.

  1. Observation of the Crab Nebula in Soft Gamma Rays with the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandstra, Mark ShenYu

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.268] G. J. Fishman. The gamma-ray burst capabilities of BATSEOlson. Observations of Gamma- Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

  2. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Gamma-ray albedo of the moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light]; low energy -ray spectroscopy data ac- quired by the Lunar Prospector were used to map the elemental

  3. Expectations for the hard x-ray continuum and gamma-ray line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    continuum and gamma-ray lines from a Type Ia supernova dominate its integrated photon emissions and can provide unique diagnostics of the mass of the ejecta, the sup 56Ni yield...

  4. X-ray flares from dense shells formed in gamma-ray burst explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hascoet, R; Daigne, F; Mochkovitch, R

    2015-01-01

    Bright X-ray flares are routinely detected by the Swift satellite during the early afterglow of gamma-ray bursts, when the explosion ejecta drives a blast wave into the external medium. We suggest that the flares are produced as the reverse shock propagates into the tail of the ejecta. The ejecta is expected to contain a few dense shells formed at an earlier stage of the explosion. We show an example of how such dense shells form and describe how the reverse shock interacts with them. A new reflected shock is generated in this interaction, which produces a short-lived X-ray flare. The model provides a natural explanation for the main observed features of the X-ray flares --- the fast rise, the steep power-law decline, and the characteristic peak duration \\Delta t /t= (0.1-0.3).

  5. X-ray afterglows and spectroscopy of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi Piro

    2004-02-26

    I will review the constraints set by X-ray measurements of afterglows on several issues of GRB, with particular regard to the fireball model, the environment, the progenitor and dark GRB.

  6. Neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple internal shocks in gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauricio Bustamante; Philipp Baerwald; Kohta Murase; Walter Winter

    2015-10-14

    Gamma-ray bursts are short-lived, luminous explosions at cosmological distances, thought to originate from relativistic jets launched at the deaths of massive stars. They are among the prime candidates to produce the observed cosmic rays at the highest energies. Recent neutrino data have, however, started to constrain this possibility in the simplest models with only one emission zone. In the classical theory of gamma-ray bursts, it is expected that particles are accelerated at mildly relativistic shocks generated by the collisions of material ejected from a central engine. We consider neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple emission regions since these internal collisions must occur at very different radii, from below the photosphere all the way out to the circumburst medium, as a consequence of the efficient dissipation of kinetic energy. We demonstrate that the different messengers originate from different collision radii, which means that multi-messenger observations open windows for revealing the evolving GRB outflows.

  7. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  8. A simple technique for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhilesh P. Nandan; Sharmili Rudra; Himangshu Neog; S. Biswas; S. Mahapatra; B. Mohanty; P. K. Samal

    2015-04-10

    A new and simple technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In these experiments only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and NIM scalers have been used. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators has been done using Co$^{60}$ and Cs$^{137}$ sources. The details experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results has been presented in this article.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  10. The Gamma Ray Detection Capabilities of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Battiston; M. Biasini; E. Fiandrini; J. Petrakis; M. H. Salamon

    1999-09-30

    The modeled performance of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) as a high energy (0.3 to 100 GeV) gamma-ray detector is described, and its gamma ray astrophysics objectives are discussed.

  11. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  12. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light...

  13. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  14. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  15. Staff Research Physicist (X-Ray Spectroscopy) | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    position to work on X-ray spectroscopy, atomic physics, X-ray instrumentation, and high energy density physics. Near-term research goals include participating in the design,...

  16. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Isabelle Grenier

    2010-01-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  18. Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, & Neutrinos in the Starburst Nuclei of Arp 220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2015-01-01

    The cores of Arp 220, the closest ultra-luminous infrared starburst galaxy, provide an opportunity to study interactions of cosmic rays under extreme conditions. In this paper, we model the populations of cosmic rays produced by supernovae in the central molecular zones of both starburst nuclei. We find that ~65 - 100% of cosmic rays are absorbed in these regions due to their huge molecular gas contents, and thus, the nuclei of Arp 220 nearly complete proton calorimeters. As the cosmic ray protons collide with the interstellar medium, they produce secondary electrons that are also contained within the system and radiate synchrotron emission. Using results from chi-squared tests between the model and the observed radio spectral energy distribution, we predict the emergent gamma-ray and high-energy neutrino spectra and find the magnetic field to be at milligauss levels. Because of the extremely intense far-infrared radiation fields, the gamma-ray spectrum steepens significantly at TeV energies due to gamma-gamm...

  19. Cosmic Rays from Supernovae Proven to Hit Earth

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A new study confirms that cosmic rays are born in the violent aftermath of supernovas, exploding stars throughout the galaxy.

  20. Lyapunov exponents for 2D ray tracing without interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lyapunov exponents for 2­D ray tracing without interfaces LudŸek KlimeŸs Department of Geophysics@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary The Lyapunov exponents asymptotically quantify the exponential divergence of rays. The ``Lyapunov exponent'' for a finite 2­D ray and the average ``Lyapunov exponents'' for a set of finite 2­D rays

  1. Internal energy dissipation of gamma-ray bursts observed with Swift: Precursors, prompt gamma-rays, extended emission, and late X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, You-Dong; Liang, En-Wei; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Peng, Fang-Kun; Lu, Rui-Jing; Lü, Lian-Zhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: Zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We jointly analyze the gamma-ray burst (GRB) data observed with Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray Telescope on board the Swift mission to present a global view on the internal energy dissipation processes in GRBs, including precursors, prompt gamma-ray emission, extended soft gamma-ray emission, and late X-ray flares. The Bayesian block method is utilized to analyze the BAT light curves to identify various emission episodes. Our results suggest that these emission components likely share the same physical origin, which is the repeated activation of the GRB central engine. What we observe in the gamma-ray band may be a small part of more extended underlying activities. The precursor emission, which is detected in about 10% of Swift GRBs, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a massive star core-collapse origin. The soft extended emission tail, on the other hand, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a compact star merger origin. Bright X-ray emission is detected during the BAT quiescent phases prior to subsequent gamma-ray peaks, implying that X-ray emission may be detectable prior the BAT trigger time. Future GRB alert instruments with soft X-ray capability are essential for revealing the early stages of GRB central engine activities, and shedding light on jet composition and the jet launching mechanism in GRBs.

  2. Portable Parallel Beam X-Ray Diffraction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than 50 pounds, and uses about 50 watts of power. The X-Beam uses polycapillary x-ray optics to collect x-rays over a large solid angle from a low-power x-ray source and to form...

  3. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  4. Galactic center gamma ray excess: features and possible origins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Members, NASA / DOE & International Contributions (Sweden, France, Italy, Japan ...). Data made public! ! !"#$%&'()#*%+(',"-"."-* Space-based instruments only UV | X-ray | -ray | VHE -ray optical 10-11 10-12 10-13 10-14 10-15 10-16 Moresensitive Fergcm-2s-1) !"#$ !"%#$!"&#$!"'#$!"(#$!")#$ Energy !"#$% !"#$%&'() *+,"-#./ 0() 122 WIMP Mass

  5. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

  7. SGARFACE: a novel detector for microsecond gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SGARFACE: a novel detector for microsecond gamma ray bursts S. LeBohec *,1 , F. Krennrich, G surveys and monitors for clas- sical gamma ray bursts. The sensitivity of these telescopes is limited 2005 Abstract The Short GAmma Ray Front Air Cherenkov Experiment (SGARFACE) is operated at the Whipple

  8. Coherent Ray Tracing for Complex Light Transport Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    soft shadows from area light sources, large ray packets for real-time Whitted ray tracing, and adaptive lighting, depth of field, motion blur, and diffuse inter-reflections. This is an adaptive Monte CarloCoherent Ray Tracing for Complex Light Transport Effects Ryan S. Overbeck Advised by: Ravi

  9. Monitoring x-ray beam damage on lipid films by an integrated Brewster angle microscope/x-ray diffractometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    Polyunsaturated lipids with conjugated tails are easily dam- aged by x-ray irradiation in the presence of oxygen samples and thin films has been detected since the beginning of x-ray studies. Dam- age to lipid samples

  10. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor streams can be especially challenging to identify. The super cooled detectors have a marked improvement in energy resolution, allowing the possibility of deconvolution of mixtures of gamma rays that was unavailable with high purity germanium detectors. Isotopic analysis codes require libraries of gamma rays. In certain situations, isotope identification can be made in the field, sometimes with a short turnaround time, depending on the choice of detector and software analysis package. Sodium iodide and high purity germanium detectors have been successfully used in field scenarios. The newer super cooled detectors offer dramatically increased resolution, but they have lower efficiency and so can require longer collection times. The different peak shapes require software development for the specific detector type and field application. Libraries can be tailored to specific scenarios; by eliminating isotopes that are certainly not present, the analysis time may be shortened and the accuracy may be increased. The intent of this project was to create one accurate library of gamma rays emitted from isotopes of interest to be used as a reliable reference in safeguards work. All simulation and spectroscopy analysis codes can draw upon this best library to improve accuracy and cross-code consistency. Modeling codes may include MCNP and COG. Gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis codes may include MGA, MGAU, U235 and FRAM. The intent is to give developers and users the tools to use in nuclear energy safeguards work. In this project, the library created was limited to a selection of actinide isotopes of immediate interest to reactor technology. These isotopes included {sup 234-238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238-242}Pu, {sup 241,243}Am and {sup 244}Cm. These isotopes were examined, and the best of gamma-ray data, including line energies and relative strengths were selected.

  11. Metrology for the advancement of x-ray optics at the ALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    S. Yuan et al. , X-ray Optics and Instrumentation 2010,in X-ray and Neutron Optics, Springer, Berlin S. G. AlcockX-ray beam metrology and X-ray optic alignment by Hartmann

  12. Compton Recoil Electron Tracking With the TIGRE Gamma-Ray Balloon Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamiya, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    AGNs), pulsars, gamma-ray bursts, cosmic ray interactionssensitive to cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the energy range ofGalactic center, a single gamma-ray burst which occurred 10

  13. Experimental investigation of beam heating in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Experimental investigation of beam heating in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope and an accuracy of Æ1 C has been fabricated for scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM). Here we describe at temperatures near their respective melting points as a means of checking for possible sample heating caused

  14. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  15. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  16. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  17. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  18. Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu Zhang; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2014-06-18

    The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein's special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation~(LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass~8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

  19. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  20. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-07-08

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. Additionally, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completionmore »in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.« less

  1. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above $10^{17}$ eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water-Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km$^2$ overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km$^2$, 61 detector infill array. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km$^2$ sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Auger Observatory.

  2. Triangular microlasers in the ray picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockschläder, Pia

    2015-01-01

    We apply ray-optical methods to dielectric optical microcavities in the shape of triangles made of low refractive index material. Geometrical optics is extended by the inclusion of intensity amplification along the optical path to achieve a better description of active, lasing cavities. Far-field emission patterns of triangular cavities obtained in this way agree well with experimental results. We find ray trajectories that maximize the intensity inside the cavity to determine the far-field emission characteristics and to complement the concept of the unstable manifold applicable to chaotic microlasers. As these maximum intensity trajectories need not to be periodic, we suggest that they provide a more general explanation for emission patterns of microlasers than single periodic orbits.

  3. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-07-08

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. Additionally, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.

  4. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  5. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Progress, Problems & Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing Zhang; Peter Meszaros

    2003-11-13

    The cosmological gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenon is reviewed. The broad observational facts and empirical phenomenological relations of the GRB prompt emission and afterglow are outlined. A well-tested, successful fireball shock model is introduced in a pedagogical manner. Several important uncertainties in the current understanding of the phenomenon are reviewed, and prospects of how future experiments and extensive observational and theoretical efforts may address these problems are discussed.

  6. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  7. Cosmological Time Dilation in Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Band

    1994-07-01

    Norris et al. (1994) report that the temporal structure of faint gamma ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  8. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  9. Energetic Runaway Electrons, Sprites and Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehtinen, Nikolai G.

    of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes (BATSE Data) Rate(counts/0.1ms)Rate(counts/0.1ms)Rate(counts/0.1ms) Time (ms. Inan, U. S., S. C. Reising, G. J. Fishman and J. M. Horack, On the association of terrestrial gamma. V. Gurevich, T. Tunnel and G. M. Milikh, Kinetic theory of runaway breakdown, Phys. Rev., 49, 2257

  10. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; H. Bräuninger; S. Cébrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. Rodríguez; L. Strüder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

    2007-05-10

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  11. Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

  12. Gamma Ray Fresnel lenses - why not?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Skinner

    2006-02-03

    Fresnel lenses offer the possibility of concentrating the flux of X-rays or gamma-rays flux falling on a geometric area of many square metres onto a focal point which need only be a millimetre or so in diameter (and which may even be very much smaller). They can do so with an efficiency that can approach 100%, and yet they are easily fabricated and have no special alignment requirements. Fresnel lenses can offer diffraction-limited angular resolution, even in a domain where that limit corresponds to less than a micro second of arc. Given all these highly desirable attributes, it is natural to ask why Fresnel gamma ray lenses are not already being used, or at least why there is not yet any mission that plans to use the technology. Possible reasons (apart from the obvious one that nobody thought of doing so) include the narrow bandwidth of simple Fresnel lenses, their very long focal length, and the problems of target finding. It is argued that none of these is a "show stopper" and that this technique should be seriously considered for nuclear astrophysics.

  13. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  14. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.

  15. Chandra X-ray Observations of Pictor A: High Energy Cosmic Rays in a Radio Galaxy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Wilson; A. J. Young; P. L. Shopbell

    2000-10-13

    We report X-ray observations of the nearby, powerful radio galaxy Pictor A with the Chandra Observatory and optical and near uv observations of its western radio hot spot with the Hubble Space Telescope. X-ray emission is detected from the nucleus, a 1.9 arcmin (110 kpc) long jet to the west of the nucleus, the western radio hot spot some 4.2 arcmin (240 kpc) from the nucleus, and the eastern radio lobe. The morphology of the western hot spot is remarkably similar to that seen at radio and optical wavelengths, where the emission is known to be synchrotron radiation. The X-ray spectrum of the hot spot is well described by an absorbed power law with photon index \\Gamma = 2.07 (+/- 0.11). The X-ray jet coincides with a weak radio jet and is laterally extended by \\simeq 2.0 arcsec (1.9 kpc). The observed jet is up to \\simeq 15 times brighter in X-rays than any counter jet, a difference ascribed to relativistic boosting as the western radio lobe is probably the closer. The jet's spectrum is well modelled by an absorbed power law with \\Gamma = 1.94 (+0.43/-0.49) and poorly fitted by a Raymond-Smith thermal plasma model. (Abstract truncated).

  16. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B. L.; Gullikson, E. M.; Davis, J. C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  17. EVIDENCE OF CONTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING CLOUDS TO GAMMA-RAY BURST'S X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.

    2013-10-20

    The origin of excess of X-ray column density with respect to optical extinction in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a puzzle. A proposed explanation of the excess is the photoelectric absorption due to the intervening clouds along a GRB's line of sight. Here, we test this scenario by using the intervening Mg II absorption as a tracer of the neutral hydrogen column density of the intervening clouds. We identify a connection between the large X-ray column density (and large column density ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})?0.5) and large neutral hydrogen column density probed by the Mg II doublet ratio (DR). In addition, GRBs with large X-ray column density (and large ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})>0) tend to have multiple saturated intervening absorbers with DR < 1.2. These results therefore indicate an additional contribution from the intervening system to the observed X-ray column density in some GRBs, although the contribution from the host galaxy alone cannot be excluded based on this study.

  18. Pinpointing the knee of cosmic rays with diffuse PeV ?-rays and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y. Q.; Hu, H. B.; Yuan, Q.; Tian, Z.; Gao, X. J. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the knee in the cosmic ray spectrum remains to be an unsolved fundamental problem. There are various kinds of models that predict different break positions and the compositions of the knee. In this work, we suggest the use of diffuse ?-rays and neutrinos as probes to test these models. Based on several typical types of composition models, the diffuse ?-ray and neutrino spectra are calculated and show distinctive cutoff behaviors at energies from tens of TeV to multi-PeV. The expected flux will be observable by the newly upgraded Tibet-AS?+MD (muon detector) experiment as well as more sensitive future projects, such as LHAASO and HiSCORE. By comparing the neutrino spectrum with the recent observations by the IceCube experiment, we find that the diffuse neutrinos from interactions between the cosmic rays and the interstellar medium may not be responsible to the majority of the IceCube events. Future measurements of the neutrinos may be able to identify the Galactic diffuse component and shed further light on the problem of the knee of cosmic rays.

  19. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  20. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell J. Smith

    2003-07-15

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

  1. Prompt TeV Emission from Cosmic Rays Accelerated by Gamma Ray Bursts Interacting with Surrounding Stellar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebur Razzaque; Olga Mena; Charles D. Dermer

    2008-11-24

    Protons accelerated in the internal shocks of a long duration gamma ray burst can escape the fireball as cosmic rays by converting to neutrons. Hadronic interactions of these neutrons inside a stellar wind bubble created by the progenitor star will produce TeV gamma rays via neutral meson decay and synchrotron radiation by charged pion-decay electrons in the wind magnetic field. Such gamma rays should be observable from nearby gamma ray bursts by currently running and upcoming ground-based detectors.

  2. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  3. EARLY THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Akihiro [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu [Research Center for the Early Universe, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-02-10

    We performed a series of hydrodynamical calculations of an ultrarelativistic jet propagating through a massive star and the circumstellar matter (CSM) to investigate the interaction between the ejecta and the CSM. We succeed in distinguishing two qualitatively different cases in which the ejecta are shocked and adiabatically cool. To examine whether the cocoon expanding at subrelativistic speeds emits any observable signal, we calculate the expected photospheric emission from the cocoon. It is found that the emission can explain early thermal X-ray emission recently found in some long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The result implies that the difference of the circumstellar environment of long GRBs can be probed by observing their early thermal X-ray emission.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts: recent results and connections to very high energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Péter Mészáros; Katsuaki Asano; Péter Veres

    2012-09-11

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \\swift and \\fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.

  5. Neutrino, Neutron, and Cosmic Ray Production in the External Shock Model of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2002-04-16

    The hypothesis that ultra-high energy (>~ 10^19 eV) cosmic rays (UHECRs) are accelerated by gamma-ray burst (GRB) blast waves is assumed to be correct. Implications of this assumption are then derived for the external shock model of gamma-ray bursts. The evolving synchrotron radiation spectrum in GRB blast waves provides target photons for the photomeson production of neutrinos and neutrons. Decay characteristics and radiative efficiencies of the neutral particles that escape from the blast wave are calculated. The diffuse high-energy GRB neutrino background and the distribution of high-energy GRB neutrino events are calculated for specific parameter sets, and a scaling relation for the photomeson production efficiency in surroundings with different densities is derived. GRBs provide an intense flux of high-energy neutrons, with neutron-production efficiencies exceeding ~ 1% of the total energy release. The radiative characteristics of the neutron beta-decay electrons from the GRB "neutron bomb" are solved in a special case. Galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by radiation halos of ~ 100 kpc extent from the outflowing neutrons, consisting of a nonthermal optical/X-ray synchrotron component and a high-energy gamma-ray component from Compton-scattered microwave background radiation. The luminosity of sources of GRBs and relativistic outflows in L* galaxies such as the Milky Way is at the level of ~10^40+-1 ergs/s. This is sufficient to account for UHECR generation by GRBs. We briefly speculate on the possibility that hadronic cosmic rays originate from the subset of supernovae that collapse to form relativistic outflows and GRBs. (abridged)

  6. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  7. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ?5 keV to ?10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  8. Can Naked Singularities Yield Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia

    1998-07-09

    Gamma-ray bursts are believed to be the most luminous objects in the Universe. There has been some suggestion that these arise from quantum processes around naked singularities. The main problem with this suggestion is that all known examples of naked singularities are massless and hence there is effectively no source of energy. It is argued that a globally naked singularity coupled with quantum processes operating within a distance of the order of Planck length of the singularity will probably yield energy burst of the order of M_pc^2\\approx2\\times 10^{16} ergs, where M_p is the Planck mass.

  9. Cosmic rays through the Higgs portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Dick; Robert B. Mann; Kai E. Wunderle

    2008-07-16

    We consider electroweak singlet dark matter with a mass comparable to the Higgs mass. The singlet is assumed to couple to standard matter through a perturbative coupling to the Higgs particle. The annihilation of a singlet with a mass comparable to the Higgs mass is dominated by proximity to the W, Z and Higgs peaks in the annihilation cross section. We find that the continuous photon spectrum from annihilation of a perturbatively coupled singlet in the galactic halo can reach a level of several per mil of the EGRET diffuse gamma ray flux.

  10. Classification of Fermi Gamma-RAY Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I; Hakkila, J; Bagoly, Z; Preece, R D

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi GBM Catalog has been recently published. Previous classification analyses of the BATSE, RHESSI, BeppoSAX, and Swift databases found three types of gamma-ray bursts. Now we analyzed the GBM catalog to classify the GRBs. PCA and Multiclustering analysis revealed three groups. Validation of these groups, in terms of the observed variables, shows that one of the groups coincides with the short GRBs. The other two groups split the long class into a bright and dim part, as defined by the peak flux. Additional analysis is needed to determine whether this splitting is only a mathematical byproduct of the analysis or has some real physical meaning.

  11. X-ray Selected Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella M. Gioia

    1996-01-21

    This paper given at the meeting on "Mapping, Measuring and Modelling the Universe" presents three topics: 1) the study of the clusters and groups of galaxies found serendipitously in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region of the ROSAT all-sky survey; 2) the highest redshift clusters found in the EMSS (up to z=0.82) and the cosmological implications of their very existence; 3) the gravitational lensing in the EMSS X-ray selected clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  12. Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos Probing Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; F. Halzen

    2006-11-28

    Very high energy, short wavelength, neutrinos may interact with the space-time foam predicted by theories of quantum gravity. They would propagate like light through a crystal lattice and be delayed, with the delay depending on the energy. This will appear to the observer as a violation of Lorenz invariance. Back of the envelope calculations imply that observations of neutrinos produced by gamma ray bursts may reach Planck-scale sensitivity. We revisit the problem considering two essential complications: the imprecise timing of the neutrinos associated with their poorly understood production mechanism in the source and the indirect nature of their energy measurement made by high energy neutrino telescopes.

  13. THE ORTHOGONAL GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Pugliese, Daniela; Nathanail, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    We explore the analogy between a rotating magnetized black hole and an axisymmetric pulsar and derive the black hole's electromagnetic spindown after its formation in the core collapse of a supermassive star. The spindown shows two characteristic phases: an early Blandford-Znajek phase that lasts a few hundred seconds and a late pulsar-like afterglow phase that lasts much longer. During the first phase, the spindown luminosity decreases almost exponentially, whereas during the afterglow phase it decreases as t {sup –a} with 1 ? a ? 1.5. We associate our findings with long duration gamma-ray bursts and compare them with observations.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts observed by INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mereghetti

    2003-12-12

    During the first six months of operations, six Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): a software for the automatic search of GRBs and the rapid distribution of their coordinates. I describe the current performances of IBAS and review the main results obtained so far. The coordinates of the latest burst localized by IBAS, GRB 031203, have been distributed within 20 s from the burst onset and with an uncertainty radius of only 2.7 arcmin.

  15. RayTracker Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy Marketing CorpMemberREC)Kiran ProjectsRayTracker

  16. Ray Sun Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU ElektronikRates with tierRay Sun Energy

  17. SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Home »

  18. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Home

  19. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

  20. SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray

  1. Ray Smith | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Ray River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. X-Ray Microscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

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  4. X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Possible association of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray events with strong gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordehai Milgrom; Vladimir Usov

    1995-05-03

    We point out that each of the error boxes of the two highest-energy cosmic-ray shower events known, overlaps with that of a strong gamma-ray burst (GRB). The GRBs precede the cosmic rays by 5.5, and 11 months respectively. In one case the strongest known cosmic ray is paired with the strongest gamma-ray burst in the BATSE catalogue. The probability of this to have occurred by chance seems rather small. Without building on post-factum statistics, we think the above is remarkable enough to suggest that the cosmic ray and gamma-ray burst were produced by the same outburst. A time delay (and a small positional disparity) is expected, since the trajectory of a charged cosmic-ray particle is wriggled by intervening magnetic fields. We estimate that the Galaxy's field alone may produce a delay of the order observed. We discuss some of the implications that follow if such an association is confirmed. For example, the upper limit on the distance to the cosmic-ray source, combined with a much-better-determined position of the gamma-ray burst source, narrows greatly the volume in which to look for an optical counterpart. There is also useful information in the time delay regarding, e.g., intergalactic magnetic fields.

  12. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  13. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  14. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  15. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore »multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  16. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. ); Griffee, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P.; Griffee, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  19. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  20. High-Energy Cosmic Ray Event Data from the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory in Mendoza, Argentina is the result of an international collaboration funded by 15 countries and many different organizations. Its mission is to capture high-energy cosmic ray events or air showers for research into their origin and nature. The Pierre Auger Collaboration agreed to make 1% of its data available to the public. The Public Event Explorer is a search tool that allows users to browse or search for and display figures and data plots of events collected since 2004. The repository is updated daily, and, as of June, 2014, makes more than 35,000 events publicly available. The energy of a cosmic ray is measured in Exa electron volts or EeV. These event displays can be browsed in order of their energy level from 0.1 to 41.1 EeV. Each event has an individual identification number.

    The event displays provide station data, cosmic ray incoming direction, various energy measurements, plots, vector-based images, and an ASCII data file.

  1. Galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets I. Cosmic ray flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grießmeier, J -M; Stadelmann, A; Grenfell, J L; Atri, D

    2015-01-01

    (abridged abstract) Theoretical arguments indicate that close-in terrestial exoplanets may have weak magnetic fields, especially in the case of planets more massive than Earth (super-Earths). Planetary magnetic fields, however, constitute one of the shielding layers that protect the planet against cosmic-ray particles. In particular, a weak magnetic field results in a high flux of Galactic cosmic rays that extends to the top of the planetary atmosphere. We wish to quantify the flux of Galactic cosmic rays to an exoplanetary atmosphere as a function of the particle energy and of the planetary magnetic moment. We numerically analyzed the propagation of Galactic cosmic-ray particles through planetary magnetospheres. We evaluated the efficiency of magnetospheric shielding as a function of the particle energy (in the range 16 MeV $\\le$ E $\\le$ 524 GeV) and as a function of the planetary magnetic field strength (in the range 0 ${M}_\\oplus$ $\\le$ {M} $\\le$ 10 ${M}_\\oplus$). Combined with the flux outside the planeta...

  2. A novel paradigm for short gamma-ray bursts with extended X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Rezzolla; Pawan Kumar

    2015-01-21

    The merger of a binary of neutron stars provides natural explanations for many of the features of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), such as the generation of a hot torus orbiting a rapidly rotating black hole, which can then build a magnetic jet and provide the energy reservoir to launch a relativistic outflow. Yet, this scenario has problems explaining the recently discovered long-term and sustained X-ray emission associated with the afterglows of a subclass of SGRBs. We propose a new model that explains how an X-ray afterglow can be sustained by the product of the merger and how the X-ray emission is produced before the corresponding emission in the gamma-band, although it is observed to follow it. Overall, our paradigm combines in a novel manner a number of well-established features of the emission in SGRBs and results from simulations. Because it involves the propagation of an ultra-relativistic outflow and its interaction with a confining medium, the paradigm also highlights a unifying phenomenology between short and long GRBs.

  3. DIFFUSE GALACTIC CONTINUUM GAMMA RAYS: A MODEL COMPATIBLE WITH EGRET DATA AND COSMIC-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    Garching, Germany; aws@mpe.mpg.de Igor V. Moskalenko1 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt. In particular, the spectrum of -rays calculated under the assumption that the proton and electron spectra -production in p-p interactions. However, a calculation made using modern Monte Carlo event generators

  4. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josep M. Paredes

    2004-12-02

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  5. ISOCAM Photometry of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Law-Green; A. Zezas; M. J. Ward; C. Boisson

    1998-12-23

    Mid-infrared photometry of the hosts of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies at 6 microns and 12 microns has been attempted with ISOCAM. No conclusive detections have been made. This implies that these are quiescent objects with little or no active star-formation. Neither X-ray binaries nor starburst-driven superwinds are consistent explanations for the X-ray emission in these objects. We conclude that these NLXGs are predominantly AGN-powered.

  6. X-ray transmission movies of spontaneous dynamic events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Holmes, M.; Novak, A.; Oschwald, D.; Dolgonos, P.; Qualls, B.

    2014-11-15

    We describe a new x-ray radiographic imaging system which allows for continuous x-ray transmission imaging of spontaneous dynamic events. We demonstrate this method on thermal explosions in three plastic bonded formulations of the energetic material octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. We describe the x-ray imaging system and triggering developed to enable the continuous imaging of a thermal explosion.

  7. X-ray interferometry with spherically bent crystals (abstract)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in manufacturing high-quality spherically bent crystals allows highly monochromatic x-ray beams to be produced, and allows efficient x-ray imaging with {mu}m-scale resolution. This article explores some of the constraints for x-ray interferometry utilizing spherically bent crystals and laser-produced plasma sources, and discusses several shearing interferometer concepts that might be experimentally investigated.

  8. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  9. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  10. Nuclear Criticality as a Contributor to Gamma Ray Burst Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bruce Hayes

    2013-01-15

    Most gamma ray bursts are able to be explained using supernovae related phenomenon. Some measured results still lack compelling explanations and a contributory cause from nuclear criticality is proposed. This is shown to have general properties consistent with various known gamma ray burst properties. The galactic origin of fast rise exponential decay gamma ray bursts is considered a strong candidate for these types of events.

  11. Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution Daniele Malesani, Dark Cosmology Centre and the X of the "Universe") #12;What is a gamma-ray burst? Brief (ms - min) and intense (~10-7 erg cm­2 s­1 ) burst of soft to ongoing star formation "Naked-eye" GRB 080319B GRBs explode within star-forming galaxies Gamma-ray bursts

  12. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: present status and future prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Watson

    2001-12-20

    Reasons for the current interest in cosmic rays above 10^19 eV are described. The latest results on the energy spectrum, arrival direction distribution and mass composition of cosmic rays are reviewed, including data that were reported after the meeting in Blois in June 2001. The enigma set by the existence of ultra high-energy cosmic rays remains. Ideas proposed to explain it are discussed and progress with the construction of the Pierre Auger Observatory is outlined.

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts, Neutron Star Quakes, and the Casimir Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Carlson; T. Goldman; J. Perez-Mercader

    1994-11-25

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into $\\gamma$--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  14. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  15. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasi?ski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  16. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  17. An alternative interpretation for cosmic ray peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative mechanism based upon dark matter (DM) interpretation for anomalous peak signatures in cosmic ray measurements, assuming an extended dark sector with two DM species. This is contrasted with previous effort to explain various line-like cosmic-ray excesses in the context of DM models where the relevant DM candidate directly annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles. The heavier DM is assumed to annihilate to an on-shell intermediate state. As the simplest choice, it decays directly into the lighter DM along with an unstable particle which in turn decays to a pair of SM states corresponding to the interesting cosmic anomaly. We show that a sharp continuum energy peak can be readily generated under the proposed DM scenario, depending on dark sector particle mass spectra. Remarkably, such a peak is robustly identified as half the mass of the unstable particle. Furthermore, other underlying mass parameters are analytically related to the shape of energy spectrum. We apply this idea to ...

  18. X-ray micromodulated luminescence tomography in dual-cone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-01

    Jul 16, 2014 ... source, a polycapillary lens, and an electron multiplying charge coupled device ... sources generate x-rays by accelerating electrons into high-z.

  19. X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sprays X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerpowell.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  20. The contribution of cosmic rays to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A search has been made for a contribution of the changing cosmic ray intensity to the global warming observed in the last century. The cosmic ray intensity shows a strong 11 year cycle due to solar modulation and the overall rate has decreased since 1900. These changes in cosmic ray intensity are compared to those of the mean global surface temperature to attempt to quantify any link between the two. It is shown that, if such a link exists, the changing cosmic ray intensity contributes less than 8% to the increase in the mean global surface temperature observed since 1900.

  1. Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic Techniques Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Gang Chen Seminar:...

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of...

  3. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology...

  4. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissociation of strong acid revisited:...

  5. Simulating Wavefront Correction via Deformable Mirrors at X-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: X-ray Adaptive Optics, San Diego, CA, United States, Aug 14 - Aug 14, 2012 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore...

  6. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy has become an important tool in understanding the electronic structure of materials. Resonant absorption edges in the soft x-ray regime are especially interesting...

  7. Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

  8. A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signals that comprise radiation interlock systems protecting personnel and equipment; * Beam diagnostics controlling multiple x-ray beams simultaneously while utilizing more than...

  9. Insight into obscure transition uncovered by X-rays | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of X-ray techniques. This transition has ramifications for material design for electronics and sensors. The transition between being electrically conductive (metallic) at...

  10. Advances in X-Ray Diagnostics of Diesel Fuel Sprays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent advances in high-speed X-ray imaging has shown several distinct behaviors of commercial fuel injectors that cannot be seen with more conventional techniques.

  11. X-ray image reconstruction from a diffraction pattern alone

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marchesini, Stefano

    X-ray diffraction pattern of a sample of 50 nm colloidal gold particles, recorded at a wavelength of 2.1 nm.

  12. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were able to directly observe redox processes in thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxide electrocatalysts using surface-sensitive, x-ray absorption spectroscopy while...

  13. Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft x-ray absorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft x-ray absorption study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic structure of titania aerogels: Soft...

  14. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1999-06-15

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

  15. X-ray Emission from Isolated Be Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2000-08-22

    I discuss the X-ray observations of Be stars, and how their properties compare to non-emission B stars. I focus on several specific stars that show high flux levels and variability but also report on several interesting survey results. The Be X-ray properties are discussed in the context of wind-shock X-ray emission from normal OB stars as well as in the context of general mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the Be phenomenon. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of the spectral diagnostics that will be available from the new generation of X-ray telescopes.

  16. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

  17. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  18. X-ray microscopy at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-RayX-ray

  19. A Cluster of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    2005-03-09

    Five ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the combined AGASA and HiRes stereo data are analyzed to test whether they come from a single source. The quad above 37 EeV in the 94-event high energy dataset can be analyzed without considering magnetic dispersion. The probability that it is a chance association is 10^-3. Assuming the source is continuous, the random magnetic deflections these UHECRs accumulated en route from their source can be used to estimate \\sqrt{B^2 \\lambda D} ~ 1 nG-Mpc. A quintuplet including a HiRes event between 10 and 30 EeV is well fit with this value. Galactic magnetic deflection appears to be smaller than in some models.

  20. Cosmic Ray Protons Illuminate Dark Matter Axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tam; Q. Yang

    2011-08-16

    Cosmic ray protons propagating in a spatially-homogeneous but time-dependent field of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) emit photons in a way that is reminiscent of Cherenkov radiation by charged particles in a preferred background. We compute the emission rate and energy spectrum of the photons, and discuss the possibility of their detection using the Square Kilometre Array which is currently under construction. In the case of a non-detection, constraints can be placed on the parameter space of ALPs whose mass lie between $10^{-7}$eV and $10^{-5}$ eV under the assumption that they are the primary constituent of dark matter.

  1. Constraining Lorentz violations with Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Tsvi Piran

    2006-05-17

    Gamma ray bursts are excellent candidates to constrain physical models which break Lorentz symmetry. We consider deformed dispersion relations which break the boost invariance and lead to an energy-dependent speed of light. In these models, simultaneously emitted photons from cosmological sources reach Earth with a spectral time delay that depends on the symmetry breaking scale. We estimate the possible bounds which can be obtained by comparing the spectral time delays with the time resolution of available telescopes. We discuss the best strategy to reach the strongest bounds. We compute the probability of detecting bursts that improve the current bounds. The results are encouraging. Depending on the model, it is possible to build a detector that within several years will improve the present limits of 0.015 m_pl.

  2. Neutrino oscillations and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kluzniak

    1998-07-22

    If the ordinary neutrinos oscillate into a sterile flavor in a manner consistent with the Super-Kamiokande data on the zenith-angle dependence of atmospheric mu-neutrino flux, an energy sufficient to power a typical cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) (about 10^{52} erg) can be carried by sterile neutrinos away from the source and deposited in a region relatively free of baryons. Hence, ultra-relativistic bulk motion (required by the theory of and observations of GRBs and their afterglows) can easily be achieved in the vicinity of plausible sources of GRBs. Oscillations between sterile and ordinary neutrinos would thus provide a solution to the ``baryon-loading problem'' in the theory of GRBs.

  3. Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    ~ 1/day Gamma Ray Bursts The X-ray counterpart detection with better pointing accuracy instrumentsIvan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy Ivan De Mitri'Aquila, 11- Jun -2002 Photo F. Arneodo #12;Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 2 Seminar Outline Background

  4. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  5. X-RAYRICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Meszaros,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    X-RAY­RICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Me´sza´ros,1,2 E. Ramirez-Ruiz,3 M. J of the observational gamma-ray variability-luminosity relation. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts -- radiation mechanisms: nonthermal 1. INTRODUCTION Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves at gamma-ray ener- gies are often

  6. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; D. A. Frail; S. R. Kulkarni; R. Sari; J. S. Bloom; T. J. Galama; F. A. Harrison; P. A. Price; D. Fox; D. Reichart; S. Yost; E. Berger; A. Diercks; R. Goodrich; F. Chaffee

    2001-06-29

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  7. X-raying Extended emission and rapid decay of short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagawa, Yasuaki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Ioka, Kunihito

    2015-01-01

    Extended emission is a mystery in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). By making time resolved spectral analyses of brightest eight events observed by {\\it Swift} XRT, we obviously classify the early X-ray emission of SGRBs into two types. One is the extended emission with exponentially rapid decay, which shows significant spectral softening during hundreds seconds since the SGRB trigger and is also detected by {\\it Swift}-BAT. The other is a dim afterglow only showing power-law decay over $10^4$ s. The correlations between the temporal decay and spectral indices of the extended emissions are inconsistent with the $\\alpha$-$\\beta$ correlation expected for the high-latitude curvature emission from a uniform jet. The observed too-rapid decay suggests the emission from a photosphere or a patchy surface, and manifests the stopping central engine via such as magnetic reconnection at the black hole.

  8. Magnetic Structures in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets Probed by Gamma-Ray Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yonetoku; Toshio Murakami; Shuichi Gunji; Tatehiro Mihara; Kenji Toma; Yoshiyuki Morihara; Takuya Takahashi; Yudai Wakashima; Hajime Yonemochi; Tomonori Sakashita; Noriyuki Toukairin; Hirofumi Fujimoto; Yoshiki Kodama

    2012-08-27

    We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of $\\Pi = 70 \\pm 22$% with statistical significance of $3.7 \\sigma$ for GRB 110301A, and $\\Pi = 84^{+16}_{-28}$% with $3.3 \\sigma$ confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. (2011). Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with all the data of the three GRBs, while photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favorable. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally-ordered fields advected from the central engine.

  9. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutron-Decay Halos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer

    2001-03-20

    Simple arguments concerning power and acceleration efficiency show that ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRS) with energies >~ 10^{19} eV could originate from GRBs. Neutrons formed through photo-pion production processes in GRB blast waves leave the acceleration site and travel through intergalactic space, where they decay and inject a very energetic proton and electron component into intergalactic space. The neutron-decay protons form a component of the UHECRs, whereas the neutron-decay electrons produce optical/X-ray synchrotron and gamma radiation from Compton-scattered background radiation. A significant fraction of galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by neutron-decay halos of characteristic size ~ 100 kpc.

  10. MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS PROBED BY GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Takuya; Wakashima, Yudai; Yonemochi, Hajime; Sakashita, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Yoshiki [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Gunji, Shuichi; Toukairin, Noriyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Koshirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Mihara, Tatehiro [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Toma, Kenji, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2012-10-10

    We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) on borad the IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of {Pi} = 70 {+-} 22% with statistical significance of 3.7{sigma} for GRB 110301A, and {Pi} = 84{sup +16}{sub -28}% with 3.3{sigma} confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with the data of the three GRBs, while the photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favored. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally ordered fields advected from the central engine.

  11. DEDUCING ELECTRON PROPERTIES FROM HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    , University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, U.S.A. 9 Dipartimento di Informatica, Universit`a di Verona-ray polarization measurements have imposed significant new constraints on the degree of anisotropy distribution 42 5.5 X-ray polarization and electr

  12. THE COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY NEAR THE ARCHEAN EARTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Kota, J.

    2012-11-20

    We employ three-dimensional state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic models of the early solar wind and heliosphere and a two-dimensional model for cosmic-ray transport to investigate the cosmic-ray spectrum and flux near the Archean Earth. We assess how sensitive the cosmic-ray spectrum is to changes in the sunspot placement and magnetic field strength, the large-scale dipole magnetic field strength, the wind ram pressure, and the Sun's rotation period. Overall, our results confirm earlier work that suggested the Archean Earth would have experienced a greatly reduced cosmic-ray flux than is the case today. The cosmic-ray reduction for the early Sun is mainly due to the shorter solar rotation period and tighter winding of the Parker spiral, and to the different surface distribution of the more active solar magnetic field. These effects lead to a global reduction of the cosmic-ray flux at 1 AU by up to two orders of magnitude or more. Variations in the sunspot magnetic field have more effect on the flux than variations in the dipole field component. The wind ram pressure affects the cosmic-ray flux through its influence on the size of the heliosphere via the pressure balance with the ambient interstellar medium. Variations in the interstellar medium pressure experienced by the solar system in orbit through the Galaxy could lead to order of magnitude changes in the cosmic-ray flux at Earth on timescales of a few million years.

  13. Sgoldstinos: Primaries of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Gorbunov

    2002-05-30

    I describe supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with light sgoldstinos and discuss the explanation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays above GZK cutoff in these models. Also I briefly discuss the possibility to solve other cosmological and astrophysical puzzles, such as gamma-ray bursts and dimming of high-redshift supernovae, within the models with light sgoldstinos.

  14. X-rays from magnetically channeled winds of OB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2008-01-30

    OB stars with strong radiation-driven stellar winds and large-scale magnetic fields generate strong and hard X-ray emission via the Magnetically Channeled Wind Shock (MCWS) mechanism. In this brief paper, I describe four separate X-ray diagnostics of the MCWS mechanism in OB stars, with applications to the prototype young O star, theta-1 Ori C.

  15. Plasmoid impacts on neutron stars and highest energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Litwin; R. Rosner

    2001-04-04

    Particle acceleration by electrostatic polarization fields that arise in plasmas streaming across magnetic fields is discussed as a possible acceleration mechanism of highest-energy cosmic rays. Specifically, plasmoids arising in planetoid impacts onto neutron star magnetospheres are considered. We find that such impacts at plausible rates may account for the observed flux and energy spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  16. The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I.

    . The Supernova Connection? 16. The Holy Grail 17. The End of the Beginning vii #12;· Afterword · Appendix. Did 16 The Holy Grail A few miles from Los Alamos, New Mexico, stands one of the most remark- able grail of gamma-ray burst astronomy for a quarter of a century. From the discovery of gamma-ray bursts

  17. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF CRUCIS: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    a corona; clear presence of UV driven wind at moderate temperatures; lack of wind X-ray absorption edges the years, consen- sus has thus instead favored an Intrinsic Wind Shock (IWS) model, in which the X-ray emission comes from shocks distributed throughout the wind, most likely arising from the strong, intrinsic

  19. X-rays from Hot Stars: Stellar Astronomy Research with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    emission lines Hot stars*: massive outflows ("stellar winds") ­ are the x-rays associated with these winds can actually take an image of its "wind nebula" ­ in all other cases, we infer the presence of a wind a model for fitting the detailed shapes of x-ray emission line profiles from hot star winds The very hot

  20. Single-frequency approximation of the coupling ray theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    . Introduction There are two different high­frequency asymptotic ray theories with frequency­indepen- dent) demonstrated analytically that the high­frequency asymptotic error of the In: Seismic Waves in Complex 3­DSingle-frequency approximation of the coupling ray theory Ludek Klimes & Petr Bulant Department

  1. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: New Physics or Old Physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. W. Stecker

    2004-07-15

    We consider the advantages of and the problems associated with hypotheses to explain the origin of ulthrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR: E > 10 EeV) and the "trans GZK" cosmic rays (TGZK: E > 100 EeV), both through "old physics" (acceleration in cosmic sources) and "new physics" (new particles, topological defects, fat neutrino cross sections, Lorentz invariance violation).

  2. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  3. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  4. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  5. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  6. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  7. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  8. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  9. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  10. Millisecond oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muno, Michael Patrick, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    I analyze 68 oscillation trains detected in a search of 159 thermonuclear bursts from eight neutron star X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. I use all data that were public as of September 2001. ...

  11. Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of energetic electrons in solar flares: event of 2003 to nonthermal energies are seen via microwave and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona. Imaging sophisticated and fully dedicated solar radio telescope operating at microwave frequencies (17 & 34 GHz) capable

  12. The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud behaviour during the past 50 of cloud factors using both satellite and ground­based data. In particular, we search for evidence for the low cloud decrease predicted by the rising levels of solar activity and the low cloud­cosmic ray flux

  13. Radio, Sub-mm, and X-ray Studies of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Berger

    2001-12-29

    The study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies in the radio, sub-mm, and X-ray wavelength regimes began only recently, in contrast to optical studies. This is mainly due to the long timescale on which the radio afterglow emission decays, and to the intrinsic faintness of radio emission from star-forming galaxies at z~1, as well as source confusion in sub-mm observations; X-ray observations of GRB hosts have simply not been attempted yet. Despite these difficulties, we have recently made the first detections of radio and sub-mm emission from the host galaxies of GRB980703 and GRB010222, respectively, using the VLA and the SCUBA instrument on JCMT. In both cases we find that the inferred star formation rates (~500 solar masses per year) and bolometric luminosities (~few 10^12 solar luminosities) indicate that these galaxies are possibly analogous to the local population of Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) undergoing a starburst. However, there is a modest probability that the observed emission is due to AGN activity rather than star formation, thus requiring observations with Chandra or XMM. The sample of GRB hosts offers a number of unique advantages to the broader question of the evolution of galaxies and star formation from high redshift to the present time since: (i) GRBs trace massive stars, (ii) are detectable to high redshifts, and (iii) have immense dust penetrating power. Therefore, radio/sub-mm/X-ray observations of GRB hosts can potentially provide crucial information both on the nature of the GRB host galaxies, and on the history of star formation.

  14. Fresnel lenses for X-ray and Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerry Skinner; Peter von Ballmoos; Neil Gehrels; John Krizmanic

    2003-08-25

    Phase Fresnel lenses have the same imaging properties as zone plates, but with the possibility of concentrating all of the incident power into the primary focus, increasing the maximum theoretical efficiency from 11% to close to 100%. For X-rays, and in particular for gamma-rays, large, diffraction-limited phase Fresnel lenses can be made relatively easily. The focal length is very long - for example up to a million kms. However, the correspondingly high `plate-scale' of the image means that the ultra-high (sub-micro-arc-second) angular resolution possible with a diffraction limited gamma-ray lens a few metres in diameter can be exploited with detectors having \\~mm spatial resolution. The potential of such systems for ultra-high angular resolution astronomy, and for attaining the sensitivity improvements desperately needed for certain other studies, are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages vis-a-vis alternative approaches are discussed. We report on reduced-scale 'proof-of-principle tests' which are planned and on mission studies of the implementation of a Fresnel telescope on a space mission with lens and detector on two spacecraft separated by one million km. Such a telescope would be capable of resolving emission from super-massive black holes on the scale of their event horizons and would have the sensitivity necessary to detect gamma-ray lines from distant supernovae. We show how diffractive/refractive optics leads to a continuum of possible system designs between filled aperture lenses and wideband interferometric arrays.

  15. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  16. Polarization mesurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Rubbia; Alexander Sakharov

    2008-09-03

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  17. NEW LIMITS ON GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: xdai@ou.edu

    2014-11-01

    Galaxy clusters are predicted to produce ?-rays through cosmic ray interactions and/or dark matter annihilation, potentially detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). We present a new, independent stacking analysis of Fermi-LAT photon count maps using the 78 richest nearby clusters (z < 0.12) from the Two Micron All Sky Survey cluster catalog. We obtain the lowest limit on the photon flux to date, 2.3 × 10{sup –11} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} (95% confidence) per cluster in the 0.8-100 GeV band, which corresponds to a luminosity limit of 3.5 × 10{sup 44} photons s{sup –1}. We also constrain the emission limits in a range of narrower energy bands. Scaling to recent cosmic ray acceleration and ?-ray emission models, we find that cosmic rays represent a negligible contribution to the intra-cluster energy density and gas pressure.

  18. The supernova/gamma-ray burst/jet connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bi-polar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star while the 56Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper I summarise the observational status of the supernova/gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A -- with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity -- as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insight into supernova explosions in general.

  19. ZAP! The X-Ray Laser is Born

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel

    2009-11-17

    SLAC has converted its giant particle accelerator into the world's first X-ray laser. By a billion fold the world's brightest X-ray source, the laser packs a trillion photons into pulses as short as a millionth of a billionth of a second. The ultra-bright, ultra-short X-ray pulses will drive a wide range of new experiments, as scientists strip electrons from atoms, photograph single molecules and make movies of chemical reactions. How has SLAC accomplished such feats of X-ray wizardry? Attend this public lecture to learn about the basics of an X-ray laser, the technologies at SLAC that make it possible, and the exciting new experiments now underway.

  20. Status of space-based gamma-ray astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations give us a direct view into the most extreme environments of the universe. They help us to study astronomical particle accelerators as supernovae remnants, pulsars, active galaxies or gamma-ray bursts and help us to understand the propagation of cosmic rays through our Milky Way. This article summarizes the status of gamma-ray observations from space; it is the write-up of a rapporteur talk given at the 34th ICRC in The Hague, The Netherlands. The primary instrument used in the presented studies is the Large Area Telescope on-board the Fermi Spacecraft, which images the whole gamma-ray sky at photon energies between 20 MeV and 2 TeV. The Fermi mission is currently in its 8th year of observations. This article will review many of the exciting discoveries made in this time, focusing on the most recent ones.

  1. Constraints on jet X-ray emission in low/hard state X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-31

    We show that the combination of the similarities between the X-ray properties of low luminosity accreting black holes and accreting neutron stars, combined with the differences in their radio properties argues that the X-rays from these systems are unlikely to be formed in the relativistic jets. Specifically, the spectra of extreme island state neutron stars and low/hard state black holes are known to be indistinguishable, while the power spectra from these systems are known to show only minor differences beyond what would be expected from scaling the characteristic variability frequencies by the mass of the compact object. The spectral and temporal similarities thus imply a common emission mechanism that has only minor deviations from having all key parameters scaling linearly with the mass of the compact object, while we show that this is inconsistent with the observations that the radio powers of neutron stars are typically about 30 times lower than those of black holes at the same X-ray luminosity. We also show that an abrupt luminosity change would be expected when a system makes a spectral state transition from a radiatively inefficient jet dominated accretion flow to a thin disk dominated flow, but that such a change is not seen.

  2. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori; Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (?E/E ? 5 × 10{sup ?3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ?3 × 10{sup ?3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  3. Potential Gamma-ray Emissions from Low-Mass X-ray Binary Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-01-01

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from jets of the low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, dynamics of jets are dominated by the magnetic and proton-matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4. The results can not only reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339-4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by Fermi and CTA telescopes. The future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, w...

  4. Constraints on Very High Energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Parkinson, P M S; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Milagro is, thus, uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Twenty-five satellite-triggered GRBs occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2001. We have searched for counterparts to these GRBs and found no significant emission from any of the burst positions. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light, detections are only expected to be possible for redshifts less than ~0.5. Three of the GRBs studied have measured redshifts. GRB 010921 has a redshift low ...

  5. Constraints on Very High Energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; D. G. Coyne; T. DeYoung; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; L. A. Kelley; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; D. A. Williams; M. E. Wilson; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2005-03-11

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Milagro is, thus, uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Twenty-five satellite-triggered GRBs occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2001. We have searched for counterparts to these GRBs and found no significant emission from any of the burst positions. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light, detections are only expected to be possible for redshifts less than ~0.5. Three of the GRBs studied have measured redshifts. GRB 010921 has a redshift low enough (0.45) to allow an upper limit on the fluence to place an observational constraint on potential GRB models.

  6. Neutrino and cosmic-ray release from gamma-ray bursts: Time-dependent simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Mészáros, Peter, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We revisit the neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) production from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with time-dependent simulations for the proton-induced cascades. This method can generate self-consistent photon, neutrino, and escaped neutron spectra. To obtain the integrated background spectra, we take into account the distributions of the burst luminosity and pulse duration timescale. A benchmark case with standard GRB luminosity function, a bulk Lorentz factor ? = 300, and a proton to gamma-ray luminosity fraction f{sub p} = 10 is consistent with both the neutrino upper limits and the observed UHECR intensity at ?10{sup 20} eV, while requiring a different type of UHECR source at the ankle. For the benchmark case, the GRBs in the bright end of the luminosity function, which contribute most of the neutrinos, have their photon spectrum substantially distorted by secondary photons. Such bright GRBs are few in number, and reducing their f{sub p} eliminates the distortion and reduces the neutrino production. Even if we neglect the contribution of the brightest GRBs, the UHECR production rate at energies corresponding to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin limit is almost unchanged. These nominal GRB models, especially with L {sub iso} ? 10{sup 53} erg s{sup –1}, appear to meet the current constraints as far as being candidate UHECR sources above the ankle energy.

  7. Exploring the Gamma Ray Horizon with the next generation of Gamma Ray Telescopes. Part 2: Extracting cosmological parameters from the observation of gamma-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Blanch; M. Martinez

    2004-06-02

    The potential of the new generation Cherenkov Telescopes to measure the energy spectrum of both, the already established extragalactic very high energy gamma-ray emitters and the best very high energy candidates from the EGRET catalogue is discussed. By a realistic simulation of the analysis of the expected extrapolated energy spectra, it is shown that the foreseen capability and precision of these instrument to measure the Gamma Ray Horizon may open the door to competitive measurements of the cosmological parameters.

  8. SWIFT AND XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXTRAORDINARY GAMMA-RAY BURST 060729: MORE THAN 125 DAYS OF X-RAY AFTERGLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    SWIFT AND XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXTRAORDINARY GAMMA-RAY BURST 060729: MORE THAN 125 DAYS:1 and absorption column density of 1 ; 1021 cmÃ?2 . Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- X-rays: bursts Online material: color figure 1. INTRODUCTION Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions

  9. THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fynbo, Johan

    THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST L Received 2002 January 16; accepted 2002 June 8 ABSTRACT The gamma-ray burst GRB 000210 had the highest: observations -- gamma-rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION It is observationally well established that about half

  10. Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X-ray Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X@iep.physik.uni-essen.de Abstract. In the last few years, bent crystal X-ray mirrors have played an important role in time, for example, with the help of toroidally bent crystals which allow a monochromatic point-to-point imaging

  11. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2269 Preliminary Evidence for TeV Gamma Ray Emission from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2269 Preliminary Evidence for TeV Gamma Ray Emission from of view results in a higher sensitivity to the diffuse emission from the galaxy com- pared to previous experiments in the same energy band. Preliminary evidence for TeV gamma emission from the galactic plane using

  12. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4065 The Cosmic Ray Shadows of the Moon and the Sun De-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4065 The Cosmic Ray Shadows of the Moon and the Sun De of the data shows that the shadows of the sun and moon have each been detected with high significances of the sun is significantly weaker than that of the moon. As expected, the measured positions of the deficits

  13. X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND ANIL BHARDWAJ extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany 6 Applied Physics Laboratory, John Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 planets Jupiter and Saturn in the energy range of 0.2-2 keV. These flares are found to occur in tandem

  14. Millimeter, Microwave, Hard X--ray and Soft X--ray Observations of Energetic Electron Populations in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Millimeter, Microwave, Hard X--ray and Soft X--ray Observations of Energetic Electron Populations in Solar Flares M. R. Kundu 1 , S. M. White 1 , N. Gopalswamy 1 and J. Lim 1,2 1 Dept. of Astronomy, Univ. of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 2 Solar Astronomy 264--33, Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125 Submitted

  15. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  16. LINE BROADENING EFFECTS IN X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF AIR PARTICULATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, B.H.

    2012-01-01

    X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF AIR PARTICULATES B. H.Ray Powder Diffraction Analysis Of Air Particulates* B.H. 0X-Ray Powder Diffraction Analysis of Air Particulates* B.H.

  17. PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO HADRONIC CASCADES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO HADRONIC CASCADES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO...

  18. X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumental drifts, and systematic errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumentalUSA Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaland reflecting x-ray optics suitable for micro- and nano-

  19. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

  20. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  1. GRB 020410: A Gamma-ray burst afterglow discovered by its supernova light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Training Network “Gamma-Ray Bursts: An Enigma and a Tool”,Journal GRB 020410: A Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow DiscoveredSubject headings: gamma rays: bursts – supernova: general

  2. Cyclotron line and wind studies of galactic high mass X- ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suchy, Slawomir

    2011-01-01

    missions detected Gamma Ray Burst afterglows and discoveredUS launched the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission (Gehrels etal. , 2004) to study gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Studies of Rapidly Evolving Nanoscale Interfacial Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yeling

    2013-01-01

    Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.grazing incidence x-ray and neutron scattering from ordered

  4. Analysis of Order Formation in Block Copolymer Thin Films Using Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virgili, Justin M.; Tao, Yuefei; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of X-Ray and Neutron Scattering in Polymer Science.µ t for X-ray and neutron scattering experiments is unity;18 In classical scattering of light, X-rays or neutrons the

  5. X-ray scattering studies of structure and dynamics of surfaces and interfaces of polymeric liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Evanescent X-ray and Neutron Scattering. Springer-Verlag,Methods of X-ray and neutron scattering in polymer science.Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.

  6. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, P.

    2010-01-01

    with polarized soft X-ray photons Peter Fischer and Mi -polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-rayhigh intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of

  7. Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01

    2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

  8. Long gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have different environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    V. et al. Host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts: Spectral energyal. Are the hosts of gamma-ray bursts sub-luminous and blueSupernova Light in Gamma- Ray Burst Afterglows. Astrophys.

  9. The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

  10. A multivariate spatial interpolation of airborne -ray data using the geological constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    A multivariate spatial interpolation of airborne -ray data using the geological constraints Enrico: Multivariate analysis Airborne -ray spectrometry Collocated cokriging interpolator Elba Island Natural (Italy) obtained with a multivariate spatial interpolation of airborne -ray data using the constraints

  11. A New Scheme for Stigmatic X-ray Imaging with Large Magnification...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F; Beiersdorfer, P; Wang, E; Sanchez del Rio, M; Caughey, T A 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY X-ray Imaging X-ray Imaging This paper describes a new x-ray scheme for...

  12. X-ray and soft gamma-ray behaviour of the Galactic source 1E 1743.1-2843

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Del Santo; L. Sidoli; A. Bazzano; M. Cocchi; G. De Cesare; A. Paizis; P. Ubertini

    2005-11-10

    The X-ray persistent source 1E 1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Centre region, has been detected by all X-ray telescope above 2 keV, whereas it is not visible in the soft X-rays (i. e. Rosat) because of the high column density along the line-of-sight. Moreover, the nature of this source remains still unknown. The gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL has long observed the Galactic Centre region in the framework of the Core Programme. We report on results of two years of INTEGRAL observations of 1E 1743.1--2843 detected for the first time in the soft gamma-ray band. Since the source does not show any evidence for strong variability, we present the broad-band spectral analysis using not simultaneous XMM-Newton observations.

  13. NEUTRINO-COOLED ACCRETION MODEL WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING FOR X-RAY FLARES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Yang; Gu Weimin; Liu Tong; Lu Jufu, E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-08-20

    The neutrino-cooled accretion disk, which was proposed to work as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts, encounters difficulty in interpreting the X-ray flares after the prompt gamma-ray emission. In this paper, the magnetic coupling (MC) between the inner disk and the central black hole (BH) is taken into consideration. For mass accretion rates around 0.001 {approx} 0.1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, our results show that the luminosity of neutrino annihilation can be significantly enhanced due to the coupling effects. As a consequence, after the gamma-ray emission, a remnant disk with mass M{sub disk} {approx}< 0.5 M{sub Sun} may power most of the observed X-ray flares with the rest frame duration less than 100 s. In addition, a comparison between the MC process and the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is shown on the extraction of BH rotational energy.

  14. A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Jones

    2002-02-04

    Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources in the presence of significant astrophysical background radiation. The analysis was performed on six pulsars and three pulsar candidates. The three brightest pulsars, Crab, Vela, and Geminga, were readily identified, and would have been detected independently in the EGRET data without knowledge of the pulse period. No significant pulsation was detected in the three pulsar candidates. Eighteen X-ray binaries were examined. None showed any evidence of periodicity. In addition, methods for calculating the detection threshold of periodic flux modulation were developed. The future hopes of gamma-ray astronomy lie in the development of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST. Part II describes the development and results of the particle track reconstruction software for a GLAST science prototype instrument beam test. The Kalman filtering method of track reconstruction is introduced and implemented. Monte Carlo simulations, very similar to those used for the full GLAST instrument, were performed to predict the instrumental response of the prototype. The prototype was tested in a gamma-ray beam at SLAC. The reconstruction software was used to determine the incident gamma-ray direction. It was found that the simulations did an excellent job of representing the actual instrument response.

  15. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R. B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Molnar, G. L.; Revay, Zs.; Belgya, T. [Institute of Isotope and Surface Chemistry, H-1525, Budapest (Hungary); McNabb, D. P.; Sleaford, B. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2006-03-13

    The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF), a new database of prompt and delayed neutron capture {gamma} ray cross sections, has been prepared as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project to develop a 'Database of Prompt Gamma-rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis'. Recent elemental {gamma}-ray cross-section measurements performed with the guided neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor have been combined with data from the literature to produce the EGAF database. EGAF contains thermal cross sections for {approx_equal}35,000 prompt and delayed {gamma}-rays from 262 isotopes. New precise total thermal radiative cross sections have been derived for many isotopes from the primary and secondary gamma-ray cross sections and additional level scheme data. An IAEA TECDOC describing the EGAF evaluation and tabulating the most prominent {gamma}-rays will be published in 2004. The TECDOC will include a CD-ROM containing the EGAF database in both ENSDF and tabular formats with an interactive viewer for searching and displaying the data. The Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory continues to maintain and update the EGAF file. These data are available on the Internet from both the IAEA and Isotopes Project websites.

  16. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2012-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L{sub x} ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v{sub {infinity}}). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L{sub x} with wind luminosity L{sub wind} = (1/2)M-dot v{sup 2}{sub {infinity}}, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  17. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  18. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  19. The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit o...

  20. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  1. Achieving hard X-ray nanofocusing using a wedged multilayer Laue...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anticipate that continuous development on wedged MLLs will advance x-ray nanofocusing optics to new frontiers and enrich capabilities and opportunities for hard X-ray microscopy....

  2. ETTORE MAJORANA FOUNDATION AND CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC CULTURE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF COSMIC-RAY ASTROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    PropagationofCosmicRays-1986CosmicGammaRaysandCosmicRadiation-1988CosmicRays, Supernovae,andtheInterstellarMedium-1990Particle

  3. ETTORE MAJORANA FOUNDATION AND CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC CULTURE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF COSMIC-RAY ASTROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    RadiationinContemporaryAstrophysics-1984GenesisandPropagationofCosmicRays-1986CosmicGammaRaysandCosmicRadiation-1988CosmicRays, Supernovae,andtheInterstellarMedium

  4. Constraints on the Cosmic-Ray Density Gradient Beyond the Solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Constraints on the Cosmic-Ray Density Gradient Beyond the Solar Circle From Fermi Gamma-Ray Observations of the Third Galactic Quadrant Citation Details...

  5. The electromagnetic model of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Lyutikov

    2005-12-13

    I describe electromagnetic model of gamma ray bursts and contrast its main properties and predictions with hydrodynamic fireball model and its magnetohydrodynamical extension. The electromagnetic model assumes that rotational energy of a relativistic, stellar-mass central source (black-hole--accretion disk system or fast rotating neutron star) is converted into magnetic energy through unipolar dynamo mechanism, propagated to large distances in a form of relativistic, subsonic, Poynting flux-dominated wind and is dissipated directly into emitting particles through current-driven instabilities. Thus, there is no conversion back and forth between internal and bulk energies as in the case of fireball model. Collimating effects of magnetic hoop stresses lead to strongly non-spherical expansion and formation of jets. Long and short GRBs may develop in a qualitatively similar way, except that in case of long bursts ejecta expansion has a relatively short, non-relativistic, strongly dissipative stage inside the star. Electromagnetic and fireball models (as well as strongly and weakly magnetized fireballs) lead to different early afterglow dynamics, before deceleration time. Finally, I discuss the models in view of latest observational data in the Swift era.

  6. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nosek, Dalibor; Vícha, Jakub; Trávní?ek, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the sup...

  7. Deep x-ray lithography for micromechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guckel, H. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Extensions of the German LIGA process have brought about fabrication capability suitable for cost effective production of precision engineered components. The process attributes allow fabrication of mechanical components which are not capable of being made via conventional subtractive machining methods. Two process improvements have been responsible for this extended capability which involve the areas of thick photoresist application and planarization via precision lapping. Application of low-stress x-ray photoresist has been achieved using room temperature solvent bonding of a preformed photoresist sheet. Precision diamond lapping and polishing has provided a flexible process for the planarization of a wide variety of electroplated metals in the presence of photoresist. Exposure results from the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that structural heights of several millimeter and above are possible. The process capabilities are also well suited for microactuator fabrication. Linear and rotational magnetic microactuators have been constructed which use coil winding technology with LIGA fabricated coil forms. Actuator output forces of 1 milliNewton have been obtained with power dissipation on the order of milliWatts. A rotational microdynamometer system which is capable of measuring torque-speed data is also discussed.

  8. X-ray spectral states of microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Malzac; Renaud Belmont

    2008-10-25

    We discuss the origin of the dramatically different X-ray spectral shapes observed in the Low Hard State (LHS: dominated by thermal comptonisation) and the High Soft State (HSS: dominated by the accretion disc thermal emission and non-thermal comptonisation in the corona). We present numerical simulations using a new code accounting for the so-called synchrotron boiler effect. These numerical simulations when compared to the data allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona. For the hard state of Cygnus X-1 we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

  9. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, D.

    1991-01-01

    We review the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on the rare earth metal holmium. When the incident incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L{sub III} absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering and resonant integer harmonics are observed. These results are analyzed within the theory of x-ray resonance exchange scattering assuming electric dipole (2p {yields} 5d) and quadrupole (2p {yields} 4f) transitions among atomic orbitals. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  11. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  12. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  13. Optical and X-ray Variability of Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, A C

    2015-01-01

    Here we report our recent results of variability studies in optical and X-ray bands of three blazars namely 3C 273, PKS 2155 - 304 and BL Lacertae with XMM-Newton. We found large amplitude optical to X-rays variability in 3C 273, and PKS 2155 - 304 on year time scale. In 3C 273, we noticed that synchrotron cooling and particle acceleration are at work at different epoch of observations. In PKS 2155 - 304, spectral energy distribution from optical to X-ray is fitted with LPPL (log parabolic + power law) model. In BL Lacertae, optical flux and degree of polarization were anti-correlated.

  14. A 0535+26: an X-ray/Optical Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camero-Arranz, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Jenke, P; Coe, M J; Steele, I; Caballero, I; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Kretschmar, P; Suso, J; McBride, V A; Rodriguez, J

    2011-01-01

    We compiled X-ray and Optical observations of the accreting X-ray binary system A 0535+262 since its discovery in 1975, that will allow us to shed light on the unpredictable behavior of this binary system. We present the data in terms of the Be-disk interaction with the neutron star companion. In addition, we show recent results from the continuous monitoring of this source by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor(GBM), on board the Fermi observatory, since its launch in 2008 June 11.

  15. Developing the Theory of Flux Limits from $?$-Ray Cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Cairns

    2007-05-18

    Dark matter annihilation and other processes may precipitate a flux of diffuse ultra-high energy $\\gamma$-rays. These $\\gamma$-rays may be observable in present day experiments which observe diffuse fluxes at the GeV scale. Yet the universe is presently opaque to $\\gamma$-rays above 10 TeV. It is generally assumed that cascade radiation is observable at all high energies, however the disparity in energy from production to observation has important consequences for theoretical flux limits. We detail the physics of cascade radiation development and consider the influence of energy and redshift scale on arbitrary flux limits that result from electromagnetic cascade.

  16. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A., E-mail: a-physics2001@yahoo.com; Tibai, Z. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary) [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Szentagothai Research Centre, University of Pecs, Pecs-7624 (Hungary); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-03-15

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  17. Inversion formulas for the broken-ray Radon transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucia Florescu; Vadim A. Markel; John C. Schotland

    2010-07-23

    We consider the inverse problem of the broken ray transform (sometimes also referred to as the V-line transform). Explicit image reconstruction formulas are derived and tested numerically. The obtained formulas are generalizations of the filtered backprojection formula of the conventional Radon transform. The advantages of the broken ray transform include the possibility to reconstruct the absorption and the scattering coefficients of the medium simultaneously and the possibility to utilize scattered radiation which, in the case of the conventional X-ray tomography, is typically discarded.

  18. Gamma Ray Burst Constraints on Ultraviolet Lorentz Invariance Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tina Kahniashvili; Grigol Gogoberidze; Bharat Ratra

    2006-10-20

    We present a unified general formalism for ultraviolet Lorentz invariance violation (LV) testing through electromagnetic wave propagation, based on both dispersion and rotation measure data. This allows for a direct comparison of the efficacy of different data to constrain LV. As an example we study the signature of LV on the rotation of the polarization plane of $\\gamma$-rays from gamma ray bursts in a LV model. Here $\\gamma$-ray polarization data can provide a strong constraint on LV, 13 orders of magnitude more restrictive than a potential constraint from the rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization proposed by Gamboa, L\\'{o}pez-Sarri\\'{o}n, and Polychronakos (2006).

  19. Laser-Produced Coherent X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Umstadter

    2007-01-31

    We study the generation of x-rays from the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-intense laser pulse either directly or via laser generated ion channels. The laser pulse acts as the accelerator and wiggler leading to an all-optical synchrotron-like x-ray source. The mm sized accelerator and micron-sized wiggler leads to a compact source of high brightness, ultrafast x-rays with applications in relativistic nonlinear optics, ultrafast chemistry, biology, inner-shell electronic processes and phase transitions.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-RayX-RayX-Ray

  1. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  2. Phase Tomography Using X-ray Talbot Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momose, A.; Yashiro, W.; Moritake, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y. [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hattori, T. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2007-01-19

    A biological tomography result obtained with an X-ray Talbot interferometer is reported. An X-ray Talbot interferometer was constructed using an amplitude grating fabricated by X-ray lithography at the LIGA beamline of NewSUBARU and gold electroplating. The pitch and pattern thickness of the grating were 8 {mu}m and 30 {mu}m, respectively. The effective area was 20 x 20 mm2, which was entirely illuminated with a wide beam available at the medium-length beamline 20B2 of SPring-8, allowing the acquisition of a three-dimensional tomogram of almost the whole body of a fish. The resulting image obtained with 17.7 keV X-rays revealed organs with bones in the same view.

  3. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  4. X-ray emission from the terrestrial magnetosheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Ina Picket; Cravens, Thomas Edward

    2003-04-29

    [1] X-rays are generated throughout the terrestrial magnetosheath as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and geocoronal neutrals. The solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited...

  5. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, A; Srivastava, R

    2015-01-01

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  6. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; R. Srivastava

    2015-09-24

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  7. Catching some rays: Organic solar cells make a leap forward ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resources Primer on solar power Solar Car Lesson Plan Catching some rays: Organic solar cells make a leap forward By Jared Sagoff * June 13, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Drawn together by...

  8. Gravitational waves from gamma-ray pulsar glitches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stopnitzky, Elan; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    We use data from pulsar gamma-ray glitches recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope as input to theoretical models of gravitational wave signals the glitches might generate. We find that the typical peak amplitude of the gravity wave signal from gamma-ray pulsar glitches lies between 10{sup –23} and 10{sup –35} in dimensionless units, with peak frequencies in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz, depending on the model. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for all gamma-ray glitches, and discuss detectability with current gravity wave detectors. Our results indicate that the strongest predicted signals are potentially within reach of current detectors, and that pulsar gamma-ray glitches are promising targets for gravity wave searches by current and next-generation detectors.

  9. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  10. Active pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Matthew (Matthew L.)

    2005-01-01

    An active pixel sensor array, APS-1, has been fabricated for the purpose of scientific x-ray detection. This thesis presents the results of testing the device. Alternate design architectures are explored. Recommendations ...

  11. Cosmic ray lithium isotope measurement with AMS-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Feng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The AMS-01 detector measured charged cosmic rays during 10 days on the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1998 and collected 108 events. By identifying 8349 Lithium and 22709 Carbon nuclei from the raw data, this thesis presents ...

  12. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Falanga

    2007-11-07

    I review the properties of three X-ray accreting millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL. Out of seven recently discovered accretion-powered pulsars (one discovered by INTEGRAL), three were observed with the INTEGRAL satellite up to 300 keV. Detailed timing and spectral results will be presented, including data obtained during the most recent outburst of the pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars are key systems to understand the spin and accretion history of neutron stars. They are also a good laboratory in which to study the source spectra, pulse profile, and phase shift between X-ray pulses in different energy ranges which give additional information of the X-ray production processes and emission environment.

  13. What are the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Telling Us?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cosmic ray astronomy. But they are very rare: ~ 1 per square kilometre per century #12;#12;#12;Post 1966 between these two results. Since then the Telescope Array experiment (TA) in Millard County Utah has

  14. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  15. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  16. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cosmic rays interact with Earth's atmosphere -- to do its work, providing a simple, passive system that can be used to thwart nuclear smugglers or look inside the cores of...

  17. X-ray obscuration in local Universe AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Guainazzi

    2006-10-31

    I review the constraints that X-ray observations impose on the physical properties and the geometrical distribution of cold absorbing gas in nearby obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), as well as their implications for AGN structure models.

  18. Prompt fission gamma-ray studies at DANCE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M.. M; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; et al

    2014-11-26

    Measurements of correlated data on prompt-fission ?-rays (PFG) have been carried out for various actinide isotopes in recent years using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a model that conveniently parametrizes the correlated data of ?-ray multiplicity and energy. New results on two- dimensional prompt-fission ?-ray multiplicity versus energy distributions from spontaneous fission on ²?²Cf and neutron-induced fission on 242mAm are presented together with previously obtained results on 233,235U and ²³?Pu. Correlated PFG data from ²?²Cf are also compared to results of the detailed theoretical model developed at LANL,more »for different thresholds of PFG energies. Future plans to measure correlated data on fission fragments, prompt fission neutrons and ?-rays at DANCE are presented.« less

  19. Redshifts of the Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Bagoly; I. Csabai; A. Meszaros; P. Meszaros; I. Horvath; L. G. Balazs; R. Vavrek

    2007-04-06

    The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.

  20. Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when...

  1. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderspek, Roland K.

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified ...

  2. The Ulysses Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranquille, C.; Hurley, K.; Hudson, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Sturrock, P.A. (ed. ) Solar Flares: A Monograph from SkylabSmith E.V.P. : 1963, Solar Flares, Macmillan, New York.Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares Table 1 (Continued. )

  3. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  4. X-Ray Propagation in Tapered Waveguides: Simulation and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    [1,2]. X-ray waveguides (WG) have been designed and fabricated as planar layered systems (1D-WG) [3. The propagation in the stuctures is studied by numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation (PWE), as used

  5. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser...

  6. Introduction to Forward Physics and Cosmic Rays at ISMD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Grothe; F. Hautmann; S. Ostapchenko

    2011-03-30

    We give a brief introduction to the topics discussed at the ISMD 2010 Symposium (Antwerp, 2010) on forward physics at the LHC and its interplay with cosmic rays physics.

  7. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01

    can be used instead of HC FEL. In the following illustra-UM is now tuned for resonant FEL interaction with the 32-nmAttosecond X-Ray Pulses from the FEL Alexander A. Zholents,

  8. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  9. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  10. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly...

  11. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; “BFKL” representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; “DGLAP” representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  12. X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials June 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Imaging and data analysis techniques offer new approach to probing material properties In a new...

  13. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  14. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  15. Nanolensing of gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Walker; Geraint F. Lewis

    2003-02-10

    All quasars vary in their optical flux on a time-scale of years, and it has been proposed that these variations are principally due to gravitational lensing by a cosmologically distributed population of planetary mass objects. This interpretation has implications for the observable properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) -- as a source expands across the nano-arcsecond caustic network, variability is expected -- and data on GRBs can be used to test the proposed model of quasar variability. Here we employ an ultra-relativistic blast-wave model of the source, with no intrinsic variations, to study the effects of nanolensing on GRBs. Taken in isolation the light-curves of the caustic crossings are predictable, and we find that a subset of the predicted light-curves (the image-annihilating fold crossings) resemble the ``pulses'' which are commonly seen in long GRBs. Furthermore, for sources at high redshift the expected time between caustic crossings is of order seconds, comparable to the observed time between pulses. These points suggest that it might be possible to model some of the observed variations of GRBs in terms of nanolensing; however, our simulated light-curves exhibit a small depth of modulation compared to what is observed. This means that the GRB data do not significantly constrain the quasar nanolensing model; it also means that the simplest nanolensing model cannot explain the observed GRB ``pulses''. Viable nanolensing models for pulses probably require a large external beam shear. If a viable model can be constructed it would effect a considerable simplification in source modelling and, ironically, it would explain why no macro-lensed GRBs have been identified to date. (Abridged)

  16. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting that iodine contrast based imaging and visualization of interventional devices could potentially be optimized for dose using similar x-ray beam spectra.

  17. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Turman, Bobby N. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaye, Ronald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  18. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Cheng; V. V. Usov

    2006-11-20

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  19. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, K S

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  20. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong (China); Usov, V. V. [Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2006-12-15

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  1. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2010-01-08

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  2. Hyperstars - Main Origin of Short Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnon Dar

    2005-09-09

    The first well-localized short-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 050509b, GRB 050709 and GRB 050724, could have been the narrowly beamed initial spike of a burst/hyper flare of soft gamma ray repeaters (SGRs) in host galaxies at cosmological distances. Such bursts are expected if SGRs are young hyperstars, i.e. neutron stars where a considerable fraction of their neutrons have converted to hyperons and/or strange quark matter.

  3. Gamma Ray Bursts as Probes of Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvi Piran

    2004-07-21

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense pulses of $\\gamma$-rays arriving from random directions in the sky. Several years ago Amelino-Camelia et al. pointed out that a comparison of time of arrival of photons at different energies from a GRB could be used to measure (or obtain a limit on) possible deviations from a constant speed of light at high photons energies. I review here our current understanding of GRBs and reconsider the possibility of performing these observations.

  4. New focusing multilayer structures for X-ray plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibishkin, M S; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, N N; Chernov, V V; Chkhalo, N I; Kazakov, E D; Shevelko, A P

    2008-02-28

    New focusing short-period multilayer structures are developed which opens up wide possibilities for X-ray and VUV spectroscopy. Multilayer structures are deposited on a flat surface of a mica crystal which is then bent to a small-radius cylinder. The use of this structure in a von Hamos spectrometer for X-ray laser plasma diagnostics is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. THE SWIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST MISSION N. Gehrels,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ian Andrew

    THE SWIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST MISSION N. Gehrels,1 G. Chincarini,2,3 P. Giommi,4 K. O. Mason,5 J. A. E. Marshall,1 P. Me´sza´ros,6 P. W. A. Roming,6 L. Angelini,1,10 L. M. Barbier,1 T. Belloni,2 S The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB

  6. Fusion of strings and cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Armesto; M. A. Braun; E. G. Ferreiro; C. Pajares; Yu. M. Shabelski

    1996-02-13

    It is shown that the fusion of strings is a source of particle production in nucleus--nucleus collisions outside the kinematical limits of nucleon--nucleon collisions. This fact, together with another effect of string fusion, the reduction of multiplicities, sheds some light on two of the main problems of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, the chemical composition and the energy of the most energetic detected cosmic rays.

  7. The University of Durham Mark 6 VHE gamma ray telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, P. M.; Dickinson, M. R.; Dipper, N. A.; Holder, J.; Kendall, T. R.; McComb, T. J. L.; Orford, K. J.; Rayner, S. M.; Roberts, I. D.; Shaw, S. E.; Turver, K. E.

    1997-05-10

    The operation of the University of Durham Mark 6 atmospheric Cerenkov telescope is discussed. The telescope has been used to detect gamma rays at energies {>=}150 GeV and to achieve good discrimination between gamma ray and hadron initiated showers, using both conventional imaging and novel fluctuation measures. The telescope was commissioned in 1995 and a description of its operation is presented. Verification of the performance during observations of PSR B1706-44 is described.

  8. A Directional Gamma-Ray Detector Based on Scintillator Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, D; Boyle, P; MacLeod, A M L

    2015-01-01

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  9. Cosmogenic Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Interactions with Extragalactic Infrared Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel De Marco; Todor Stanev; F. W. Stecker

    2005-12-19

    We discuss the production of cosmogenic neutrinos on extragalactic infrared photons in a model of its cosmological evolution. The relative importance of these infrared photons as a target for proton interactions is significant, especially in the case of steep injection spectra of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. For an E$^{-2.5}$ cosmic ray injection spectrum, for example, the event rate of neutrinos of energy above 1 PeV is more than doubled.

  10. Relativity at Action or Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvi Piran

    1996-07-08

    Gamma ray Bursts (GRBs) - short bursts of few hundred keV $\\gamma$-rays - have fascinated astronomers since their accidental discovery in the sixties. GRBs were ignored by most relativists who did not expect that they are associated with any relativistic phenomenon. The recent observations of the BATSE detector on the Compton GRO satellite have revolutionized our ideas on these bursts and the picture that emerges shows that GRBs are the most relativistic objects discovered so far.

  11. Spectral Properties of Black Holes in Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2005-01-14

    Black holes are the most compact objects in the universe. Therefore, matter accreting onto is likely to radiate photons of energy comparable to very high gravitational potential energy. We discuss the nature of the emitted radiation in X-rays and gamma-rays from black hole candidates. We present theoretical solutions which comprise both Keplerian and sub-Keplerian components and suggest that shocks in accretion and outflows

  12. The geometry of sound rays in a wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Gibbons; C. M. Warnick

    2011-02-11

    We survey the close relationship between sound and light rays and geometry. In the case where the medium is at rest, the geometry is the classical geometry of Riemann. In the case where the medium is moving, the more general geometry known as Finsler geometry is needed. We develop these geometries ab initio, with examples, and in particular show how sound rays in a stratified atmosphere with a wind can be mapped to a problem of circles and straight lines.

  13. Gamma-ray emission from binaries in context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubus, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    More than a dozen binary systems are now established as sources of variable, high energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) gamma rays. Five are also established sources of very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma rays. The mechanisms behind gamma-ray emission in binaries are very diverse. My current understanding is that they divide up into four types of systems: gamma-ray binaries, powered by pulsar rotation; microquasars, powered by accretion onto a black hole or neutron star; novae, powered by thermonuclear runaway on a white dwarf; colliding wind binaries, powered by stellar winds from massive stars. Some of these types had long been suspected to emit gamma rays (microquasars), others have taken the community by surprise (novae). My purpose here is to provide a brief review of the current status of gamma-ray emission from binaries, in the context of related objects where similar mechanisms are at work (pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants).

  14. Evaluation of partial coherence correction in X-ray ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Parks, Daniel; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kevan, Stephen D.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-02-23

    Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CDI) and X-ray ptychography both heavily rely on the high degree of spatial coherence of the X-ray illumination for sufficient experimental data quality for reconstruction convergence. Nevertheless, the majority of the available synchrotron undulator sources have a limited degree of partial coherence, leading to reduced data quality and a lower speckle contrast in the coherent diffraction patterns. It is still an open question whether experimentalists should compromise the coherence properties of an X-ray source in exchange for a higher flux density at a sample, especially when some materials of scientific interest are relatively weak scatterers. Amore »previous study has suggested that in CDI, the best strategy for the study of strong phase objects is to maintain a high degree of coherence of the illuminating X-rays because of the broadening of solution space resulting from the strong phase structures. In this article, we demonstrate the first systematic analysis of the effectiveness of partial coherence correction in ptychography as a function of the coherence properties, degree of complexity of illumination (degree of phase diversity of the probe) and sample phase complexity. We have also performed analysis of how well ptychographic algorithms refine X-ray probe and complex coherence functions when those variables are unknown at the start of reconstructions, for noise-free simulated data, in the case of both real-valued and highly-complex objects.« less

  15. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Joseph [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida, United States

    2010-01-08

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  16. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  17. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  18. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bonito; S. Orlando; G. Peres; F. Favata; R. Rosner

    2006-10-17

    Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. We performed an extensive exploration of a wide space of the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. We performed a set of bidimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely the thermal conduction and the radiative losses. Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular we find that the case of a protostellar jet less dense than the ambient medium reproduces well the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (vsh = 500 km/s), detectable with Chandra. Furthermore our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  19. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  20. Cluster of Gamma-ray Bursts - Image of a Source. Catalog of Clusters (Sources) of Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kuznetsov

    2001-11-01

    The clusters of gamma-ray bursts are considered which are assumed to be images of the repeated gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources. It is shown, that localization of the cosmic gamma-ray burst sources (GBS) is determined by the clusters of GRBs. About 100 candidates in sources are presented in the form of the catalog, which is compiled relying on the base of the BATSE data up to middle of 2000. Gamma-ray bursts (from 5 to 13) of a cluster that display a source do not coincide in their position. The catalog table containing basic information about the GRB sources yields the possibility to research the GBS properties and their identification. The birth of GRBs in the clusters allows predicting the appearance of GRBs both in time and space. Most general properties of the supposed GRB sources are discussed. An attempt to compile the first GRB source catalog is made.