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1

Wendel Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wendel Geothermal Area Wendel Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wendel Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.35734979,"lon":-120.2549785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Wendel, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wendel, California: Energy Resources Wendel, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Wendel, California Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5573472 Coordinates 40.34823°, -120.23355° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.34823,"lon":-120.23355,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

The Honorable Aaron Thompson.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\ \ Departmet? of Energy Washington. DC 20585 j FEB.16 1gg5 ' ~.. The Honorable Aaron Thompson. 6th Market Streets ,, Camden, New, Jersey 08101 :., , _ I / Dear Mayor Thompson: , . . . ...: _ ,. Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has,announced a new.approach to a the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the pub1 support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed , related to then former New York Shipbuilding'corp. site in your juri that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies.- This info provided for your information, use, and retention. DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsibl identification of sites used by DOE's predecessor agencies', determi current radiological condition and, 'where it has authority; perform

4

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

5

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

6

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

7

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

8

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

9

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

10

LS-13 K. Thompson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K. Thompson February 19, 1985 Second Designs and Cost Estimates for Storage Ring Dipoles and Quadrupoles When the first designs for these magnets, summarized in LS-12, were reviewed, it was decided to change two of the design criteria. These new criteria are: 1. Retain the original aperture dimensions but increase the maximum operating energy by 25%; and 2. Permit ALL insertion device straight sections to be able to accept either type of device. The result of No. 1 above is to increase the flux density in the yoke at the maximum operating point and increase the coil size for the dipole magnet. The quadrupole yokes were increased in size to keep the flux density less than 15kG but the coils were not changed. When applying criteria 2. above, five different quadrupoles immediately

11

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Abstract The fluid chemistry of the geothermal system that feed Amedee and Wendel Hot Springs in eastern California is complex. Two thermal fluids have been identified based on the concentrations of the conservative elements C1 and B, fluid enthalpies, and the application of chemical geothermometers. One is characterized by temperatures above 120°C and a TDS content of 1300 ppm, and will be used by GeoProducts Corporation to produce electricity. The second did lower in temperature, 75°C, and has a TDS content of 650 ppm. This fluid may be used fore direct heat application at the Susanville

12

Principal facts for a gravity survey of Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The observed gravity, theoretical gravity, free-air correction, Bouguer correction, and simple Bouguer anomaly are given for 29 station locations in the Wendel-Amedee known resource area, California. (WHK)

Peterson, D.L.; Hassemer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Robert J. Thompson | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert J. Thompson Robert J. Thompson About Us Robert J. Thompson - EMAB Board Member Robert J. Thompson is Chairman of the Energy Communities Alliance, a national coalition of cities and counties located adjacent to Department of Energy facilities. Mr. Thompson has also served on the Richland City Council since January 1994 and as Mayor from January 2000 to January 2004. He received a B.A. in Political Science from Washington State University and a J.D. from Willamette Law School. He is currently in private practice. Mr. Thompson has been a member of the Washington State Trial Lawyers Association, the Washington Defenders Association, the Western State Trial Lawyers Association, and the National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys. He is past President of the Benton Franklin County Health

14

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

15

Siting and drilling recommendations for a geothermal exploration well, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available exploration data relevant to the GeoProducts leasehold in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA are reviewed and interpreted. On the basis of this interpretation, locations and procedures are recommended for drilling geothermal production wells capable of supplying fluid at a temperature of 250/sup 0/F or greater. The following are covered: stratigraphy and geological history, geologic structure, geochemistry, geophysics, temperature-gradient data, and fluid quality. (MHR)

McNitt, J.R.; Wilde, W.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Larry Thompson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells. The EMBO Journal 20:5513-5520. Takata, M., Sasaki, M.S., Tachiiri, S., Fukushima, T., Sonoda, E., Schild, D., Thompson, L.H., and Takeda, S. (2001). Chromosome...

17

Philip Thompson: Pages from a Scientist's Life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Philip Thompson (192294) pioneered innovative approaches to weather analysis and prediction that blended determinism and probability. He generally posed problems in terms of simplified dynamics that were amenable to analytic solution. His ...

John M. Lewis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thompsons, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thompsons, Texas: Energy Resources Thompsons, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.491019°, -95.619634° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.491019,"lon":-95.619634,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

Brad Thompson Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: Brad Thompson Company Name Brad Thompson Company Address 12517 131st Ct NE Place Kirkland, Washington Zip 98034 Region Pacific Northwest Area Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 1978 Phone number 4258255800 Website http://www.bradtco.com Notes Energy developer Coordinates 47.7126882°, -122.1662162° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7126882,"lon":-122.1662162,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thompson Technology Industries TTI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TTI TTI Jump to: navigation, search Name Thompson Technology Industries (TTI) Place Novato, California Zip 94949 Sector Solar Product Designer and manufacturer of solar tracking and roof mounting systems. Coordinates 38.106075°, -122.567889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.106075,"lon":-122.567889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable for the purpose of siting an exploration drill hole. Drilling of reservoir confirmation well WEN-1 took place from August 1 to September 22, 1981. Pulse and long-term flow testing subjected the reservoir to a maximum flow of 680 gpm for 75 hours. At that rate, the well exhibited a productivity index of 21.6 gpm/psi; the reservoir transmissivity was 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ md-ft/cp. The maximum bottom-hole temperature recorded during testing was 251/sup 0/F. The conceptual model of the geothermal resource at Wendel Hot Springs calls on ground water, originating in the neighboring volcanic highlands, descending through jointed and otherwise permeable rocks into the granitic basement. Once in the basement, the fluid is heated as it continues its descent, and lateral movement as dictated by the hydrologic gradient. It then rises to the discharge point along transmissive faults. 45 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.; Adams, M.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Siemens Building Technologies and Thompson School District: SPP Success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siemens Building Technologies and Thompson School District: SPP Siemens Building Technologies and Thompson School District: SPP Success Story Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

24

Application of the Knox-Thompson method to solar observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Knox-Thompson (KT) technique is well suited for speckle imaging of an extended source, such as the sun. Other techniques require that the extent of the observed object is restricted to the field size (e.g., the Fienup technique) or even to much less than the seeing disk size (e.g., shift-and-add). The Knox-Thompson technique, as well as the speckle-masking technique, are more general in that they make no assumptions about the object size. Because of its relative simplicity, the KT technique has been applied to solar data. A KT speckle-imaging program has been dedicated to solar data analysis. The program, named KISIP, now runs on the NSO/Sacramento Peak VAX 750 under 4.3 BSD UNIX. Major features of the code are: combination of the Labeyrie (1970, for Fourier-amplitude recovery) - and Knox-Thompson (phase recovery) techniques; incorporation of the spectral-ratio technique to correct Fourier amplitudes for seeing attenuation; and incorporation of a phase consistency test to estimate the accuracy to which phases can be reconstructed from Knox-Thompson bispectra.

Luhe, O.V.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Two-and Three-Dimensional Modelling Studies of the Big Thompson Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Thompson storm occurred on 31 July1 August 1976 over Big Thompson Canyon, Colorado, when a secondary cold frontal surge was accelerated and reached the foothills of the Front Range. Two- and three-dimensional moist compressible cloud ...

Masanori Yoshizaki; Yoshi Ogura

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Tanglewilde-Thompson Place, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanglewilde-Thompson Place, Washington: Energy Resources Tanglewilde-Thompson Place, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.0531597°, -122.7822066° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.0531597,"lon":-122.7822066,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Adaptation of P.D. Thompson's Scheme to the Constraint of Potential vorticity Conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical adjustment scheme of P.D. Thompson (1969) has been adapted to the two-parameter baroclinic model which has potential vorticity as the constraint. In contrast to Thompson's approach, which used a differential-difference form of the ...

John M. Lewis

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geothermometry At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion, we favor a model in which thermal water rises somewhere between Howard and Seigler Springs. At Howard Springs we see evidence for the most representative deep thermal water because the C1 is elevated (highest measured C1 concentrations occur at Howard Springs). Moreover, the Na-Li, Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers suggest temperatures greater than 240 degrees C. References J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser, W. C.

29

The Extension of P.D. Thompson' Scheme to Multiple Times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P.D. Thompson devised a scheme to correct imperfect analyses of a conservative quantity at two observation times. His scheme has been extended to include a sequence of observation times. When the times are equally spaced, the governing adjustment ...

John M. Lewis; Lee Panetta

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Isotopic Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Deuterium and oxygen- 18 values of the thermal waters indicate that they recharged locally and became K271enriched in oxygen-18 by exchange with rock. The isotopic composition of the waters indicates that they are of meteoric origin. A plot of deuterium versus chloride indicates that as the chloride concentration increases, the deuterium composition remains essentially constant. A plot of oxygen-18 versus chloride shows that the

31

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson Noelle profound impacts on the other. Therefore, it is important to consider both U.S. Regional Energy Policy Energy Policy Scenarios Criteria Pollution Impacts on Air Quality one realm can have profound impacts

32

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1992) Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion, we favor a model in which thermal water rises somewhere between Howard and Seigler Springs. At Howard Springs we see evidence for the most representative deep thermal water because the C1 is elevated (highest measured C1 concentrations occur at Howard Springs). Moreover, the Na-Li, Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers suggest temperatures greater than 240 degrees C. References J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser, W. C.

33

B I OENV I RONMENTAL FEATURES OF THE OGOTORUK CREEK AREA, CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B I OENV I RONMENTAL FEATURES B I OENV I RONMENTAL FEATURES OF THE OGOTORUK CREEK AREA, CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA A First Summary by The Committee on Environmental Studies for Project Chariot . . December 1960 r Division of Biology and Medicine, AEC Washington, D. C. IT U S WEGWS LIBIA3"b This page intentionally left blank NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS -PEACE UL APPLICATIONS . . BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE BIOENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES OF THE OGOTORUK CREEK AREA . . CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA A F i r s t Sumnary The C o d t t e e on E n v i r o n m e n t a l S t u d i e s for P r o j e c t C h a r i o t PLllWSHARE PROGRAM THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION December, 1 9 6 0 MAP OF ALASKA - CHARIOT LOCATION SCALE IN MILES . 111*1.1) , FOREWORD . . This summary is based on the reports on more than 30 bioenvironmental investigations carried out' in the Cape Thompson area in Alaska since

34

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Thompson Falls Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a preliminary mitigation and enhancement plan for the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. It discusses options available to provide wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501). The options focus on mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat losses attributable to the construction of the hydroelectric project. These losses were previously estimated from the best available information concerning the degree of negative and positive impacts to target wildlife species (Wood and Olsen 1984). Criteria by which the mitigation alternatives were evaluated were the same as those used to assess the impacts identified in the Phase I document (Wood and Olsen 1984). They were also evaluated according to feasibility and cost effectiveness. This document specifically focuses on mitigation for target species which were identified during Phase I (Wood and Olsen 1984). It was assumed mitigation and enhancement for the many other target wildlife species impacted by the hydroelectric developments will occur as secondary benefits. The recommended mitigation plan includes two recommended mitigation projects: (1) development of wildlife protection and enhancement plans for MPC lands and (2) strategies to protect several large islands upstream of the Thompson Falls reservoir. If implemented, these projects would provide satisfactory mitigation for wildlife losses associated with the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. The intent of the mitigation plan is to recommend wildlife management objectives and guidelines. The specific techniques, plans, methods and agreements would be developed is part of the implementation phase.

Bissell, Gael; Wood, Marilyn

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The effects of applied water at various fractions of measured evapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth of Thompson Seedless grapevines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on reproductive growth and water productivity of ThompsonPAPER The effects of applied water at various fractionsevapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth

Williams, L. E.; Grimes, D. W.; Phene, C. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of the Dallas Thompson Riverscreen Site on the Touchet River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Riverscreen irrigation pumps are a relatively new design in which the pump intake floats on the river surface, pulling water in only from the bottom side and surrounded by a self-cleaning screen. The Walla Walla County Conservation District recently started replacing old pump screens with the Riverscreen and was interested in whether the screens are protective of juvenile salmonids. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated approach velocities and operations at the Riverscreen installation on the Dallas Thompson property, approximately 3 mi. north of Touchet, Washington and 300 ft north of Hofer Dam, on June 18, 2007. Evaluation of this site consisted of underwater videography and water velocity measurements. The Dallas Thompson Riverscreen was pumping approximately 930 gpm during our evaluation, which is close to the maximum pumping rate for this model. Underwater videography showed only slow movement of water-borne particulates toward the pump intake, and the screen material was clean. All water velocity measurements were taken below the pump intake opening and between 3 to 6 in. from the screen face. All approach velocities (flow toward the screen and pump) were below National Marine Fisheries Service draft guidelines for juvenile fish screens.

Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

The effects of applied water at various fractions of measured evapotranspiration on reproductive growth and water productivity of Thompson Seedless grapevines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER The eVects of applied water at various fractions ofon reproductive growth and water productivity of ThompsonThe reproductive growth and water productivity (WP b ) of

Williams, Larry E.; Grimes, D. W.; Phene, C. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hydrologic Tracer Studies Conducted August 20 - 25, 1962 Near Cape Thompson, Alaska  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S T A T E DIEPAR- O F THE IlVTERIGR GEOLOGICAL SURVEX Federal Cenzer, Denver 2 5 , C a l o r a a o DATA RELEASE - Sept. 1 0 , 1963 HYDROLOGIC TRACEEI STUDIES CONDUCTED A U G ~ T 20-25, 1962 NEAR CAPE THOMPSON, ALASKA V. J. Janzer and W. A. Beetem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P l o t ? r e p a r a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , f i e l d . . . . . . . . . D i s t r i b u t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s , l a b o r a t o r y , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L n f i l t r a t i c n e q e r i m e n t . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stream d i s p e r s i o n s t u d y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sedan event f z l l o u t p l o t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References c i t e d ILLUSTRATIONS Figure I . Summed c o u n t s removed from cesium s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e q u i l i b r a t i o n s , . . . . . . . . 2. S m e d c o u n t s removed from s t r o n t i u m s o i l by s u c c e s s i v e e a - u i l i b r a t i o n s . . . . . . . . . 3. P l

39

Health assessment for Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company, Fresno, Fresno County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD009106220. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company site is on the National Priorities List. The five-acre site is part of the former location of an agricultural chemical formulation, packaging, and warehousing plant that was in operation from 1942 until 1981. The environmental contamination on-site consists of pesticides, including DDT (3,800 ppm), toxaphene (100 ppm), dieldrin (5 ppm), Dinoseb (1,000 ppm), PCNB (pentachloronitrobenzene), Guthion, DEF (s,s,s-tributylphosphorotrithioate), chlordane, DBCP, chloroform, and 1,2-dichloroethane in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated ground water.

Not Available

1988-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

MARINONI & THOMPSON: 565-578 Studia dipterologica 10 (2003) Heft 2 ISSN 0945-3954 Flower flies of southeastern Brazil (Diptera: Syrphidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of southeastern Brazil (Diptera: Syrphidae) Part I. Introduction and new species [Schwebfliegen aus dem Siidosten MARINONI and F. Christian THOMPSON Curitiba (Brazil) Washington (USA) Abstract A review is given to the flower fly fauna of southeastern Brazil. Eight new species are de- scribed and their critical characters

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

By Robert M. Thompson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... could be characterized as a search engine for firearm ... is cycled by an external lever generally ... a projectile is propelled by products of combustion. ...

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

42

GEOLOGIC INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF PROJECT CHARIOT, PHASE III, IN THE VICINITY OF CAPE THOMPSON, NORTHWESTERN ALASKA--PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

BS>Geologic investigations were made at the Chariot test site, at the mouth of Ogotoruk Creek in the vicinity of Cape Thompson, Alaska. IN the area within a 15-mile radius of the site, bedrock consists entirely of consolidated clastic and chemical sediments. The test excavation lies entirely in frozen mudstone which is complexly folded and faulted. Moisture determinations conducted within 10 ft of the surface indicated that the moisture content of the rock ranges from 3.1% in the thawed mudstone to 12.5% in the frozen mudstone. The use of refrigerated diesel fuel as drilling fluid in Holes Charlie and Dog in 1960 overcame the collapse of drill-hole walls owing to thawing of permafrost experienced in drilling by conventional techniques. Work on coastal processes was focused on establishing a physical background for ecological studies being conducted by other investigators and on characterizing the natural movement of sediment as an aid in evaluating the success and safety of the proposed nuclear test. Piston-core samples from lagoons which do not contain the mouths of rivers and streams showed that only about 10 cm of sediment were laid down in the lagoons since the last major rise of sea level. The shoreline history of the area was inferred from these samples. The two new holes were used to provide temperature information needed for a quantitative evaluation of the thermal regime ot lower Ogotoruk Creek Valley. The thermal regime of permafrost was found to not be in equilibrium with the present position of the shoreline or the present climate. Preliminary calculations indicated that the flow of heat to the surface from the earth's interior is on the order of one-millionth of a calorie per square centimeter of surface per second. A series of gravity measurements between Kotzebue and Point Hope indicated a broad uneven gravity low with double minimums near Cape Seppings and Kivalina. The possibility of radioactive contamination of shallow and deep aquifers existing in the area was investigated. (M.C.G.)

Kachadoorian, R.; Campbell, R.H.; Moore, G.W.; Scholl, D.W.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; Greene, G.W.; Marshall, B.V.; Barnes, D.F.; Allen, R.V.; Waller, R.M.; Slaughter, M.J.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

LS-12 K. Thompson/R. Lari  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

computer programs TRIM, PE2D, and POISSON. These produced data on the vertical field shape in the radial direction for a flat pole dipole. These results permitted the magnitudes...

45

Thompson, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9587089°, -71.8625715° 9587089°, -71.8625715° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9587089,"lon":-71.8625715,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Direct patterning of surface quantum wells with an atomic force J. Cortes Rosa, M. Wendel, H. Lorenz,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct patterning of surface quantum wells with an atomic force microscope J. Cortes Rosa, MAs­AlSb surface quantum wells. Sharp and sturdy electron beam deposited tips are developed to withstand the comparatively high N forces in the direct patterning process. By direct patterning the InAs surface quantum well

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

47

Station location map, and audio-magnetotelluric and telluric data for Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The audio-magnetotelluric data log for Breitenbush Known Geothermal Resource Area, Oregon is presented covering 12 different frequencies and several stations. (MHR)

O'Donnell, J.E.; Long, C.L.; Senterfit, R.M.; Brougham, G.W.; Martinez, R.; Christopherson, K.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thompson Technology Industries Inc TTI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries, Inc. (TTI) Industries, Inc. (TTI) Place Novato, California Zip 94949 Product California-based maker of PV tracking systems, mounting and monitoring systems. Coordinates 38.106075°, -122.567889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.106075,"lon":-122.567889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

P D P Rogers, Thompson Named New Directors  

Budget and the Senate and House leader-ship on the funding of federal depart-ments and agencies. He received his doctorate from the

52

Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island prepared by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of weather data at nearby sites, including Logan airport and offshore buoys, the long term mean wind demand. #12;23 8. References Bundesverband WindEnergie e.V., WindEnergie 1999, Bundesverband WindEnergie

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

53

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distribution Category UC-98 Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures by Consumption and Supply Surveys Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 General information concerning the contents of the report may be obtained from Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use Division (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of the publication may be obtained from Nancy L. Leach, Chief of the Residential and Commercial Branch (202/586-1114). The Residential Energy Consumption Survey manager and a major contributor to this report is Wendel Thompson (202/586-1119). The report was written by Gerald Peabody (202/586-6160). Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector

54

First phase report on identification of environmental issues hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following disciplines are covered: air resources; land use, vegetation, and wildlife, geotechnical environment; surface water, ground water, and waste disposal; cultural resources; health, industrial hygiene and noise; and socio-economics. The following are presented for each discipline: general comments; regulations, ordinances, statutes, and guidelines; bibliography with abstracts; and sensitive environmental issues. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Services Provided for Boyce Thompson Institute Research Laboratories Service Description Unit Unit Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our growth facilities found by visiting: http://bti.cornell.edu/Greenhouse.php Per square foot See Cost Media Preparation Maintenance of regular media inventory in each lab, media requests, preparation at the bench. Per lab member $103.00 Glassware Dirty glassware is collected, cleaned, autoclaved, and returned

Pawlowski, Wojtek

56

Theos J. Thompson, 1964 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

& Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S....

57

Thompson, Berwick, Pratt & Partners Compiled by Ann Carroll (1989) and Jayne Bellyk (1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Columbia, and Out-of-Province Building Files series Communication, Transportation, & Public Utilities sub and Regional sub-series Hotels and Cafes sub-series Government sub-series Industrial sub-series File List

Pulfrey, David L.

58

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spruce forest, near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. The samplingsite near Thompson, Manitoba, showed increased contribution

Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

THE HUBSummer/Fall 2006 Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research Volume 8, Issue 5 Wabash Cannonball Summer . . . . 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a professional. Or...competent adult. So my quest immediately set sail for the land of DIY. Otherwise known as "Do-It-Yourself". My initial DIY efforts to slay "the damp" were of the low-effort variety, mainly

Pawlowski, Wojtek

60

STIMULATION OF INCREASED SHORT-TERM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAYFLY BAETIS TRICAUDATUS FROM THE THOMPSON RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as organochlorines (e.g. chlorophenols, guaiacols, catechols) are costly, and despite their release

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Hydrogen Effects on Material Behavior and Corrosion Deformation Interactions Edited by N.R.Moody, A.W.Thompson, G.S.Was and R.H.Jones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Effects on Material Behavior and Corrosion Deformation Interactions Edited by N.R.Moody, A Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Utilizing plane-strain ring-stretch tests with the maximum principal stress rim, linkage of microcracks to form a long (surface) crack, and subsequent failure of the cladding

Motta, Arthur T.

62

Ice Sheets: Byrd Polar Outreach & Education August 2013 Lonnie Thompson, Bryan Mark, and I have all been running into Greg Hitzhusen from Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and financial need. To apply, send a brief (typically 1-2 pages) statement of eligibility and intended usage-292-6692 or bromwich.1@osu.edu. Expert Science Reviews for Climate and Energy Educational Resources Requested by CIRES are seeking science reviewers with an expertise in climate science, climate change and energy topics

Howat, Ian M.

63

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. GE-22, NO. 3, MAY 1984 David R. Thompson received the B.S., M.S.,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth from aerial survey markers, and snow covered area from satellite data to estimate the amount survey and conservation operations. In 1975, he served as USDA remote sensing technical advisor.S. degrees from Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, in 1961 and 1963 and the Ph.D. degree from

Dozier, Jeff

64

Nuclear Data Measurements at the RPI LINAC Y. Danon, R.C. Block, R. Bahran, M. Rapp, F. Saglime, C. Romano, J. Thompson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Data Measurements at the RPI LINAC Y. Danon, R.C. Block, R. Bahran, M. Rapp, F. Saglime, C are used for a variety of experiments primarily related to nuclear data measurements. Neutron targets) at RPI was built as a pulsed neutron source designed for nuclear data measurements [ 1 ]. The facility

Danon, Yaron

65

Evaluation of land-surface interaction in ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis models over grassland (FIFE) and boreal forest (BOREAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site in 1996 near Thompson, Manitoba. Some aspects of the98.484W near Thompson, Manitoba. Some aspects of the40 ln west of Thompson, Manitoba (designated TF-3 for tower

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Intersection of Feminism and Disability Theory in Sylvia Plaths The Bell Jar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a woman, but as a disabled woman. For this reason,as Wendell points out, no disabled person is completelySchriempf argues that disabled women face different issues

Maple, Jeni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation, topical report appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices for the water resources evaluation report are included for the Imperial Valley KGRA's, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Wendell Amedee, Glass Mountain, Lassen, Puna, and for power plant case studies. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,Introduction The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a

Thompson, Neil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Studies of Ephydrinae (Diptera: Ephydridae), II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- trona et ai., 1994; Ness, 1996; Shen-Ong, 1990; Thompson and Ramsay, 1995;Wolff, 1996). More information

Mathis, Wayne N.

70

Rail Supply Chain Forum- Clarion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and rousing support for manufacturers in America from Congressman Glenn GT Thompson and information from Chief Rolling Stock, Kevin Kesler ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

71

spring CommenCemenT friday, may 8, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LeGare, Tracey Martinson, Heather McIntyre, Amber Moody, Scott Rupp, Catharine Thompson, Dan Uliassi

Beresnev, Igor

72

General Phase Transformations - Non-Ferrous: Part III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Location: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center Session Chair: Matthew Kramer, Ames Laboratory; Greg Thompson, University of Alabama...

73

East Brawley East MesaHeber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Brawley Glamis Dunes East MesaHeber Salton Sea South Brawley Randsburg Sespe Hot Springs Coso Randsburg Sespe Hot Springs Coso Hot Springs Mono - Long Valley Bodie Saline Valley Calistoga The Geysers Hot Springs Mono - Long Valley Bodie Saline Valley Calistoga The Geysers Lassen Wendel - Amedee Glass

74

Chronological List of LSU School of Renewable Natural Resources Graduates 1926-2008 Prepared by Dr. Paul Y. Burns, Prof. Emeritus, School of RNR, Dec. 26, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Barstow Richard T. Begley George D. Bouline, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard W. Castor Robert R. Cutler James Froggatt Brenda and Bernard Gitlin Suzanne and Edwin H. Gott, Jr. Sharon and Thomas Gratto Drs. Wendell Bowman James L. Dorris III Steven L. Edwards J. Spencer Ferebee, Jr. Margaret McGarrity and James

75

Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Science and Global Security, 17:119, 2009 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Wendell C. DeMarcus of the University of Kentucky, Carl Eckart of the University of California of U.S. Programs R. Scott Kemp Program on Science & Global Security, Princeton University, Princeton on Science & Global Security, 221 Nassan St., 2nd Floor, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08542, USA. E

Chen, Sow-Hsin

77

Corrosion Control and Lay-up of the Crystal River-3 Steam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Corrosion Control and Lay-up of the Crystal River-3 Steam Generators and Secondary Plant during an Extended Outage by R.H. Thompson...

78

Last Name First Name Job Title Supervisor CourseTitle CourseDate RenewDate 2010 Health, Safety, and Radiation Training Report for Departments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hager, Postdoctoral Research Associate (Gibson) 7. Dr. Robert Handler, Postdoctoral Scientist (Shonnard (Goldman) 45. Alex Munguia, Chemical Engineering (Shonnard) 46. Chelsea Nikula, Chemistry (Thompson) 47

Wilcock, William

79

MBAT: A scalable informatics system for unifying digital atlasing workflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neuroscientist 2002, 2. Lau C, Ng L, Thompson C, Pathak S,Lee, Seth Ruffins, Queenie Ng, Nikhil Sane, Steve Anderson,

Lee, Daren; Ruffins, Seth; Ng, Queenie; Sane, Nikhil; Anderson, Steve; Toga, Arthur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Environmental Management Advisory Board Subcommittees | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBCOMMITTEE Ms. Jane Hedges (Co-Chair) Washington State Department of Ecology Mr. Robert Thompson (Co-Chair) Energy Communities Alliance Dr. Carolyn Huntoon Consultant Mr. John...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

The Y-12 Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

maintaining the retirement fund at 100 percent? Would it be DOE or the contractor? -Faye Thompson, Quality Assurance A: The contractor. The con- tractor is responsible for...

82

Solar observations with a millimeter-wavelength Array - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

see Chapter 13 of Thompson, Moran, and Swenson, 1986). One of these ...... Hoyng, P., Marsh, K. A., Zirin, H., and Dennis, B. R.: 1983, Astrophys. J. 268, 865.

83

Novel Tools for 3D Data Acquisition and Analysis - Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010... Single Crystal Turbine Blade: Michael Groeber1; Dennis Dimiduk1; ... Robert Morris1; Gregory Thompson1; 1The University of Alabama

84

NETL: 2001 Conference on Unburned Carbon (UBC) on Utility Fly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Pulverized Coal PDF-8KB David J. Earley, Air Monitor Corporation Presenter: John Thompson, Air Monitor Corporation Pilot-Scale Testing of a Vibrating Electrostatic...

85

Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Officer: Terrence R. Fehner, Ph.D. Environment, Safety and Health Coordinator: Lois Thompson Executive Committee: Linda Cohn, DOE, NNSA, Nevada Site Office Gary Hartman, DOE,...

86

Fourteenth National Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Detector...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

questions: Sharon Fisher (APS User Office) slfisher@aps.anl.gov Chairperson: Al Thompson (Lawrence Berkeley Lab) Workshop Committee Members: Sol M. Gruner (Cornell...

87

Session III - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011... Dennis Dimiduk2; Jaafar El-Awady3; Triplicane Parthasarathy1; ... Aidan P. Thompson1; Matthew D. Lane1; M. P. Desjarlais1; 1Sandia...

88

Brian Tierney  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2007, Download File: grid2007.pdf (pdf: 290 KB) Chin Guok, David Robertson, Mary Thompson, Jason Lee, Brian Tierney and William Johnston, "Intra and Interdomain Circuit...

89

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apollinari, Director Pier Oddone, Robert Schuessler, Donna Hicks, Chad Thompson, Eileen Hahn. Not pictured: Alexander Romanenko. Photo: Reidar Hahn Six Fermilab employees...

90

C:\\NLC\\FermiLab2000\\Publication\\PostSLAC\\slac-pub-8725.DVI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 0101 Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC January 2001 Lewis Keller, Rainer Pitthan, Sayed Rokni and Kathleen A. Thompson Stanford Linear Accelerator Center...

91

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yearly Review Meeting Project DE-FE0002128 Analysis of microbial activity under a supercritical CO 2 atmosphere Massachusetts Institute of Technology Prof. Janelle Thompson,...

92

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

94

MSID Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... G. Thomas, G. Thompson, C. Chung, Edward ... S. Fox and B. Hartman: "Heterogeneous Distributed ... Tom Kramer, M. Palmer and Allison Barnard ...

2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

MSID Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Publication summary. Author(s): G. Thomas, G. Thompson, C. Chung, Edward Barkmeyer, F. Carter, M. Templeton, S. Fox and B. Hartman. ...

96

SAND2011-6431A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Lane*, Gary S. Grest*, Aidan P. Thompson*, Kyle Cochrane, Michael Desjarlais*, Thomas R. Mattsson* * Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM USA Raytheon Ktech...

97

Controls on Evaporation in a Boreal Spruce Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boreal forest of Northern Manitoba. J. Hydrol. , 196, 310km west of Thompson, Manitoba, to show the climatic controlsforest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada. This paper

Betts, Alan K.; Goulden, Mike; Wofsy, Steve

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of Microwave Pre-treatment on Grindability of Ultramafic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different ultramafic nickel ores were studied: one from a deposit near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada (Pipe ore), and one from the Okanogan region of...

99

Boreal forest CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration predicted by nine ecosystem process models: Intermodel comparisons and relationships to field measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propagation of errors wan and Manitoba, Canada, J. Geophys.in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, Tree Physiol. , Ameselevation) near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada, was dominated by

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydropower conf SDOX June 2008 final ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Osborn, Chief Technology Officer Clay Thompson, Senior Engineer Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference June 12, 2008 BlueInGreen, LLC 535 W. Research Blvd. Fayetteville, AR...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Influence of Interstitial Content and Stress State of the Shock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Interstitial Content and Stress State of the Shock- Induced Phase Transitions in Zr, Ti, and Fe. Author(s), George Thompson Gray,...

102

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.J. Thompson,Determining Plutonium in BIBLIOGRAPHY Spentweapons and power-reactor plutonium, Nature Vol. 283 (1980)Japans Spent Fuel and Plutonium Managament Challenges,

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dictionary of Upriver Halkomelem, Volume I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concise Nuxalk-English Dictionary. Mercury Series, EthnologyThompson River Salish dictionary, n|ekepmxcn. UMOPL 12,Nile. 1979. A Preliminary Dictionary of the Twana Language.

Galloway, Brent Douglas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

PUBLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jacobson, DL, Arif, M., Bergmann, L., Ioffe, A., Development of the ... G., Thompson, A., Gefter, WB, Schnall, MD, Leigh, JS, Ventilation/Perfusion of ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hoydoo You, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Am. Chem. Soc., 131, 5732 (2009) * C. Lucas, P. Thompson, M. Cormack, A. Brownrigg, B. Fowler, D. Strmcnik, V. Stamenkovic, J. Greeley, A. Menzel, H. You, N. Markovic,...

106

High-Speed Detector Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Results of this Special Test report the magnitude and phase response of a ... Ethernet, and Fibre Channel) to follow a 4 th-order Bessel-Thompson ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pieper, Joshua T. Thompson, Collier Scalzitti-Sanders, and Shaun Wolfe Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4401 U.S. Department of Energy...

108

Soil Data Used in Analysis by L.K. Mann 1986  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.24 4.88 2.76 60 ANDERSON 1949 3 ALBOLL 0 15 8.03 5.40 5.03 2.87 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 4 ALBOLL 0 15 6.26 4.31 3.50 2.16 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 5 ANDEPT 0 15 12.30 10.93...

109

manndata.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.24 4.88 2.76 60 ANDERSON 1949 3 ALBOLL 0 15 8.03 5.40 5.03 2.87 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 4 ALBOLL 0 15 6.26 4.31 3.50 2.16 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 5 ANDEPT 0 15 12.30 10.93...

110

Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morgan, Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Paul Morgan, Wendell Duffield, John Sass, Tracey Felger (2003) Searching For An Electrical-Grade Geothermal Resource In Northern Arizona To Help Geopower The West Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_San_Francisco_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Morgan,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510822" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

111

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ogren 10/24/2008 Ogren 10/24/2008 Miniature Multi-filter Continuous Light Absorption Photometer John A. Ogren and Jim Wendell Earth System Research Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, CO J. Ogren 10/24/2008 Motivation for new design * Aerosol light absorption is a crucial contributor to radiative climate forcing * Current instruments all have shortcomings - filter transmission * PSAP's single filter requires frequent changes * aethalometer is poorly characterized * MAAP has best optics, but only a single wavelength - photoacoustic is expensive and only marginally sensitive enough - photothermal interferometer is promising but unproven - extinction minus scattering * cavity ring-down extinction device is expensive * difference measurement adds uncertainty

112

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61110 61110 Office Administrative Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov ROCKY FLATS ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

113

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Quality Office - Real-Time Assessment of Instrument Performance K. Kehoe, R. Peppler, K. Sonntag, T. Thompson, N. Hiers, and C. Schwarz ARM Data Quality Office, University of...

114

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53210 53210 Office Supplies and Stationery Stores BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NEW BRUNSWICK LAB NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PRINCETON PLASMA LAB Arlene White (609) 243-2080

115

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41219 41219 Other Accounting Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671

116

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 results: 8 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Lisa Thompson [Clear All Filters] 2011 Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, Lisa Thompson, and Virginie E. Letschert. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers. Berkeley: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2011. 2010 Meyers, Stephen, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, Lisa Thompson, and Andrew Sturges. Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Sense for the U.S. Market?. Berkeley, 2010. Thompson, Lisa, Alexander B. Lekov, Aimee T. McKane, and Mary Ann Piette. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study. CEC/LBNL, 2010.

117

Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200-ZP-1_PW-1...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as well as conceptual and mathematical model development in support of the 200-ZP-1 FS. * Dennis Faulk, EPA Region 10 * Arlene Tortoso, DOE RL * Mike Thompson, DOE RL * Briant...

118

Rocky Flats 100th Shipments Arrives at WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RELEASE Rocky Flats For Immediate Release Contact: Karen Lutz, DOE RFFO, 303966-4546 01-08 Jennifer Thompson, Kaiser-Hill, 303966-6285 Kate Foster, Westinghouse TRU Solutions,...

119

The role of chess in artificial intelligence research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our eminent researchers including John McCarthy, Allen Newell, Claude Shannon, Herb Simon, Ken Thompson and Alan Turing put significant effort into computer chess research. Now that computers have reached the grandmaster level, and are beginning to vie ...

Robert Levinson; Feng-Hsiung Hsu; T. Anthony Marsland; Jonathan Schaeffer; David E. Wilkins

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Walleye and Yellow Perch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE WALLEYE AND YELLOW PERCH The Walleye is king of game fish in the eyes of many Illinois sportsmen. To find, hook and land this fighting fish...

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121

From the Ground Up: UCSC Professor Gary Griggs as Researcher, Teacher, and Institution Builder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Thacher and Thompson, architects in town. They becameguy that was the campus architect and said, I think we canServices, which handles the architect and the physical plan

Griggs, Gary; Rabkin, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Prediction of convective morphology in near-cloud permitting WRF model simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models ability to forecast convective morphological evolution is examined for 37 convective systems. The simulations used Thompson microphysics with 3-km horizontal grid spacing. Ten convective mode ...

Darren V. Snively; William A. Gallus; Jr.

123

Exploratory Well At Coso Geothermal Area (1967) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

114.3 m. References Fournier, R. O.; Thompson, J. M.; Austin, C. F. (1 January 1978) Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1...

124

The Origins of Hopelessness Among Inner-City African-American ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

293. 0091-0562/05/1200-0293/0 C 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. ... (Hanson, McLanahan, & Thompson, 1997; Fletcher,. Darling ..... Movement, when it does occur, tends to ...... In J. Cassidy & P. R. Shaver (Eds.), Handbook.

125

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Trimodal Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010... Patterson1; Bo Yao1; Clara Hofmeister1; Bill Mohr2; Brian Thompson2; Yongho Sohn1; 1Univ of Central Florida; 2Edison Welding Institute

127

Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. European Journal of Cell Biology 2006 . Thompson, D. M. ;S. H. Journal of Cell Biology 1977 , 75 , 606-616. Zicha,Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 1997 , 48 , 493-523.

Campbell, James Kyle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

2013 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Publications Journal Papers T. A. Addington, R. W. Mertz, J. B. Siegel, J. M. Thompson, A. J. Fisher, V. Filkov, N. M. Fleischman, A. A. Suen, C. Zhang and M. D. Toney, "Janus:...

129

Age-dependent variation in the biophysical properties of boreal forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. U.S. Geological Survey,was conducted in Northern Manitoba, Cana- da, within 100 km2003). The area within Manitoba burned in 2003 was almost a

McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, M. L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sensitivity of Boreal Forest Carbon Balance to Soil Thaw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 km of Thompson, Manitoba, that ranged in age since theblack spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada. The site lost 0.3 ?black spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada, from 1994 to 1997 (

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Consideration of the bioavailability of iron in the North American Great Lakes: Development of novel approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................N-3 28 South of Beimfohr Hall................................... F-9 29 Northwest of Wham Education Building ......... J-4 30 Northwest of Wham Education Building ......... J-4 31 Thompson Point (South ILLINOISAVE SOUTHNORMALAVENUE CLOCKTOWER DRIVE WEST GRANDAVENUE WHAM DRIVE FORESTAVENUE ELIZABETHSTREET WEST

Sterner, Robert W.

132

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AEC Seal 1940: Manager 1947 AF Thompson Jr. 1940: Manager 1948-1951 Dr. Brewer F. Boardman Thumbnail panels: Loading... Stop news scroll Most Visited Adopt-A-Doc DOE Data...

133

Whole-genome analysis of animal A- and B-type cyclins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Thompson JD, Higgins DG, Gibson TJ: CLUSTAL W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice. Nucleic Acids Res 1994, 22:4673-4680. 30. Page RD: Tree...

Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Murray, James; Carrington, Mark

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRG Energy: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project W.A. Parish Generating Station, Thompsons, Texas PROJECT FACT SHEET NRG Energy: W.A. Parish...

135

Hydrogen Effects on Material Behavior and Corrosion Deformation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A.W. Thompson and D.C. Nguyen. Interactions of Hydrogen with Amorphous Nano-Structures and Their Effects on Relaxation Behavior of Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Bulk ...

136

452.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.C. RIBEIRO, E. UCHOA, AND R.F. WERNECK, A hybrid GRASP with ... P.M. THOMPSON AND H.N. PSARAFTIS, Cyclic transfer algorithms for multi-vehicle.

137

Pantex Earth Day 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Earth Day 2012 May 17, 2012 Julie Chavarria Earth Day 2012 Saturday, April 21 st 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Held at Thompson Park in Amarillo, TX Sponsored by B&W...

138

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.J. Thompson,Determining Plutonium in Spent Fuel withTobin, Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelFluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Reply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edwards and Thompson have made comprehensive and thorough comments concerning the methods, accuracy, and results in a case study by Kellenbenz et al. These comments questioned the representativeness of model-derived soundings and graphics used, ...

David J. Kellenbenz; Thomas J. Grafenauer; Jonathan M. Davies

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: David Schild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells. Nucleic Acids Research 30:1001-1008. Takata, M., Sasaki, M.S., Tachiiri, S., Fukushima, T., Sonoda, E., Schild, D., Thompson, L.H., and Takeda, S. (2001). Chromosome...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Implementation of a Silver Iodide Cloud-Seeding Parameterization in WRF. Part I: Model Description and Idealized 2D Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A silver iodide (AgI) cloud-seeding parameterization has been implemented into the Thompson microphysics scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model to investigate glaciogenic cloud-seeding effects. The sensitivity of the parameterization ...

Lulin Xue; Akihiro Hashimoto; Masataka Murakami; Roy Rasmussen; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Daniel Breed; Shaun Parkinson; Pat Holbrook; Derek Blestrud

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Learn to program with phrogram!: a guide to learning through game programming using the latest version of kids programming language, First edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"This guide will quickly and easily walk complete beginners through creating their first simple games using Phrogram. The material is friendly and approachable to the young and to the technologically timid alike."--Alfred Thompson, Academic Relations ...

Jon Schwartz; Walt Morrison; David Witus

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Search results - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion Control and Lay-up of the Crystal River-3 Steam Generators and Secondary Plant during an Extended Outage by R.H. Thompson and W.R. Kassen...

144

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graves 1 , J.M. Ringe 1 , J.W. Stringer 1 and J.A 2 . Thompson 1 Department of Forestry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546, 2 Department of Soil Science, North Carolina...

145

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8-kV Transmission Line Structure Replacement Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8-kV Transmission Line Structure Replacement Larimer County, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace four existing single wood pole structures along the Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8-kV transmission line. The structures are located along a previously disturbed area adjacent to the Horsetooth Supply Canal in Larimer County, Colorado. The structures will be replaced in-kind with single wood poles of the same height, hardware, configuration, and in the same location. All work will be confined to Western's right-of-way easement. Existing access would be used and no new roads are proposed. Equipment used in the work includes pick-ups, truck mounted augers and cranes, bucket trucks, and

146

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

147

Published Research 2011 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou A., Wendel M., Riemer B., Volpenhein E., Brewster R., "Two-phase flow simulations of protective gas layer for Spallation Neutron Source target", Proceedings of the ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, IMECE2011-64346. Abdulbaki M. K., "Nanoparticle effects on polymer crystallization and dynamics", University of Houston. Abell D. T., Bruhwiler D. L., Choi Y., Mahalingam S., Stoltz P., Han B., Stock M. P., "Simulation of H- beam chopping in a solenoid-based

148

Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Notice of Availability and Publications 2: Notice of Availability and Publications SEARCHLIGHT WIND ENERGY PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT PUBLIC MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is holding public meetings to receive comments on the Searchlight Wind Energy Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Please plan to attend one of the following meetings: Laughlin Tuesday, February 21, 2012 6 pm - 8 pm Clark County Regional Government Center 101 Civic Way Laughlin, NV 89029 Searchlight Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6 pm - 8 pm Searchlight Community Center 200 Michael Wendell Way Searchlight, NV 89046 Boulder City Thursday, February 23, 2012 6 pm - 8 pm Boulder City Library 701 Adams Blvd. Boulder City, NV 89005 For further information, please contact Gregory Helseth, BLM Project Manager, at (702) 515-

149

Published Research 2009 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou A., Wendel M., Felde D., Riemer B., "CFD validation of gas injection in flowing mercury over vertical smooth and grooved wall", Proceedings of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division Summer Conference 2009. Agamalian M., Carpenter J. M., Richardson J. W., "Validity of the Darwin and Ewald reflectivity functions in the range of the far wings: neutron diffraction study", Physics Letters A 373, 292-295. Alfonsov A., Vavilova E., Kataev V., Buchner B., Podlesnyak A., Russina M., Furrer A., Strassle Th., Pomjakushina E., Conder K., Khomskii

150

HL Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HL Power Company HL Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name HL Power Company Place Wendel, California Sector Biomass Product A power company located in California, the company main focus of energy is directed to biomass production. Coordinates 40.293339°, -79.687036° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.293339,"lon":-79.687036,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Published Research 2012 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou A., Wendel M., Riemer B., Volpenheini E., Brewster R., "Two-phase flow simulations of protective gas layer for Spallation Neutron Source target", ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition 2011. Abernathy D. L., Stone M. B., Loguillo M. J., Lucas M. S., Delaire O., Tang X., Lin J. Y.Y., Fultz B., "Design and operation of the wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source", Review of Scientific Instruments 83, 15114. Aczel A. A., Granroth G. E., MacDougall G. J., Buyers W. J.L.,

152

Published Research 2009 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Published Research 2009 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A A. Abdou, M. Wendel, D. Felde, and B. Riemer, "CFD validation of gas injection in flowing mercury over vertical smooth and grooved wall," Proceedings of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division Summer Conference 2009, FEDSM2009 1 (Part B), 1061-1067 (2009). M. Agamalian, J. M. Carpenter, and J. W. Richardson, "Validity of the Darwin and Ewald reflectivity functions in the range of the far wings: Neutron diffraction study." Physics Letters A 373, 292-295 (2009). A. Alfonsov, E. Vavilova, V. Kataev, B. Büchner, A. Podlesnyak, M.

153

Federal Energy Management Program Report Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reverse Osmosis Reverse Osmosis Optimization Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Pacific Northwest National Laboratory K. L McMordie Stoughton, X. Duan, and E.M. Wendel August 2013 Contacts Will Lintner, P.E., CEM Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-3120 E-mail: william.lintner@ee.doe.gov Kate McMordie Stoughton Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA Phone: (888) 375-7665 E-mail: kate.mcmordie@pnnl.gov Cover photo: Reverse osmosis system at Sandia National Laboratories. i Acknowledgements The authors of this report would like to thank the following individuals that provided support to

154

Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant Project. Volume 1. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic feasibility study of the engineering aspects of a hybrid wood-fired geothermal electrical generating plant is presented. The proposed plant location is in Lassen County, California, near the Wendel Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. This power plant uses moderate temperature geothermal fluid to augment the heat supplied from a wood waste fired boiler. This report defines major plant systems for implementation into the plant conceptual design and provides sufficient design information for development of budgetary cost estimates. Emphasis is placed on incorporation of geothermal heat into the power generation process. Plant systems are designed and selected based on economic justification and on proven performance. The culminating economic analysis provides the financial information to establish the incentives for construction of the plant. The study concludes that geothermal energy and energy from wood can be combined in a power generating plant to yield attractive project economics.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

TTW 4-18-12.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 4-15-12) 10,420 Shipments received since opening (9,884 CH and 536 RH) 80,936 Cubic meters of waste disposed (80,666 CH and 270 RH) 158,554 Containers disposed in the underground (158,018 CH and 536 RH) Wendell Weart and WTS Deputy Strategic Communications Manager Susan Scott at the WIPP exhibit in Arizona. WIPP front and center on international stage WIPP was a prime topic of conversation at the 2012 Waste Management Symposium held recently in Phoenix, Ariz. More than 2,000 participants from 39 countries attended this year's conference, which included 105 technical sessions, 500 papers and an exhibit hall packed with the nuclear industry's latest technologies. Government representatives and nuclear professionals from around

156

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researcher Honored for Lifetime Achievement in Solving Nuclear Waste Challenges Researcher Honored for Lifetime Achievement in Solving Nuclear Waste Challenges ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY RESEARCHER HONORED FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN SOLVING NUCLEAR WASTE CHALLENGES AIKEN, S.C. (February 27, 2008) - Dr. Carol Jantzen, internationally recognized ceramics expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory, was honored this week at the international Waste Management '08 Conference in Phoenix, Arizona, for more than three decades of outstanding contributions to nuclear waste management. Dr. Jantzen is this year's recipient of the Wendell D. Weart Lifetime Achievement Award, which is sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories to recognize long-term commitment to solving significant nuclear waste management issues.

157

Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Limited Soil Investigation of Project Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes Cape Thompson, Alaska December 2010 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District Post Office Box 6898 Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99506-6898 Contract W911KB-08-D-0003 Task Order 12, Mod 001 Prepared by Fairbanks Environmental Services 3538 International Street Fairbanks, Alaska 99701 (907) 452-1006 FES Project No. 5012-06 Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes, Cape Thompson, Alaska Fairbanks Environmental Services 5012-06 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 1-1

158

Local Providers | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Providers Local Providers Local Providers Links to websites are provided for information only. These hospitals may not be approved for use under your medical plan. Check your medical plan for approved hospitals. The Covenant Health website also includes links to many regional hospitals and services and is provided here for your reference. East Tennessee Children's Hospital, Knoxville Fort Loudoun Medical Center, Loudon Parkwest Medical Center, Knoxville Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center, Knoxville LeConte Medical Center, Sevierville Methodist Medical Center of Oak Ridge, Oak Ridge Thompson Cancer Survival Center at Methodist, Oak Ridge St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville

159

Microsoft PowerPoint - 4FO-6-Parker-BNL-Direct-Wind-Magnets.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * presented by Brett Parker, BNL-SMD presented by Brett Parker, BNL-SMD BNL Direct Wind Magnets * BNL Direct Wind Magnets * *In memory of Pat Thompson *In memory of Pat Thompson * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Outline: BNL Direct Wind Magnets * Overview production process and terminology. - Coil Winding, Wrapping, Measurement, and Curing - Planar Patterns versus Serpentine Coils - Multifunction, Multi-Layer Coils and Field Quality * Examples from past and current projects. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Examples from past and current projects. - ILC QD0 R&D Prototype and ATF2 Upgrade Magnets

160

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brad Thompson Company st Ct NE Kirkland Washington Brad Thompson Company st Ct NE Kirkland Washington Energy developer http www bradtco com Pacific Northwest Area Clean Tech Trade Alliance Clean Tech Trade Alliance Wheaton Way Bremerton Washington Internationally focused hybrid trade alliance that will create a successful Clean Technology business cluster http www cleantechtradealliance org Pacific Northwest Area Northwest Biodiesel Network Northwest Biodiesel Network Phinney Ave N Seattle Washington To promote the use and benefits of biodiesel through awareness campaigns educational programs and specific initiatives http www nwbiodiesel org Pacific Northwest Area Puget Sound Clean Air Agency Puget Sound Clean Air Agency Third Avenue Seattle Washington Special purpose regional agency chartered by state

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

Conservation of DNA-binding specificity and oligomerisation properties within the p53 family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residues with a hash. The flexible loop around the DNA-contact residue K120 is highlighted with a black bar. Colour coding is according to ClustalX [1]. 1. Thompson JD, Gibson TJ, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F, Higgins DG: The CLUSTAL_X windows interface... -specific conservation criteria are met. The alignment was prepared using Jalview [2]. 1. Thompson JD, Gibson TJ, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F, Higgins DG: The CLUSTAL_X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools...

Brandt, Tobias; Petrovich, Miriana; Joerger, Andreas C; Veprintsev, Dmitry B

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

No Slide Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Presented by: Presented by: Nancy Slater Nancy Slater - - Thompson Thompson Office of National Transpo Office of National Transpo rtation rtation April 22, 2004 April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM 2 P-Name-Meeting_XX/XX/XX.ppt OCRWM Office of National Transportation Security Session * ONT envisions four fundamental functional elements to a successful security program - Information Security - Personnel Security - Operations Security - Physical Security * Since shipments will not commence until 2010, we have an excellent opportunity to collaboratively build an effective transportation security system that will meet the need of the DOE as well as

163

SOLAR TODAY WINTER 2012/13 ISSUE MANUSCRIPT Richard Perez, ASRC, University at Albany,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR TODAY WINTER 2012/13 ISSUE MANUSCRIPT SmartFiT © Richard Perez, ASRC, University at Albany, Tom Thompson, Advanced Solar Products, Thomas E. Hoff, Clean Power Research, Lyle Rawlings, Advanced Solar Products, Ken Zweibel, GW Solar Institute, George Washington University Pradeep Haldar

Perez, Richard R.

164

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:00-4:30 p.m.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the development of efficient and safe future transportation systems at the local and national level. SponsoredThompson, Division Director, MnDOT Minnesota Transportation Systems - FutureVision and Challenges James Foldesi and St. Lawrence Seaway James Oberstar - Future Transportation Systems and Challenges #12;

Levinson, David M.

165

Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia Jessica Thompson and F.R. Hauer Coal mining can have a variety of effects on surrounding nutrients into surrounding streams. We examined the potential effects of coal mining by comparing adjacent

Renn, Susan C.P.

166

Report to the Regents Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but are not limited to, LIFE Scholarships, Palmetto Fellows, Stafford or Direct Loans, and Pell Grants. Students often Gilman Scholarship provides up to $5,000 per semester for students with Pell Grants and was awarded to 17 Roger Soles Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Stowe III Mr. and Mrs. Jerry D. Thompson Vista Hotel Partners, LLC

Mathis, Wayne N.

167

SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1) , Charlotte Bay Hasager(1) , Donald Thompson(2) , Lars Boye Hansen(3) (1) Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory, Technical, Denmark ABSTRACT Wind fields extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are used to analyze

168

Spatial variation of Anopheles-transmitted Wuchereria bancroftiand Plasmodium falciparuminfection densities in Papua New Guinea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Transactions of the Royal Society of 15. Thompson R, Begtrup K, Cuamba N, Dgedge M, Mendis C, Gamage- Mendis A, Enosse SM, Barreto J, Sinden RE and Hogh B: The Matola malaria project: a temporal and spatial study of malaria transmission and disease in a...

Alexander, Neal D; Moyeed, Rana A; Hyun, Phil J; Dimber, Zachary B; Bockarie, Moses J; Stander, Julian; Grenfell, Bryan T; Kazura, James W; Alpers, Michael P

2003-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

EPA/600/X-99/XXX December 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution of optically96 thin cirrus in the tropical tropopause transition layer (TTL) have also received and spatial structure of cirrus in the TTL has been linked to tropical stratospheric99 waves in field-Dobson circulation and103 cloud amount in both the TTL and Arctic troposphere [Li and Thompson, 2013

Pitt, Robert E.

170

SPECIALREPORT97-17 Bibliography on Northern Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconstruction ByCarloTomasi sor of computer science at the Univer- sity of British Columbia, showed how, Thompson himself, a young Captain of the British Royal Engineers, had designed a double microscope to yield reasonable results. In 1981, to lessen this difficulty, the British theoretical chemist

171

A machine-checked proof of the odd order theorem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a six-year collaborative effort that culminated in a complete formalization of a proof of the Feit-Thompson Odd Order Theorem in the Coq proof assistant. The formalized proof is constructive, and relies on nothing but the axioms ...

Georges Gonthier, Andrea Asperti, Jeremy Avigad, Yves Bertot, Cyril Cohen, Franois Garillot, Stphane Le Roux, Assia Mahboubi, Russell O'Connor, Sidi Ould Biha, Ioana Pasca, Laurence Rideau, Alexey Solovyev, Enrico Tassi, Laurent Thry

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Woojin Lee We seek to offer an affordable and easy method of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statement To replace inefficient fluorescent and incandescent light bulbs in the commons of the residential was identified to be the most "in- need" with over 150 light bulbs · David Brown, the senior operati (building ex.) #12;Switching to Light Emitting Diodes Alex Nunez-Thompson and Shantan Cheemerla #12;Problem

173

Received 18 July 2002 Accepted 29 August 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1999. (2) Pontius, F. W.; Brown, K. G.; Chen, C. J. J. Am. Water, 2699-2705. (30) Bargar, J. R.; Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J. A. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1999, 33, 2481-2484. (31) Thompson, H. A.; Brown, G. E., Jr.; Parks, G. A. Am. Mineralog. 1997, 82, 483-496. (32) Templeton

Gentner, Timothy

174

Controls on Evaporation in a Boreal Spruce Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface energy balance over a boreal spruce forest is analyzed using 3 yr of 30-min-averaged data collected during the 199496 Boreal EcosystemAtmosphere Study experiment 40 km west of Thompson, Manitoba, to show the climatic controls on ...

Alan K. Betts; Mike Goulden; Steve Wofsy

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

TCRD Boundary 1) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TCRD Boundary 1) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2) Fluor Hanford 3) Thompson Mechanical-Tech, Inc. 28) YAHSGS 29) Washington Closure Hanford 30) KinderCare 31) A.M. Express 32) Energy Solutions 33 (Cougar Café) 74) Corporate Wellness Center 75) University Park Condominiums 76) CH2M Hill Hanford Group

176

AesculapianForandAboutAlumniandFriendsoftheUGACollegeofVeterinaryMedicine Vol.6,No.3Fall2005 A big thank you from our faculty,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. James Derrell Clark Dr. William Paul Cleland and Dr. Janis L. Cleland Dr. and Larry M. Cornelius Dr and Sybil M. Fletcher William Howard Flowers Jr. Foundation, Inc. Dr. Cynthia J. Fordyce Susan L. Forehand. Malcolm Kling William M. Knight Dr. Dolores J. Kunze in memory of Dr. Morrow B. Thompson Timothy F. Koby

Scott, Robert A.

177

SOLAR ENERGY A New York perspective,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR ENERGY A New York perspective, Richard Perez & Thomas Thompson (Based upon a manuscript misconception that New York doesn't get enough sun and that solar power is both too expensive and too unreliable the St. Lawrence Seaway to Montauk Point, solar electric PV power can lower the cost of energy in NYS

Perez, Richard R.

178

EVRN 320: Environmental Policy GEOG 379: Topics in Cultural Geography Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to previous course material ­ Are there any familiar themes, problems or trends that reappear from earlier of Clumsiness: Understanding Man and Nature as a Single But Complex System", Thompson, M. and M. F. Price, IHDP: Energy: Nuclear Dreams, Black Gold and Vanishing Crude (*) "A Graceful Exit? Decommissioning Nuclear

Peterson, Blake R.

179

2004-01-2299 Elevated Carbon Dioxide Alters Hydrocarbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The target of vegetable Allium production is a high yield of superior quality produce. Bulbing is affected. Jasoni, E. Peffley a , L. Thompson b , D. Tissue c and C. Green a Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. With the onset of bulbing, leaf production ceases, photosynthates are reallocated to the bulb, lowering

Paré, Paul W.

180

Demystifying White Spaces Xuemin Hongl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

white spaces. The term "white space" refers to "spatial white space" in the rest of this paper cellular (planned) networks [9] and ad-hoc networks [10]. Different from previous works, in this paper weDemystifying White Spaces Xuemin Hongl , Cheng-Xiang Wangl , John Thompson2 , and Yan Zhang3 1Joint

Wang, Cheng-Xiang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Parameterization of Convective Effects on the Momentum and Vorticity Budgets of Synoptic-Scale Atlantic Tropical Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic budgets of an average synoptic-scale wave have been made by Stevens (1979) from GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment Phase III B- and A/B-scale data composited by Thompson et al. (1979). In the present study the apparent sources of momentum ...

Lloyd J. Shapiro; Duane E. Stevens

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

I:\\Applications and Forms\\Rackham\\Flint Rackham Guest Application.doc University of Michigan-Flint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I:\\Applications and Forms\\Rackham\\Flint Rackham Guest Application.doc University of Michigan-Flint Office of Graduate Programs 251 Thompson Library Flint, MI 48502-1950 Telephone: (810) 762-3171 Fax: (810) 766-6789 THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-FLINT Current Ann Arbor or Dearborn Student Application

Awtar, Shorya

183

University of Munich Department of Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ahlborn, D. Thompson, O. Kreylos, B. Hamann, and O. G. Staadt. A practical system for laser pointer on Interactive Surfaces, 2009 involve the metaphor of focus + context [6]. The actual system fea- tured a large. The drawback of these methods is that using infrared light is prone to occlusion and therefore the system might

184

EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, FIOA (Professor of Acoustics) F D J Thompson, MA, PhD, CEng, FIMechE, FIOA, FHEA (Professor of Railway (Leuven) and the 10th International Workshop on Railway Noise (Nagahama, Japan). David Herron successfully, multifunctional panels (e.g. including piezoelectric elements as sensors and/or actuators) and the use

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

185

A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, FIOA (Professor of Acoustics) F D J Thompson, MA, PhD, CEng, FIMechE, FIOA, FHEA (Professor of Railway (Leuven) and the 10th International Workshop on Railway Noise (Nagahama, Japan). David Herron successfully, multifunctional panels (e.g. including piezoelectric elements as sensors and/or actuators) and the use

Lynch, Jerome P.

186

Kimmerle, Kunzer; Mathematics for Engineers II (Math203) http://math.guc.edu.eg To be handed in in the respective first tutorial in the week 01. May 06. May.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- CP1 Efthymiou, Aristeidis Dean of Research - College of Science and Engineering Webber, Bonnie Deputy Page 1 of 6 #12;Duty Type Duty Scope Name Deputy Head - Computing Renals, Steve - Personnel Stirling Shillcock, Richard Smaill, Alan Stenning, Keith Stevens, Perdita Stirling, Colin Thompson, Henry Renals

Kuenzer, Matthias

187

Zoe Vanessa Finkel ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 233 (1999) 181­211 183 abundance of intermediate-sized particles ranging from 2) Experimental set-up to measure particle removal in static and flow-through experiments. The peristaltic pump and Thompson, 1995). 2.4. Static experiments Using a peristaltic pump, the water in the jars was periodically

188

Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8128 amccray@west ernintech.com Aaron McCray http://www.wes ternintech.com/ Hydraulic and Pneumatic Automation electronics, IT, connectivity, medical technician and bio- medical instrumentation.) 5112 Software publishers-3533 pws@pacific- wireless.net Dean Thompson http://pacific- wireless.net/ Broadband data connectivity

189

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11110 11110 Newspaper Publishers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 511120 Periodical Publishers AMES LAB Lisa Rodgers (515) 294-4191 rodgers@ameslab.gov ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE

190

Microsoft Word - Snohomish_High_School_Field_Improvements_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert Thompson - TERR Snohomish Robert Thompson - TERR Snohomish Project Manager Proposed Action: Snohomish High School Field Improvements Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.9 Grant or denial of requests for multiple use of a transmission facility rights-of-way, such as grazing permits and crossing agreements, including electric lines, water lines... Location: Snohomish, Snohomish County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to grant the Snohomish School District's request to install a new synthetic turf with a subsurface drainage system on an existing sports field. The field is on fee owned property leased to the Snohomish School District and is adjacent to BPA's Snohomosh Substation.

191

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31110 31110 Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov IDAHO LAB Stacey Francis (208) 526-8564 stacey.francis@inl.gov IDAHO OPERATIONS Maria Mitchell (208) 526-8600 mitchemm@id.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER

192

PowerPoint Presentation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Land Use and Institutional Controls Land Use and Institutional Controls and Homeland Security Focus Area Work Session Weldon Spring Site Interpretive Center December 5, 2002 2 Agenda 7:00 p.m. Welcome, Pam Thompson, Manager, Weldon Spring Objective of Work Session, Dave Geiser, Director, DOE Office of Long-Term Stewardship Results of the October 23, 2002, Work Session on Communication and Public Participation; Approach to Work Session, Ray Plieness, Deputy Manager, DOE Grand Junction Office 7:10 p.m. Major Issue 1: Assess Risks From Residual Contamination, Mary Picel, Argonne National Laboratory 7:30 p.m. Major Issue 2: Define Institutional Control Areas and Requirements and Institutional Control Process and Implementation, Pam Thompson 3 Agenda (continued) 8:00 p.m. Major Issue 3: Stewardship Activities for

193

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 10/03/00 4, 10/03/00 Luminosity for NLC Design Variations March 10, 1999 K.A. Thompson and T.O. Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: In this note we give Guineapig simulation results for the luminosity and luminosity spectrum of three baseline NLC designs at 0.5~TeV and 1.0~TeV and compare the simulation results with analytic approximations. We examine the effects of varying several design parameters away from the NLC-B-500 and NLC-B-1000 designs, in order to study possible trade-offs of parameters that could ease tolerances, increase luminosity, or help to optimize machine operation for specific physics processes. Luminosity for NLC Design Variations K.A. Thompson and T.O.Raubenheimer INTRODUCTION In this note we give Guineapig [l] simulation results for the luminosity and

194

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41222 41222 Boat Dealers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 441229 All Other Motor Vehicle Dealers CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com LOS ALAMOS LAB

195

chariot.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina, 41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a

196

LCC_0019.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 21/06/99 9, 21/06/99 Disruption Effects in e-e- Linear Colliders June 21, 1999 K. A. Thompson and P. Chen Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California Abstract: We present simple analytic approximations for the "de-enhancement" factor H D in e - e - collisions, as a function of the disruption and hour-glass parameters and the beam aspect ratio 0 x /0 y . We treat Gaussian beams with essentially arbitrary aspect ratio R, assuming only that the vertical beam size is less than or equal to the horizontal beam size and that the vertical beta function is less than or equal to the horizontal beta function. We also examine the effect of disruption on the calculation of upsilon and n D for e - e - collisions. Disruption e ects in e , e , linear colliders K.A. Thompson and P. Chen

197

BOREAS Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) NSA Operations (NSA-Ops) The Keewatin Air Hanger: site of BOREAS Ops 1994 Dr. Piers Sellers working in Ops, 1994 BOREAS "Air Force" The NASA C-130 The University of Wyoming King Air The NASA Helicopter The NRC Twin Otter The NCAR Electra The Ontario Chieftain Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help |

198

Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the tritium shot heard around the world  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the tritium shot heard around the world Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the tritium shot heard around the world By John Greenwald December 9, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL staffers monitor a closed-circuit screen during the historic 1993 experiment. PPPL staffers monitor a closed-circuit screen during the historic 1993 experiment. Gallery: Some 1993 D-T shot staffers in today's control room. Front row from left: Marilee Thompson; Steve Sabbagh; PPPL Deputy Director for Research Michael Zarnstorff. Rear row from left: Ken Hill; Dave Johnson; Eric Fredrickson; Charles Skinner; Brent Stratton; Lane Roquemore. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Offfice of Communications) Some 1993 D-T shot staffers in today's control room. Front row from left: Marilee Thompson; Steve Sabbagh; PPPL Deputy Director for Research Michael

199

California's 6th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6th congressional district 6th congressional district A10 Power Akuacom Alternative Energy Inc Autodesk Bio Energy Systems LLC Bioil Energy Matters LLC Enphase Energy Inc Forecast Energy Geysers Geothermal Association GGA GreenSource Solutions LLC Greenline Industries HMH Energy Resources Integrated Power Corp Marin Solar Pioneer Global Renewables Real Goods Solar San Rafael SPG Solar Inc formerly Sunpower Geothermal Energy Co Inc Solar Depot Inc Solar Power Partners Inc SolarCraft Services Inc Sonoma County-Climate Protection Campaign SunLink Corporation Terranova Bioenergy LLC ThermaSource Inc Thermochem Inc Thompson Technology Industries Inc TTI Thompson Technology Industries TTI ZAP Registered Financial Organizations in California's 6th congressional district Marathon Capital LLC (California) Retrieved from

200

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11410 11410 Business and Secretarial Schools EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 611420 Computer Training ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

chariot.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted reme- dial action in 1993 to remove remnants of radioactive tracers used in a 1962 experiment at the Project Chariot Tracer Test Site, located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. Because of its remote location, the site is accessible only by air or by sea. High winds, extreme cold, and snow make the site inaccessible during the 9-month winter. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat Eskimo villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina, 41 miles to the southeast. The Inupiats use the Cape Thompson area for subsistence hunting and fishing. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a DOE predecessor agency, to study

202

LCC-0022 cover.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 18/08/99 2 18/08/99 High-luminosity NLC Designs with Near-equal Horizontal and Vertical Beta Functions August 18, 1999 K.A. Thompson, T.O. Raubenheimer, P. Tenenbaum Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California Abstract: Modifications are studied of the NLC designs with aspect ratio close to or equal to 1, so that higher luminosity and/or much-relaxed vertical tolerances are obtained. High-luminosity NLC designs with near-equal horizontal and vertical beta functions K.A. Thompson, T.O.Raubenheimer, P.Tenenbaum In this note we consider some modi cations of the NLC for high luminosity run- ning. One way to get very high total luminosity is to change the beta functions to make the aspect ratio x = y smaller. Such designs have the additional advan- tage that, due to the larger vertical beam size, tolerances in the nal focus

203

The Standards Action - April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Canceled Projects Canceled The following DOE technical standard project was recently can- celed. If you have any questions about this action, please contact the person listed below. • Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for High-Level Waste Storage Tanks, 6910-0035; Owen Thompson, EM-38, 301- 903-1926, FAX 301-903-7604, Owen.Thompson@em.doe.gov. DOE Technical Stan- dards Recently Sent for Coordination The appropriate Technical Stan- dards Managers (TSMs) will pro- vide selected reviewers with cop- ies for comment. The full text of this document is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) Internet Site at the URL shown at the bottom of this page. If you wish to comment on this document, please notify your TSM. • Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing

204

CX-008381: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

381: Categorical Exclusion Determination 381: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008381: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/09/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace four existing single wood pole structures along the Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8 kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The structures are located along a previously disturbed area adjacent to the Horsetooth Supply Canal in Larimer County, Colorado. The structures will be replaced in-kind with single wood poles of the same height, hardware, configuration, and in the same location. CX-008381.pdf More Documents & Publications

205

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research 2011 Yearly Review Meeting Project DE-FE0002128 Analysis of microbial activity under a supercritical CO 2 atmosphere Massachusetts Institute of Technology Prof. Janelle Thompson, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering February 24-26, 2011 Project Participants * Dr. Janelle Thompson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering (MIT) * Dr. Hector Hernandez, PhD, Martin Luther King Postdoctoral Fellow (MIT) * Mr. Kyle Peet, doctoral student, Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT * 2 undergraduates Janelle Hector Kyle 3 Why do microbes matter? CO 2 "trapping" mechanisms -biofilm barriers -mineralization Natural and Engineered Systems Mitchell et al, 2009 dawsonite Biofilm Barriers Biological catalysis of mineral trapping Can we recover life forms that grow in supercritical CO

206

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 11480 of 31,917 results. 71 - 11480 of 31,917 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-M-06-07 Management Controls over Performance Fees in the Idaho National Laboratory Contract http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-m-06-07 Download Management Controls over Performance Fees in the Idaho National Laboratory Contract, OAS-M-06-07 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/management-controls-over-performance-fees-idaho-national-laboratory-contract-oas-m-06-0 Rebate Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction This incentive allows Arizona taxpayers to deduct the cost of converting an existing wood fireplace to a qualifying wood stove. The cost to purchase and install all necessary equipment is tax... http://energy.gov/savings/qualifying-wood-stove-deduction Contributor Robert J. Thompson Robert J. Thompson is Chairman of the Energy Communities Alliance, a

207

LCC_0017.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 10/06/99 7, 10/06/99 Effects of Position and Angle Offsets on NLC Luminosity June 10, 1999 K.A. Thompson and T.O. Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California Abstract: We present simulation results for the luminosity reduction due to position and angle offsets in the beams colliding at the NLC interaction point. We look at the nominal NLC-B-500 and NLC-B-1000 designs and also at designs having the vertical beta function doubled at the IP. E ects of position and angle o sets on NLC luminosity K.A. Thompson and T.O.Raubenheimer The purpose of this note is to study the e ect on luminosity of position and angle o sets in the beams colliding at the NLC interaction point. Baseline NLC interaction point design parameters are as given on the NLC web- site 1 and a previous note 2 ; for convenience we redisplay

208

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

922120 922120 Police Protection CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OAK RIDGE LAB Cassandra McGee Stu (865) 576-3560 mcgeecm@ornl.gov OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS Freda Hopper (856) 576-9430

209

Research Article: In silico analyses of a new group of fungal and plant RecQ4-homologous proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial and eukaryotic RecQ helicases comprise a family of homologous proteins necessary for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle and DNA repair. There is one known bacterial RecQ helicase, and five eukaryotic RecQ helicases that have ... Keywords: Hrq1 sequences, Hydrophobic cluster analysis, Protein phylogeny, RecQ4 sequences, Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, Three-dimensional protein modeling

Fernanda Barea; Simone Tessaro; Diego Bonatto

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating Turing machines have attracted much attention in the last decade or so. They have been described as "the work-horse of hypercomputation" (Potgieter and Rosinger 2010: 853). But do they really compute beyond the "Turing limit"--e.g., compute ... Keywords: ATM paradox, Accelerating Turing machine, Epistemic embedding, External and internal computation, Halting problem, Hypercomputation, Ontology of computing, Supertask, Thompson lamp paradox, Turing-machine purism, Turing-machine realism

B. Jack Copeland; Oron Shagrir

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caterpillar - Thompson Machinery Caterpillar - Thompson Machinery EE DE-FC26-01CH11079 PVT 10, 11 and FY 12 Walter G. Parker 8/1/2010 to 12/31/2011 Gleason, Weakley County, Tennessee Thompson Machinery (under subcontract to Caterpilar) for Demo Installation and Maintenance TM will supply and install a producer gas cleaning skid,install all electrical and mechanical interconnections for all equipment,install an electronic generating set, and provide maintenance supp. 07 06 2010 Walter G. Parker Digitally signed by Walter G. Parker DN: cn=Walter G. Parker, o=PVT, ou=NETL, email=walter.parker@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.07.06 08:28:39 -04'00' 07 15 2010 Mark Lusk Digitally signed by Mark Lusk DN: cn=Mark Lusk, o=NETL-DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=mark.lusk@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.07.15 09:08:54

212

Division Personnel - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

srs Sun, 12 Jan 2014 01:06:56 srs Sun, 12 Jan 2014 01:06:56 +0000 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Andi M. Barbour http://www.msd.anl.gov/barbour http://www.msd.anl.gov/barbour lbersano@anl.gov (Lacey Bersano) Tue, 05 Apr 2011 15:49:48 +0000 Boyd W. Veal Jr. http://www.msd.anl.gov/veal http://www.msd.anl.gov/veal lbersano@anl.gov (Lacey Bersano) Tue, 05 Apr 2011 16:03:26 +0000 Carol Thompson http://www.msd.anl.gov/thompson http://www.msd.anl.gov/thompson lbersano@anl.gov (Lacey Bersano) Tue, 05 Apr 2011 15:46:45 +0000 Chad Folkman http://www.msd.anl.gov/folkman http://www.msd.anl.gov/folkman lbersano@anl.gov (Lacey Bersano) Tue, 05 Apr 2011 15:52:47 +0000 Chenhui Zhu http://www.msd.anl.gov/c-zhu http://www.msd.anl.gov/c-zhu lbersano@anl.gov (Lacey Bersano) Tue, 29 Mar 2011 18:35:00 +0000 Daniel

213

PJM Staff Present:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participation. Mr Callis then asked Mr. Herman to call roll. B. Mr. Herman reviewed the minutes from the July 31th 2012 Meeting seeking comments. Hearing no comments, the minutes will be finalized and posted to PJM.com. 2. MODEL ON-DEMAND IMPLEMENATION INTIATIVE A. Mr. Thompson led a discussion of Siemens File Builder including the purpose of the tool, where MOD Page 1 of 2users will get the file builder tool from, and how PSSE and PSLF users can both use File Builder. PJM will take the action item to work with Siemens and begin supplying File Builder to non PSSE users B. Mr. Thompson led a discussion on the schedule for building cases in MOD, indicating that PJM will start with a 2013 Series 2014 Summer Peak case. This led to a healthy discussion of how frequently PJM will allow users to update cases, and furthermore what qualifies as a major change vs. a minor change. PJM will begin to categorize and define major modeling updates vs minor modeling updates and when they are allowed in the process. C. Mr. Thompson led a discussion on file formats, and wholesale updates. This topic also led to a discussion on what is a wholesale updates (entire case dumped out in RAW format) vs. an incremental update (entire 34.5 kV system). Members also discussed allocation of new bus numbers for generation

Meredith Gafford; Brian Hallett; Hugh Scott; Phillip Briggs; Jason Harchick; Paul Gerber; Elizabeth Pease; Mike Donnelly; Alexandra Ryder; Rollie Mongonon; Gerry Binder; Joe Callis Facilitator; Tracy Miehlke Facilitator; Bk Choi; Yiming Mao; Ian Mundell; Mark Sims; Jonathan Thompson; Michael Herman Secretary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina,41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

None

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

HL Power Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » HL Power Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home HL Power Geothermal Facility General Information Name HL Power Geothermal Facility Facility HL Power Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Wendel, California Coordinates 40.3482346°, -120.2335461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3482346,"lon":-120.2335461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

Sakaguchi, J.L.

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a preliminary engineering and economic assessment of five direct use projects using low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. Each project site and end-use application was selected because each has a high potential for successful, near-term (2 to 5 years) commercial development. The report also includes an extensive bibliography, and reference and contact lists. The five projects are: Wendel Agricultural Complex, East Mesa Livestock Complex, East Mesa Vegetable Dehydration Facility, Calapatria Heating District and Bridgeport Heating District. The projects involve actual investors, resource owners, and operators with varying financial commitments for project development. For each project, an implementation plan is defined which identifies major barriers to development and methods to overcome them. All projects were determined to be potentially feasible. Three of the projects cascade heat from a small-scale electric generator to direct use applications. Small-scale electric generation technology (especially in the 0.5 to 3 MW range) has recently evolved to such a degree as to warrant serious consideration. These systems provide a year-round heating load and substantially improve the economic feasibility of most direct use energy projects using geothermal resources above 200/sup 0/F.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

California energy flow in 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California's energy use showed a modest increase (2.2%) in 1989 over 1988 which was in keeping with the steady increase in population that the state has experienced annually during the decade. All end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, etc.) contributed to the growth. The larger demand was met by increased imports of all major fuels. Only electrical imports remained close to 1988 levels, in part due to increased output from Diablo Canyon nuclear plant whose performance exceeded expectations. California's per capita energy consumption has traditionally been below the national average due to the relatively benign climate associated with its centers of population. The largest single use for energy in the state was for transportation which overtook industrial usage in the 60's. Use of highway fuels continued to grow and reached all time highs in 1989. Highway congestion, a major problem and concern in the state, is anticipated to grow as the number of licensed drivers increases; in 1989 the increase was 3.4%. Output from the The Geysers Geothermal fields, the largest in the world, continued to falter as the steam output fell. Nonetheless new resources at the Coso Geothermal Resource Area and at the Wendel Geothermal field came on line during the year, and other geothermal areas were under active development. Novel sources of renewable energy (solar, wind, etc.) grew; however, collectively they made only a small contribution to the overall energy supply. Cogenerated electricity sold to the utilities by small power producers inexplicably fell in 1989 although estimates of the total capacity available rose. Energy flow diagrams illustrate energy sources and energy consumption.

Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

1991-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microsoft Word - 09121-3300-08 - Final Report, C - 09-04-13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report 09121.3300.08.Final Sensors and Processing for Pipe, Riser, Structure, and Equipment Inspection to Provide Detailed Measurements, Corrosion Detection, Leak Detection, and/or Detection of Heat Plumes from Degraded Pipeline Insulation 09121-3300-08 July, 2013 Dr. Lee Thompson, PI Jason Seawall Teledyne BlueView 2151 N. Northlake Way Seattle, WA 98115 (206) 200-2924 www.blueview.com jseawall@gmail.com 2 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Teledyne BlueView as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

222

Environmental Management Advisory Board - November 17, 2010, Public Teleconference Minutes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- November 17, 2010, Public Teleconference Minutes - November 17, 2010, Public Teleconference Minutes ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC TELECONFERENCE MINUTES November 17, 2010 Board members present: * Mr. James Ajello, Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. * Mr. A. James Barnes, Indiana University * Mr. Paul Dabbar, J.P. Morgan, Inc. * Mr. G. Brian Estes, Consultant * Dr. Dennis Ferrigno, CAF & Associates, LLC * Mr. Keith Klein, Consultant * Mr. John Owsley, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation * Mr. Willie Preacher, NCSL State and Tribal Government Working Group * Ms. Lessie Price, Aiken City Council * Mr. David Swindle, Federal Services/URS Corporation * Mr. Robert Thompson, Energy Communities Alliance Subcommittee members present: * Dr. Franklin Coffman, AECOM Government Services

223

Microsoft Word - ASHRAE_Water Heater Paper_2010-11-24_Final_LBNL_.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers Presented at: 2011 ASHRAE Winter Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada January 2011 Alex B. Lekov, Victor H. Franco, Steve Meyers, Lisa Thompson, and Virginie Letschert Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

224

Report: EM Energy Park Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Energy Park Initiative EM Energy Park Initiative September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB Energy Park Initiative Subcommittee Background: The Energy Park Initiative (EPI) aims to convert the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) liabilities - its contaminated sites, facilities, and materials - into reusable assets focused on providing solutions to critical national energy and environmental issues. These assets include the sites' natural resources, infrastructure, institutional controls, and human and economic capital. The EPI is a high priority for EMAB since the initiative is still in the formative planning and implementation phases. The EPI Subcommittee members are Paul Dabbar (lead), James Ajello, Lessie Price, and Robert Thompson. Recommendations:

225

Business Opportunity Session Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Materials Business Opportunity Session Materials Presentations from our Washington DC Business Opportunity Session, held March 3, 2011 How to do Business with DOE Nickolas (Nick) Demer Senior Procurement Analyst OSDBU NNSA Opportunities Gary Lyttek Small Business Program Manager, NNSA Sandia National Laboratories Opportunities Don Devoti, Small Business Program Manager, Sandia National Laboratories Office of Science SBIR/STTR, Chris O'Gwin, Program Analyst, SBIR/STTR Program Office/Office of Science Opportunities with DOE Laboratories, Larry Thompson, Small Business Program Manager/Contract Specialist, Chicago Operations Office (Office of Science) Opportunities with the Office of Environmental Management, Kay Rash, Small Business Program Manager, Office of Environmental

226

Tank 241-S-102, Core 232 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-S-102 push mode core segments collected between March 5, 1998 and April 2, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-S-102 Retained Gas Sampler System Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1998), Letter of Instruction for Compatibility Analysis of Samples from Tank 241-S-102 (LOI) (Thompson, 1998) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1998). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

STEEN, F.H.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

'Sifting the significance from the data' - the impact of high-throughput genomic technologies on human genetics and health care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be particularly high for common diseases. Mapping the polygenes Krawczak also discussed the limitations of the available strategies for mapping the loci which contribute to the common, complex disorders. The power of the affected sib pair (ASP) linkage approach... , Latimer C, Dicks E, Menzies A, Stephens P, Blow M, Greenman C, Xue Y, Tyler- Smith C, Thompson D, Gray K, Andrews J, Barthorpe S, Buck G, Cole J, Dunmore R, Jones D, Maddison M, Mironenko T, Turner R, Turrell K, Varian J, West S, Widaa S, et al: A...

Clarke, Angus J; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Wallace, Helen M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Raymond, Frances L; Chadwick, Ruth; Craddock, Nick; John, Ros; Gallacher, John; Chiano, Mathias

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

An interview with Bob Rowthorn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mountaineering; went on various Aldermaston marches for CND but even in those days I was in favour of nuclear power; apart from Thompson, my tutor, did have a specialist called Higman in my third year; I got a post-graduate research fellowship at Berkeley... ; the First World War led to widespread belief in the possibilities of central planning; in wartime the objectives of a society are relatively limited and many desires of people are pushed aside; focus on more weapons etc. which the state can often do quite...

Rowthorn, Bob

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Using Bayesian Analysis and Gaussian Processes to Infer Electron Temperature and Density Profiles on the MAST Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified, Bayesian inference of midplane electron temperature and density profiles using both Thompson scattering (TS) and interferometric data is presented. Beyond the Bayesian nature of the analysis, novel features of the inference are the use of a Gaussian process prior to infer a mollification length-scale of inferred profiles and the use of Gauss-Laguerre quadratures to directly calculate the depolarisation term associated with the TS forward model. Results are presented from an application of the method to data from the high resolution TS system on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak, along with a comparison to profiles coming from the standard analysis carried out on that system.

von Nessi, G T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spherically symmetric solutions, Newton's Law, and the infrared limit {lambda}{yields}1 in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity  

SciTech Connect

In this note we examine whether spherically symmetric solutions in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity can reproduce Newton's Law in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1. We adopt the position that the auxiliary field A is independent of the space-time metric [J. Alexandre and P. Pasipoularides, Phys. Rev. D 83, 084030 (2011).][J. Greenwald, V. H. Satheeshkumar, and A. Wang, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 12 (2010) 007.], and we assume, as in [A. M. da Silva, Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 055011 (2011).], that {lambda} is a running coupling constant. We show that under these assumptions, spherically symmetric solutions fail to restore the standard Newtonian physics in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1, unless {lambda} does not run, and has the fixed value {lambda}=1. Finally, we comment on the Horava and Melby-Thompson approach [P. Horava and C. M. Melby-Thompson, Phys. Rev. D 82, 064027 (2010).] in which A is assumed as a part of the space-time metric in the IR.

Alexandre, Jean [King's College London, Department of Physics, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Pasipoularides, Pavlos [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus GR 157 73, Athens (Greece)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Published Research 2006 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

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6 6 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: B C E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T W X Y B E. D. Bauer, A. D. Christianson, J. S. Gardner, V. A. Sidorov, J. D. Thompson, J. L. Sarrao, and M. F. Hundley, "Physical properties of the ferromagnetic heavy-fermion compound UIr2Zn20," Physical Review B 74, (Oct 2006). B. Bennett, P. Langan, L. Coates, M. Mustyakimov, B. Schoenborn, E.E. Howell, C. Dealwis, "Neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate," PNAS of the United States of America 103(49), pp. 18493-8 (5 Dec. 2006). M. L. Benson, P. K. Liaw, H. Choo, T. A. Saleh, D. W. Brown, M. R.

232

Western Veg Management EA  

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the the Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project within the Coconino National Forest DOE/EA-1863 July 2012 Lead Agency: United States Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: United States Forest Service Coconino National Forest FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-1863 Glen Canyon - Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project Coconino and Yavapai Counties, Arizona U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Customer Service Region 615 South 43rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 U.S. Department of Agriculture US Forest Service Coconino National Forest 1824 S. Thompson St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001 July 2012

233

Project Title  

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RISK ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF RISK ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF STORED CO 2 IN ORGANIC ROCKS UNDER NON- EQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS DOE (NETL) Award Number: DE-FE0002423 Investigator: Vivak (Vik) Malhotra DOE supported undergraduate student participants: Jacob Huffstutler, Ryan Belscamper, Stephen Hofer, Kyle Flannery,, Bradley Wilson, Jamie Pfister, Jeffrey Pieper, Joshua T. Thompson, Collier Scalzitti-Sanders, and Shaun Wolfe Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4401 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Carbon Storage Program * Program goals being addressed: - To attempt to answer whether CO

234

DOE site facility mgt contracts Internet Posting 5-2-11.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/30/2011 6/30/2011 2 three month option periods until protest resolved 9/30/2011 M&O 1999 http://www.id.energy.gov/PSD/AMWTPHomepage.html Mike Adams 208-526-5277 Wendy Bauer 208-526-2808 Paducah Remediation EM LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky 4/22/2010 7/21/2015 7/21/2015 Site Clean up 2009 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Pam Thompson 859-219-4056 Bill Creech 859-219-4044 West Valley Demonstration Project EM West Valley Environmental Svcs 6/29/2007 6/30/2011 6/30/2011 Site Clean up 2007 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Ralph Holland 513-246-0550 Derrick Franklin 513-246-0103 Argonne National Laboratory SC UChicago Argonne, LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2011 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award

235

September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Power Generation And Distribution Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 200 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 103 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 76 Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G. (1982) 69 Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 65 Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results Portante, E.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Peerenboom, J.P. (1997) 52 Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee

236

Organization Timeline (1947-Present) | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Organization Timeline (1947-Present) Organization Timeline (1947-Present) OSTI Directors Timeline, 1994 to 1997 1984 DOE/OSTI 1977 DOE/TIC 1975 ERDA/TIC 1972 AEC/TIC 1962 AEC/DTIE 1960 AEC/OTIE 1956 AEC/TISE 1951 AEC/TIS 1948 AEC/TID 1947 ORO/TID Names and administrations may come and go, but the foundation of OSTI's mission has remained the same: to advance science by making R&D findings available and useful to advance discovery. Oak Ridge Directed Operations (ORO) U.S. President Manager Name 1947 Truman Thompson Technical Information Division (TID) U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) U.S. President Manager Name 1948 Truman Boardman Technical Information Division (TID) 1951 Truman Boardman/Abdian Technical Information Service (TIS) 1953 Eisenhower Abdian Technical Information Service (TIS)

237

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "The seismic reflection profiles of the range front structures are difficult to interpret because of he steep dips and 3-d fault zone geometry, in the-classical paper by Okaya and Thompson (1985) the range-bounding fault is not imaged as they proposed. The reflection seismic studies are the most useful of the geophysical techniques also the most expensive. The reflection data are two-dimensional making structural interpretation complicated for the three-dimensional geometry of the basin so that the other structural studied have been critical in correctly interpreting the seismic profiles. There are many

238

untitled  

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Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation System Chin Guok ∗ , David Robertson ∗† , Mary Thompson † , Jason Lee † , Brian Tierney † and William Johnston ∗† ∗ Energy Sciences Network Berkeley, California 94720; Email: {chin, wej}@es.net † Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720; Email: {dwrobertson, mrthompson, jrlee, bltierney}@lbl.gov Abstract- With the advent of service sensitive applications such as remote controlled experiments, time constrained massive data transfers, and video-conferencing, it has become apparent that there is a need for the setup of dynamically provisioned, quality of service enabled virtual circuits. The ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) is

239

The Seaweeds  

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Seaweeds Seaweeds Nature Bulletin No. 702 January 26, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE SEAWEEDS As the number of people in the world increases and the number of acres of fertile soil to produce food for them decreases, man looks more and more hopefully at the huge expanses of ocean for relief from hunger. For ages, fish and other sea foods -- including Seaweeds -- have been mainstays in the diet of seafaring peoples, islanders and coast dwellers. Even in the Middle West we are accustomed to eating saltwater fish and shellfish. Seaweeds, however, are not seen on the vegetable counters of our stores but, unsuspected by most of us, products of seaweeds are found in many of our foods, medicines and articles in daily use.

240

zhang-98.pdf  

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7 7 Integrating ARM Measurements to Force and Evaluate GCM Parameterizations M. H. Zhang Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres Marine Sciences Research Center State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Data from a sounding array can be used to calculate vertical velocity and advective tendencies for an atmospheric column defined by the array. These diagnostics are often used to 1) describe the structure of the large-scale systems and budgets (e.g., Thompson et al. 1979); 2) drive semi- prognostic general circulation model (GCM) physical parameterizations (e.g., Lord 1982, Wang and Randall 1996) or single-column models (Randall et al. 1996); and 3) diagnose effects of sub-grid circulations on the resolvable scale fields (Yanai and Johnson 1993).

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241

Potato Beetles  

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Potato Beetles Potato Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 522 March 22, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Floyd A. Swink, Naturalist David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist POTATO BEETLES Until a little over a hundred years ago the Colorado Potato Beetle was a well-behaved harmless insect. It was unimportant because it fed on the buffalo bur, a close relative to the potato, a tough stickery weed that grew along the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Then. suddenly, it discovered a new diet in the white man's gardens and adopted the tender-leaved cultivated potato as its favorite food. It spread rapidly on potatoes and we have been fighting it ever since. Now, this pest is among our best-known beetles. In addition to the potato it occasionally attacks other plants of the nightshade family -- tobacco, tomato, eggplant, pepper and petunia.

242

Mosquito Life Histories  

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Life Histories Life Histories Nature Bulletin No. 682 June 2, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist MOSQUITO LIFE HISTORIES Everybody knows that a mosquito is a small, long-legged insect that bites. However, there are many kinds of them each with its own peculiarities of life history and habits. Some are produced in marshes or in flood plains of streams, some in puddles, some in woodlands, and others in cities and towns. Here in the Chicago region, although mosquito-borne diseases are no longer a danger, they become nuisances in many places at certain times in almost every year. In times past and in many countries the mosquitoes which carried malaria, yellow fever and other infections shaped the course of history. Hundreds of scientists have studied them for years but much remains to be learned.

243

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 20650 of 28,905 results. 41 - 20650 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Collect Soil Samples Near the Chariot, Alaska Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Cape Thompson, Alaska Office(s): Legacy Management http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003136-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EIS-0303: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure, SC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0303-supplement-analysis Download EA-1106: Finding of No Significant Impact Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1106-finding-no-significant-impact Download CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events- August 21, 2012

244

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fluid temperature of feed water Notes Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate that the reservoir feeding water to the Coso Hot Spring well has a temperature of about 240 -250 C, and the reservoir feeding the CGEH well has a temperature of about 205 C. The variation in the chemical composition of water from the two wells suggests a model in which water-rock chemical equilibrium is maintained as a convecting solution cools from about 245-205 C by conductive heat loss. References Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M.; Austin, C.F. (10 May 1980)

245

EA-1863-FEA-2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project within the Coconino National Forest DOE/EA-1863 July 2012 Lead Agency: United States Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: United States Forest Service Coconino National Forest Approved October 2012 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-1863 Glen Canyon - Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project Coconino and Yavapai Counties, Arizona U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Customer Service Region 615 South 43rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 U.S. Department of Agriculture US Forest Service Coconino National Forest 1824 S. Thompson St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001

246

Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Allen J. Gray Allen J. Gray <AJGray@gvea.com> Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 12:35 PM To: ERS2014 Cc: Peterson, Rebecca; McArdle, Paul; McGrath, Glenn; 'Paul Jones'; Lynn N. Thompson; Donna L. Rose Subject: Comments on Form EIA-930 Golden Valley Electric Association 758 Illinois Street PO Box 71249 Fairbanks, AK 99707-1249 Via Email to ERS2014@eia.gov RE: Comments on Form EIA-930 Rebecca Peterson U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Energy Information Administration Mail Stop EI-23, Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Ms. Peterson: Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) is the electric utility which serves Fairbanks and nearby communities on the road system of interior Alaska. We submit the following comments on the proposed Form EIA-930 Balancing Authority

247

NECDC Word Style Guide (U)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preconditioning a Parallel, Inexact Block-Jacobi Splitting of Preconditioning a Parallel, Inexact Block-Jacobi Splitting of the S N Algorithm J.S. Warsa, * K. Thompson, * J. Morel, * J. Chang, * K. Budge, * M. Benzi † *Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87544, † Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 We explored effectiveness of traditional "β" and modified "β" transport synthetic accelerations (TSA) as preconditioners for a parallel, inexact block-Jacobi algorithm for optically thin problems of Richardson iteration and GMRES iterative solvers. We observed that restarted GMRES stagnates when the restart value is less than the number of processors for thin problems. However, with TSA as a preconditioner, restarted GMRES with the restart value less than the number of processors does not

248

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

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Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

249

Design and Drafting  

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AES / D&D Group Online AES / D&D Group Online Request for Information (RFI) Please complete and submit the following form. Please fill out this form as complete as possible. Project Name: Requested Response Date Requesting Designer: Any Available Alley. Reginald Andrist. John Bartkowiak. Neil Brown. Lloyd Davis. Brenda Downey. Josh Fallin. David Givens. Michelle Gunkelman. Patricia Grabinski. Tom Hibbard. Robert Jensen. Don Kalt. Robert Kirkus. Ed Lerch. Jason Mulvey. James O'Neill. Maria Pilar Panchal. Prakash Pasholk. Dan Poindexter. Nate Rocke. Benjamin Skiadopoulos. Denise Thompson. Kimberly Turner. Bill Walker. Karen Jo Respondent Engineer: Last Name First Name Requestors Phone: Importance Level: Time Holder Low Normal High URGENT Requestors E-mail: @aps.anl.gov Estimated Hours of Impact:

250

Life in a Tree Hole  

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Tree Hole Tree Hole Nature Bulletin No. 581 November 21, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE IN A TREE HOLE A forest is much more than just trees. It includes all of the underbrush, wildflowers and other vegetation that grow beneath these trees; as well as all of its animal life, both large and small. Sunshine, rain, wind, soil, and the leaf litter on the ground are part of it, too. A forest is a community -- a fabric in which the lives of its inhabitants are woven together and into their surroundings by a complex web of interrelations. Tree holes -- together with the birds, mammals and small life which they shelter -- furnish an important binding force in this forest community.

251

Childhood Customs and Superstitions  

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Childhood Customs and Superstitions Childhood Customs and Superstitions Nature Bulletin No. 627 February 4, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist CHILDHOOD CUSTOMS AND SUPERSTITIONS In all the world there remains only one large tribe of savages which shows no signs of dying out or becoming civilized. These people have a language of their own; they practice magic; and they follow weird customs which have come down by word of mouth from the far-off past. Actually they are only part-time savages because, most of the time, these are our sons and daughters or our grandchildren who go to school, live in our homes, wash behind their ears, and seem to be civilized. The strangest thing about them is their ability to shift personalities right in front of your eyes.

252

ARM Data Quality Office … Real-Time Assessment of Instrument Performance  

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Data Quality Office Data Quality Office Real-Time Assessment of ARM Data *Ken Kehoe *Randy Peppler *Karen Sonntag *Terra Thompson *Nathan Hiers *Chris Schwarz Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK *Sean Moore ATK Mission Research, Santa Barbara, CA ARM Data Quality History Originally, each Site Scientist and Instrument Mentor was responsible for data quality analysis. This resulted in uneven treatment of instruments at the different ARM climate research facilities. The ARM Infrastructure Review in 1999 decided there was a need for a single data quality "czar" to oversee DQ activities for all sites. In response to this review the ARM DQO was established in July 2000 at The University of Oklahoma. ARM's goal is to provide the best data possible for scientific

253

EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development and protect riparian habitat. The land is owned by the Plum Creek Timber Company, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will own and monitor the perpetual easement. The goal of the project is to protect approximately 142,000 acres owned by Plum Creek Timber Company: 56,400 in the Fisher River valley and 86,000 in the Thompson River valley. The total cost for the easement over 142,000 acres is estimated at around $30 million. BPA will contribute $500,000 toward the smaller parcel in the Fisher River valley, for each of fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004, for a total of $1.5

254

Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Public Hearings for the Proposed Tucson Electric Power Company (TEP) Sahuarita-Nogales Transmission Line (DOE/EIS-0336) (8/27/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 166 / Wednesday, August 27, 2003 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Betty Thompson, Special Assistant, White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities, U.S. Department of Education, Suite 408, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20208. Telephone 202-219-0704. Fax: 202-208-2174. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Board is established by Executive Order 13270, dated July 3, 2002, to provide advice regarding the progress made by Federal agencies toward fulfilling the purposes and objectives of the order. The Board also provides recommendations to the President, through the Secretary of Education, on ways the Federal government can help tribal colleges: (1) Use long-term development, endowment building and planning to

255

The Life History of a Pond  

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History of a Pond History of a Pond Nature Bulletin No. 617 November 12, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LIFE HISTORY OF A POND In the Palos division of the Forest Preserve District there is an extraordinary number of ponds and sloughs Many were created by damming the outlets from wet places; some were originally farm ponds that we have restored. The largest and probably oldest pond is located in Swallow Cliff Woods, west of the picnic area in a grove of white pines planted about 40 years ago. The pond is dying. Like most others, if undisturbed, after fifty years or so it will be forgotten because in its place there will be trees willows, cottonwoods, soft maples, and probably swamp white and bur oaks. Indeed, at one time it had already filled up until, after being drained by tile, corn was grown there.

256

Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas March 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that a project with NRG Energy has been selected to receive up to $154 million, including funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Located in Thompsons, TX, the post-combustion capture and sequestration project will demonstrate advanced technology to reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. It will also assist with enhanced oil recovery efforts from a nearby oil field. "Advancing our carbon capture and storage technology will create new jobs

257

January 20, 2011, HSS Union Focus Group Meeting - Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(HSS) (HSS) January 20, 2011 HSS FOCUS GROUP Meeting Attendees HSS Attendees: Podonsky, Glenn Eckroade, Bill Campagnone, Mari-Jo Ardaiz, Michael Berry, Tracey Boulden III, John S Brewer, Stephanie Donovan, Dick Lawrence, Andrew Lewis, Charles Lingan, Robert Worthington, Pat McArthur, Bill Roege, William Simonson, Steven Staker, Thomas Stone, Barbara Thompson, Martha Weston-Dawkes, Andy Wilcher, Larry Lily Alexander Mark Do Heidi Ascosi National Training Center - Call-in: Gasperow, Lesley Nelson, Bob Lozoya, Jeannie Union/Stakeholder Attendees: 1. Ron Ault - Metal Trades Department 2. Dennis Phelps (for Chico McGill) - International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 3. James Frederick - United Steel Workers 4. Randy Lawson - International Guards Union of America/National Council of Security Police

258

The Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic  

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Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Hyperplasia in Canine Model Gayle Woloschak Northwestern University Abstract Purpose/Objective(s): There have been few studies analyzing radiation-induced prostate cancer in humans or animals. Our research attempts to fill this void by determining the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer and prostatic hyperplasia in a large cohort of beagle dogs. Material/Methods: The subjects for the experiment were beagle dogs, which were chosen due to physiologic and anatomic similarities to humans (Thompson, 1989). We retrospectively analyzed data from historic irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on 347 beagles. The cobalt-60 cohort consisted of 268 dogs, which received whole

259

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

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Analysis of In-Situ Stress Regime in the Alberta Basin, Canada, for Performance Assessment of CO 2 Geological Sequestration Sites Christopher D. Hawkes, University of Saskatchewan, Stefan Bachu and Kristine Haug, Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, and Adam W. Thompson, University of Saskatchewan, Canada CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL May 2-5, 2005 ABSTRACT Oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline aquifers are primary candidates for long-term geological sequestration of greenhouse and acid gases. Risk assessment for sequestration projects must include predictions of sequestration zone performance. These performance assessments will guide the selection of sequestration sites and/or operating parameters, such as injection pressure and rate, that mitigate

260

United States Environmental Monitoring EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPAJ60014-901016 EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062 Agency P.O. Box 93478 May 1990 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development - Offsite Environmental lcrgw Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring d ,& Around United States Nuclear Test Areas Calendar Year 1989 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90/016 DOEIDP100539-062 May 1990 Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1989 contributors: C. F. Costa, N. R. Sunderland, S. C. Black, M. W. Chilton, B. B. Dicey, W. G. Phillips, C. A. Fontana, R. W. Holloway, C. K. Liu, A. A. Mullen, V. E. Niemann, C. J. Rizzardi, D. D. Smith, D. J. Thome, E. A. Thompson, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division

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261

Drosophila  

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Drosophila Drosophila Nature Bulletin No. 576 October 17, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DROSOPHILA: THE FRUIT FLY Have you noticed any tiny flies in your kitchen or around the fruit bowl? They are so small that they come through ordinary screens into homes, stores and restaurants. From midsummer until the killing frosts of autumn, swarms of them cluster wherever ripe or fermenting fruit is exposed -- outdoor markets, tomato canneries, garbage cans, melon patches, vineyards, and apple, pear or peach orchards. At this season, hordes of them are found around cider mills where they breed in the cakes of pressed apple pulp or pomace. A few adults and young survive the winter in basement drains and other protected places with food and warmth.

262

The Des Plaines River -- Part One  

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One One Nature Bulletin No. 606 May 28, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE DES PLAINES RIVER -- PART ONE: DESCRIPTION Chicago was incorporated as a village in 1833 and in less than 100 years it had become one of the world's great cities. Four unique natural features have contributed to its phenomenal growth. The first is Lake Michigan. Chicago is strategically located at the south end of it, deep in the heart of the continent and the vast central lowland -- bread-basket of our nation. The lake provides an inexhaustible supply of fresh water and a highway for water-borne commerce. Since the completion of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Chicago has also become a port for ocean going ships.

263

Nesting Habits of Owls  

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Nesting Habits of Owls Nesting Habits of Owls Nature Bulletin No. 624 January 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NESTING HABITS OF OWLS From all of the information available it appears to us that, amongst the owls, there is greater variation in where and how they nest than in any other group of birds. Two nesting characteristics, however, are common to all owls. The eggs are nearly spherical and white, or off-white, without any markings. Also, a nesting female does not lay one egg per day, as most birds do, but at intervals of two or more days -- sometimes several. In extreme cases there may be a fresh egg, others incubating, and a newly hatched fledgling -- all in the same nest.

264

Four Lawrence Livermore researchers named 2013 APS Fellows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 For immediate release: 12/23/2013 | NR-13-12-06 Four Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have been selected as 2013 fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). They include, from left: Charles Cerjan, Ian Thompson, Eric Schwegler and Marilyn Schneider. Four Lawrence Livermore researchers named 2013 APS Fellows Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov LIVERMORE, Calif. - Four Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have been selected as 2013 fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). Physicist Charles Cerjan was cited by the Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics for "seminal contributions to time-dependent Schrodinger equation propagation algorithms and their application to particle scattering and intense field dynamics, the development of laser-produced

265

CX-003136: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

136: Categorical Exclusion Determination 136: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Collect Soil Samples Near the Chariot, Alaska Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Cape Thompson, Alaska Office(s): Legacy Management The United States Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management proposes to conduct a limited soil investigation in the vicinity of five Project Chariot test holes (Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, and XI). The purpose of the investigation is to determine if diesel-range organics are present in the soils as a result of geologic characterization activities conducted at the site between 1959 and 1962. The investigation would be conducted in response to concerns of regional inhabitants that residual contamination may remain in the site soils.

266

Microsoft Word - Cover Page - Exhibit 10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Northern Pass Project Area Map of Border Crossing CANADA Northern Pass Transmission LLC is the owner of the U.S. transmission facilities Hydro-Quebec TransEnergie is the owner of the Canadian transmission facilities Border Crossing 45.017820, -71.501217 Vermont Pittsburg Errol Milan Stark Berlin Stratford Bethlehem Odell Carroll Dixville Littleton Success Columbia Clarksville Dummer Jefferson Millsfield Lancaster Jackson Randolph Shelburne Cambridge Franconia Dalton Beans Purchase Colebrook Gorham Lisbon Stewartstown Whitefield Lyman Kilkenny Chatham Second College Northumberland Dixs Grant Sugar Hill Low & Burbanks Bath Landaff Wentworths Location Lincoln Sargents Purchase Cutts Grant Atkinson & Gilmanton Thompson & Meserve Beans Grant Monroe Crawfords Purchase Hart's Location Greens Grant Pinkham's Grant

267

Traer Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Traer Wind Traer Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Traer Wind Facility Traer Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Norsemen Wind Energy LLC Developer Clark Thompson Energy Purchaser Traer Municipal Electric Utility Location Traer IA Coordinates 42.15242792°, -92.46557236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.15242792,"lon":-92.46557236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK REPAIR CAPACITY IN HUMAN DIPLOID FIBROBLASTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK REPAIR CAPACITY IN HUMAN DIPLOID FIBROBLASTS Paul F. Wilson, John M. Hinz, Peter B. Nham, Salustra S. Urbin, Cynthia B. Thomas, Irene M. Jones, and Larry H. Thompson Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA The induction of bi-stranded clustered DNA damage (BCD), which includes direct DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), is a hallmark of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Incorrectly repaired DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements and an increased risk of genomic instability and cancer. Because there is polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes and much of this variation is predicted to have a functional impact, healthy people likely vary in their capacity to repair DSBs and other BCD. This project

269

Ronald E. Gill (NE), Scoville, ID - Level I Curtis Roth (EM), Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E. Gill (NE), E. Gill (NE), Scoville, ID - Level I Curtis Roth (EM), Idaho Falls, ID - Level I Jared T. Howerton (NNSA), Oak Ridge, TN - Level I Richard L. Person (NNSA), DOE HQ - Level I Phillip (Tony) A. Polk (EM), Aiken, SC (Savannah River) - Level IV Jane Powell-Dolan (LM), Cincinnati, OH - Level I Eric M. Thompson (NNSA), Oak Ridge, TN - Level II Congratulations to our newly certified FPDs! The Certification Review Board (CRB or 'the Board') convened on Friday, Sep- tember 24 to review certifi- cation candidates and dis- cuss several topics. The Department of Energy (DOE) met the FY2010 tar- gets for the Root Cause Analysis, Corrective Action Plan metrics 7 and 8, as fol- lows: DOE surpassed the target for Metric #7 (95% of pro-

270

Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas March 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that a project with NRG Energy has been selected to receive up to $154 million, including funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Located in Thompsons, TX, the post-combustion capture and sequestration project will demonstrate advanced technology to reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. It will also assist with enhanced oil recovery efforts from a nearby oil field. "Advancing our carbon capture and storage technology will create new jobs

271

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

272

Fine Particles in Soils  

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Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

273

Aquatic Turtles  

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Aquatic Turtles Aquatic Turtles Nature Bulletin No 632 march 11, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist AQUATIC TURTLES Turtles are old and conservative. All other living reptiles -- crocodiles, lizards and snakes -- came along much later So did birds and mammals. The group was already ancient when the giant dinosaurs made their appearance, ruled the animal kingdom during the Age of Reptiles, then became extinct. The turtles merely smiled their toothless smile and slowly went their way. With a shell that is both a house and a suit of armor, they have survived 200 million years with very few changes. Five species of aquatic turtles are more or less common in the Chicago region and three others are rare. One or more kinds can be found in each of over a hundred bodies of water in the forest preserves.

274

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

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Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

275

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

transition) transition) 6/15/1999 6/30/2011 2 three month option periods 9/30/2011 M&O 1999 http://www.id.energy.gov/PSD/AMWTPHomepage.html Mike Adams 208-526-5277 Wendy Bauer 208-526-2808 Paducah Remediation EM LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky 4/22/2010 7/21/2015 7/21/2015 Site Clean up 2009 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Pam Thompson 859-219-4056 Bill Creech 859-219-4044 Argonne National Laboratory SC UChicago Argonne, LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2015 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award Term Available 9/30/2026 M&O 2006 http://www.anl.gov/contract/ Patricia Schuneman 630-252-2956 Sergio Martinez 630-252-2075 Kristin Palmer 630-252-2127 Oak Ridge Environmental Management

276

Glenn T. Seaborg - Patents - 1960 through 1961  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 – 1961) 60 – 1961) Seaborg Page · Resources with Additional Information · Patents (1954–1958, 1959, 1962–1965) US 2,940,819 (Concentration Process for Plutonium Ions, in an Oxidation State Not Greater than +4, in Aqueous Acid Solution) G.T. Seaborg, S.G. Thompson; Jun 14, 1960. A process for concentrating plutonium is given in which plutonium is first precipitated with bismuth phosphate and then, after redissolution, precipitated with a different carrier such as lanthanum fluoride, uranium acetate, bismuth hydroxide, or niobic oxide. US 2,947,601 (Complex Fluorides of Plutonium and an Alkali Metal) G.T. Seaborg; Aug 2, 1960. A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides, such as KPuF5, KPu2F9, NaPuF5, and RbPuF5, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal-fluoride.

277

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

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Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

278

Marco Polo  

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Marco Polo Marco Polo Nature Bulletin No. 591 February 13, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist MARCO POLO In the year 1295 a man named Marco Polo returned to his native Venice with a fortune in jewels sewn inside his ragged, outlandish clothing. He had been away twenty-four years on a trip with his father, Nicolo, and his uncle, Maffeo Polo. They had been forgotten by their family and friends. Three years later he was captured during a naval battle with the Genoese and lay in prison for several months. During this time he dictated an account of his travels and experiences to a fellow prisoner who wrote down over 200 chapters in a kind of French. Thus, he left to posterity one of the greatest books of all time, "The Travels of Marco Polo. .

279

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

280

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation Intra and Interdomain Circuit Provisioning Using the OSCARS Reservation System October 1, 2006 | Author(s): Chin P. Guok, David Robertson, Mary Thompson, Jason Lee, Brian Tierney, William Johnston | Third International Conference on Broadband Communications, Networks, and Systems, IEEE/ICST. 2006. Control Plane Architecture and Design Considerations for Multi-Service Multi-Layer, Multi-Domain Hybrid Networks May 1, 2007 | Author(s): Tom Lehman , Xi Yang, Chin P. Guok, Nageswara S. V. Rao, Andy Lake, John Vollbrecht, Nasir Ghani | Presented at INFOCOM 2007, IEEE (TCHSN/ONTC). 2007. Measurements On Hybrid Dedicated Bandwidth Connections May 1, 2007 | Author(s): Nageswara S. V. Rao, William R. Wing, Qishi Wu, Nasir Ghani, Tom Lehman, Chin P. Guok, and Eli Dart |

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281

INPA Journal Club  

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Location and Directions Location and Directions The Institute is located in the Building 50 complex. The Administrative office is in Building 50, room 5005 and the Institute Common Room (meeting area, seminar room, lounge, etc.) is in room 50-5026. Most of the scientists associated with INPA are located in the Building 50 complex near the Common Room. The Institute may be reached by: Email: inpa.lbl.gov Telephone (510) 486-5074, (510) 486-4384 Fascimile (510) 486-6738 Post: MS 50R5008 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 The Administrative Office is staffed by Cathy Thompson, Anytra Henderson and Tami Blackwell Directions for INPA Journal Club Speakers To LBNL by Car: Route I-80 to LBNL Leave the freeway at the University Avenue exit Take University Ave. east to Oxford Street (over a mile).

282

Applied Science  

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Geological Sciences Geological Sciences Atomic-scale structure of the orthoclase (001)-water interface measured with high-resolution x-ray reflectivity P. Fenter, H. Teng, P. Geissbühler, J.M. Hanchar, K.L. Nagy, and N.C. Sturchio Chemical analysis of individual interplanetary dust particles G.J. Flynn, S.R. Sutton, M. Rivers, P. Eng, and M. Newville Diffusion-limited biotransformation of metal contaminants in soils/sediments: chromium T. Tokunaga, J. Wan, D. Joyner, T. Hazen, M. Firestone, E. Schwartz, S. Sutton, and M. Newville Investigation of meteorite porosity by computed microtomography G.J. Flynn, M. Rivers, and S.R. Sutton Microscale imaging of pore structure in hydrothermal sulfide chimneys using synchrotron x-ray computed tomography P. O'Day, J. Muccino, S. Thompson, M.Jew, and J. Holloway

283

Microsoft Word - ACEEE_2010_HPCD_Paper929_2010-05-21_Final_LBNL_.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Sense for the U.S. Market? Presented at: 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 2010 Steve Meyers, Victor H. Franco, Alex B. Lekov, Lisa Thompson, and Andy Sturges Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

284

Avian and Bat Assessment at the Lewes Wind Turbine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Bat Assessment at the Lewes Wind Turbine and Bat Assessment at the Lewes Wind Turbine University of Delaware College of Earth, Ocean and Environment March 1, 2013 A conference call was held with the advisory committee on February 14, 2013. On the call were Genevieve LaRouche (US Fish & Wildlife Service-USFWS), Julie Thompson (USFWS), Holly Niederriter (Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control- DNREC), and William Fintel, (President of the Sussex Bird Club), Nancy Targett (Dean, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, University of Delaware-UD CEOE), and Jeremy Firestone, Professor, UD CEOE. The Advisory Committee was presented with the results of March - October of year 2 of the study and related recommendations (see attachments 1 and 2). Last year, on June 7, 2012,

285

Notices Bldg., 901 Pilottown Road, Lewes, DE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Federal Register 4 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 249 / Friday, December 28, 2012 / Notices Bldg., 901 Pilottown Road, Lewes, DE 19958. January 17, 2013: 7-9 p.m.; Ocean County Administration Building, 101 Hooper Avenue, Public Hearing Room #119, Toms River, NJ 08754. Special Accommodations The hearings are physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to M. Jan Saunders at the Mid-Atlantic Council Office, (302) 526-5251, at least 5 days prior to the hearing date. Dated: December 21, 2012. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2012-31148 Filed 12-27-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510-22-P COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING

286

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Directors Directors 1947 Thompson 1948 Boardman 1951 Abdian 1956 Day 1959 Shannon 1979 Coyne 1991 Buffum 1997 Warnick OSTI Directors Timeline, 1994 to 1997 Walter L. Warnick, 1997 to present Office of Scientific and Technical Information Walter L. Warnick Amid emerging computing power and expanding networks now revolutionizing scientific communication, OSTI has pushed pedal to the metal to lead government search technology under the guidance of Walt Warnick. The OSTI Corollary: accelerating the spread of knowledge will accelerate discovery, has generated expansion of OSTI's longtime commitment to development of superior access to quality content. OSTI has championed relevancy ranking and federated search technology to increase access to research results. Soon after Dr. Warnick arrived at OSTI, the

287

Directors | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Directors Directors 1947 Thompson 1948 Boardman 1951 Abdian 1956 Day 1959 Shannon 1979 Coyne 1991 Buffum 1997 Warnick OSTI Directors Timeline, 1994 to 1997 Walter L. Warnick, 1997 to present Office of Scientific and Technical Information Walter L. Warnick Amid emerging computing power and expanding networks now revolutionizing scientific communication, OSTI has pushed pedal to the metal to lead government search technology under the guidance of Walt Warnick. The OSTI Corollary: accelerating the spread of knowledge will accelerate discovery, has generated expansion of OSTI's longtime commitment to development of superior access to quality content. OSTI has championed relevancy ranking and federated search technology to increase access to research results. Soon after Dr. Warnick arrived at OSTI, the

288

September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fission And Nuclear Technologies Fission And Nuclear Technologies Estimation of gas leak rates through very small orifices and channels. [From sealed PuO/sub 2/ containers under accident conditions] Bomelburg, H.J. (1977) 133 Stress analysis and evaluation of a rectangular pressure vessel. [For equipment for sampling Hanford tank radwaste] Rezvani, M.A.; Ziada, H.H. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Shurrab, M.S. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)) (1992) 78 Graphite design handbook Ho, F.H. (1988) 76 Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G. (1982) 69 Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures Chen, S.S. (1985)

289

Magnetic Field Measurements and Analysis For an Aladdin Dipole Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Measurements and Analysis Field Measurements and Analysis For an Aladdin Dipole Magnet by Kenneth M. Thompson Electromagnetic Technology Program Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, 1L 60439 L8-40 November 21, 1985 Table of Contents Summary i A. Introduction *..*.**.***.....****...**.*..*...*..***.......*..... 1 1. Magnet Description 2. Measuring System 3. Data Descriptions 1 1 3 B. Equipment **********************.***.******.*************..******* 5 1. Probe Positioning System a. Description b. Calibration 2. Field Probe a. Calibration b. Probe Center 1. Method 2. Repeatability c. Hall Gaussmeter Parameters 3. Auxiliary Probes 4. Optical Alignment Equipment 5. Power Supply 6. Magnet Cooling Water System 7. Support a. Magnet b. Manipulator 5 5 7 7 8 9 9 9 10 10 13 13

290

School Aquariums  

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Aquariums Aquariums Nature Bulletin No. 577 October 24, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SCHOOL AQUARIUMS Everybody seems to be born with a special curiosity about animals that live in water. Partly, this is because the underwater world is so different from our life on land partly because aquatic animals are of so many strange kinds or are so secretive that they are "sights unseen" to most people. The best way to get better acquainted with many of the smaller ones is to catch, in a pond or stream, some small fish, tadpoles, crayfish, snails, or any of a wide variety of water insects. Carry them back home or to school in a bucket of water. Then they can be put in glass containers where they can be kept alive, their habits watched, and their life histories studied.

291

Native Sparrows  

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Sparrows Sparrows Nature Bulletin No. 525 April 12, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NATIVE SPARROWS The commonest bird of our cities and towns, or about buildings in rural regions, is the English Sparrow. This much cussed and discussed immigrant was brought from Europe to America. about a century ago and quickly followed man across the continent. It builds large trashy nests of grass and straw, lined with feathers, under the eaves or roofs of garages, barns, sheds and porches, as well as in birdhouses. It is quarrelsome and they sang together to drive out songbirds. Sometimes it is called the House Sparrow but, strictly speaking, it is one of the Weaver Finches which build nests with a side entrance. It is not a sparrow.

292

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste 9/6/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

989 989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON, E. A. MR. SOMOROFF, A. R. DR. STELLOH-GARNER, C. MS. STOREY, R. C. MR. STUSSIE, W. A. MR. SULLIVAN, P. E. RADML TAMBURRINO, P. M. MR. TARRANT, N. J. MS. TESCH, T. G. MR. THOMAS, J. R. BGEN THOMAS, R. O. MR. THOMPSON, R. C. MR. THROCKMORTON JR., E. L. MR. TOWNSEND, D. K. MS.

293

Animal Hands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hands Hands Nature Bulletin No. 611 October 1, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMAL HANDS Muddy footprints shaped like babies' hands can be seen on almost every trash barrel in our forest preserve picnic areas. These are made by raccoons which come at night to eat discarded sandwiches, chicken bones and other food scraps. The hind feet as well as the front feet of the coon are built like hands and that its front foot, especially in mud or soft snow, leaves a print of the palm with four spread fingers and a thumb. The track of the hind foot is longer with a definite heal. The coon feels for fish, crawfish, frogs and snails along the water's edge, scrubbing each thoroughly before eating. Full of curiosity and mischief, a pet coon quickly learns to unlatch doors, play with small objects and pick people's pockets.

294

Efficient Generation of the LF Excited State of Tris-(bpy)-Ru(II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation of the Ligand Field Excited State of Generation of the Ligand Field Excited State of Tris-(2,2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II) through Sequential Two-Photon Capture by [Ru(bpy)3]2+ or Electron Capture by [Ru(bpy)3]3+ David W. Thompson, James F. Wishart, Bruce S. Brunschwig and Norman Sutin J. Phys. Chem. A, 105, 8117-8122 (2001) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The relaxation dynamics and product distribution resulting from the decay of high lying excited states generated via sequential two-photon capture by [Ru(bpy)3]2+ or electron capture by [Ru(bpy)3]3+ have been investigated by flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis techniques. In comparison to the decay dynamics for monophotonic excitation, dramatically different relaxation dynamics have been observed. High-power flash excitation yields

295

Animal Noses  

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Noses Noses Nature Bulletin No. 729 October 26, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor ANIMAL NOSES "Of all the animals, man has the poorest nose; he has virtually lost the sense of smell". Like so many general statements, that remark by Ernest Thompson Seton, the great naturalist, artist and storyteller, should be taken with a grain of salt. Seton was speaking of mammals only. Modern man does have a sense of smell and in some individuals, such as wine tasters, coffee tasters and perfumers, it is highly developed but, in general, his nose is far inferior to the smellers of other mammals. Nearly all of them have noses which provide the most acute and discriminating of the five senses: smell, sight, hearing, touch and taste. Among the few exceptions are the toothed whales, believed to have no sense of smell at all.

296

Frankincense and Myrrh  

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Frankincense and Myrrh Frankincense and Myrrh Nature Bulletin No. 548 December 13, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FRANKINCENSE AND MYRRH The Bible says that when Jesus was born in Bethlehem, "behold, there came wise men from the east". It does not say how many but tradition has it that they were three magi or, perhaps, three kings "And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary its mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh". At the end of His life on earth, after the crucifixion, we are told that Nicodemus brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, "about an hundred pound weight", which they placed in the linen shroud, "as the manner of the Jews is to bury".

297

foote-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Weather Balloon Radiosonde Automated Weather Balloon Radiosonde Launcher Development J. P. Foote, J. T. Lineberry, and B. R. Thompson ERC, Incorporated Tullahoma, Tennessee Introduction Balloon-borne radiosondes are a primary means used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to collect atmospheric data. Currently, three radiosondes are launched daily from the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during non-intensive observation periods (IOPs). During IOPs, eight radiosondes are launched daily from the Central Facility and from each of four boundary facilities, for a total of forty daily launches. Launching balloons during IOPs is a major effort, in terms both of logistics and manpower. ERC, Incorporated is currently developing an automated

298

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantification of Repair of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Diploid Human Cells Authors: David Schild,1 and Larry H. Thompson,2 Institutions: 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and 2BBR Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the biochemical lesions of primary concern in radiation related health effects. Compelling evidence from rodent and chicken model systems indicates that homologous recombinational repair (HRR) plays an essential role for cell viability in the repair of spontaneous DSBs arising during DNA replication and an important role in the repair of IR-induced DSBs. IR-induced DSBs are also repaired by error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Using hTERT-immortalized

299

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 18, 2012 May 18, 2012 CX-008766: Categorical Exclusion Determination Asphalt Repair and Concrete Work Activities at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/18/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management May 15, 2012 CX-008238: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Colorado State Capitol Building Geothermal Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.1, B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office May 9, 2012 CX-008401: Categorical Exclusion Determination Giant Track Communications Tower Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 05/09/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region May 9, 2012 CX-008381: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Thompson to Flatiron 13.8 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure

300

Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydropower conf SDOX June 2008 final [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen (SDOX(tm)) Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen (SDOX(tm)) Delivery Technology at Norfork Dam Delivery Technology at Norfork Dam Scott Osborn Chief Technology Officer Scott Osborn, Chief Technology Officer Clay Thompson, Senior Engineer Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference June 12, 2008 BlueInGreen, LLC 535 W. Research Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 (479) 527 6378 , (479) 527-6378 Background Background  Thanks to Marshall Boyken, Southwestern Power Administration Tulsa for inviting us and setting this up Administration, Tulsa for inviting us and setting this up.  The original presentation is from a meeting concerning low DO at Norfork Dam in Arkansas and how BlueInGreen's technology can address this problem.  Norfork River (tailrace) is 303(d) listed for low DO, feeds Norfork National

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301

Non-Destructive Examination Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda Registration (early registration and speaker check-in) Agenda Registration (early registration and speaker check-in) Monday, August 24, 4:00-6:00pm Tuesday, August 25, 7:00-7:45am 1 Tuesday, August 25, 2009 Session One TIME TITLE/EVENT AUTHORS/SPEAKERS ORGANIZATION 7:00 Registration - - 7:45 Administrivia and Introductions Mike Terry V3 Technical Services 8:15 SRNL & PNNL Welcome Kristine Zeigler SRNL 8:20 Opening Remarks John Shultz C. K. Liu Don Blake James Castleberry Karthik Subramanian DOE-HQ DOE-ORP DOE-SR WRPS SRR 8:45 Intro to SRS Tanks: Structures, Materials Karthik Subramanian SRR 9:10 Intro to Hanford Tanks: Structures, Materials Kayle Boomer WRPS 9:35 Break - - 9:55 HLW Tank Degradation Mechanisms Bruce Wiersma SRNL 10:20 Tank Structural Integrity Panel NDE Recommendations Bruce Thompson Iowa State Univ.

302

Brett Parker | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brett Parker Brett Parker Recent Presentations "BNL Direct Wind Magnets," (pdf) presentation dedicated to the memory of Pat Thompson given at the 22nd Magnet Technology Conference (MT22), September 11 - 16, 2011, Marseille, France A Review of BNL Direct-Wind Superconducting IR Magnet Experience, (pdf) presented at the 30th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Luminosity e+e- Collisions, October 13 - 16, 2003, Stanford, California The Serpentine Coil Design for BEPC-II Superconducting IR Magnets, (pdf) presented at the "Mini-Workshop on BEPC-II IR Design", January 12 - 16, 2004, Beijing, P.R. China Ma nufacture of a Superconducting Octupole Magnet for the ALPHA Experiment at CERN using the Direct Wind Machine Presentations Prior to 2004 Superconducting Final Focus Magnet Issues (pdf), presented at

303

Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References T. E. C. Keith, J. M. Thompson, R. A. Hutchinson, L. D. White (1992) Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Valley_Of_Ten_Thousand_Smokes_Region_Area_(Keith,_Et_Al.,_1992)&oldid=386869" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

304

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frank Russo, NA-3.6 Frank Russo, NA-3.6 Garrett Harencak, NA-10 Gerald Talbot, NA-17 Dae Chung, EM-2 Steven Krahn, EM-20 Dennis Miotla, NE-3 George Malosh, SC-3 Glenn Podonsky, HS-1 William Eckroade, HS-1 Martha Thompson, HS-1 Robert McMorland, HS-1.1 Patricia Worthington, HS-10 Andrew Lawrence, HS-20 James O'Brien, HS-21 Stephen Domotor, HS-21 Earl Hughes, HS-21 William Roege, HS-30 John Boulden, HS-40 Steven Simonson, HS-40 Kevin Dressman, HS-41 Richard Day, HS-42 Thomas Staker, HS-60 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Chicago Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office

305

Horns and Antlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horns and Antlers Horns and Antlers Nature Bulletin No. 730 November 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist HORNS AND ANTLERS A great many large grazing or browsing animals, the ones which have cloven hoofs and chew their cud, are armed with either horns or antlers. These weapons are used for defense against the attacks of bloodthirsty enemies and in duels between males for possession of a female or a harem of females. Although both horns and antlers are borne on the head and have similar uses, they are very different structures. Most of the world's cattle, sheep and goats -- both wild and domesticated -- have horns. In North America the only living horn- bearers are those noble beasts, the bison (usually called buffalo), the musk ox, the Rocky Mountain goat and the bighorn sheep.

306

Dale Perry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Not Available Not Available Dale Perry Laser Technologies Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70-1150 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 70-0111E (510) 486-4819 DLPerry@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 1997 Perry, Dale L., Albert C. Thompson, Richard E. Russo, Xianglei Mao, and Karen L. Chapman. "Characterization of quaternary metal oxide films by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe." Applied Spectroscopy 51, no. 12 (1997): 1781-1783. 1995 Mao, Xianglei, Dale L. Perry, and Richard E. Russo. "Thin films of Calcium-Nickel-Potassium oxide fabricated by pulsed laser deposition." High Temperature and Materials Science 33 (1995): 117-123.

307

2005 Users Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Register Program Workshops Abstracts Exhibitors Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Register Submit Abstract Print Meeting Poster * 11x17 * 8.5x11 Exhibitors Schedule-at-a-glance Events Elections Travel & Housing General Information Committees APS Home CNM Home Past Meetings * 2005 * 2004 Deadline Dates March 28th Abstracts (posters and talks) April 1st Registration for non-U.S.citizens April 15th Housing reservations Registration without late fee Program Committee Carol Thompson, APS Chair Samuel Bader, CNM Chair Julie Cross (APS) Stephan Ginell (APS) Thomas Gog (APS) Jörg Maser (APS/CNM) Awards 2005 Compton Award Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz received the 2005 Compton Award for "pioneering and developing the field of x-ray microscopy using Fresnel zone plates."

308

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03 Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Weldon Spring Chemical Co. (MO.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site Documents Related to Weldon Spring Chemical Co. Summary of Work Session - Focus Area: Monitoring and Maintenance. Summary of Weldon Spring Long-Term Stewardship Plan Public Workshop. Summary of Work Session - Focus Area: Communication and Public Involvement. Land Use and Institutional Controls and Homeland SecurityFocus Area Work SessionWeldon Spring SiteInterpretive CenterDecember 5, 20022 Agenda7:00 p.m.Welcome, Pam Thompson, Manager, Weldon SpringObjective of

309

2004 Users Meeting for the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 3-6, 2004 May 3-6, 2004 Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois DATES TO REMEMBER March 15 Franklin Award deadline April 1 Registration deadline for non-U.S. citizens April 5 Abstract deadline April 19 Housing deadline Registration deadline . Technical Program Schedule-at-a-Glance Comprehensive Program Workshops Banquet Exhibitors/Sponsors Participation Call for Poster Abstracts APSUO Steering Committee Elections VOTE NOW Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award Practical Matters Registration Form General Information Travel and Housing Arrangements CNM Meeting Meeting Information APS Users Organization Steering Committee Stephen Durbin, Chairman Mark Rivers, Vice-Chairman Malcolm Capel Lin Chen David Cookson Julie Cross Stephan Ginell Gene Ice Lisa Keefe John Rose Sunil Sinha Carol Thompson

310

LINE Commission Visits Idaho National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LINE Commission Visits Idaho National Laboratory Members of the state of Idaho�s Leadership in Nuclear Energy (LINE) Commission recently visited the Idaho National Laboratory and related DOE-Idaho cleanup facilities. These photos show commission members at the Materials and Fuels Complex, where Steve Marschman from INL talks to the commission members, and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility. At the AMWTP, members saw the supercompactor as Facility Manager Jeremy Hampton explained how it worked. Participants included, from top right in the INL: INL Laboratory Director John Grossenbacher; North Wind Group President Sylvia Median; former Idaho U.S. Senator Larry Craig; Idaho Department of Labor�s Dwight Johnson; BEA Government Affairs Boise Manager Brian Whitlock; and Idaho House District 33 Rep. Jeff Thompson.

311

Plows and Plowing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plows and Plowing Plows and Plowing Nature Bulletin No. 520 March 8, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLOWS AND PLOWING At a country crossroads about five miles northeast of Joliet, Illinois, is a weathered stone monument with this inscription: "In memory of John Lane who made the first steel plow in 1833 on this farm. " He is one of hundreds of farmer-inventors who have made American agricultural tools and labor-saving machinery known and envied throughout the world. In contrast to the slow cumbersome methods of the Old World, our efficient well-designed farm implements have speeded up and lightened almost every task. The American farmer now produces more with less labor than any other on earth.

312

BNL | Stefan Tafrov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stefan Tafrov Stefan Tafrov Research Interests Understanding the molecular organization of the chromatin and the changes in it during replication, transcription, silencing, repair etc. Development of models for examining the effects of the radiation over human skin cells. Molecular biology of the yeast Saccharamyces. Recent News Thanks Again, to BNL's Mentors Selected Publications Sampath V., Liu B., Tafrov S., Srinivasan M., Rieger R., Chen E.I., and Sternglanz R. Biochemical characterization of Hpa2 and Hpa3-two small closely related acetyltransferases from S. cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem., [Epub ahead of print] (2013 Jun 17). PubMed Lebel E.A., Rusek A., Sivertz M.B., Yip K., Thompson K.H., and Tafrov S.T. Analyses of the secondary particle radiation and the DNA damage it causes

313

The Little Red Schoolhouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Little Red Schoolhouse Little Red Schoolhouse Nature Bulletin No. 424 September 10, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LITTLE RED SCHOOLHOUSE We have opened the doors of The Little Red Schoolhouse, our new nature center in the Palos forest preserves. You are invited to visit it and urged to use it. Many youth organizations, summer day camps, and teachers with their classes have already done so. It is now open every day, including Saturdays and Sundays, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. From late October until April it probably will be closed. The entrance is on 104th Ave. (Willow Springs Road), one mile west of U.S. 45 and a half-mile south of 95th St. There is ample parking space for buses.

314

Real Goods Solar Santa Cruz | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goods Solar Santa Cruz Goods Solar Santa Cruz Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Real Goods Solar Santa Cruz Name Real Goods Solar Santa Cruz Address 1115 Thompson Avenue, #1 Place Santa Cruz, California Zip 95062 Sector Solar Year founded 1978 Phone number 831-477-0943 Website http://www.realgoodssolar.com/ Coordinates 36.967958°, -121.971606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.967958,"lon":-121.971606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Story City Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Story City Wind Story City Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Story City Wind Facility Story City Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hamilton Wind Energy LLC Developer Clark Thompson Energy Purchaser Story City Municipal Electric Utility Location Story City IA Coordinates 42.186602°, -93.561374° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.186602,"lon":-93.561374,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Wampum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wampum Wampum Nature Bulletin No. 725 September 26, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WAMPUM What is wampum? According to stories about the early colonists, it was Indian money made out of shells. However, wampum -- short for the Algonquian word wampumpeag--means strings of shell beads or belts woven from shell beads. True wampum beads had certain sizes, shapes and colors. Each bead, about one-fourth of an inch long, was cylindrical with a hole drilled lengthwise to form a tube. There were two colors: white ones made from a large sea snail called a whelk, and dark purple ones from the quahog -- a saltwater clam of the north Atlantic coast. They were polished glassy smooth and strung on sinew cords or embroidered in patterns on strips of deer skin to make belts.

317

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 results: 12 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Victor H. Franco [Clear All Filters] 2013 Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, and Stephen Meyers. "Evaluation of energy efficiency standards for residential clothes dryers in the USA." Energy Efficiency (2013). 2012 Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, and Stephen Meyers. "Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US." Scientific Research doi:10.4236/ojee.2012.12 (2012): 9-20. Lutz, James D., Asa S. Hopkins, Virginie E. Letschert, Victor H. Franco, and Andrew Sturges. "Using National Survey Data to Estimate Lifetimes of Residential Appliances." HVAC&R Research (2012). 2011 Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, Lisa Thompson, and

318

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 G 10 G . Drexel/ M. Poligone F i l e no. 7315/124 s b j e c t Determination of Additional D o t e Contaminated Areas at AAS March 17, 1994 Copies to J. Allison G. Palau K. Thompson A. John At Oak Ridge Ext. 6-5173 The purpose of this memorandum is t o provide results from characterization activities at the Former Associated Aircraft Site (AAS) in Fairfield, Ohio. Additional areas of contamination requiring remediation were identified during these activities. Areas that are currently known to exhibit elevated readings, and were not in the original scope of work are shown in Figure 3. To summarize, the areas added are located in the following areas; North of Zone V in the bathroom area (north of the locker room) and the office (located north of the caged area)

319

G< TEI-779 MASTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c*£ c*£ & G< TEI-779 MASTER (fA/L-y-yj. U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGIC INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF PROJECT CHARIOT, PHASE 111, IN THE VICINITY OF CAPE THOMPSON, NORTH- WESTERN ALASKA Preliminary Report By Reuben Kachadoorian Russell H. Campbell George W. Moore David W. Scholl January 1961 Arthur H. Lachenbruch Rex V. Allen Gordon W. Greene Roger M. Waller B. Vaughn Marshall Marvin J. Slaughter David F. Barnes This report is preliminary and has not been edited for con- formity with Geological Survey format and nomenclature. Geological Survey Washington, D. C. Prepared by Geological Survey for the UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Office of Technical Information L E G A L N O T I C E This report was prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United

320

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Calendar Thurs., December 7 12:00 p.m. Special Particle Astrophysics Seminar - The Dark Side (WH-6W) (NOTE DATE, TIME, LOCATION) Speaker: G. Rigoloulos, Universit Utrecht Title: The Evolution of Non-Linear Perturbations in Inflation 1:00 p.m. ALCPG ILC Physics and Detector Seminar - West Wing (WH-10NW) Speaker: M. Thompson, University of Cambridge Title: Particle Flow Algorithms: Current Status 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: C. Berger, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Title: Bootstrapping One-Loop Amplitudes (Needles in Large HaystaCks) 4:00 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - Curia II (NOTE LOCATION) Speaker: M. Convery, Fermilab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

322

EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo 61: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed 150 megawatt Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, in Hyde County, South Dakota, with DOE's Western Area Power Administration's existing Fort Thompson Substation in Buffalo County, South Dakota. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 19, 2011 EIS-0461: Notice of Cancellation of the Environmental Impact Statement Hyde County Wind energy Center Project November 30, 2010 EIS-0461: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

323

Observed physical processes in mechanical tests of PBX9501 and recomendations for experiments to explore a possible plasticity/damage threshold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo discusses observations that have been made in regards to a series of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial experiments performed on PBX9501 by Darla Thompson under Enhanced Surveilance Campaign support. These observations discussed in Section Cyclic compression observations strongly suggest the presence of viscoelastic, plastic, and damage phenomena in the mechanical response of the material. In Secton Uniaxial data analysis and observations methods are discussed for separating out the viscoelastic effects. A crude application of those methods suggests the possibility of a critical stress below which plasticity and damage may be negligible. The threshold should be explored because if it exists it will be an important feature of any constitutive model. Additionally, if the threshold exists then modifications of experimental methods may be feasible which could potentially simplify future experiments or provide higher quality data from those experiments. A set of experiments to explore the threshold stress are proposed in Section Exploratory tests program for identifying threshold stress.

Buechler, Miles A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Kidd, Bruce and John Mcfarlane. The Death of Hockey. New Press. Toronto, ON. 1972. Kilbourn, William, Ed. Religion in Canada: The Spiritual Development of a Nation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ience. Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd. London, UK. 1977. Van Manen, Max. Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy. State University of New York Press. Albany, NY. 1990. White, Philip. "Sports: why do we care so much?" In Taking Sport Seriously: Social Issues in Canadian Sport. Peter Donnelly, Editor. Thompson Educational Publishing, Inc. Toronto, Ontario. 1997. 19-21. Zeitlin, Irving M. Ideology and the Development of Sociological Theory. 6 Edition. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ. 1997. 161 Carrier, Roch. Our Life with the Rocket: The Maurice Richard Story. Translated from the French by Sheila Fischman. Penguin Books Canada Ltd. Toronto, ON. 2001. Casey, Edward S. Getting Back Into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World. Indiana University Press. Bloomington & Indiana. 1993. ______________. Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. 2 Edition. Indiana University Press. Bloomington and Indiana. 2000. Cult

Mclelland And Stewart; Lisa Anne Gunderson; Lisa Anne Gunderson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NUCLEAR BATTERY-THERMOCOUPLE TYPE SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The potential usefulness of approximately 1300 radioactive isotopes as a heat source for the thermoelectric generator was investigated. Only 47 were found to have the proper characteristics of high specific activity and usable haif-life combined with an easily absorbable radiation. These isotopes are discussed showing possible sources of supply, the hazards involved, and the expected performance. Three large Po/sup 210/ heat sources were designed and constructed (for battery use), including one for the SNAP III generator. One small Tl/sup 204/ test heat source was made by irradiation. Eight thermoelectric generators were developed and two of these were used as thermoelectric batteries. Theoretical equations for non-semiconductor thermoelectric materials and experimental measurements to verify the Thompson and Peltier effects are given. (auth)

Blanke, B.C.; Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.; Murphy, E.L.

1960-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cooperation Between Homologous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Suppressor Proteins in Minimizing Spontaneous and Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability Authors: Larry H. Thompson, John M. Hinz, Robert S. Tebbs, and N. Alice Yamada Institutions: Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Purpose and experimental approach. This study addresses the genetic basis of spontaneous mutagenesis as a means of understanding the DNA damage-response pathways that maintain chromosome stability. It is our view that knowledge of these processes is fundamental to understanding how low dose ionizing radiation (IR) produces chromosomal rearrangements that lead to carcinogenesis. Endogenous oxidative DNA damage is presumed to be a

327

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 10030 of 28,905 results. 21 - 10030 of 28,905 results. Download CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT http://energy.gov/downloads/california-recovery-act-snapshot Download CX-004461: Categorical Exclusion Determination Taft-Hot Springs #1 Landing Construction, Access Road and Structure Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 10/26/2010 Location(s): Thompson Falls, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004461-categorical-exclusion-determination Article New Funding from DOE Boosts Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development Investment of more than $62 million from Recovery Act reflects Administration's aggressive approach for carbon capture http://energy.gov/articles/new-funding-doe-boosts-carbon-capture-and-storage-research-and-development

328

GUIDELINES FOR ORGANIZATION OF TECHNICAL REPORTS (DEC 1999)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling and Coring Operations Drilling and Coring Operations Topical Report January 28, 2003 to March 19, 2004 by Ali Kadaster (Anadarko Petroleum Corp.) Bill Liddell (Anadarko Petroleum Corp.) Tommy Thompson (Anadarko Petroleum Corp.) Thomas Williams (Maurer Technology Inc.) Michael Niedermayr (Noble Engineering and Development) February 2005 DE-FC26-01NT41331 (Task 9.2) Anadarko Petroleum Corp. 1201 Lake Robbins Drive The Woodlands, Texas 77380 Maurer Technology Inc. 13135 South Dairy Ashford, Suite 800 Sugar Land, Texas 77478 Noble Engineering and Development, Ltd. 13135 South Dairy Ashford, Suite 800 Sugar Land, Texas 77478 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

329

Candles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Candles Candles Nature Bulletin No. 590 Febraury 6, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist CANDLES The first candles probably consisted of dried rushes soaked in grease. Homemade rushlights were commonly used in England as late as 1800 because, although they smoked and smelled horribly, they were so cheap. In the Bible, candles are mentioned several times but there is no information on how or of what they were made. Eventually someone discovered the method of making a "tallow dip" with a wick running longitudinally through its center. The wick -- a few threads of flax, hemp, or cotton, lightly twisted or plaited -- was dipped in melted tallow and allowed to cool, again and again, until the candle had a desired thickness.

330

Cotton  

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Cotton Cotton Nature Bulletin No. 464 September 29, 1956 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COTTON Illinois is considered a northern state. Travelers are astonished when they see fields of cotton in its southernmost counties. They do not realize that Cairo, where the Ohio river empties into the Mississippi, is on the same parallel of latitude as the north boundaries of three cotton- growing states: Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona. Cotton, a tropical plant which has been adapted to temperate regions where there is a growing season of six months or more, is the world's most important source of fiber. Man depends mainly upon cotton for his clothing and other textiles. Countless uses have been found for it and its by-products. It enters into the daily life of more of the world's peoples than any other product except salt.

331

National Best Practices Manual for Building High Performance Schools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices Manual Best Practices Manual For Building High Performance Schools Acknowledgements The U.S. Department of Energy would like to acknowledge the help and assistance of the EnergySmart Schools team and the many authors and reviewers that provided input and feedback during the process of developing the report. Those include: US Department of Energy: David Hansen, Daniel Sze; EnergySmart Schools Team: Larry Schoff; US Environmental Protection Agency: Melissa Payne, Bob Thompson; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Rick Diamond; National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Ren Anderson, Zahra Chaudhry, Jeff Clarke, Kyra Epstein, Tony Jimenez, Patty Kappaz, Patricia Plympton, Byron Stafford, Marcy Stone, John Thornton, Paul Torcellini; Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Andre Desjarlais,

332

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 24260 of 31,917 results. 51 - 24260 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003196: Categorical Exclusion Determination Emergency Crossarm Replacement at Structure 39/7 and Access Road Maintenance along the Existing Tucson-Apache 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line in Pima County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/08/2010 Location(s): Pima County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003196-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Collect Soil Samples Near the Chariot, Alaska Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Cape Thompson, Alaska Office(s): Legacy Management http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003136-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003621: Categorical Exclusion Determination

333

URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE BELLEFIELD BOILERPLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Environmental Questionnaire for the demonstration at the Bellefield Boiler Plant (BBP) was submitted to the national Energy Technology Laboratory. An R&D variance for the air permit at the BBP was sought from the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). R&D variances for the solid waste permits at the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC), and Emery Tree Service (ETS) were sought from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Construction wood was acquired from Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation. Verbal authorizations were received in all cases. Memoranda of understanding were executed by the University of Pittsburgh with BBP, JARC and ETS. Construction wood was collected from Thompson Properties and from Seven D Corporation. Forty tons of pallet and construction wood were ground to produce BioGrind Wood Chips at JARC and delivered to Mon Valley Transportation Company (MVTC). Five tons of construction wood were hammer milled at ETS and half of the product delivered to MVTC. Blends of wood and coal, produced at MVTC by staff of JARC and MVTC, were shipped by rail to BBP. The experimental portion of the project was carried out at BBP in late March and early April 2001. Several preliminary tests were successfully conducted using blends of 20% and 33% wood by volume. Four one-day tests using a blend of 40% wood by volume were then carried out. Problems of feeding and slagging were experienced with the 40% blend. Light-colored fly ash was observed coming from the stack during all four tests. Emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx and total particulates, measured by Energy Systems Associates, decreased when compared with combusting coal alone. A procedure for calculating material and energy balances on BBP's Boiler No.1 was developed, using the results of an earlier compliance test at the plant. Material and energy balances were then calculated for the four test periods. Boiler efficiency was found to decrease slightly when the fuel was shifted from coal to the 40% blend. Neither commercial production of sized urban waste wood for the energy market in Pittsburgh nor commercial cofiring of wood/coal blends at BBP are anticipated in the near future.

James T. Cobb Jr.; Gene E. Geiger; William W. Elder III; William P. Barry; Jun Wang; Hongming Li

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Musk Ox  

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Musk Ox Musk Ox Nature Bulletin No. 740 January 25, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE MUSK OX Why are bones of the arctic musk ox found here in Illinois? The evidence shows that these remains date back to the Ice Age when mile- deep ice sheets covered Canada and large parts of the United States, Europe and Asia. At that time the musk ox was one of the few hardy animals that thrived along the edges of these ice sheets. Then, for thousands of years, as the climate warmed and the glaciers melted, the musk oxen followed the retreating glaciers northward. Today, they survive only on the bleak tundras of Alaska, northern Canada and the coast of Greenland . The musk ox looks somewhat like a small, unusually shaggy buffalo. It is built and upholstered for life in the most rugged climate on earth, where blizzards howl and temperatures 50 degrees below zero are common. Adult bulls weigh 500 pounds or more but appear heavier because of their thick padding of hair and wool. Cows are smaller. The dark brown to black hair -- two feet or longer on the neck, chest, sides and hind quarters -- hangs like an ankle-length skirt. The horns of both sexes are sharp, vicious weapons.

335

Rabies  

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Rabies Rabies Nature Bulletin No. 719 May 25, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist RABIES On October 29, 1959, a girl fell from her bicycle in an Evanston alley and probably was bitten by a bat lying on the ground. Fortunately the bat was taken to the state public health laboratory where it was found to be infected with rabies. The girl was promptly given the Pasteur treatment which protected her against possible infection by that disease. Since then -- over three and one-half years later -- there has been no other case of rabies in animals reported from Cook County. This is in sharp contrast with the rabies outbreak of a decade ago when in one year 123 cases were found among dogs. Of those, 75 were in Chicago. At the same time several cases were reported in cats, cows, wild foxes and skunks. An emergency quarantine of dogs, their compulsory vaccination against rabies, and a cleanup of strays was so effective that only five cases were found in Cook County in 1955 and a single one in 1956.

336

Plant Rosettes  

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Rosettes Rosettes Nature Bulletin No. 662 January 13, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLANT ROSETTES In winter our landscape is mostly leafless trees silhouetted against the sky, and the dead stalks of wildflowers, weeds and tall grasses -- with or without a blanket of snow. Some snows lie on the ground for only a few days. Others follow one after another and cover the ground with white for weeks at a time. Soon the eye begins to hunger for a glimpse of something green and growing. Then, in sunny spots where the snow has melted or where youngsters have cleared it away, there appear clusters of fresh green leaves pressed tight to the soil. Whether it is a dandelion in the lawn, a pansy in a flower border, or a thistle in a vacant lot, such a typical leaf cluster -- called a winter rosette -- is a ring of leaves around a short central stem. The leaves are narrow at the base, wider toward the tip, and spread flat on the ground with little or no overlap. This arrangement gives full exposure to sunlight and close contact with the warmer soil beneath. Such plants continue to grow, sometimes faster, sometimes slower, even under snow, throughout winter.

337

Animals that Hide Underground  

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Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

338

The Skokie Lagoons  

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Skokie Lagoons Skokie Lagoons Nature Bulletin No. 646 September 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE SKOKIE LAGOONS The Skokie Lagoons and their surroundings comprise a remarkable development of which we in the Forest Preserve District are extremely proud. They lie in the valley west of three north shore suburbs -- Wilmette, Winnetka and Glencoe -- between Willow Road and Dundee Road. They fulfill a dream of many people for many years: the transformation of a great marsh, ruined by drainage ditches, into an area as notable for its scenic beauty as for the recreation it provides. The Skokie valley lies between two broad ridges of glacial drift. Originally, the southern portion was an elongated shallow bay of ancient Lake Chicago when that ancestor of Lake Michigan was at its highest level. As the lake level dropped the bay became a marsh. Into and out of it flowed a stream, now called the Skokie River or East Fork, that drained a watershed extending northward beyond Waukegan. Emerging, its course was deflected westward by a long sand bar until, joined by the Middle Fork, they could turn southward and, joined by the West Fork, form the North Branch of the Chicago River.

339

Bees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bees Bees Nature Bulletin No. 13 May 5, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation BEES Last week, in a big hollow tree that had been blown down, we found a squirrel's den, a screech owl's nest, and the comb of a hive of honey- bees. There are many such bee-trees in the forest preserves. They may be located by following the flight of the bees because once it has taken on its load of pollen and honey, a bee returns to the hive in a straight "bee-line. "Dr. David H. Thompson tells of a big elm in Indiana that yielded 350 pounds of honey. Honey-bees are the original communists. Like the bumblebee, the wasp and the ant, they live in large colonies (sometimes 50,000 individuals), and are called social insects. They live in a commune where the citizens govern, where the many kings (drones) are powerless, and where the one queen works as hard as any of her subjects and longer. They have an elaborate caste system, with specific tasks for certain classes of workers.

340

Kitchen Botany  

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Kitchen Botany Kitchen Botany Nature Bulletin No. 684 September 8, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist KITCHEN BOTANY The corner grocery store and the local fruit stand offer a variety of plant materials that can be grown and studied in the schoolroom or laboratory. At any time of year, fruit seeds and root vegetables of many kinds can be made to germinate, take root and thrive indoors. In addition to those from the orchards, home gardens and truck farms of this region, it is possible to grow seedlings of a number of tropical fruits. Most of the contents of this bulletin are taken from a recent article by Blair Coursen, published in Turtox News. A few simple supplies including flower pots, boxes or trays of garden soil are the only equipment needed. A school terrarium or leaky aquarium can be used to advantage. A good hand lens or microscope, though not essential, can show some of the finer details of roots, stems, leaves and developing seeds not visible to the naked eye.

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341

Columbus Day  

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Columbus Day Columbus Day Nature Bulletin No. 651 Oct6ober 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLUMBUS DAY October 12th, 1492, was a great turning point in history. On that day Christopher Columbus, with 87 men in three small sailing vessels, sighted the low hills of a little island in the West Indies which he named San Salvador. Although he made three more voyages across the Atlantic he never realized that, instead of a route to the Orient, he had discovered a whole New World. With favorable winds they had sailed westward from the Canary Islands for 33 days and nights without sighting land. As they ran before the wind day after day into unknown seas the crews began to grumble that they would starve before they could make their way back to Spain. On the 6th day a brilliant meteor was an ill omen to the superstitious sailors. To quiet their fears somewhat, Columbus kept two ship's logs: a private record of his own showing the true distances traveled, and a second one -- for the crew -- in which each day's run was reduced.

342

Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

344

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650 October 7, 1961 650 October 7, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO Few people realize that there is enough native wildlife worth mentioning in roaring, jam-packed Chicago, nor that very much of it is left in its fringe of adjoining suburbs. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Just as rural people become accustomed to urban life, some wild birds and mammals have adjusted to city life and are holding their own. A few kinds seem to be more numerous in parts of metropolitan Chicago than they were in those same areas a hundred years ago. The white-tailed deer, long extinct in this part of Illinois, is on the increase in the Chicago region. In recent winters two of them, perhaps chased by dogs, were rescued from the ice on the lake front -- one at Jackson Park and the other in the Calumet region.

345

Microsoft Word - SAFARI 2000_special_ed_refs_20040804.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South African Journal of Science South African Journal of Science Volume 98 Number 3/4 March/April 2002 (http://www.nrf.ac.za/sajs/co_mar02.stm ) Southern Africa's ecosystem in a test-tube: a perspective on the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) - H.J. Annegarn, L. Otter, R.J. Swap and R.J. Scholes....111 SAFARI 2000 Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): summary of science plan - R.J. Swap, H.J. Annegarn and L. Otter...119 The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): overview of the dry season field campaign - R.J. Swap, H.J. Annegarn, J.T. Suttles, J. Haywood, M.C. Helmlinger, C. Hely, P.V. Hobbs, B.N. Holben, J. Ji, M.D. King, T. Landmann, W. Maenhaut, L. Otter, B. Pak, S.J. Piketh, S. Platnick, J. Privette, D. Roy, A.M. Thompson, D. Ward and R. Yokelson....125

346

The Dogwoods  

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Dogwoods Dogwoods Nature Bulletin No. 490 April 20, 1957 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE DOGWOODS According to Christian legends the Flowering Dogwood was used to make Jesus' cross because, at that time, it grew as large and sturdy as an oak. During the crucifixion, sensing the dogwood's sadness at being put to such a cruel use, He promised that henceforth, it shall be slender, bent and twisted; never again to be used for a cross. Easter and spring both stand for the coming of new life. Our floral parade begins early with the bizarre fleshy bloom of the skunk cabbage and reaches a peak in early May. However, the flowering dogwood is lacking. It is native throughout most of the eastern half of the United States, but Chicago people must take week-end trips to downstate Illinois or Indiana to see it in bloom. There, on slopes and in woodlands, beneath the still leafless taller trees, its blossoms will flush the landscape like an untimely May snowstorm. A single one of its showy blooms is a dense head of tiny greenish flowers set in a white flower-like cup. What appear to be four broad petals with puckered notches at their tips are not true petals at all but the greatly expanded scales of the winter flower buds. In some of the eastern and southern states these may be pink or rose-colored.

347

School Trips & Projects in Spring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Projects in Spring & Projects in Spring Nature Bulletin No. 484 March 9, 1957 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SCHOOL TRIPS & PROJECTS IN SPRINg Spring is the morning of the year when nature reawakens. The days become noticeably longer and warmer. We feel an urge to get out-of- doors and see green growing plants, early wildflowers, and swelling buds on trees and shrubs; see and hear birds returning from their winter homes; hear the mating songs of frogs and toads. The nearest forest preserve, park, meadow or hedgerow -- even a city street or weedy vacant lot -- will have a wealth of plant and animal life. March is a chancy month for field trips but spring can be perking in a classroom before many signs of it appear outdoors. One twig of a forsythia bush, placed in a bottle of water, will soon display its yellow flowers; willow and aspen twigs will develop fat fuzzy catkins; the end of branches from cottonwood, soft maple and elm trees will reveal how some of their winter buds produce flowers and others burst into leaves. The long reddish catkins on a male cottonwood are showy but the small flowers of a maple or an elm are no less beautiful, although seldom noticed on the trees.

348

Snapping Turtles  

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Snapping Turtles Snapping Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 7 March 24, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Dr. David H. Thompson, Zoologist SNAPPING TURTLES A SNAPPING TURTLE, a BLANDING'S TURTLE and two PAINTED TURTLES were found along the shores of McGinnis Slough on March 10. They were alive but very sluggish. On March 17, nineteen snappers, another Blanding and several painted turtles were found alive. All were very sluggish although it was a warm, sunny day. The two largest snappers, weighing about 25 pounds each, later died. Numbers of dead painted turtles were found along the shore. This was unusually early for turtles to be out. Turtles and frogs "hole up" for the winter and hibernate in the mud under the ice. When animals hibernate, their body processes do not stop completely; they merely slow way down. Some species slow down more than others but all of them continue to breathe or use oxygen, and their hearts continue to beat very slowly. Although turtles can remain under water for long periods in the hot summer, they have lungs and must come up to breathe air once in a while. So it is with frogs. Both turtles and frogs must have some oxygen when they hibernate for the winter under the ice. They get this oxygen by absorbing oxygen, dissolved in the water, through the membranes of their mouths and throats. Some kinds of animals may also take dissolved oxygen in through their skins.

349

Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snow Snow Nature Bulletin No. 588 January 23, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SNOW Snow is one of nature's most remarkable phenomena and of incalculable benefit to mankind. It brings fun and adventure, beauty and tranquillity, to young and old. Like anything else, there can be too much of it -- especially in metropolitan areas -- but, fundamentally, snow is good for the land and in the final analysis we all depend upon the land. Farmers and gardeners dread a snowless period of bitter cold. They welcome snow because a thick porous blanket of it, having myriads of air spaces, is nature's best insulator for roots and bulbs in the ground. For example, one test revealed that when the air temperature at the surface of a deep snow was 27 below zero, the temperature of the soil at a depth of seven inches underground was 24 above zero -- an amazing difference of 51 degrees.

350

Covered Bridges  

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Covered Bridges Covered Bridges Nature Bulletin No. 644 June 3, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COVERED BRIDGES Covered bridges have a peculiar fascination for most of us. W e wish they could talk. Many of them are truly historic landmarks. Each one is a unique and picturesque relic of the days when .America was a young country. As a locality became more thickly settled the people demanded roads, improved roads, with bridges across creeks and rivers where fords or ferries had been the only means of crossing. There were no steel mills. But there were skilled woodsmen and virgin forests with huge trees from which they could fashion timbers of any dimension and length desired. Equally important, in certain regions there were master builders: craftsmen with shrewd knowledge of stresses and strains in trusses and arches. That is why covered bridges were and are so numerous in Vermont, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. Lack of such men may explain the absence of those structures in Minnesota and other states where timber was plentiful.

351

Springs  

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Springs Springs Nature Bulletin No. 618 November 19, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SPRINGS Springs -- cold, clear springs bubbling from hillsides or welling up from secret depths -- played an important part in the settlement of these United States from the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia and the Great Smokies in Tennessee to the Ozarks of Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas. Always more plentiful in mountainous and hilly country, they were much more numerous and vigorous in those days before the great forests were cut over or destroyed. Then, most of the rainfall was retained and sank into the ground. Springs are fed by ground water. An early settler, penetrating a frontier wilderness with his family and their meager possessions, traveled and searched until he found a suitable home-site. That was determined not only by the quality of the land and what brew on it but also by the availability of water and timber. Although some preferred to dig a well, fearful that the dreaded milk sickness and "the shakes" or ague might lurk in spring water, a favorite location was near some good "strong" spring.

352

Carpenter Ants  

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Carpenter Ants Carpenter Ants Nature Bulletin No. 598 April 2, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson Senior Naturalist CARPENTER ANTS Cutting stove wood for home heating and cooking used to be a regular wintertime job. Then, when the trees are frozen solid, the work is easy. A large chunk of red oak, for example, pops wide open at a single stroke of the ax. Sometimes the fresh surface exposes a cluster of hibernating Carpenter Ants stiff and numb with cold inside a network of frost-lined tunnels. Warmed by the sun or the heat from a campfire they slowly begin to move their legs and feebly creep away. In summer we see these carpenter ants prowling tree trunks and the forest floor in search of food. Occasionally, if we sit down on a fallen log or tap on a dead tree, dozens of them come rushing out with their antennae waving to see what is causing the disturbance. Less often, a colony is found enlarging its quarters. One ant after another runs out and drops a pellet of wood onto a pile of sawdust on the ground below, then hurries back inside for another load.

353

Weldon Spring, Missouri, Long-Term Stewardship Plan Public Workshop Notes, August 28, 2002  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

W W W e e l l d d o o n n S S p p r r i i n n g g L L o o n n g g - - T T e e r r m m S S t t e e w w a a r r d d s s h h i i p p P P l l a a n n P P u u b b l l i i c c W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p N N o o t t e e s s A A u u g g u u s s t t 2 2 8 8 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 Opening Pam Thompson, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Manager made opening comments, welcomed everyone, and introduced members of the DOE, Weldon Spring Citizens Commission, and others that were present. Introduction Dave Geiser, Director of Office of Long-Term Stewardship, DOE Headquarters 1. What are we trying to accomplish tonight? a. Input on the Long-Term Stewardship Plan. What citizens want to see that is not there. What needs to be changed so it reflects the public's concerns. We need clear, constructive comments. b. Approach and schedule. DOE is abandoning the current schedule and would like input

354

The History of the Microscope  

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the Microscope the Microscope Nature Bulletin No. 506 November 9, 1957 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE HISTORY OF THE MICROSCOPE During that historic period known as the Renaissance, after the "dark" Middle Ages, there occurred the inventions of printing, gunpowder and the mariner's compass, followed by the discovery of America. Equally remarkable was the invention of the microscope: an instrument that enables the human eye, by means of a lens or combinations of lenses, to observe enlarged images of tiny objects. It made visible the fascinating details of worlds within worlds. Long before, in the hazy unrecorded past, someone picked up a piece of transparent crystal thicker in the middle than at the edges, looked through it, and discovered that it made things look larger. Someone also found that such a crystal would focus the sun's rays and set fire to a piece of parchment or cloth. Magnifiers and "burning glasses" are mentioned in the writings of Seneca and Pliny the Elder, Roman philosophers during the first century A. D., but apparently they were not used much until the invention of spectacles, toward the end of the 13th century. They were named lenses because they are shaped like the seeds of a lentil.

355

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards  

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Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Nature Bulletin No. 706 February 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLOR CHANGES IN FISH, FROGS AND LIZARDS Proverbially, the chameleon changes its color to suit every mood or situation. Hence the word is also an expression of contempt for a person who is fickle or changeable in character. That little lizard which is peddled at circuses or sold in pet shops under the name of "chameleon" is not the true Chameleon of the Old World tropics but the Anole, a native of the warm humid regions of our southeastern states. It is able to change from green to brown, or reverse, with some intermediate colors. Ordinarily it is pale green when quite warm or after it has been in the dark. In bright light or at low temperatures it is brown. Contrary to popular belief a brown anole may be found on a green leaf or a green one on brown bark.

356

Life on the Bottom of a Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the Bottom of a Stream on the Bottom of a Stream Nature Bulletin No. 690 October 20, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE ON THE BOTTOM OF A STREAM A stream conceals a teeming world of bottom-dwelling animals that are the food supply for all stream fish and a source of live bait for catching them. Raccoons, mink, muskrats, ducks, shore birds, turtles and frogs hunt here for mussels, snails, crayfish and aquatic insects. These insects, after passing their young stages on the stream bottom, emerge as swarms of flying adults devoured by dozens of kinds of song birds. These, too, are the insects that fly fishermen imitate in making their artificial lures. Streams of all sizes have about the same kinds of bottom animals, whether a brook small enough to be stepped across or the mile-wide Mississippi. The greatest differences are found when the populations from different types of bottom are compared -- rock, gravel, sand and mud. These main types result from the sorting action of the water, especially during floods. Rock bottom is found in the fastest water because all smaller materials are swept downstream. As the current becomes slower the gravel, then the sand, and finally the mud, settle out.

357

Waterdogs, Hellbenders, Sirens and Congo Eels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waterdogs, Hellbenders, Sirens and Congo Eels Waterdogs, Hellbenders, Sirens and Congo Eels Nature Bulletin No. 757 May 23, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WATERDOGS, HELLBENDERS, SIRENS AND CONGO EELS Occasionally a perch fisherman on Chicago's lake front lets out a startled gasp as he pulls in an ugly, squirming creature that looks like something out of a bad dream. It is a foot-long, chunky animal with a flat head, small eyes, a collar of red, bushy gills, four weak legs and a broad tail. The skin -- sickly gray with dark blotches -- is disgustingly slimy. The Waterdog or Mud Puppy is the most numerous of four species of large salamanders that live in the streams and lakes of the Middle West. Unlike our smaller salamanders which change into an adult form that lives on land, these four remain in a juvenile stage and spend their entire lives in water. As a rule they are active only at night and so secretive in their habits that they are seldom seen except when one swallows a baited hook. Contrary to popular superstitions they are entirely harmless to man. Skinned and fried they are said to have the flavor of frog legs.

358

Bows and Arrows -- Part One: The Bow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One: The Bow One: The Bow Nature Bulletin No. 592 February 20, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist BOWS AND ARROWS: PART ONE THE BOW Primitive man, although at different times in various parts of the world, seems to have passed through three stages of development. During what is called the Old Stone Age he discovered how to make and use fire but had only clubs, stones and crudely shaped axes as weapons. During the Middle Stone Age he invented the spear, perhaps a throwing stick to hurl it, and finally the bow and arrow. Then man became a match for the mammoth, mastodon, cave bear, saber-toothed tiger or any predator. Then he was able to kill his food at a distance, or from a hiding place, with less risk of his life Then, too, he was enabled to ambush an enemy instead of meeting him in desperate hand-to-hand conflict.

359

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

360

The Mourning Dove  

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Mourning Dove Mourning Dove Nature Bulletin No. 691 October 27, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE MOURNING DOVE One of the familiar voices of an American spring is a low-pitched, moaning ooah, cooo, cooo, coo that sounds as if someone were blowing across the mouth of a jug. Like the work of an expert ventriloquist, it seems to come from one direction, then another until, with a whistle of wings, a bird clad in soft colors flashes away. The mourning dove -- commonly called turtle dove -- has a light brown head and back but the neck and breast shimmer like watered silk with tints of rose, lavender and tan. The feathers of the long sharp tail are tipped with white. The beak is black and the feet are red. The bird has long pointed wings and is streamlined for speed. The sexes are much alike and average about four ounces in weight. The male puffs out his chest and does all the cooing.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Do Animals Talk?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

362

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Authors: E. A. Blakely1, R. I. Schwarz1, A. C. Thompson2, K. A. Bjornstad1, P. Y. Chang1,3 C.J. Rosen1, and D. Sudar1 Institutions: Divisions of 1Life Sciences and 2Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. and 3SRI International, Menlo Park, CA. We are using a novel x-ray Microprobe Beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL to investigate bystander effects of low doses in well characterized human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). The ALS facility is capable of producing a beam of 12.5 keV x-rays with a focussed spot size of __m_ and a wide range of doses and dose-rates. Unlike normal x-ray sources, this beam has a very small background of either low-

363

Illinois Foxes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foxes Foxes Nature Bulletin No. 700 January 12, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ILLINOIS FOXES The Red Fox and the Gray Fox are the only common wild relatives of the dog in the Chicago region. Another, the coyote, if present at all in recent years, is very scarce, Both foxes have long pointed faces, large ears, long legs, long bushy tails and weigh only about ten pounds. The red fox is reddish yellow with a white tip on the tail and has black stockings on its feet and legs. The gray fox has a grizzled gray back with rusty yellow on the throat, sides, feet and legs. The tip of its tail is black. In Illinois the red fox is most at home in farmlands, open country and the borders of woodlands where it has held its own and thrived over the years in spite of hunters, trappers and the disturbances of its habitat by man. The less common gray is a shy forest animal that has increased in wildlife sanctuaries. However, the total fox population of the Cook County forest preserves is probably little different from that of other areas of similar size in Illinois.

364

Sod Houses  

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Houses Houses Nature Bulletin No. 620 December 3, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SOD HOUSES In the 1860's and 70's, when pioneer settlers came to homestead free land on the vast lonely prairies of Kansas and Nebraska, they found a country that, except for fringes of cottonwoods and willows along the streams, was treeless. There was no rock and mighty little timber for building houses and barns. Lumber was very expensive and scarce. So was money. However, the prairies were thickly covered with short, drought- enduring buffalo and blue grama grasses. Some of the Indian tribes which not only hunted buffalo but also grew corn -- notably the Pawnee, Osage and Hidatsa -- had large earthlodges. They used sod in the walls and the conical or dome-like roofs had pole rafters covered with willow brush, slough hay, sod, and finally clay. So the homesteaders were inspired to build their homes with slabs of the remarkably thick and tough prairie sod: "Nebraska marble".

365

The Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears Nature Bulletin No. 655-A November 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GRIZZLY AND THE BIG BROWN BEARS In the early days, more tall tales were told about "Old Ephraim, " the grizzly bear, than any other animal. It had the reputation of being a bloodthirsty enemy of man and was given the scientific name Ursus horribilis by a taxonomist who had never seen a live one but had heard and read some of those yarns about its terrible ferocity and prodigious strength. The Grizzly is very intelligent and shrewd but, actually, has a rather phlegmatic disposition. It avoids people and will not attack unless provoked. Then, a female with cubs is unpredictable, and big game hunters say that a wounded grizzly is the most dangerous animal on earth. But ordinarily, as Earnest Thompson Seton observed, Ephraim is a peaceful giant who is perfectly satisfied to let you alone if you leave him alone.

366

Classroom Projects -- Part One  

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One One Nature Bulletin No. 609 September 17, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist CLASSROOM PROJECTS -- PART ONE The essence, the fundamental purpose, of the outdoor education program conducted by our department is stated briefly in the introductory words of a book -- Natural Science Through the Seasons, by J. A. Partridge -- which we use and recommend for teachers: "To initiate children into the romance and wonder of science, and to enhance their natural desire to get to know the world around them and find an explanation of its phenomena. In this bulletin are a few examples of many projects that appeal to younsters and have proven successful in giving pupils more insight into their surroundings, including the flora and fauna, than can be obtained solely from books. These brief outlines are offered as starting points in areas of exploration and study. They may be supplemented by use of our nature bulletins, Partridge's book, the Golden Nature Guides, and publications by agencies such as the Illinois State Museum and the Illinois Office of Public Instruction.

367

The Japanese Beetle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Japanese Beetle Japanese Beetle Nature Bulletin No. 579 November 7, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE JAPANESE BEETLE The deadly warfare between mankind and the insects never ends. Every minute of the day and night, billions of them are attacking our crops, orchards, forests and grasslands. They attack our homes, gardens, and even ourselves. Of those that were inadvertently brought to the United States from foreign countries, one of the most destructive is the Japanese Beetle. This pest was discovered in a nursery near Riverton, New Jersey, in 1916. Evidently some of its grubs -- the larvae-- had arrived a few years earlier in earth around the roots of plants imported from Japan. Over there, native parasites keep this beetle under control. Here, with none of those natural enemies, it multiplied and spread rapidly. Also, before we established stringent preventive measures, it was widely distributed in shipments of nursery and greenhouse plants. Now it hitchhikes on railroad trains and airplanes. Except northern New England, all but three states east of the Great Plains are infested by the Japanese beetle.

368

L O L C D K  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UIIILGU ~ UIIILGU ~ L O L C D K i ~ v ~ r u l l i i ~ i r ~ ~ a r r v r u i r r ~ u r r ~ r y L k r \ / b u u , + - 0 5 u 6 2 -- Env~ronmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-061 Agency P O Box 93478 M a v 1989 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research a n d Development Off-Site Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States # 6 7 Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1988 This page intentionally left blank EPA-60014-891019 DOElDPl00539-061 May 1989 Off-Site Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1988 contributors C. A. Fontana, N. R. Sunderland S. C. Black, B. B. Dicey, A. N. Jarvis, K. S. Moroney, A. A. Mullen, V. E. Niemann, D. D. Smith, E. A. Thompson, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division prepared for the

369

Rotationally-induced asymmetry in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed emission from the bright EGRET pulsars - Vela, Crab, and Geminga - extends up to 10 GeV. The generic gamma lightcurve features two peaks separated by 0.4 to 0.5 in phase. According to Thompson (2001) the lightcurve becomes asymmetrical above 5 GeV in such a way that the trailing peak dominates over the leading peak. We attempt to interpret this asymmetry within a single-polar-cap scenario. We investigate the role of rotational effects on the magnetic one-photon absorption rate in inducing such asymmetry. Our Monte Carlo simulations of pulsar gamma-ray beams reveal that in the case of oblique rotators with rotation periods of a few millisecond the rotational effects lead to the asymmetry of the requested magnitude. However, the rotators relevant for the bright EGRET pulsars must not have their inclination angles too large in order to keep the two peaks at a separation of 0.4 in phase. With such a condition imposed on the model rotators the resulting effects are rather minute and can hardly be reconciled with the magnitude of the observed asymmetry.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Rotation as a source of asymmetry in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of rotational effects in inducing asymmetry present above ~5 GeV in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars: Vela, Crab, and Geminga. According to Thompson 2001, the trailing peak dominates over the leading peak above ~5 GeV consistently for all three pulsars, even though this is not the case over the entire energy range of EGRET, i.e. above ~100 MeV. We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of electromagnetic cascades in a pulsar magnetosphere within a single-polar-cap scenario with rotationally-induced propagation effects of the order of v/c (where v is the local corotation velocity). We find that even in the case of nearly aligned rotators with spin periods of P ~ 0.1 s rotation may lead to asymmetric (with respect to the magnetic axis) magnetic photon absorption which in turn leads to asymmetric gamma-ray pulse profiles. The resulting features - softer spectrum of the leading peak and the dominance of the trailing peak above ~5 GeV - agree qualitatively with the EGRET data of the bright gamma-ray pulsars.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2002-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Aluminum-fly ash metal matrix composites for automotive parts. [Reports for October 1 to December 31, 1999, and January 1 - to March 31, 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highlights of this report are: (1) fly ash classified by less than 100 microns in size was mixed into a 300 lb melt of alloy 535 without the need of a magnesium additive; (2) a vibratory feeder fitted with a sieve was used as the means to minimize particle clustering while introducing fly ash into the aluminum alloy 535 melt; and (3) the industrial-size field test was successful in that sand mold castings and permanent mold castings of tensile bars, K mold bars, and ingots were made from aluminum alloy 535-fly ash mix. Use of aluminum alloy 535 containing 7% magnesium precluded the need to introduce additional magnesium into the melt. The third round of sand mold castings as well as permanent mold castings produced components and ingots of alloy 535 instead of alloy 356. The ingots will be remelted and cast into parts to assess the improvement of flyash distribution which occurs through reheating and the solidification wetting process. Microstructure analysis continues on sand and permanent mold castings to study particle distribution in the components. A prototype sand cast intake manifold casting was found to be pressure tight which is a major performance requirement for this part. Another heat of pressure die cast brackets of A380-classified fly ash will be made to examine their strength and fly ash distribution. Ingots of A356-fly ash have been made at Eck for remelting at Thompson Aluminum for squeeze casting into motor mounts.

Weiss, David; Purgert, Robert; Rhudy, Richard; Rohatgi, Pradeep

2000-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Polarization effects in low-energy electron-CH sub 4 elastic collisions in an exact exchange treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the polarization effects in very-low-energy (below 1 eV) electron- CH{sub 4} collisions in an exact-exchange treatment. The two models of the parameter-free polarization potential are employed; one, the {ital V}{sub pol}{sup JT} potential, introduced by Jain and Thompson (J. Phys. B 15, L631 (1982)), is based on an approximate polarized-orbital method, and two, the correlation-polarization potential {ital V}{sub pol}{sup CP}, first proposed by O'Connel and Lane (Phys. Rev. A 27, 1893 (1983)), is given as a simple analytic form in terms of the charge density of the target. In this rather very low-energy region, the polarization effects play a decisive role, particularly in creating structure in the differential cross section (DCS) and producing the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the total cross section. Our DCS at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 eV are compared with recent measurements. We found that a local parameter-free approximation for the polarization potential is quite successful if it is determined under the polarized-orbital-type technique rather than based on the correlation-polarization approach.

Jain, A.; Weatherford, C.A. (Department of Physics, Box 981, Florida A M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307 (USA)); Thompson, D.G.; McNaughten, P. (Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics The Queen's University, Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern (Ireland))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE BELLEFIELD BOILERPLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the third quarter, important preparatory work was continued so that the experimental activities can begin early in the fourth quarter. Authorization was awaited in response to the letter that was submitted to the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) seeking an R&D variance for the air permit at the Bellefield Boiler Plant (BBP). Verbal authorizations were received from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) for R&D variances for solid waste permits at the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC), and Emery Tree Service (ETS). Construction wood was acquired from Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation. Forty tons of pallet and construction wood were ground to produce BioGrind Wood Chips at JARC and delivered to Mon Valley Transportation Company (MVTC). Five tons of construction wood were milled at ETS and half of the product delivered to MVTC. Discussions were held with BBP and Energy Systems Associates (ESA) about the test program. Material and energy balances on Boiler No.1 and a plan for data collection were prepared. Presentations describing the University of Pittsburgh Wood/Coal Co-Firing Program were provided to the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, and the Upgraded Coal Interest Group and the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). An article describing the program appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. An application was submitted for authorization for a Pennsylvania Switchgrass Energy and Conservation Program.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Gene E. Geiger; William W. Elder III; William P. Barry; Jun Wang; Hongming Li

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electroforming of Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires for high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices on a chip.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active cooling of electronic systems for space-based and terrestrial National Security missions has demanded use of Stirling, reverse-Brayton, closed Joule-Thompson, pulse tube and more elaborate refrigeration cycles. Such cryocoolers are large systems that are expensive, demand large powers, often contain moving parts and are difficult to integrate with electronic systems. On-chip, solid-state, active cooling would greatly enhance the capabilities of future systems by reducing the size, cost and inefficiencies compared to existing solutions. We proposed to develop the technology for a thermoelectric cooler capable of reaching 77K by replacing bulk thermoelectric materials with arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. Furthermore, the Sandia-developed technique we will use to produce the oriented nanowires occurs at room temperature and can be applied directly to a silicon substrate. Key obstacles include (1) optimizing the Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} alloy composition for thermoelectric properties; (2) increasing wire aspect ratios to 3000:1; and (3) increasing the array density to {ge} 10{sup 9} wires/cm{sup 2}. The primary objective of this LDRD was to fabricate and test the thermoelectric properties of arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. With this proof-of-concept data under our belts we are positioned to engage National Security systems customers to invest in the integration of on-chip thermoelectric coolers for future missions.

Overmyer, Donald L.; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

PRELIMINARY PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE WITHOUT PERMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the effects of pollution control regulation on input markets. Under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, sulfur dioxide emissions from large coal-fired electric power plants in the United States are regulated by a cap-and-trade system. We address the question of who gained from from Title IV. We first show that Phase I of the tradeable permits program, from 1995 to 1999, coincided with a dramatic expansion in the geographic extent of low-sulfur coal from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. We then analyze detailed data on coal deliveries from the Powder River Basin. Our results suggest that the two railroads that carry coal east from the PRB lowered their transportation charges to customers near the geographic margin of low-sulfur coal usage, but raised the charges in inframarginal customers. Moreover, data on minemouth prices for PRB coal indicates that coal mines there did not raise prices substantially under Title IV. Hence, within the low-sulfur coal industry, the railroads captured most of the gains from the regulation. JEL codes: Q28, L51, L92, L94. We are grateful to Paul MacAvoy, Erin Mansur, and Frank Wolak for helpful comments, and to Daryl Newby of the Kentucky Public Service Commission and Jim Thompson of Energy Publishers for assistance in gathering information on coal contracts.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

FROM NDE WITH A Q TO SHM AND BEYOND  

SciTech Connect

In the nineteen-sixties, a significant limitation of NDI and NDE became apparent with the advent of fracture mechanics. Fracture mechanics requires quantitative information on defects, which has to be obtained from quantitative non-destructive testing. A DARPA Program directed by Don Thompson provided the point of departure for the journey to put the Q with NDE. The DARPA Program, and subsequent DOD, FAA and industrial programs produced seminal results for diagnostics and prognostics. In diagnostics, measurement models, probability of detection considerations and techniques of defect characterization were developed, which were complemented by damage evolution laws, probabilistic failure analysis and damage progression estimates, for methods of prognostication. The new results in QNDE naturally led to the concept of structural health monitoring (SHM), whereby sensors are permanently installed on structures. An SHM system can provide on-demand (or continuous) information on the state of a structure, so that an assessment of the structural integrity can be made at any time, and timely remedial actions can be taken. In this paper, we review the development of QNDE towards SHM. Sensor development, data processing, materials engineering and solid mechanics play dominant roles in both the diagnostic and the prognostic components of SHM. A probabilistic approach is essential, as will be shown by examples of pre-crack fatigue damage, crack growth and optimization of an inspection schedule.

Achenbach, J. D. [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

CMB in a box: causal structure and the Fourier-Bessel expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper makes two points. First, we show that the line-of-sight solution to cosmic microwave anisotropies in Fourier space, even though formally defined for arbitrarily large wavelengths, leads to position-space solutions which only depend on the sources of anisotropies inside the past light-cone of the observer. This happens order by order in a series expansion in powers of the visibility $\\gamma=e^{-\\mu}$, where $\\mu$ is the optical depth to Thompson scattering. We show that the CMB anisotropies are regulated by spacetime window functions which have support only inside the past light-cone of the point of observation. Second, we show that the Fourier-Bessel expansion of the physical fields (including the temperature and polarization momenta) is an alternative to the usual Fourier basis as a framework to compute the anisotropies. In that expansion, for each multipole $l$ there is a discrete tower of momenta $k_{i,l}$ (not a continuum) which can affect physical observables, with the smallest momenta being $k_{1,l} ~ l$. The Fourier-Bessel modes take into account precisely the information from the sources of anisotropies that propagates from the initial value surface to the point of observation - no more, no less. We also show that the physical observables (the temperature and polarization maps), and hence the angular power spectra, are unaffected by that choice of basis. This implies that the Fourier-Bessel expansion is the optimal scheme with which one can compute CMB anisotropies. (Abridged)

L. Raul Abramo; Paulo H. Reimberg; Henrique S. Xavier

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

CMB in a box: causal structure and the Fourier-Bessel expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper makes two points. First, we show that the line-of-sight solution to cosmic microwave anisotropies in Fourier space, even though formally defined for arbitrarily large wavelengths, leads to position-space solutions which only depend on the sources of anisotropies inside the past light-cone of the observer. This happens order by order in a series expansion in powers of the visibility $\\gamma=e^{-\\mu}$, where $\\mu$ is the optical depth to Thompson scattering. We show that the CMB anisotropies are regulated by spacetime window functions which have support only inside the past light-cone of the point of observation. Second, we show that the Fourier-Bessel expansion of the physical fields (including the temperature and polarization momenta) is an alternative to the usual Fourier basis as a framework to compute the anisotropies. In that expansion, for each multipole $l$ there is a discrete tower of momenta $k_{i,l}$ (not a continuum) which can affect physical observables, with the smallest momenta being $...

Abramo, L Raul; Xavier, Henrique S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE BELLEFIELD BOILERPLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the second quarter, important preparatory work was continued so that the experimental activities can begin toward the end of the third quarter or early in the fourth quarter. The Environmental Questionnaire was submitted to the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), after thorough review by the Bellefield Boiler Plant (BBP). Letters were submitted to the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) to seek R and D variances for permits at the BBP, the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC), and Emery Tree Service (ETS) for their portion of the project. Memoranda of understanding were executed by the University of Pittsburgh (University) with the BBP, JARC and ETS. Construction wood was collected from Thompson Properties. Discussions were held with the BBP and Energy Systems Associates (ESA), the BBP's engineering consultant. Presentations describing the University of Pittsburgh Wood/Coal Co-Firing Program were provided to the American Chemical Society (ACS), the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Engineering Center for Environment and Energy (ECEE) of the University of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Coal Conference (PCC), the Pennsylvania Ethanol Workshop, BioEnergy 2000 and the Kick-Off Meeting of the Biomass Cofiring Opportunities Solicitation Projects.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Gene E. Geiger; William W. Elder III

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cooling the dark energy camera instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "202-252-1114 wendel thompson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Shapes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shapes of Animals Shapes of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 698 December 15, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE SHAPES OF ANIMALS The shape of an animal tells a great deal about the kind of life it leads. Unlike common plants which stay rooted to one spot, they are active creatures that move about under their own power. They crawl, walk, run, jump, climb, dig, swim or fly. They hunt food, make homes, produce young, flee from their enemies or fight them. Certain body proportions and types of legs, wings or other features go along with each habit of life. Animals, even when they are at rest, give the impression of being ready to do something or go somewhere. For example, animals that specialize in jumping, such as the rabbit, frog, flea, grasshopper and kangaroo, have long powerful hind legs. The climbers may have the grasping feet of the opossum and raccoon; the hooked claws of tree squirrels, cats, woodpeckers and many insects; or the suction cups of the tree frog's toes, or the housefly's feet, by which they can walk up a window pane or upside down across a ceiling. The best diggers -- the mole, woodchuck, badger and the underground young of a 17-year cicada -- have short stout forelegs equipped with heavy claws for scooping earth.

382

Spring Frogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frogs Frogs Nature Bulletin No. 6 March 17, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Dr. David H. Thompson, Zoologist SPRING FROGS The CRICKET FROG and the SPRING PEEPER are among the first of the winter sleepers to come out of hibernation and greet the new year, On March 10, a few were found at McGinnis Slough, near Orland Park, where the sun had melted the ice and warmed the water along the shore. A week later the ice was all gone and they were singing in full chorus. If it freezes again, they will crawl back under the logs, leaves and trash where they spent the winter. Both of these frogs are tiny -- about the size of a lima bean. The cricket frog has a rough skin and a dark triangle between the eyes. The spring peeper' s skin is smooth with a large dark-colored X on the back. The male frog does all the singing, blowing up the loose skin at his throat into a small balloon to serve as an amplifier. The cricket frog gets its name from the song of the male, which is a rapid series of staccato chirps -- as sharp as a note struck on a xylophone. The spring peeper's voice is a drawn-out "pe-e-e-ep", sounding like that of a cold hungry baby chick.

383

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Umatilla, Tucannon, Asotin, and Grande Ronde River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Umatilla and Grande Ronde River basins, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960) inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uperconducting uperconducting M agnets for the N LC: A D esign O dyssey Br et tPar kerw i l lbe your gui de t oday. . . However it takes a team to make things work: M. Anerella, J. Escallier, G. Ganetis, A. Ghosh, M. Harrison, A. Jain, LX. Jia, A. Marone, J. Muratore, R. Thomas, P. Thompson, P. Wanderer, KC. Wu + ... DESY GO Coil Field Map SLAC Presentation December 2001 OPERA-2d Pre and Post-Processor 8.014 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 14.0 18.0 22.0 26.0 30.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 14.0 18.0 22.0 26.0 30.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 X [mm] Y [mm] OPERA-2d Pre and Post-Processor 8.014 8.38835E-04 1.151021 2.301203 Component: BMOD 8.38835E-04 1.151021 2.301203 Component: BMOD 14 m m C oilT oy M odelQ uadrupole D esign Design codes, Wire2dopt, Coilgen and Coilfield, which use actual wire centers for f i e l d c a l c u l a t i o n s, w e r e used; however, to keep to a manageable

388

Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

SciTech Connect

The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

THE DOUBLE PULSAR ECLIPSES. I. PHENOMENOLOGY AND MULTI-FREQUENCY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B displays short, 30 s eclipses that arise around conjunction when the radio waves emitted by pulsar A are absorbed as they propagate through the magnetosphere of its companion pulsar B. These eclipses offer a unique opportunity to directly probe the magnetospheric structure and the plasma properties of pulsar B. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the eclipse phenomenology using multi-frequency radio observations obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. We have characterized the periodic flux modulations previously discovered at 820 MHz by McLaughlin et al. and investigated the radio frequency dependence of the duration and depth of the eclipses. Based on their weak radio frequency evolution, we conclude that the plasma in pulsar B's magnetosphere requires a large multiplicity factor ({approx}10{sup 5}). We also found that, as expected, flux modulations are present at all radio frequencies in which eclipses can be detected. Their complex behavior is consistent with the confinement of the absorbing plasma in the dipolar magnetic field of pulsar B as suggested by Lyutikov and Thompson and such a geometric connection explains that the observed periodicity is harmonically related to pulsar B's spin frequency. We observe that the eclipses require a sharp transition region beyond which the plasma density drops off abruptly. Such a region defines a plasmasphere that would be well inside the magnetospheric boundary of an undisturbed pulsar. It is also two times smaller than the expected standoff radius calculated using the balance of the wind pressure from pulsar A and the nominally estimated magnetic pressure of pulsar B.

Breton, R. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferdman, R. D. [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A., E-mail: breton@astro.utoronto.ca [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Obscuring Active Galactic Nuclei with Nuclear Starburst Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the potential of nuclear starburst disks to obscure the Seyfert-like AGN that dominate the hard X-ray background at z~1. Over 1200 starburst disk models, based on the theory developed by Thompson et al., are calculated for five input parameters: the black hole mass, the radial size of the starburst disk, the dust-to-gas ratio, the efficiency of angular momentum transport in the disk, and the gas fraction at the outer disk radius. We find that a large dust-to-gas ratio, a relatively small starburst disk, a significant gas mass fraction, and efficient angular momentum transport are all important to produce a starburst disk that can potentially obscure an AGN. The typical maximum star-formation rate in the disks is ~10 solar masses per year. Assuming no mass-loss due to outflows, the starburst disks feed gas onto the black hole at rates sufficient to produce hard X-ray luminosities of 10^{43}-10^{44} erg s^{-1}. The starburst disks themselves should be detectable at mid-infrared and radio wavelengths; at z=0.8, the predicted fluxes are ~1 mJy at 24microns and ~10-30 microJy at 1.4GHz. Thus, we predict a large fraction of radio/X-ray matches in future deep radio surveys. The starburst disks should be easily distinguished from AGN in future 100microns surveys by Herschel with expected fluxes of ~5 mJy. Any AGN-obscuring starbursts will be associated with hot dust, independent of AGN heating, resulting in observable signatures for separating galactic and nuclear star-formation. Finally, because of the competition between gas and star-formation, nuclear starbursts will be associated with lower-luminosity AGN. Thus, this phenomenon is a natural explanation for the observed decrease in the fraction of obscured AGN with luminosity.

D. R. Ballantyne

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter (Lee & Ramirez-Ruiz 2007, Oechslin & Janka 2006), and the conversion of a fraction of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst (Nakar 2006). Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a black hole formation is required to produce a short gamma-ray burst in a double neutron star merger. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2 - 2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude a black hole -- torus central engine model of short gamma-ray bursts in double neutron star mergers. Such an observation would also indicate that if in fact short gamma-ray bursts are connected to neutron star mergers, the gamma-ray burst engine is best explained by the lesser known model invoking a highly magnetized massive neutron star (e.g., Usov 1992; Kluzniak & Ruderman 1998; Dai et al. 2006; Metzger, Quataert & Thompson 2007).

K. Belczynski; R. O'Shaughnessy; V. Kalogera; F. Rasio; R. Taam; T. Bulik

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire  

SciTech Connect

In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

Michael Hack

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present photometric observations of an apparent Type Iasupernova (SN Ia) at a redshift of approximately 1.7, the farthest SNobserved to date. The supernova, SN 1997, was discovered in a repeatobservation by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Hubble DeepField{North (HDF-N), and serendipitously monitored with NICMOS on HSTthroughout the Thompson et al. GTO campaign. The SN type can bedetermined from the host galaxy type: an evolved, red elliptical lackingenough recent star formation to provide a significant population ofcore-collapse supernovae. The classification is further supported bydiagnostics available from the observed colors and temporal behavior ofthe SN, both of which match a typical SN Ia. The photometric record ofthe SN includes a dozen flux measurements in the I, J, and H bandsspanning 35 days in the observed frame. The redshift derived from the SNphotometry, z = 1:7 plus or minus 0:1, is in excellent agreement with theredshift estimate of z = 1:65 plus or minus 0:15 derived from the U_300B_450 V_-606 I_814 J_110 J_125 H_160 H_165 K_s photometry of the galaxy.Optical and near-infrared spectra of the host provide a very tentativespectroscopic redshift of 1.755. Fits to observations of the SN provideconstraints for the redshift-distance relation of SNe Ia and a powerfultest of the current accelerating Universe hypothesis. The apparent SNbrightness is consistent with that expected in the decelerating phase ofthe preferred cosmological model, Omega_M approximately equal to 1/3;Omega_Lambda approximately equal to 2/3. It is inconsistent with greydust or simple luminosity evolution, candidate astrophysical effectswhich could mimic previous evidence for an accelerating Universe from SNeIa at z approximately equal to 0:5. We consider several sources ofpotential systematic error including gravitational lensing, supernovamisclassification, sample selection bias, and luminosity calibrationerrors. Currently, none of these effects alone appears likely tochallenge our conclusions. Additional SNe Ia at z>1 will be requiredto test more exotic alternatives to the accelerating Universe hypothesisand to probe the nature of dark energy.

Riess, Adam G.; Nugent, Peter E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tonry, John; Dickinson, Mark; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Thompson, Rodger I.; Budavari,Tamas; Casertano, Stefano; Evans, Aaron S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Livio,Mario; Sanders, David B.; Shapley, Alice E.; Spinrad, Hyron; Steidel,Charles C.; Stern, Daniel; Surace, Jason; Veilleux, Sylvain

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

Kropp, Roy K.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE NIOSH BOILER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of this project began by obtaining R&D variances for permits at the NIOSH boilerplant (NBP), Emery Tree Service (ETS) and the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC) for their portions of the project. Wood for the test burn was obtained from the JARC inventory (pallets), Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation (construction wood), and the Arlington Heights Housing Project (demolition wood). The wood was ground at ETS and JARC, delivered to the Three Rivers Terminal and blended with coal. Three one-day tests using wood/coal blends of 33% wood by volume (both construction wood and demolition wood) were conducted at the NBP. Blends using hammermilled wood were operationally successful. Emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx decreased and that of CO increased when compared with combusting coal alone. Mercury emissions were measured and evaluated. During the first year of Phase II the principal work focused upon searching for a replacement boilerplant and developing a commercial supply of demolition wood. The NBP withdrew from the project and a search began for another stoker boilerplant in Pennsylvania to replace it on the project. Three potential commercial demolition wood providers were contacted. Two were not be able to supply wood. At the end of the first year of Phase II, discussions were continuing with the third one, a commercial demolition wood provider from northern New Jersey. During the two-and-a-third years of the contract extension it was determined that the demolition wood from northern New Jersey was impractical for use in Pittsburgh, in another power plant in central New Jersey, and in a new wood gasifier being planned in Philadelphia. However, the project team did identify sufficient wood from other sources for the gasifier project. The Principal Investigator of this project assisted a feasibility study of wood gasification in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. As a result of the study, an independent power producer in the county has initiated a small wood gasification project at its site. Throughout much of this total project the Principal Investigator has counseled two small businesses in developing a waxed cardboard pellet business. A recent test burn of this biofuel appears successful and a purchase contract is anticipated soon. During the past two months a major tree-trimming firm has shown an active interest in entering the wood-chip fuel market in the Pittsburgh area and has contacted the NBP, among others, as potential customers. The NBP superintendent is currently in discussion with the facilities management of the Bruceton Research Center about resuming their interest in cofiring this renewable fuel to the stoker there.

James T. Cobb Jr.

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

First-principles calculations of the adsorption and hydrogenation reactions of CHx(x=0,4) species on a Fe(100) surface  

SciTech Connect

A previous set of investigations related to adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation properties of CO [D. C. Sorescu, D. L. Thompson, M. M. Hurley, and C. F. Chabalowski, Phys. Rev. B 66, 035416 (2002)] and H2 [D. C. Sorescu, Catal. Today 105, 44 (2005)] on Fe(100) surface have been extended to the case of chemisorption properties of CHx (x=0,4) species on the same surface. Similar to our previous studies, the current work is based on first-principles plane-wave calculations using spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculations employ slab geometry and periodic boundary conditions. It was determined that CHx (x=0,2) species preferentially adsorb at the four-folded sites while the CH3 species prefer the binding at the bridge site. In contradistinction, the CH4 molecule is only weakly physisorbed on the surface, independent of surface site or molecular orientation. In the case of the C atom, the adsorption investigations have been extended to include both the coverage effects as well as the possibility for absorption at subsurface sites. The presence of the C atom at either hollow or subsurface sites was found to increase the stability of the other atomic (C, H, O) and molecular or radical species [CO, CHx (x=1,4)] adsorbed on the surface. Beside chemisorption properties, the activation energies for surface diffusion have been determined for all individual CHx (x=0,3)species while in the case of C atom diffusion to subsurface sites have also been considered. Finally, we have determined the minimum energy path for the elementary hydrogenation reactions of CHx (x=0,3) species. We found that for the ensemble of surface processes involving dissociation of CO and H2 on Fe(100) surface followed by hydrogenation of CHx (x=0,3) species with formation of CH4, the CO dissociation is the rate determining step with an activation energy of 24.5 kcal/mol.

Sorescu, D.C.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies  

SciTech Connect

An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to determine the 'age' and rate of change of carbon stocks or as a biogeochemical tracer to elucidate processes and pathways. It is this dual nature that can be exploited across scales in space (individual plant, plot or research site, ecosystem, regional, and global) and time (days to millennia). For example, across regional scales, {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements of atmosphere CO{sub 2} can be used to attribute carbon dioxide to sources (e.g., respiration vs. fossil fuel emissions) or sinks ( e.g,. photosynthesis), which cannot be readily inferred from concentration, net flux measurements, or {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} [eg. Graven et al., 2009; Levin and Hessheimer, 2000; Turnbull et al., 2007]. At smaller scales, similar analyses can be used to elucidate the source, and 'age' of the below ground component undergoing heterotrophic respiration. Net (biome or ecosystem) uptake of carbon is the difference of two large fluxes: photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon fixation by photosynthesis is, to a large extent, a single process with theoretical underpinnings. On the other-hand, net ecosystem or biome respiration integrates microbial (heterotrophic) and plant (autotrophic) respiration. Eddy covariance methods can be used to estimate bulk CO{sub 2} fluxes but they cannot discriminate the process nor the source of the respired CO{sub 2}. It is these processes that are parameterized in predictive models and contribute to the uncertainty in the climate forcing effect of the carbon cycle in the future [Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Heimann and Reichstein, 2008].

Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 081103) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 090397) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 012296) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 102192) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 111093) The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 Jan, 1996) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R