National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 2016-20p 2008p 2009p

  1. Uncorrelated volatile behavior during the 2011 apparition of comet C/2009 P1 Garradd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feaga, Lori M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Farnham, Tony L.; Bodewits, Dennis; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Gersch, Alan M.; Protopapa, Silvia [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Yang, Bin [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Drahus, Michal [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schleicher, David G., E-mail: feaga@astro.umd.edu [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The High Resolution Instrument Infrared Spectrometer (HRI-IR) on board the Deep Impact Flyby spacecraft detected H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CO in the coma of the dynamically young Oort Cloud comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) post-perihelion at a heliocentric distance of 2 AU. Production rates were derived for the parent volatiles, Q {sub H2O} = 4.6 0.8 10{sup 28}, Q {sub CO2} = 3.9 0.7 10{sup 27}, and Q {sub CO} = 2.9 0.8 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup 1}, and are consistent with the trends seen by other observers and within the error bars of measurements acquired during a similar time period. When compiled with other observations of Garradd's dominant volatiles, unexpected behavior was seen in the release of CO. Garradd's H{sub 2}O outgassing, increasing and peaking pre-perihelion and then steadily decreasing, is more typical than that of CO, which monotonically increased throughout the entire apparition. Due to the temporal asymmetry in volatile release, Garradd exhibited the highest CO to H{sub 2}O abundance ratio ever observed for any comet inside the water snow line at ?60% during the HRI-IR observations. Also, the HRI-IR made the only direct measurement of CO{sub 2}, giving a typical cometary abundance ratio of CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O of 8% but, with only one measurement, no sense of how it varied with orbital position.

  2. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CO-RICH COMET C/2009 P1 (GARRADD) AT R{sub h} = 2.4 and 2.0 AU BEFORE PERIHELION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.

    2012-03-20

    We quantified 10 parent volatiles in comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) before perihelion, through high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired with CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope on UT 2011 August 7 (R{sub h} = 2.4 AU) and September 17-21 (R{sub h} = 2.0 AU). On August 7, water was searched for but not detected at an upper limit (3{sigma}) of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} s{sup -1}, while ethane was detected with a production rate of 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} s{sup -1}. On September 17-21, the mean production rate for water was 8.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} s{sup -1}, and five trace species (CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, and CH, OH) were securely detected, and (3{sigma}) upper limits were retrieved for NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, OCS, and HDO. Given the relatively large heliocentric distance, we explored the effect of water not being fully sublimated within our field of view and identified the 'missing' water fraction needed to reconcile the retrieved abundance ratios with the mean values found for 'organics-normal' comets. The individual spatial profiles of parent volatiles and the continuum displayed rather asymmetric outgassing. Indications of H{sub 2}O and CO gas being released in different directions suggest chemically distinct active vents and/or the possible existence of polar and apolar ice aggregates in the nucleus. The high fractional abundance of CO identifies comet C/2009 P1 as a CO-rich comet.

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Lab Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in 1984, and has been deputy director for research since 2009.<p>

    Zarnstorff's broad curiosity dovetails with the task...

  4. GAO-11-879T Federal Real Property: Overreliance on Leasing Contributed...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    enhance the use of real property by leasing nonexcess property to an individual or entity Food Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, P. L. No. 110-246, Section 7409 Department of...

  5. Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Michael Salmon, LANL Larry, Goen, LANL Voice: 505-665-7244 Fax: 505-665-2897 salmon@lanl.gov 10/22/2008 p. 2, LA-UR 11-06024 Purpose * To discuss LANLs implementation of SAFER and lessons learned * Background * Results * Lessons learned 10/22/2008 p. 3, LA-UR 11-06024 SAFER Project * Project Mission - Conduct quantitative evaluation of seismic risk due to operations of Nuclear and High Hazard (DSA) Facilities at LANL operating under a

  6. Need for an Integrated Risk Model

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Need for An Integrated Risk Model Michael Salmon, LANL Voice: 505-665-7244 Fax: 505-665-2897 salmon@lanl.gov 10/22/2008 p. 2, LA-UR 11-06023 Purpose * To highlight some observations on safety strategy when concerned with NPH * To encourage discussion and collaboration on the use of an integrated risk model at sites * To propose a test case for use of a sample case 10/22/2008 p. 3, LA-UR 11-06023 Observations * SAFER Comments of Peer Reviewers - There is a need to consider operator interaction -

  7. Administrator D'Agostino Celebrates NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, P

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting Cloud Properties Working Group Breakout Monday, March 30, 2009 Cloud Data Product Priorities of the ARM Cloud Modeling Working Group Stephen A. Klein, 30 March 2009.p 2 What do cloud modelers want? * I discussed the use of cloud property retrievals by the cloud modeling working group at the November 2007 joint meeting of the Cloud Properties and Cloud Modeling Working Groups * The answers to this question haven't changed

  9. 21 briefing pages total

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law

  10. kiedron_RSSoverh_09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RSS Overhaul Status March 23, 2009 P. Kiedron and J. Berndt RSS at NOAA RSS Optical Layout New design: CCD chamber New design: CCD chamber * Vacuum chamber CAD design completed * Vacuum chamber manufacturing by A&N Corp. to be completed in 3rd week of April * Vacuum fused-silica window flange purchased * New CCD purchased * New CCD holder design in progress * Vacuum gauge on order SECTION A-A SECTION B-B 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 A A B B A&N CORPORATION WILLISTON, FLORIDA (800)FLANGE1

  11. Influence of fatigue on the nanohardness of NiTiCr-wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frotscher, M.; Young, M. L.; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Neuking, K.; Eggeler, G.

    2009-01-01

    Testing parameters, such as rotational speed and bending radius, have a strong influence on the fatigue life of pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloys during bending rotation fatigue (BRF) experiments [M. F. X. Wagner, Int. J. Mat. Res. 97 (2006), p. 1687-1696. and M. Frotscher, et al., Thermomechanical processing, microstructure and bending rotation fatigue of ultra-fine grained NiTiCr-wires, Proceedings of the International Conference for Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies (SMST 2007), Tsukuba, Japan, ASM International, (2008), p. 149-158.]. Previous studies showed a decrease in the fatigue life for smaller bending radius (i.e. higher equivalent strain) and larger rotational speed. This observation is associated with an increase of dislocation density, the stabilization of stressinduced martensite during cycling, and an increase of the plateau stresses due to self-heating. In the present study, we examine the influence of these fatigue parameters on the nanohardness and shape recovery of pseudoelastic NiTiCr shape-memory alloy wires by nanoindentation. We show that nanoindentation is a suitable method for the characterization of fatigue-related microstructural changes, which affect the mechanical properties.

  12. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  13. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  14. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.