Sample records for 2011-q1 2012-q1 100

  1. , 0.5 100 , . -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , , () - , - , . - - , 0.5 100 , . - : DD (2.45 ) - - Li . - 100 with a measurement of ionization yield and scintillation quenching factor for low energy recoiling nuclei (in 0.5

  2. The APE100 project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avico, N. (INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)); Battista, C.; Cabasino, S. (INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)); Cabibbo, N. (INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, II Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)); Del Prete, F. (INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)); Fucci, A. (CERN, Geneve (Switzerland)); Lai, A.; Lombardo, M.P. (INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)); Marinari, E. (INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, II Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)); Marzano, F. (INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)); Paolucci, P.S.; Parisi, G. (INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, II Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)); Pech, J.; Rapuano, F.; Sarno, R. (INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento diFisica, Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)); Salina, G. (INFN, Sezione diRoma, Roma (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica, II Universi

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief description of the architecture of APE100, a parallel floating point SIMD engine optimized for LGT simulation is presented. A more detailed descriptoin is given of MAD, the single-chip floating piont unit of APE100. The advantages and design issues related to a massive usage of custom integrated circuits are discussed.

  3. 100% petroleum house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costanza, David (David Nicholas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I am designing a Case Study House to be sponsored by Royal Dutch Shell which utilizes the by-product of oil extraction, petroleum gas, to produce a zero waste, 100% petroleum based house. The motivation of the Case Study ...

  4. Science at 100 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    100 tesla fields are essential for answering many key questions in condensed matter: (1) Collapse of magnetic length crucial tool for understanding high Tc superconductors; (2) Field can also behave as 'negative pressure' in condensed matter; and (3) Field-tuned emergent phenomena involving commensurability effects.

  5. Sampling Instruction: 100-D-100 and 100-D-30/104 Excavation Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Brady D.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes procedures that will be used to obtain and analyze samples a the 100-D-100 and 100-D-30/104 excavation sites in the 100 Area of Hanford.

  6. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  7. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  8. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  9. First Results from XENON100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    (Columbia): First Results from XENON100 11 Design for Electric Field · hexagonal electrode meshes · cathode-13 irrelevant · but 85Kr beta decays (687keV), natural abundance 85Kr/Kr ~ 10-11 · use dedicated distillation column to get Kr to ~100ppt level The Other Noble Gas in Xenon Firestone #12;Rafael F. Lang (Columbia

  10. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  11. 100-B area technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the environmental remediation effort of the 100-B Area by providing remediation planners with key data that characterize the 100-B and 100-C Reactor sites. It provides operational histories of the 100-B and 100-C Reactors and each of their associated liquid and solid waste sites.

  12. 100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) 100 MHz NMR Thorium (Solids) Research applications Samples containing paramagnetics Soils (SOM and NOM) Metal oxide materials for catalysis...

  13. La supraconductivité a 100 ans !

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Il y a 100 ans, le 8 avril 1911, une découverte majeure était réalisée : celle de la supraconductivité. La supraconductivité est la caractéristique qu?ont certains métaux et alliages de perdre toute résistance électrique en dessous d?une température donnée. Cette renversante découverte, réalisée de manière presque fortuite par Kammerlingh Onnes de l?Université de Leyde (Pays-Bas) et son étudiant Gilles Holst, a ouvert un nouveau champ de recherche en physique et de fabuleuses perspectives d?applications technologiques. Du point de vue scientifique, la supraconductivité est en effet l?une des rares manifestations de la physique quantique à l?échelle macroscopique.  Du point de vue des retombées techniques, elle est porteuse d?applications majeures dans le domaine de la santé, des communications et de l?énergie. 100 ans après, les physiciens n?ont toujours pas fini d?explorer ce phénomène et ses applications. Le CERN abrite des applications de la supraconductivité à des échelles inédites. L?accélérateur de particules LHC, avec ses milliers d?aimants supraconducteurs répartis sur 27 kilomètres de circonférence, est en effet la plus grande application mondiale de la supraconductivité. Il ne pourrait exister sans elle.  Le CERN fête donc la découverte de la supraconductivité avec une conférence exceptionnelle donnée par Philippe Lebrun. Au cours de cette conférence, l?expérience historique de Kammerlingh Onnes sera reproduite. Philippe Lebrun racontera l?histoire de cette étonnante découverte, en la replaçant dans le contexte scientifique de l?époque. Il racontera les développements scientifiques et les applications du premier siècle de la supraconductivité. Conférence en français Merci de bien vouloir vous inscrire au : +41 22 767 76 76 ou cern.reception@cern.ch

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  16. Science 100 Suitability Assessment 2012/13. Page 1 of 2 Science 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Science 100 Suitability Assessment 2012/13. Page 1 of 2 Science 100 Suitability Assessment This is a brief self-questionnaire to help you decide if Science 100 is the right choice for you. There are no right or wrong answers, only honest ones. Science 100 may or may not be for you. Now is the time to find

  17. Page 1 of 100 Full Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    ()d. #12;Home Page Title Page Contents Page 7 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit The behavior of bothHome Page Title Page Contents Page 1 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Scenario Generation Uncertainty Quantification in Industrial and Energy Applications: Experiences and Challenges, Minneapolis

  18. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

  19. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  20. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU-100-001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    to extreme heat or cold or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Protect the equipment from theft. 2.5.3. For policies regarding remote access to Boston University's information resources, see Remote Access Policy [BU 100-001A]. #12;

  1. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  2. Water and Methanol Adsorption on MgO(100)/Mo(100) Studied by Electron Spectroscopies and Thermal Programmed Desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Water and Methanol Adsorption on MgO(100)/Mo(100) Studied by Electron Spectroscopies and Thermal, 2000 The adsorption of methanol (CH3OH) and water (D2O) on the MgO(100)/Mo(100) surface at 100 K has covered MgO(100)/Mo(100) surface. On the other hand, the formation of a methanol multilayer desorption

  3. Scaling study for SP-100 reactor technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; McKissock, B. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we explored several ways of extending SP-100 reactor technology to higher power levels. One approach was to use the reference SP-100 pin design and increase the fuel pin length and the number of fuel pins as needed to provide higher capability. The impact on scaling of a modified and advanced SP-100 reactor technology was also explored. Finally, the effect of using alternative power conversion subsystems, with SP-100 reactor technology was investigated. One of the principal concerns for any space-based system is mass; consequently, this study focused on estimating reactor, shield, and total system mass. The RSMASS code (Marshall 1986) was used to estimate reactor and shield mass. Simple algorithms developed at NASA Lewis Research Center were used to estimate the balance of system mass. Power ranges from 100 kWe to 10 MWe were explored assuming both one year and seven years of operation. Thermoelectric, Stirling, Rankine, and Brayton power conversion systems were investigated. The impact on safety, reliability, and other system attributes, caused by extending the technology to higher power levels, was also investigated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  5. Building Name 100 Antoinette 191 DTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    2-Jul-13 Building Name Bldg No Utility 100 Antoinette 191 DTE 1011 Ferry East 527 DTE 110 E. Warren Hancock West 074 DTE Academic/Administrative Building 062 DTE Alex Manoogian Hall 155 PLD Alumni House 042 PLD Art Building 040 PLD Atchison (South) Hall 104 DTE Athletic Multi-purpose Indoor Facility 091 PLD

  6. EGGN 100 -INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Engineering design project - Continued Week 13 Field Trip to an Engineering site Project reviews, demosEGGN 100 - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTION Introduction to engineering disciplines and their sub-fields, basic tools used in engineering practice, hands-on engineering projects. COURSE OBJECTIVE

  7. Hexadecapolar excitation in sup 100 Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirota, S.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T. (Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sa Paulo, 01498 Sao Paulo, Brasil (BR))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attention is drawn to the strong collective {ital L}=4 direct excitation of the state at 2.367 MeV in {sup 100}Ru by inelastic scattering of 16 MeV protons characterized by a deformation parameter {beta}{sub 4}=0.10, one of the highest reported for any region of the mass table.

  8. 100 T science at the NHMFL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    100 T science is a vibrant area of research: (1) Collapse of magnetic length crucial tool for understanding high Tc superconductors; (2) Field can also behave as 'negative pressure' in condensed matter; and (3) Field-tuned emergent phenomena involving commensurability effects.

  9. CSUF A.S. Bylaws Interim UPS 100.001 Interim UPS 100.001 Cover Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CSUF A.S. Bylaws ­ Interim UPS 100.001 Interim UPS 100.001 Cover Page Effective Date: 1-2-13 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS Interim UPS 100.001 includes sections moved from UPS 100 faculty in a special election held spring 2011 (ASD 11-64). UPS 100.001 (BYLAWS) to be edited

  10. 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Page 1 of 1 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Page 1 of 1 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Policy Name: Building leadership to students and others by directing all persons to promptly vacate a building upon the activation safety of members of the University community, adherence to building evacuation procedures protects

  11. Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. B. Mitchem

    2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

  12. The SNL100-01 blade : carbon design studies for the Sandia 100-meter blade.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of design studies to investigate the effect of carbon on blade weight and performance for large blades was performed using the Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Blade design as a starting point. This document provides a description of the final carbon blade design, which is termed as SNL100-01. This report includes a summary of the design modifications applied to the baseline all-glass 100-meter design and a description of the NuMAD model files that are made publicly available. This document is intended primarily to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-01.

  13. CAGE100: Real-Time Multi-Port Packet Capture System for 100 Gigabit Ethernet Traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Namazi; Babak Azimi-Sadjadi; Chujen Lin

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Future large scale sciences are anticipated to use massive amount of data in their experiments. DOE�¢����s ESnet (Energy Science Network) is developing a 100 Gbps backbone based on this state-of-the-art 100 Gigabit Ethernet standard. ESnet will serve thousands of DOE and non-DOE scientists with its high bandwidth backbone, and connect several national laboratories. Current Ethernet test and debug solutions, such as network traffic capturer/analyzer tools, support up to 10 Gbps speed, and the very few capable of handling 100 Gbps are extremely costly. Such tools are essential in the development of high speed devices and routers, and ultimately the success of 100 Gigabit Ethernet.

  14. SP-100 design, safety, and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.L.; Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SP-100 Program is developing a nuclear reactor power system that can enhance and/or enable future civilian and military space missions. The program is directed to develop space reactor technology to provide electrical power in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. The major nuclear assembly test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and is designed to validate the performance of the 2.4-MWt nuclear and heat transport assembly. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  15. JLab Cluster Tops 100 Teraflops | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON 2004 February 12,Cluster Tops 100

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: 100 Resilient Cities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100 Resilient Cities - Sandia

  17. Investigation of Double Beta Decay of 100Mo to Excited States of 100Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. J. Caffrey; The NEMO-3 Collaboration

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double beta decay of 100Mo to the excited states of daughter nuclei has been studied using a 600 cm3 low-background HPGe detector and an external source consisting of 2588 g of 97.5% enriched metallic 100Mo, which was formerly inside the NEMO-3 detector and used for the NEMO-3 measurements of 100Mo. The half-life for the two-neutrino double beta decay of 100Mo to the excited View the MathML source state in 100Ru is measured to be T1/2=[7.5±0.6(stat)±0.6(syst)]·1020 yr. For other (0?+2?) transitions to the View the MathML source, View the MathML source, View the MathML source, View the MathML source and View the MathML source levels in 100Ru, limits are obtained at the level of ~(0.25–1.1)·1022 yr.

  18. Differential Ion Mobility Separations in up to 100% Helium Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in up to 100% Helium Using Microchips. Differential Ion Mobility Separations in up to 100% Helium Using Microchips. Abstract: The performance of differential IMS (FAIMS) analyzers...

  19. Four of Popular Science's 100 best innovations from Los Alamos...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Popular Science's 100 best innovations from Los Alamos, Sandia, Livermore Popular Science lists three of 100 best innovations from Los Alamos, Sandia Four of Popular Science's...

  20. UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton UPS 210.100 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICY I. PREAMBLE California State University, Fullerton. #12;UPS 210.100 Page 2 of 2 UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84 III. DEPARTMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY All

  1. 100 Area soil washing treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general methodology for conducting a soil washing treatability study as applied to source unit contamination in the 100 Area. The objective ofthis treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The purpose of separating these fractions is to minimize the volume of soil requiring permanent disposal. It is anticipated that this treatability study will be performed in two phases of testing, a remedy screening phase and a remedy selection phase. The remedy screening phase consists of laboratory- and bench-scale studies performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) under a work order issued by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This phase will be used to provide qualitative evaluation of the potential effectiveness of the soil washing technology. The remedy selection phase, consists of pilot-scale testing performed under a separate service contract to be competitively bid under Westinghouse Hanford direction. The remedy selection phase will provide data to support evaluation of the soil washing technology in future feasibility studies for Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) or final operable unit (OU) remedies. Performance data from these tests will indicate whether applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or cleanup goals can be met at the site(s) by application of soil washing. The remedy selection tests wig also allow estimation of costs associated with implementation to the accuracy required for the Feasibility Study.

  2. Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2009 1 Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2009 The operator of an oil or...

  3. Transverse Feedback in a 100 TeV Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambertson, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings Transverse Feedback in a 100 TeV Storage Ring G.DE93 001571 TRANSVERSE FEEDBACK IN A 100 TeV STORAGE RING*IS UNLIMITED r-t_9. TRANSVERSE FEEDBACK IN A 100 TeV STORAGE

  4. SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15 INSTRUCTION MANUAL Serial No._____________________ 8/94 World Precision Instruments, Inc. SP100i Syringe Pump Digital Infusion Syringe Pump #12;SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Contents GENERAL DESCRIPTION

  5. 100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, James C.

    in Japan. Fujikura Ltd. provided the tapes used in the experiment. "Yttrium-based HTS wire has been100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is sufficient for fusion, our 100 kA is still lower, however ours is presently the world's highest among HTS conductors. Put

  6. COLLOQUIUM: Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work in Fusion Energy Dr. Greg Hammett Princeton University Professor Russell Kulsrud Princeton...

  7. DOE to Award $100 Million for Energy Frontier Research Centers...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to Award 100 Million for Energy Frontier Research Centers Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC...

  8. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    performance TEG thermal and electrical interfaces modified to withstand high temperature environment Development of a 100 watt High Temperature TE Generator DEER 2008 11 Prototype...

  9. 100-F Target Analyte List Development for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovink, R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-F Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

  10. 100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia 100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia · Jeffrey+GLIMS Glacier databaseMODIS+GLIMS Glacier database #12;Benchmark GlaciersBenchmark Glaciers #12;Everest ASTER Mosaic, 2001Everest ASTER Mosaic, 2001 #12;KhumbuKhumbu Glacier, Nepal, 1958Glacier, Nepal, 1958 #12

  11. 100 Prisoners and A light Bulb Yisong Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    100 Prisoners and A light Bulb Yisong Song 1. Introduction The article represent three different protocols for solving the "100 Prisoners and a Light Bulb" riddle, including the explicit computations only a light bulb with a toggle switch. The prisoner will be able to observe the current state

  12. ENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Bruce

    requirements (a) The use of internal combustion engines (gas and glow fuel engines) is prohibited. (bENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications HC_PS_004 Rev. A, 22 100 Introduction to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications HC_PS_004 Rev. A, 22 January

  13. Future perspectives at SIS-100 with HADES-at-FAIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HADES Collaboration; I. Froehlich; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; G. Bellia; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; E. Grosse; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Kozuch; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; J. Lamas-Valverde; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Marin; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; R. Novotny; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. Perez Cavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; R. Simon; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; I. Veretenkin; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; J. Wuestenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the HADES spectrometer undergoes un upgrade program to be prepared for measurements at the upcoming SIS-100 synchrotron at FAIR. We describe the current status of the HADES di-electron measurements at the SIS-18 and our future plans for SIS-100.

  14. Q value of the 100Mo Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rahaman; V. -V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; J. Hakala; A. Jokinen; J. Julin; A. Kankainen; A. Saastamoinen; J. Suhonen; C. Weber; J. Äystö

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Penning trap measurements using mixed beams of 100Mo - 100Ru and 76Ge - 76Se have been utilized to determine the double-beta decay Q-values of 100Mo and 76Ge with uncertainties less than 200 eV. The value for 76Ge, 2039.04(16) keV is in agreement with the published SMILETRAP value. The new value for 100Mo, 3034.40(17) keV is 30 times more precise than the previous literature value, sufficient for the ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches in 100Mo. Moreover, the precise Q-value is used to calculate the phase-space integrals and the experimental nuclear matrix element of double-beta decay.

  15. Operating experience with 100% pellet burden on Amanda blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keaton, D.E.; Minakawa, T. (Armco Steel Co., Middletown, OH (United States). Ironmaking Dept.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of significant changes in operations at the Ashland Works of the Armco Steel Company occurred in 1992 which directly impacted the Amanda Blast Furnace operation. These changes included the shutdown of the hot strip mill which resulted in coke oven gas enrichment of the Amanda stoves and an increase of 75 C in hot blast temperature, transition to 100% continuous cast operation which resulted in increased variation of the hot metal demand, and the July idling of the sinter plant. Historically, the Amanda Blast Furnace burden was 30% fluxed sinter and 70% acid pellet. It was anticipated that the change to 100% pellet burden would require changes in charging practice and alter furnace performance. The paper gives a general furnace description and then describes the burden characteristics, operating practice with 30% sinter/70% acid pellet burden, preparations for the 100% acid pellet burden operation, the 100% acid pellet operation, and the 100% fluxed pellet burden operation.

  16. Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang-Tse Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...Õ,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 Received 8 March 2002; published 30 August 2002 The friction theories predict that most perfect clean incommensurate interfaces would produce no static friction

  17. 13 (1): 100-xxx (2006)13 (1): 100-110 (2006) Distribution and survival of birds within a landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    they increased with radiation incidence of oakwood plots (i.e., birds avoided northern orientations where solar exposed to the south. Keywords: altitude, bird distribution, habitat structure, oakwood forests, solar13 (1): 100-xxx (2006)13 (1): 100-110 (2006) Distribution and survival of birds within a landscape

  18. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers UC Davis Water Management Research Group Aplication Efficiency: Dry Beans 2001 Developed as a cooperative project between University of California, Davis United States Geological Survey and California Department of Water Resources Map prepared

  19. NUMBER: IT 1.00 SECTION: Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    NUMBER: IT 1.00 SECTION: Information Technology SUBJECT: Information Technology Procurement DATE by: William F. Hogue Issued by: Office of Information Technology __________________________________________________________________________ Background: This Information Technology (IT) policy is designed to support the Academic, Research

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office's Research Recognized by R&D 100...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    fuel costs. Read more about VTO's research on Emissions Control for Internal Combustion Engines. Addthis Related Articles U.S. Department of Energy Projects Win 31 R&D 100 Awards...

  1. Discovery of Isotopes of Elements with Z $\\ge$ 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Thoennessen

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, 163 isotopes of elements with Z $\\ge$ 100 have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  2. Fueling Innovation -- 100 MPGe at a Time | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    that can handle all the rigors of real world use we've come to expect while achieving ultra low-emissions and a minimum of 100 MPGe. The competition recently completed the...

  3. Power plant system assessment. Final report. SP-100 Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.V.; Atkins, D.F.; Bost, D.S.; Berman, B.; Clinger, D.A.; Determan, W.R.; Drucker, G.S.; Glasgow, L.E.; Hartung, J.A.; Harty, R.B.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this assessment was to provide system-level insights into 100-kWe-class space reactor electric systems. Using these insights, Rockwell was to select and perform conceptual design studies on a ''most attractive'' system that met the preliminary design goals and requirements of the SP-100 Program. About 4 of the 6 months were used in the selection process. The remaining 2 months were used for the system conceptual design studies. Rockwell completed these studies at the end of FY 1983. This report summarizes the results of the power plant system assessment and describes our choice for the most attractive system - the Rockwell SR-100G System (Space Reactor, 100 kWe, Growth) - a lithium-cooled UN-fueled fast reactor/Brayton turboelectric converter system.

  4. Design of a wideband, 100 W, 140 GHz gyroklystron amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joye, Colin D., 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design study of a 140 GHz, 100 W continuous wave gyroklystron amplifier is presented. The device is intended for use in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments. ...

  5. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  6. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  7. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  8. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  9. Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: • Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. • Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. • Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE’s proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. • Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

  10. S100A1 Mediated Signaling in the Nervous System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maza, Ilka

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    , resulting in the neurofibrillary tangles seen in AD patients (Hernández et al., 2010). GSK3? is 6 inactivated by AKT phosphorylation (Liang et al., 2003). Thus we predict that ablation/inhibition of S100A1 will increase phospho-GSK3? levels..., Verma S, Parker TG. (2009) Lack of S100A1 in mice confers a gender-dependent hypertensive phenotype and increased mortality after myocardial infarction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296(5): H1457-65. Hernández F, Gómez de Barreda E, Fuster...

  11. S M Stoller Star Center-B100

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/MonthlyB100 Monthly

  12. S M Stoller Star Center-B100

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/MonthlyB100

  13. NUMBER: FCMN 1.00 SECTION: Campus Planning and Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    NUMBER: FCMN 1.00 SECTION: Campus Planning and Construction SUBJECT: Procurement of Architectural/Engineering and Other Professional Services Related to Construction DATE: November 1, 2006 Policy for: All Campuses Procedure for: All Campuses Authorized by: Rick Kelly Issued by: Campus Planning and Construction

  14. Alan Turing 100 -eine Geburtstagsfeier fr einen groen Mathematiker, Informatiker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyfarth, Andre

    Alan Turing 100 - eine Geburtstagsfeier für einen großen Mathematiker, Informatiker und Kryptologen und Werk von Alan Turing --- Prof. Dr. Michael Fothe Alan Turings Arbeiten von 1936 - eine Geburtsstunde der theoretischen Informatik --- Prof. Dr. Martin Mundhenk Alan Turing als Kryptologe im 2

  15. 3-100.1 Building Evacuation 1 Building Evacuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glebov, Leon

    3-100.1 Building Evacuation 1 SUBJECT: Building Evacuation Effective Date: 10-20-10 Policy Number and Safety APPLICABILITY/ACCOUNTABILITY: This policy applies to all individuals in all buildings on all University of Central Florida campuses. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: University buildings occasionally need

  16. 100% container scanning : security policy implications for global supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Allison C. (Allison Christine)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 3, 2007, President George Bush signed into law HR1 the "Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007." The 9/11 Act requires 100% scanning of US-bound containers at foreign seaports by 2012 ...

  17. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

  18. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

  19. FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership Competent, Confident, and Agile OCTOBER 2006 DISTRIBUTION and complex security environment we face. FM 6-22 is the Army's keystone field manual on leadership. It establishes leadership doctrine and fundamental principles for all officers, noncommissioned officers

  20. 1 of 7 102699 Single 100-position taper potentiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    1 of 7 102699 FEATURES Single 100-position taper potentiometer Nonvolatile "on-demand" wiper - Wiper of Potentiometer VCC - 3V or 5V Power Supply CS - Chip Select U/ D - Up/Down Control INC - Increment/Decrement Wiper Control GND - Ground DESCRIPTION The DS1804 NV Trimmer Potentiometer

  1. Superhydrophobic coating (2008 R&D 100 winner)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeff Brinker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent coating that is not just impermeable to water, but actually makes it bounce off a surface to help prevent corrosion, protect electronic and antiquities, or provide a new, more efficient surface to collect pure water. 2008 R&D 100 winner (SAND2008-2215W)

  2. Chemistry 100 Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Chemistry 100 ­ Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5 The World of Chemistry ­ Course Syllabus Instructor Kirkwood Hall 212 Texts: Required: Chemistry in Context (CC) Course information is online through OnCourse. Course Objective(s): The primary goal of this course is to teach you about the chemistry that surrounds

  3. 2006 B100 Quality Survey Results: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.; Deutch, S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a nationwide quality survey of pure biodiesel (B100) intended to be used as a blendstock. The study collected random samples throughout the United States and analyzed them for quality against the current and proposed ASTM D6751 fuel quality specifications.

  4. heplat/9311002 Full QCD on APE100 Machines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    hep­lat/9311002 Full QCD on APE100 Machines. Stefano ANTONELLI, Marco BELLACCI, Andrea DONINI of QCD with two flavours of dynamical Wilson fermions using the Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm (HMCA on the lattice by means of Monte Carlo methods have become an important tool to understand and pre­ dict non

  5. ENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Bruce

    requirements (a) The use of internal combustion engines (gas and glow fuel engines) is prohibited. (bENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications HC_PS_005 Rev. A, 28 to Engineering Design Hovercraft Product Specifications HC_PS_005 Rev. A, 28 August 2008 Figure 1: The test

  6. MATH 100 Introduction to the Profession Linear Equations in MATLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasshauer, Greg

    's input-output model in economics, electric circuit problems, the steady-state analysis of a systemMATH 100 ­ Introduction to the Profession Linear Equations in MATLAB Greg Fasshauer Department;Chapter 5 of Experiments with MATLAB Where do systems of linear equations come up? fasshauer@iit.edu MATH

  7. Cantilever Epitaxy Process Wins R&D 100 Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories received an R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine for development of a new process for growing gallium nitride on an etched sapphire substrate. The process, called cantilever epitaxy, promises to make brighter and more efficient green, blue, and white LEDs.

  8. Bachelor of Science in Construction Management UF 100 UF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Project Management & Law Management CMGT 110 CMGT 245 CMGT 367 CMGT 417 Construction Materials DrawingsBachelor of Science in Construction Management 2014-2015 UF 100 UF 200 Intellectual Foundations Civic and Ethical Foundations ENGL 101 ENGL 102 CMGT 201 Management Elective CMGT 485 English

  9. Time-dependent Hamiltonians with 100% evolution speed efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raam Uzdin; Uwe Guenther; Saar Rahav; Nimrod Moiseyev

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution speed in projective Hilbert space is considered for Hermitian Hamiltonians and for non-Hermitian (NH) ones. Based on the Hilbert-Schmidt norm and the spectral norm of a Hamiltonian, resource-related upper bounds on the evolution speed are constructed. These bounds are valid also for NH Hamiltonians and they are illustrated for an optical NH Hamiltonian and for a non-Hermitian $\\mathcal{PT}-$symmetric matrix Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the concept of quantum speed efficiency is introduced as measure of the system resources directly spent on the motion in the projective Hilbert space. A recipe for the construction of time-dependent Hamiltonians which ensure 100% speed efficiency is given. Generally these efficient Hamiltonians are NH but there is a Hermitian efficient Hamiltonian as well. Finally, the extremal case of a non-Hermitian non-diagonalizable Hamiltonian with vanishing energy difference is shown to produce a 100% efficient evolution with minimal resources consumption.

  10. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent. 20 refs.

  11. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

  12. UPS 100.601 1 Effective Date: 7-7-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 100.601 1 Effective Date: 7-7-06 UPS 100.601 PROCEDURES FOR DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM NAME CHANGES I California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 100.601 UPS 100.601 2 Effective Date: 7-7-06 E. If opposition. Source: University Curriculum Committee EFFECTIVE DATE: July 7, 2006 Supersedes UPS 100.601 dated 10

  13. Aluminum and tungsten X-pinch experiments on 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jian [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sun Tieping; Wu Gang; Wang Liangping; Han Juanjuan; Li Mo; Cong Peitian; Qiu Aici [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Lv Min [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-pinch experiments have been carried out on a 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage recently built up. The X-pinches exhibited a source size of about 10 {mu}m, a pulse duration of 3 ns, 3-5 keV radiation energy of 3.9 mJ, and a burst time jitter of tens of nanosecond with the 2-wire 8 {mu}m W X-pinch load. The generator output current and the X-pinch characteristics depended on the X-pinch wire materials in the tests. X-ray backlighting images from the insects showed the significant phase-contrast effect.

  14. Photo of the Week: What You Needed to Contain 100 Million Degree...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo of the Week: What You Needed to Contain 100 Million Degree Plasma for 100 Millionths of a Second... in 1974 Photo of the Week: What You Needed to Contain 100 Million Degree...

  15. Testing of SP-100 reactor control approaches in the NAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhow, S.K.; Meyer, R.A.; Wong, K.K.; Halfen, F.J. (General Electric Company, SP-100 Programs, Astro Space Division, San Jose, California 95153-5354 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generic Flight System (GFS) reactor control approach will be tested at the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) test site as part of the Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) program. A control scheme for the NAT has been developed to emulate the GFS conditions for testing of the GFS reactor control approach in the NAT. Comparisons between the GFS simulation results and the NAT simulation results show that a reasonably good emulation of the GFS conditions can be achieved in the NAT using the control scheme described in this paper.

  16. Certification of the Cessna 152 on 100% ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shauck, M.E.; Zanin, M.G.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1996, the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, received a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) for the use of 100% ethanol as a fuel for the Cessna 152, the most popular training aircraft in the world. This is the first certification granted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for a non-petroleum fuel. Certification of an aircraft on a new fuel requires a certification of the engine followed by a certification of the airframe/engine combination. This paper will describe the FAA airframe certification procedure, the tests required and their outcome using ethanol as an aviation fuel in a Cessna 152.

  17. Multiplexer/amplifier test results for SP-100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.B.; Luker, S.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ryan, R. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplexer and amplifier systems must be designed with transistors that can perform satisfactorily over ten years to a total gamma dose of 120E6 rads and a total neutron fluence of 1.6E15 nvt for the SP-100 reactor system. Series of gamma and neutron tests have been completed to measure transistor degradation as a function of total dose, fluence, and temperature. Test results indicate that modest increases in temperature result in substantial improvement of transistor performance at a neutron flux of 8E8 n/cm{sup 2}/s. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Design Studies of ``100% Pu'' Mox Lead Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document the results of neutronics studies of <<100%Pu>> MOX LTA design are presented. The parametric studies of infinite MOX-UOX grids, MOX-UOX core fragments and of VVER-1000 core with 3 MOX LTAs are performed. The neutronics parameters of MOX fueled core have been performed for the chosen design MOX LTA using the Russian 3D code BIPR-7A and 2D code PERMAK-A with the constants prepared by the cell spectrum code TVS-M.

  19. A 100-kc modulation system for an EPR microwave spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank Edwin

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE II-1 Molecular Structure of DPPH 22 II-2 11-3 III-1 IV-1 Hyperfine Splitting in the DPPH EPR Spectrum . 25 Hyperfine Splitting in the Mn EpR Spectrum , . 27 100-kc Field Modulation and Detection System . 4I Typical... spectrometer. Most EPR spectrometers induce transitions at microwave frequencies and split the Zeeman levels with a polarizing field of 3400 gauss' The inherent advantage of operating in this region is that high sensitivities can be realized from small...

  20. Hanford Site - 100-NR-2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents andNR-2 Hanford Site - 100-NR-2

  1. Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011DryTop 100 Oil and Gas

  2. Laboratory snags five R&D 100 awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receive DOE EarlyR&D 100

  3. S M Stoller Star Center-B100

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/Monthly Accutest

  4. S M Stoller Star Center-B100

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/Monthly

  5. R746-100-10(A) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia: Energy Resources Jump to:QubedR746-100-10(A)

  6. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt...

  7. SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

    1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

  8. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and excessive creep and mechanical property changes. Postulated accident scenarios would be the same for 20-year or 100-year storage, because they are mostly governed by operational or outside events, and not by the cask or fuel. Analyses of accident scenarios during extended dry storage could be impacted by fuel and cask changes that would result from the extended period of storage. Overall, the results of this work indicate that, based on fuel behavior, spent fuel at burnups below {approximately}45 GWd/MTU can be dry stored for 100 years. Long-term storage of higher burnup fuel or fuels with newer cladding will require the determination of temperature limits based on evaluation of stress-driven degradation mechanisms of the cladding.

  9. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Geophysical investigation of the ``Thimble,`` 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the geophysical investigations conducted as part of the characterization of the buried ``Thimble`` site. The site is located just south of the 116-H-2 Crib and is in the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit. Available documentation has it located between, and at the convergence of, two railroad spurs that run north-south. A concrete monument is believed to mark the site. The burial ground is suspected of containing a vertical safety rod thimble that is reportedly 40 ft long. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other similar investigations on the Hanford Site. The objective of the investigation was to locate the buried thimble.

  11. COMMISSIONING AND OPERATION OF THE CEBAF 100 MV CRYOMODULES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Trent; Davis, G; Drury, Michael; Harwood, Leigh; Hogan, John; Kimber, Andrew; Lahti, George; Merz, William; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz; Seidman, David; Spata, Michael; Wilson, Michael

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules and RF systems. The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at a maximum accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m. To support the higher gradients and higher Q{sub L} ({approx} 3 x 10{sup 7}), a new RF system has been developed and is being installed to power and control the cavities. The RF system employs digital control and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, two of these cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been installed and commissioned in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 540 {micro}A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the RF system and cryomodules.

  12. Radiopurity control in the NEXT-100 double beta decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Álvarez, V.; Cárcel, S.; Cervera, A.; Díaz, J.; Ferrario, P.; Gil, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lorca, D.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de València, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)] [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de València, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive material screening and selection process is underway in the construction of the 'Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC' (NEXT), intended to investigate neutrinoless double beta decay using a high-pressure xenon gas TPC filled with 100 kg of Xe enriched in {sup 136}Xe. Determination of the radiopurity levels of the materials is based on gamma-ray spectroscopy using ultra-low background germanium detectors at the Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc (Spain) and also on Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry. Materials to be used in the shielding, pressure vessel, electroluminescence and high voltage components and energy and tracking readout planes have been already taken into consideration. The measurements carried out are presented, describing the techniques and equipment used, and the results obtained are shown, discussing their implications for the NEXT experiment.

  13. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.)

    1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  14. Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level March 22, 2012), the scientists achieved a whopping 100.75 tesla--a magnetic field nearly 100 times more powerful than a junkyard and insulators. The 100-tesla level is roughly equivalent to 2 million times Earth's magnetic field. #12;- 2

  15. UPS 100.001 COVER PAGE Effective Date: 5-15-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 100.001 COVER PAGE Effective Date: 5-15-14 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS #12;UPS 100.001 TOC i Effective Date: 5-15-14 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS TABLE OF CONTENTS Pages I. ACADEMIC................................................................................................4 2. University Policy Statement (UPS

  16. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  17. Hanford Site 100-N Area In Situ Bioremediation of UPR-100-N-17, Deep Petroleum Unplanned Release - 13245

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saueressig, Daniel G. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington, 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington, 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1965 and 1966, approximately 303 m{sup 3} of Number 2 diesel fuel leaked from a pipeline used to support reactor operations at the Hanford Site's N Reactor. N Reactor was Hanford's longest operating reactor and served as the world's first dual purpose reactor for military and power production needs. The Interim Action Record of Decision for the 100-N Area identified in situ bioremediation as the preferred alternative to remediate the deep vadose zone contaminated by this release. A pilot project supplied oxygen into the vadose zone to stimulate microbial activity in the soil. The project monitored respiration rates as an indicator of active biodegradation. Based on pilot study results, a full-scale system is being constructed and installed to remediate the vadose zone contamination. (authors)

  18. Progress toward a MEMS fabricated 100 GHz oscillator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Lemp, Thomas; Weyn, Mark L.; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Rowley, James E. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an LDRD effort which looked at the feasibility of building a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabricated 100 GHz micro vacuum tube. PIC Simulations proved to be a very useful tool in investigating various device designs. Scaling parameters were identified. This in turn allowed predictions of oscillator growth based on beam parameters, cavity geometry, and cavity loading. The electron beam source was identified as a critical element of the design. FEA's (Field Emission Arrays) were purchased to be built into the micro device. Laboratory testing of the FEA's was also performed which pointed out care and handling issues along with maximum current capabilities. Progress was made toward MEMS fabrication of the device. Techniques were developed and successfully employed to build up several of the subassemblies of the device. However, the lower wall fabrication proved to be difficult and a successful build was not completed. Alternative approaches to building this structure have been identified. Although these alternatives look like good solutions for building the device, it was not possible to complete a redesign and build during the timeframe of this effort.

  19. First Axion Results from the XENON100 Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The XENON100 Collaboration; E. Aprile; F. Agostini; M. Alfonsi; K. Arisaka; F. Arneodo; M. Auger; C. Balan; P. Barrow; L. Baudis; B. Bauermeister; A. Behrens; P. Beltrame; K. Bokeloh; A. Brown; E. Brown; S. Bruenner; G. Bruno; R. Budnik; J. M. R. Cardoso; A. P. Colijn; H. Contreras; J. P. Cussonneau; M. P. Decowski; E. Duchovni; S. Fattori; A. D. Ferella; W. Fulgione; F. Gao; M. Garbini; C. Geis; L. W. Goetzke; C. Grignon; E. Gross; W. Hampel; R. Itay; F. Kaether; G. Kessler; A. Kish; H. Landsman; R. F. Lang; M. Le Calloch; D. Lellouch; C. Levy; S. Lindemann; M. Lindner; J. A. M. Lopes; K. Lung; A. Lyashenko; S. Macmullin; T. Marrodan Undagoitia; J. Masbou; F. V. Massoli; D. Mayani Paras; A. J. Melgarejo Fernandez; Y. Meng; M. Messina; B. Miguez; A. Molinario; M. Murra; J. Naganoma; U. Oberlack; S. E. A. Orrigo; E. Pantic; R. Persiani; F. Piastra; J. Pienaar; G. Plante; N. Priel; S. Reichard; C. Reuter; A. Rizzo; S. Rosendahl; J. M. F. dos Santos; G. Sartorelli; S. Schindler; J. Schreiner; M. Schumann; L. Scotto Lavina; M. Selvi; P. Shagin; H. Simgen; A. Teymourian; D. Thers; A. Tiseni; G. Trinchero; O. Vitells; H. Wang; M. Weber; C. Weinheimer

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results of searches for axions and axion-like-particles with the XENON100 experiment. The axion-electron coupling constant, $g_{Ae}$, has been tested by exploiting the axio-electric effect in liquid xenon. A profile likelihood analysis of 224.6 live days $\\times$ 34 kg exposure has shown no evidence for a signal. By rejecting $g_{Ae}$, larger than $7.7 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) in the solar axion search, we set the best limit to date on this coupling. In the frame of the DFSZ and KSVZ models, we exclude QCD axions heavier than 0.3 eV/c$^2$ and 80 eV/c$^2$, respectively. For axion-like-particles, under the assumption that they constitute the whole abundance of dark matter in our galaxy, we constrain $g_{Ae}$, to be lower than $1 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c$^2$.

  20. Logging anomalies key to 100-bcf, shallow gas play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, P.L. Jr. (Cook Energy, Inc. (US)); Scheneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Paramount Petroleum Co., Inc., Jackson, MI (US))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper cretaceous Eutaw formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 Tcf of gas since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to the discovery of Trimble field in 1988, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in Mississippi was at Maxie-Pistol Ridge field in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt Basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field now contains 21 wells, with gas reserves in excess of 100 bcfg and maximum daily production averaging 42 MMcfd. As of January 1991, Trimble field has produced 12.2 Bcfg and 67,688 bbl condensate from 21 wells. Annual gas production for 1991 is expected to be 12 Bcfg. This article focuses on the log evaluation techniques developed to aid in the recognition of the low-resistivity Eutaw pay. Trimble field is an excellent example of how an anomalous set of occurrences in a trend can lead to new exploration opportunities. For a more detailed look at this case study, readers are referred to the 1990 Transaction of the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies annual meeting.

  1. Tissue phantom ratios for a Clinac 4/100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.; Doppke, K.P.; Leong, J.C.; Russell, M.D.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue phantom ratios (TPR), based on a normalization depth of 5 cm, have been measured in water for field sizes from 5 x 5 cm/sup 2/ to approximately 40 x 40 cm/sup 2/ and for depths from 1 to 40 cm for a Varian Clinac 4/100. These TPR's have been compared with those calculated from percent depth doses measured at the same time, and the two sets of data generally agree to better than 1%, with an average ratio of measured to calculated TPR of 0.999 +- 0.013. Beam profiles have been measured for open and wedged fields, with particular concern for the often observed ''horns,'' or the increase in dose at the corners of the field. The maximum dose at a depth of 1 cm, along the diagonal of the field for this machine, is approximately 5% higher than at the same depth on the central axis, whereas along the principal plane the maximum dose is only about 3% higher.

  2. Dual Sync Pulse orbital welding of Zeron 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warburton, G.R.; Spence, M.A. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom); Potter, S.R. [Dimetrics, Inc., Davidson, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a new orbital GTAW welding system. Dual Synchronized Pulsation is a further development of the Sync Pulse mode of operation. In Sync Pulse operation the primary weld parameters (current, voltage and wire feed speed) are pulsed between a primary and background value together with synchronization to the torch oscillation position allied with presetting duration using in dwell, excursion and out dwell times. Dual Sync Pulse utilizes two wire feed systems feeding a chill wire directly into the rear of the weld pool on the side opposite the weld torch and the main wire feed. The chill wires fed into the trailing side of the torch absorbs energy from the weld pool effectively limiting heat transmitted to the base material. This technique provides higher deposition rates, decreased welding times and lower heat inputs per pound of deposited metal. Using Dual Sync Pulse, substantial increases in metal deposition rate compared to single wire technique were obtained together with lower heat inputs per kg (pound) of deposited metal. Both mechanical properties and corrosion test results met normal fabrication specification requirements. No evidence of intermetallic phase precipitation was found using optical microscopy. The ability to increase deposition rate without concurrent increase in heat input offers the fabricator significant advantages when welding a super duplex stainless steels such as Zeron 100. In addition, the reduced number of runs and lower heat inputs provide welds with less hoop shrinkage and lower residual stress.

  3. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

  4. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  5. Adsorption of Potassium on the MoS2(100) Surface: A First-Principles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potassium on the MoS2(100) Surface: A First-Principles Investigation. Adsorption of Potassium on the MoS2(100) Surface: A First-Principles Investigation. Abstract: Periodic density...

  6. Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System, Wins R&D 100 Award...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System, Wins R&D 100 Award Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System, Wins R&D 100 Award October 16, 2014 - 5:24pm Addthis Developed...

  7. Alpha Emission Near 100Sn and the Termination of the rp Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha Emission Near 100 Sn and the Termination of the rp Process The astrophysical rp-process is thought to reach a termination point in the region of 100 Sn, via the...

  8. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Developed jointly...

  9. UPS 211.100 1 Effective Date: 3-25-08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 211.100 1 Effective Date: 3-25-08 UPS 211.100 APPOINTMENT OF DEPARTMENT CHAIRS AND VICE University, Fullerton #12;UPS 211.100 UPS 211.100 2 Effective Date: 3-25-08 3. A member of the department who to place this responsibility in the hands of an ad hoc committee, made up of persons who are not candidates

  10. United States- Land Based and Offshore Annual Average Wind Speed at 100 Meters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-size, high resolution version of the 100-meter land-based and offshore wind speed resource map.

  11. NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

  12. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    countries with average annual per capita energy consumption rates under 1 TOE)? [5 points] 2. Exponential, poverty and gender The chapter "Energy and Poverty" from the 2002 World Energy Outlook, states "...theEnergy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100

  13. ADSORPTION OF INTAN-100 AT THE BITUMEN/AQUEOUS SOLUTION INTERFACE STUDIED BY SPINNING DROP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    1 ADSORPTION OF INTAN-100 AT THE BITUMEN/AQUEOUS SOLUTION INTERFACE STUDIED BY SPINNING DROP an experimental study on the adsorption behaviour of Intan-100, a non- ionic surfactant, at the bitumen Spinning Drop Tensiometer, bitumen, heavy water, Intan-100, Gibbs adsorption isotherm. #12;2 Introduction

  14. Leishmania donovani Heat Shock Protein 100 CHARACTERIZATION AND FUNCTION IN AMASTIGOTE STAGE DIFFERENTIATION*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    are translated preferentially under heat stress. The gene product, a 100-kDa heat shock protein, Hsp100, becomes abundant only during sustained heat stress, but not un- der common chemical stresses. Hsp100 associates is the key for their survival inside the mammalian host. Leishmania parasites encounter heat stress

  15. Monolayer Passivation of Ge(100) Surface via Nitridation and Oxidation Joon Sung Leea,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Monolayer Passivation of Ge(100) Surface via Nitridation and Oxidation Joon Sung Leea,b , Sarah R passivation of Ge(100) surface via formation of Ge-N and Ge-O surface species was studied using scanning cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source formed an ordered Ge-N structure on a Ge(100) surface at 500o C. DFT

  16. UPS 450.100 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    UPS 450.100 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04 UPS 450.100 POLICY ON EXTENSION PROGRAM University Extended on a contractual basis. Policies associated with Special Session Courses are dealt with in UPS 450.200. A. DEGREE and special courses, (UPS 411.100), and travel courses, (UPS 450.700) and certificate programs (UPS 410

  17. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the levelized cost of electricity. [5 points] #12;Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind Points: 102 [ER100/PP184], 113 [ER200/PP284] - 2 - 2. Wind Power Analysis [18 points grad, 10 pointsEnergy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21

  18. Cancer Reporting Rule R384-100 R384. Health, Community Health Services, Chronic Disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Cancer Reporting Rule R384-100 R384. Health, Community Health Services, Chronic Disease. R384-100. Cancer Reporting Rule R384-100-1. Purpose Statement (1) The Cancer Reporting Rule is adopted under authority of sections 26-1-30 and 26-5-3. (2) Cancers Constitute a leading cause of morbidity and mortality

  19. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the process. If the article comes from New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Time, etc Timeliness1 Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100/PPC184 120 for ER200/PPC284 Topics covered: Energy and development, Combustion, Exponential growth

  20. APRIL Results 4--UC Clermont Batavia, OH 1:00 DH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8-0 W 10-2 25-- Miami University Hamilton © Newark, OH 1:00 DH W 10-0 W 11-1 26-- Ashland University Club Ashland, OH 1:00 DH W 15-4 W 13-1 29-- Clark State Newark, OH 3:00 DH PPD PPD 30-- Ohio University

  1. DOE Investment Yields R&D 100 Award Winner in Energy-Efficient Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RTI International's nanofiber lighting improvement technology (NLITe™) has been honored with a 2011 R&D 100 Award. Established in 1963 by the editors of R&D Magazine, the annual R&D 100 Awards identify the 100 most significant, newly introduced research and development advances of the past year in multiple disciplines.

  2. Seamless On-Wafer Integration of Si(100) MOSFETs and GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piner, Edwin L.

    The first on-wafer integration of Si(100) MOSFETs and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) is demonstrated. To enable a fully Si-compatible process, we fabricated a novel Si(100)-GaN-Si(100) virtual substrate ...

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-21:2 Subsite (100-B/C Discovery Pipeline DS-100BC-002), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-B-21:2 waste site consists of the immediate area of the DS-100BC-02 pipeline. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory and verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  4. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-H-6:2, 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:3, 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils; The 118-H-6:3 Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils; the 100-H-9, 100-H-10, and 100-H-13 French Drains; the 100-H-11 and 100-H-12 Expansion Box French Drains; and the 100-H-14 and 100-H-31 Surface Contamination Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of removal actions for the 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils (subsite 118-H-6:2); 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils (118-H-6:3); and Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils. This CVP also documents remedial actions for the following seven additional waste sties: French Drain C (100-H-9), French Drain D (100-H-10), Expansion Box French Drain E (100-H-11), Expansion Box French Drain F (100-H-12), French Drain G (100-H-13), Surface Contamination Zone H (100-H-14), and the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Surface Contamination Zone (100-H-31).

  5. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  6. DOE Awards $100 Million for Innovative Energy Research | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Awards 100 Million for Innovative Energy Research Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE...

  7. ESnet Powers NRL's 100 Gbps Remote I/O Demo at SC14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powers NRL's 100 Gbps Remote IO Demo at SC14 News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Media Jon...

  8. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecogenomics study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at HanfordRegenesis In-situ bioremediation at Hanford 100H area ??

  9. California: Heliotrope Technologies Wins R&D 100 Award for Universal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies, with support from EERE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), received a 2013 R&D 100 Award for their Universal Smart Window (USW) Coating. This...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: MEPV Wins 2012 R&D100 Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, News, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaics, also known as "solar glitter," captured a prestigious R&D 100 Award in this...

  11. DESCRIPTION Shipley BPR-100 Photoresist is a liquid, negative-tone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including electroless copper and electroless nickel PROCESS GUIDELINES Shipley BPR-100 Photoresist is most, copper, gold, nickel, titanium, chromium, silicon, silicon oxide, glass, ceramic and polyamide. Shipley

  12. ESnet's On-Demand Bandwidth Reservation Service Wins R&D 100...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On-Demand Bandwidth Reservation Service Wins R&D 100 Award News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us...

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-23, 100-B/C Area Surface Debris, Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-027

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-B-23, 100-B/C Surface Debris, waste consisted of multiple locations of surface debris and chemical stains that were identified during an Orphan Site Evaluation of the 100-B/C Area. Evaluation of the collected information for the surface debris features yielded four generic waste groupings: asbestos-containing material, lead debris, oil and oil filters, and treated wood. Focused verification sampling was performed concurrently with remediation. Site remediation was accomplished by selective removal of the suspect hazardous items and potentially impacted soils. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. Moleculardynamics simulation of thermal stress at the (100) diamond/substrate interface: effect of film continuity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    with the development of advanced CVD techniques 2 producing polycrystalline diamond of quality approachingMolecular­dynamics simulation of thermal stress at the (100) diamond/substrate interface: effect at the (100) diamond/substrate interface. The stress­induced binding energy reduction obtained

  15. Selected materials development for the 100 T magnet: Cu-Nb conductors with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Selected materials development for the 100 T magnet: Cu-Nb conductors with nanocomposite components (PBO) based composite for reinforcement Materials R&D for the 100-Tesla Pulsed Magnet Gregory S for this achievement was the long-term and painstaking research and development of high strength materials

  16. 100-N Area Decision Unit Target Analyte List Development for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovink, R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-N Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

  18. Ductile rupture of prestrained X100 pipeline steel sheets Jacques Besson1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (TMCP process). The resulting microstructure is mainly a dual phase structure consisting of fineDuctile rupture of prestrained X100 pipeline steel sheets Jacques Besson1, a , Yasuhiro Shinohara,1.morgeneyer@ensmp.fr, d yazid.madi@mat.ensmp.fr Keywords: Prestrain, X100 steel, ductile rupture, anisotropy, toughness

  19. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  20. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline and epitaxial TiN films on (100) silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Qiuming

    Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline and epitaxial TiN films on (100) silicon H. Wang, A 2001) We investigated mechanical properties of TiN as a function of microstructure varying from nanocrystalline to single crystal TiN films deposited on (100) silicon substrates. By varying the substrate

  1. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman [University of New Mexico

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  2. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Animal Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Animal Science Communication Food Science and Technology English Sciences Med. Sci. - Immunology & Microbial Pathogenesis Applied Economics and Management Chemical #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Plant Breeding Communication Food Science and Technology Animal

  3. Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu,,100... N. Lorente*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu,,100... N. Lorente* Laboratoire of individual chemisorbed benzene molecules on Cu 100 has recently been performed in atomic manipulation experiments J. Phys. Chem. A. 104, 2463 2000 ; Surf. Sci 451, 219 2000 . Benzene dissociates under controlled

  4. Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells cations (e.g. ammonium) as electrolytes in fuel cells operating in the temperature range 100­200 uC, where cell operating with optimized electrodes in the same temperature range, while open circuit voltages

  5. Section 100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking Over OurSecretary of Energy12,RodImpact,500

  6. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  7. Laser-interferometric Detectors for Gravitational Wave Background at 100 MHz : Detector Design and Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Seiji Kawamura; Tomotada Akutsu; Koji Arai; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Daisuke Tatsumi; Erina Nishida; Masa-aki Sakagami; Takeshi Chiba; Ryuichi Takahashi; Naoshi Sugiyama

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, observational searches for gravitational wave background (GWB) have developed and given direct and indirect constraints on the energy density of GWB in a broad range of frequencies. These constraints have already rejected some theoretical models of large GWB spectra. However, at 100 MHz, there is no strict upper limit from direct observation, though the indirect limit by He4 abundance due to big-bang nucleosynthesis exists. In this paper, we propose an experiment with laser interferometers searching GWB at 100 MHz. We considered three detector designs and evaluated the GW response functions of a single detector. As a result, we found that, at 100 MHz, the most sensitive detector is the design, a so-called synchronous recycling interferometer, which has better sensitivity than an ordinary Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometer by a factor of 3.3 at 100 MHz. We also give the best sensitivity achievable at 100 MHz with realistic experimental parameters.

  8. American Economic Review 100 (June 2010): 837869 http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.100.3.837

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    .1257/aer.100.3.837 When the US federal government first began regulating major sources of air pollution in electricity market regulations, a larger share of the permitted pollution is being emitted in states where air in the 1960s, the conventional approach to meeting air quality standards involved establishing maxi- mum

  9. 100 Area D4 Project Semi-Annual 2006 Building Completion Report, August 2005 - April 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. C. Griff

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination, decommissioining (D&D) and the demolition of select facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site as required by DOE G 430.1-4.

  10. Analysis and mitigation of key losses in a multi-stage 25-100 K cryocooler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segado, Martin Alan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A need exists for small, robust, and efficient cryocoolers operating in the 25-100 K range; however, while technological advances have enabled the development of such machines, a greater understanding of the losses affecting ...

  11. Meridian Centre Location 100Meridian Centre. Suite 125 . Rochester, NY14618

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    right into Meridian Centre Blvd. .Continue straight to the three-story building marked #100 Elmwood Ave. Westfall Rd. mlm A N Brighton-Henrietta Townline Rd. Jefferson Rd. 90 NYS Thruway 585-273- EYES #12;

  12. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    00,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER...

  13. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: An update on Barrier Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates a previous report covering the performance of a permeable reactive barrier installed at 100N. In this report we re-evaluate the results after having an additional year of performance monitoring data to incorporate.

  14. S100 Inhibitors: A New Paradigm for Treating Alzheimer’s Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathai, David 1991-

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    identified, this mechanistic information can be used toward the development of S100 inhibitors that improve memory loss in patients. The availability of novel pharmacological interventions for AD will significantly reduce the monetary and societal impacts...

  15. LATEST RESULTS AND TEST PLANS FROM THE 100 mA CORNELL ERL INJECTOR SCRF CRYOMODULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    LATEST RESULTS AND TEST PLANS FROM THE 100 mA CORNELL ERL INJECTOR SCRF CRYOMODULE M. Liepe , S developed and fabricated a SCRF injector cryomodule for the acceleration of a high current, low emittance

  16. Summary of TPH Monitoring Conducted at 100-NR-2 during CY 2008 and 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; young, david; Stegen, J. A.; Bunn, Amoret L.

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers a variety of environmental monitoring activities that were conducted over an 18 month period to provide characterization of a TPH-diesel contamination plume in the 100-NR-2 OU

  17. Design and characterization of Si/SiGe heterostructure sub-100 nm bulk p-MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae-kyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the gate length of CMOS device is scaled down to the sub-100 nanometer node, the development of devices faces many technological challenges, which are related to material and process integration. As a new channel material, ...

  18. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Fall

  19. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  20. Results of Cavity Series Fabrication at Jefferson Laboratory for the Cryomodule “R100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Marhauser, W.A. Clemens, M.A. Drury, D. Forehand, J. Henry, S. Manning, R.B. Overton, R.S. Williams

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series production of eight superconducting RF cavities for the cryomodule R100 was conducted at JLab in 2010. The cavities underwent chemical post-processing prior to vertical high power testing and routinely exceeded the envisaged performance specifications. After cryomodule assembly, cavities were successfully high power acceptance tested. In this paper, we present the achievements paving the way for the first demonstration of 100 MV (and beyond) in a single cryomodule to be operated at CEBAF.

  1. GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

  2. A 100 MWe advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. K.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) was developed targeting a small electrical grid to be transportable to the plant site and operable for a long time without frequent refueling. The reactor power rating was strategically decided to be 100 MWe, and the core barrel diameter was limited to 3.0 m for transportability. The design parameters were determined by relaxing the peak fast fluence limit and bulk coolant outlet temperature to beyond irradiation experience assuming that advanced cladding and structural materials developed under US-DOE programs would be available when the AFR-100 is deployed. With a de-rated power density and U-Zr binary metallic fuel, the AFR-100 can maintain criticality for 30 years without refueling. The average discharge burnup of 101 MWd/kg is comparable to conventional design values, but the peak discharge fast fluence of {approx}6x10{sup 23} neutrons/cm{sup 2} is beyond the current irradiation experiences with HT-9 cladding. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provide sufficient negative feedbacks and the reactivity control systems provide sufficient shutdown margins. The integral reactivity parameters obtained from quasi-static reactivity balance analysis indicate that the AFR-100 meets the sufficient conditions for acceptable asymptotic core outlet temperature following postulated unprotected accidents. Additionally, the AFR-100 has sufficient thermal margins by grouping the fuel assemblies into eight orifice zones. (authors)

  3. End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Jesse

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, network bandwidth requirements have scaled multiple folds, pushing the need for the development of data exchange mechanisms at 100 Gb/s and beyond. High performance computing, climate modeling, large-scale storage, and collaborative scientific research are examples of applications that can greatly benefit by leveraging high bandwidth capabilities of the order of 100 Gb/s. Such requirements and advances in IEEE Ethernet standards, Optical Transport Unit4 (OTU4), and host-system interconnects demand a network infrastructure supporting throughput rates of the order of 100 Gb/s with a single wavelength. To address such a demand Acadia Optronics in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, proposed and developed a end-system Network Interface Controller (NIC) for the 100Gbps WANs. Acadia’s 100G NIC employs an FPGA based system with a high-performance processor interconnect (PCIe 3.0) and a high capacity optical transmission link (CXP) to provide data transmission at the rate of 100 Gbps.

  4. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  5. Progress on the Construction of the 100 MeV / 100 kW Electron Linac for the NSC KIPT Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Long, Chi; Guo-Xi, Pei; Shu-Hong, Wang; Jian-She, Cao; Mi, Hou; Wei-Bin, Liu; Zu-Sheng, Zhou; Feng-Li, Zhao; Rong, Liu; Xiang-Cheng, Kong; Jing-Xia, Zhao; Chang-Dong, Deng; Hong, Song; Jin-Tong, Liu; Xu-Wen, Dai; Jun-Hui, Yue; Qi, Yang; Da-Yong, He; Xiang, He; Qi, Le; Xiao-Ping, Li; Lin, Wang; Xiang-Jian, Wang; Hui-Zhou, Ma; Xiao-Yan, Zhao; Yan-Feng, Sui; Hai-Sheng, Guo; Chuang-Xin, Ma; Jian-Bing, Zhao; Peng, Chen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IHEP, China is constructing a 100 MeV / 100 kW electron Linac for NSC KIPT, Ukraine. This linac will be used as the driver of a neutron source based on a subcritical assembly. In 2012, the injector part of the accelerator was pre-installed as a testing facility in the experimental hall #2 of IHEP. The injector beam and key hardware testing results were met the design goal. Recently, the injector testing facility was disassembled and all of the components for the whole accelerator have been shipped to Ukraine from China by ocean shipping. The installation of the whole machine in KIPT will be started in June, 2013. The construction progress, the design and testing results of the injector beam and key hardware are presented.

  6. New Results for Double-Beta Decay of Mo-100 to Excited Final States of Ru-100 Using the TUNL-ITEP Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Kidd; J. H. Esterline; W. Tornow; A. S. Barabash; V. I. Umatov

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The coincidence detection efficiency of the TUNL--ITEP apparatus designed for measuring half-life times of two-neutrino double-beta decay transitions to excited final states in daughter nuclei has been measured with a factor of 2.4 improved accuracy. In addition, the previous measuring time of 455 days for the study of the Mo-100 two-neutrino double-beta decay to the first excited 0+ state in Ru-100 has been increased by 450 days, and a new result (combined with the previous measurement obtained with the same apparatus) for this transition is presented: T_(1/2) = [5.5 (+1.2/-0.8) (stat) +/- 0.3 (syst)] x 10^20 y. Measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life times to excited states can be used to test the reliability of nuclear matrix element calculations needed for determining the effective neutrino mass from zero-neutrino double-beta decay data. We also present new limits for transitions to higher excited states in Ru-100 which, if improved, may be of interest for more exotic conjectures, like a bosonic component to neutrino statistics.

  7. A study of improved MHR 50/100 toward a higher level of inherent safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minatsuki, I.; Otani, T.; Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Oyama, S.; Tsukamoto, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Kunitomi, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of the Mitsubishi small-sized High temperature gas-cooled modular Reactors (MHR-50/100) had been developed and published in papers. The study results of the first design concept show that the MHR-50/100 can achieve the inherent safety level set as a design target in case of water ingress during steam generator tube rupture accident. And more specifically, the reactor was shown to remain stable during long-term station black out (SBO) with protection of only passive devices during a depressurization accident and with additional motion of steam dump system during a water ingress accident. Recently greater requirements for safety of future nuclear plants including the MHR-50/100 have been expected. This study has thus made a key design improvement for the MHR-50/100 in order to secure the inherent safety aspect without reliance on active steam dump system in case of a water ingress accident. The innovative technologies listed below have been created and investigated to achieve the improved MHR-50/100 design; (1) Design improvement of steam generator, (2) Heat balance optimization of steam cycle, (3) Control system design of differential pressure between primary helium gas and water/steam, (4) Study on operation procedure during a water ingress accident. (authors)

  8. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  9. Spectroscopy of Double-Beta and Inverse-Beta Decays from 100Mo for Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ejiri; J. Engel; R. Hazama; P. Krastev; N. Kudomi; R. G. H. Robertson

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic studies of two beta-rays from 100Mo are shown to be of potential interest for investigating both the Majorana neutrino mass by neutrinoless double beta-decay and low energy solar neutrino's by inverse beta-decay. With a multi-ton 100Mo detector, coincidence studies of correlated beta-beta from neutrinoless double beta-decay, together with the large Q value, permit identification of the neutrino-mass term with a sensitivity of ~ 0.03 eV. Correlation studies of the inverse beta and the successive beta-decay of 100Tc, together with the large capture rates for low energy solar neutrino's, make it possible to detect in realtime individual low energy solar neutrino in the same detector.

  10. Bioremediation Well Borehole Soil Sampling and Data Analysis Summary Report for the 100-N Area Bioremediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. A. Gamon

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings acquired during the drilling and construction of seven bioremediation wells in the 100-N Area in conjunction with remediation of the UPR-100-N-17 petroleum waste site.

  11. Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdomo, Dario

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Load Settlement Curves "Good Guess" Example for Actual Curve(from Briaud et al, 1985) TOP LOAD (HIPS) 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 iJ PILE I. D. NO. 28 Actual Wild Guess + Penpile- Verbrugge (L. P. C. Cone) Coyle Briaud-Tucker L. P. C... ' 7. 2 Mgbinpina1. JLDglxaim ~ The results of the statistical analysis are shown in Tables 10 600 DRIVEN PILES SAND COYLE'S METHOD 500 M 0 400 (A o o UJ 300 X I? O UJ I- 200 O L0 K 100 No. OF PILES=S MEAN PRED/MEAS=1. 01...

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Apatite Investigation at the 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the 100-NR-2 Apatite Project. The U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment. The scope of this project covers the technical support needed before, during, and after treatment of the targeted subsurface environment using a new high-concentration formulation.

  13. The U.S. NHMFL 100 tesla multi-shot magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Coe, H. (Hideyoshi); Ellis, G. G. (Gretchen G.); Lesch, B. L. (Bernard L.); Sims, J. R. (James R.); Schillig, J. B. (Josef B.); Swenson, C. A. (Charles A.); Bacon, J. L. (James L.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, analysis and fabrication progress of the 100 T Multi-Shot Magnet is described. The description includes the structural analysis of the outer coil set, the fabrication of the 100 T prototype coil 1, the fabrication of a coil 1 test shell, and the analysis of the electrical busbar assembly. Fabrication issues and their solutions are presented. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the U.S. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Strain rate-dependent failure of Westerly Granite at 100 MPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Joseph

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRAIN RATE-DEPEIYDENT FAILURE OF WESTERLY GRANITE AT 100 MPa A Thesis by WILLIAh1 JOSEPH HARRIS Submitted to the Graduate Colleoe of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1984 Major Subject: Geophys-, 'cs STRAIN RATE-DEPENDENT FAILURE OF WESTERLY GRANITE AT 100 MPa A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH HARRIS Approved as to styie and content by: Nevi e L. Carter (Chairman of Committee) obert L. Kranz (Member) Me vin ie...

  15. Monolayer-induced band shifts at Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mäkinen, A. J., E-mail: Antti.Makinen@nrl.navy.mil; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kushto, G. P. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report our study of the interfacial electronic structure of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces that have been chemically modified with various organic monolayers, including octadecene and two para-substituted benzene derivatives. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals an upward band shift, associated with the assembly of these organic monolayers on the Si substrates, that does not correlate with either the dipole moment or the electron withdrawing/donating character of the molecular moieties. This suggests that the nature and quality of the self-assembled monolayer and the intrinsic electronic structure of the semiconductor material define the interfacial electronic structure of the functionalized Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces.

  16. SP1TFRE-SP-100 transient fuel rod evaluation code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, David Charles

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carpenter Compar ison of theoretical Fuel element temperatures with and without flux depression . . 63 65 IV-6 BWR/6 thermal-hydr aulic input par ametens. IV-7 BWR/6 actinide inventor y. IV-8 CRBR ther mal-hydr aulic input par ameters . . IV-9 CRBR... actinide inventory. IV-10 SP-100 ther mal-hydr aulic input parameter s. 73 76 78 82 IV-11 SP-100 actinide inventor y. A-1 Constants used for specific heat cor r elation . A-2 Constants used for ther mal expansion cour clat. ion 90 . 101 G-1...

  17. S M Stoller Star Center-B100 Monthly/Effluent; Largo, FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/MonthlyB1001/06B100

  18. S M Stoller Star Center-B100 Monthly/Effluent; Largo, FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100 Monthly/Effluent; Largo,

  19. UW CENPA Annual Report 2002-2003 May 2003 33 2.18 Electron-capture branch of 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Mo as a solar neutrino detector. Neutrinos would undergo the reaction: + 100Mo e + 100Tc, and 100Tc-K Mo-K Mo-K Countsperchannel Energy [keV] 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 10 100 1000 10000 a a b Figure 2¨askyl¨a, Jyv¨askyl¨a, Finland. Department of Physics, Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, IN 46556. 1 H. Ejiri

  20. Shower characteristics of particles with momenta from up to 100 GeV in the CALICE Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klempt W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shower characteristics of particles with momenta from up to 100 GeV in the CALICE Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL

  1. Enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers to search for $0 ? 2?$ decay of $^{100}$Mo with the LUMINEU experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash; D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. Giuliani; I. M. Ivanov; E. P. Makarov; M. Mancuso; S. Marnieros; S. G. Nasonov; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; G. Pessina; D. V. Poda; V. N. Shlegel; M. Tenconi; V. I. Tretyak; Ya. V. Vasiliev; M. Velazquez; V. N. Zhdankov

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUMINEU project aims at performing a demonstrator underground experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope $^{100}$Mo embedded in zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) scintillating bolometers. In this context, a zinc molybdate crystal boule enriched in $^{100}$Mo to 99.5\\% with a mass of 171 g was grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The production cycle provided a high yield (the crystal boule mass was 84\\% of initial charge) and an acceptable level -- around 4\\% -- of irrecoverable losses of the costy enriched material. Two crystals of 59 g and 63 g, obtained from the enriched boule, were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers. They showed a high detection performance, equivalent to that of previously developed natural ZnMoO$_4$ detectors. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMINEU technology, capable to approach and explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  2. Adsorption and Reaction of NO on Cu(100): An Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopic Study at 25 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Adsorption and Reaction of NO on Cu(100): An Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopic Study oxide (NO) on a Cu(100) surface at 25 K has been studied using infrared reflection absorption to the Cu(100) surface. Heating to 55 K leads to reorientation of the dimer molecules in the multilayer

  3. Interaction of methanol and water on MgO,,100... studied by ultraviolet photoelectron and metastable impact electron spectroscopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Interaction of methanol and water on MgO,,100... studied by ultraviolet photoelectron; accepted 27 October 1998 The coadsorption of methanol (CH3OH) and water (D2O) on the MgO 100 /Mo 100 photoelectron spectroscopy UPS HeI , and by thermal programmed desorption TPD . Methanol wets the MgO surface

  4. The genomic impact of 100 million years of social evolution in seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    The genomic impact of 100 million years of social evolution in seven ant species Ju¨ rgen Gadau1, Switzerland Vital-IT Group, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland, School in terms of both their geographic distribution and species number. The publi- cation of seven ant genomes

  5. NanoFermentationTM Process Wins R&D 100 Award

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;NanoFermentationTM Process Wins R&D 100 Award New Process Developed for Manufacturing Nanoscale, which in turn result in part from concerns about reliability of manufacturing techniques. The Project temperature, incubation time, and choice of electron donor or the addition of certain chemical additives

  6. Geologic map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of those quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports (listed below). The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey (Tabor and others, 1982), and the Moses Lake (Gulick, 1990a), Ritzville (Gulick, 1990b), and Rosalia (Waggoner, 1990) quadrangles have already been released. The geology of the Priest Rapids quadrangle has not previously been compiled at 1:100,000 scale. Furthermore, this is the first 1:100,000 or smaller scale geologic map of the area to incorporate both bedrock and surficial geology. This map was compiled in 1992, using published and unpublished geologic maps as sources of data.

  7. AAS Meeting #193 Austin, Texas, January 1999 Session 100. The Quiet and Active Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedel, Manuel

    AAS Meeting #193 ­ Austin, Texas, January 1999 Session 100. The Quiet and Active Sun Display. Guedel (PSI, ETHZ), I. Ribas (U. de Barcelona) We present an aspect of our on­going program of "The Sun in Time" that deals with identifying and studying nearby stars that closely match the Sun

  8. Solar Physics (2006) 237: 85--100 DOI: 10.1007/s1120700601737 C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Physics (2006) 237: 85--100 DOI: 10.1007/s11207­006­0173­7 C # Springer 2006 IS PRE Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008, China (e­mail: lihui@mail.pmo.ac.cn) BRIGITTE SCHMIEDER and GUILLAUME Imager (MDI) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Obser­ vatory (SOHO), the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope

  9. OIKOS 100: 311316, 2003 Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altwegg, Res

    OIKOS 100: 311­316, 2003 Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles ineffective Res Altwegg Altwegg, R. 2003. Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles render the behavioral responses in their prey ineffective. Nevertheless, most studies investigating

  10. Inventory-Measurements Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Inventory-Measurements 289 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Hardwood Inventory or region, or developing statewide hardwood policy guidelines. A physical inventory, while by no means

  11. Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 Harbor Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor Section Your goal for this lab is to become familiar with the physical properties used to identify minerals. Physical properties are determined by the chemical and crystalline properties of the given mineral. However

  12. Feasibility analysis of scanning 100% of maritime cargo containers for fissile material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, William E., III

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 3, 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law H.R. 1: Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007. The law mandates that 100% of air and maritime cargo must be scanned prior to entering ...

  13. Graduation (research) project procedures -After the student completes 100 credit hours he may register for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduation (research) project procedures - After the student completes 100 credit hours he may register for the graduation project module, and after registering this module and obtaining the approval a form particular to the proposed graduation project (form No. 23/a), whereby three proposed titles

  14. Performance of First C100 Cryomodules for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, Michael A.; Burrill, Andrew B.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the project is a doubling of the available beam energy of CEBAF from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due primarily to the construction and installation of ten "C100" cryomodules in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver an average 108 MV each from a string of eight seven-cell, electropolished superconducting RF cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.2 MV/m. The new cryomodules fit in the same available linac space as the original CEBAF 20 MV cryomodules. Cryomodule production started in September 2010. Initial acceptance testing started in June 2011. The first two C100 cryomodules were installed and tested from August 2011 through October 2011, and successfully operated during the last period of the CEBAF 6 GeV era, which ended in May 2012. This paper will present the results of acceptance testing and commissioning of the C100 style cryomodules to date.

  15. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  16. PHYSIOLOGIA PLANTARUM 100: 361-370. 1997 Printed in Denmark -all rights resented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeJong, Theodore

    and Elfving 1989, Li et al. 1989, Caspari et al. 1994). Seasonal effects of temperature and water rela- tions): Temperature and fluctuations in water status determine growth rate M. E. Berman and T. M. DeJong Berman, M. E and fluctuations in water status determine growth rate. - Physiol. Plant. 100: 361-370. Field measurements of stem

  17. Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan recognizes that energy will be a defining challenge for the new Administration--for economic competitiveness, national security and long-term environmental sus- tainability. Energy price and supply volatility impact

  18. CARIBBEAN COLLOQUIUM ON POWER QUALITY (CCPQ), JUNE 2003 100 Defining Reactive Power in Circuit Transients via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    CARIBBEAN COLLOQUIUM ON POWER QUALITY (CCPQ), JUNE 2003 100 Defining Reactive Power in Circuit the notion of reactive power during circuit transients. The definition we propose is based on the concept, namely Short- Time Fourier Coefficients and Haar Wavelets. We illustrate this "dynamic" reactive power

  19. Surface Science 415 (1998) 2936 Structural studies of sulfur-passivated GaAs (100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keywords: Atomic force microscopy; Gallium arsenide; Low-energy electron diffraction; Roughness; SulfurSurface Science 415 (1998) 29­36 Structural studies of sulfur-passivated GaAs (100) surfaces Abstract We present the results of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED

  20. Title: Environmental Health and Safety --Chemical Hygiene Plan Code: 1-310-100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Title: Environmental Health and Safety -- Chemical Hygiene Plan Code: 1-310-100 Date: 7: · Occupational exposure monitoring · Preparation of a Chemical Hygiene Plan · Employee information and training keeping The new laboratory standard requires each employer to appoint a Chemical Hygiene Officer

  1. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 {mu}g/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 {mu}g/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model.

  2. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Were you aware that we are a Fairtrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Relevant 0 20 40 60 80 100 Best practice indicators Procurement capability assessment Increase flexible requirements Social responsibility People and skills Priority of themes to be developed across key strategies.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00% Value for money Conflicting demand priorities

  3. CLINICAL VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS Children's Hospital of Orange County/ commitment = 100 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    CLINICAL VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS Children's Hospital of Orange County/ commitment = 100 hours 455 S Hospital Clinical Care Extender Program/ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS NOW INTERVIEWING THROUGH MARCH 26TH 1 Hoag-4 departments Telephone 949 764-5740 Applications every three months http://www.hoag.org/volunteering/clinical

  4. Double beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    nuclear laboratory for spectroscopic studies of neutrinos Neutrinos are key particles for new frontiers) are sensitive and realistic experiments for studying the Majorana nature of the neutrino and the absolute massDouble beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 Mo ­MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)­ May 24, 2005

  5. Solving the Puzzle of ? 100 ? Interstitial Loop Formation in bcc Iron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetsky, Yury N.; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interstitial loop is a unique signature of radiation damage in structural materials for nuclear and other advanced energy systems. Unlike other bcc metals, two types of interstitial loops, 1/2?111? and ?100?, are formed in bcc iron and its alloys. However, the mechanism by which ?100? interstitial dislocation loops are formed has remained undetermined since they were first observed more than fifty years ago. We describe our atomistic simulations that have provided the first direct observation of ?100? loop formation. The process was initially observed using our self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo method, and subsequently confirmed using molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of ?100? loops involves a distinctly atomistic interaction between two 1/2?111? loops, and does not follow the conventional assumption of dislocation theory, which is Burgers vector conservation between the reactants and the product. The process observed is different from all previously proposed mechanisms. Thus, our observations might provide a direct link between experiments and simulations and new insights into defect formation that may provide a basis to increase the radiation resistance of these strategic materials.

  6. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  7. A 100 MHz 2.5 GHz Direct Conversion CMOS Transceiver for SDR Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    A 100 MHz ­ 2.5 GHz Direct Conversion CMOS Transceiver for SDR Applications Gio Cafaro, Tom frequency switching and phase noise of ­123 dBc/Hz at 25 KHz offset. Index Terms -- CMOS, Direct Conversion are not practical in today's technology [5]-[7]. Direct conversion is preferred for this reason, but it has some

  8. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO/sub 2/ tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study.

  9. Advantages of Biofuels B100 biodiesel has many benefits over traditional, petroleum-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advantages of Biofuels B100 biodiesel has many benefits over traditional, petroleum-based diesel-produced biofuels. Environmental & Social Benefits Decreases emissions of fossil fuels that contribute to climate-powered vessel fleet to biofuels and bio-lubricants. This effort produced the first federal vessel to run

  10. LU Surface Chemistry 17 STM of (2222)R45-Ti5O8/Pt(100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    on MgO(100) NO2 adsorption on metals IRAS ITAS #12;LU Surface Chemistry 22 New FTIR ·Measurements Research Scientist, Air Products PLC, Packaged Gases COE, European Technology Group, Crewe, Cheshire CW1 6(-x) Corrosion Etching and Dissolution UPD and Film growth Electrodes for Batteries Fuel cell electrocatalysts

  11. Women in Science The Lady with the Lamp 100 years on Prof. Sylvia Draper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    into current (or vice versa) provides us with the capacity to devise efficient solar cells or LightemittingWomen in Science ­ The Lady with the Lamp ­ 100 years on Prof. Sylvia Draper Florence Nightingale was an inspiration to the wounded and the dying in the Crimean war and to future generations of women who wanted

  12. An All Metal High Power Circularly Polarized 100 MW RF Load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; /SLAC

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact RF load has been designed using a cascaded array of lossy radial RF chokes to dissipate 100 MW peak and 8 kW average power uniformly along the length of the load. Operation in the circularly polarized Te{_}11 mode assures uniform dissipation azimuthally as well.

  13. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2014; 100:871913

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Michael

    in order to ensure exact energy conservation in conservative systems, and the right rate of energy decayINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2014; 100,*, and M. Ortiz1 1Computational Mechanics Group, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 105

  14. Nanotechnology is defined as materi-als and systems ranging from 1 to 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Nanotechnology is defined as materi- als and systems ranging from 1 to 100 nm which exhibit novel in the potentially revo- lutionary impacts that nanotechnology has to offer clinical medicine, particu- larly oncology. Numerous proof of concept appli- cations of nanotechnology have been described for high impact

  15. HRLEED and STM study of misoriented Si(100) with and without a Te overlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yala, S.; Montano, P.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.]|[Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of high quality Te on misoriented Si(100) is important as an intermediate phase for epitaxial growth of CdTe. The misorientation angle plays a key role in the growth quality of CdTe/Si(100); this incited the curiosity to investigate the effect of the misorientation angle on the topography of the surface structure of Si(100). The main goal is to show the relation between the misorientation angle, the terrace width and the step height distributions. HRLEED (High Resolution Low Energy Electron Diffraction) provides information in reciprocal space while STM gives real space topographic images of the surface structure. STM and HRLEED measurements were performed on Si(100) with misorientation angle {var_theta} = 0.5{degree}, 1.5{degree} and 8{degree} towards the [110] direction and {var_theta} = 4{degree} towards the [130] direction. Except for the 8{degree} misorientation in which case a regular step array with diatomic step height was observed, for the other misorientations the terrace width was variable. The average terrace width decreased with increasing misorientation angle. A mixture of diatomic and monatomic step heights was observed on the 0.5{degree} and 1.5{degree} misoriented Si(100) samples. It proves that one can not assume purely monatomic step height for low misorientation angles. The results do not agree with the belief that at low miscut angle A and B terraces are equal and that as the misorientation angle increases the B terrace tends to be wider than the A terrace. In fact, pairing of terraces was not observed at all. Te was deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 C. The authors observed a significant reduction in the terrace widths for all miscut angles.

  16. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  17. Geologic map of the Richland 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This map of the Richland 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of these quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports. The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey, and the Moses Lake, Ritzville quadrangles have already been released.

  18. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  19. Design and Overview of 100 kV Bushing for the DNB Injector of ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Sejal; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Rotti, C.; Singh, M. J.; Roopesh, G.; Chakraborty, A. K. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382025, Gujarat (India); Rajesh, S. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382025, Gujarat (India); Microelectronics and Materials Physics Labs, P.O.Box 4500, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Nishad, S.; Srusti, B. [DesignTech Systems Ltd, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh-500034 (India); Schunke, B.; Hemsworth, R.; Chareyre, J.; Svensson, L. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100 kV bushing is one of the most important and technologically challenging Safety Important Class (SIC) components of the Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) injector of ITER. It forms interface between gas insulated electrical transmission line and torus primary vacuum and acts as a vacuum feedthrough of ITER. Design optimization has been carried out to meet the electric and structural requirements based on its classification. Unlike HNB bushing, single stage bushing is designed to provide 100 kV isolation. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) based optimization has been carried out for electrostatic and structural analysis. Manufacturing assembly sequence is studied and presented in this paper. However validation of the same is foreseen from manufacturer.

  20. PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary. Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing strontium-90 flux to the Columbia River. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  1. Digital-photonic synthesis of ultra-low noise tunable signals from RF to 100 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortier, T M; Quinlan, F; Baynes, F N; Metcalf, A J; Hati, A; Ludlow, A; Hinkley, N; Shimizu, M; Ishibashi, T; Campbell, J C; Diddams, S A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for higher data rates and better synchronization in communication and navigation systems necessitates the development of new wideband and tunable sources with noise performance exceeding that provided by traditional oscillators and synthesizers. Precision synthesis is paramount for providing frequency references and timing in a broad range of applications including next-generation telecommunications, high precision measurement, and radar and sensing. Here we describe a digital-photonic synthesizer (DPS) based on optical frequency division that enables the generation of widely tunable signals from near DC to 100 GHz with a fractional frequency instability of 1 part in 10^15. The spectral purity of the DPS derived signals represents an improvement in close-to-carrier noise performance over the current state-of-the-art of nearly 7 orders of magnitude in the W-band (100 GHz), and up to 5 orders of magnitude in the X-band (10 GHz).

  2. 100 km secure differential phase shift quantum key distribution with low jitter up-conversion detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleni Diamanti; Hiroki Takesue; Carsten Langrock; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2006-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum key distribution experiment in which keys that were secure against all individual eavesdropping attacks allowed by quantum mechanics were distributed over 100 km of optical fiber. We implemented the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and used low timing jitter 1.55 um single-photon detectors based on frequency up-conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Based on the security analysis of the protocol against general individual attacks, we generated secure keys at a practical rate of 166 bit/s over 100 km of fiber. The use of the low jitter detectors also increased the sifted key generation rate to 2 Mbit/s over 10 km of fiber.

  3. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  4. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices on {110}<100> oriented substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices on {110}<100> textured substrates are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  5. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)] [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters.

  6. Adsorption and thermal decomposition of H2S on Si(100) Ying-Huang Lai a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Adsorption and thermal decomposition of H2S on Si(100) Ying-Huang Lai a , Chuin-Tih Yeh a , Yi Adsorption and thermal decomposition of H2S on Si(1 0 0)-2 Â 1 are studied by means of temperature- sociates to form H and HS on the Si surface at adsorption temperature of 115 K. The Si(1 0 0)-2 Â 1 surface

  7. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report May 2006 - June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. G. Ison

    2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and the demolition of the 153-N, 1515-N, 1516-N, 1517-N, 1518-N, 1519-N, 1331-N, 1332-N, and 181-NC facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D&D and demolition of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs.

  8. Electronic structure of Fe{sub 3}Si on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lal, Chhagan, E-mail: clsaini52@gmail.com [Centre for Non-Conventional Energy Resources, 14-Vigyan Bhavan, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India); Synchrotron S.C.p.A., SS-14 km, 163.5, in Area Science Park, 34149, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Italy); Di Santo, G.; Caputo, M.; Panighel, M.; Goldoni, A. [Synchrotron S.C.p.A., SS-14 km, 163.5, in Area Science Park, 34149, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Taleatu, B. A. [Department of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Jain, I. P. [Centre for Non-Conventional Energy Resources, 14-Vigyan Bhavan, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The improved performance of large-scale integrated circuits (LSIs) by the shrinking of devices is becoming difficult due to physical limitations. Here we report, the growth and formation of Fe{sub 3}Si on Si(100) and characterized by x-ray photoemission, UV photoemission and low energy electron diffraction to study the electronic structure. The results revealed that the DO{sub 3} phase formation is exist and photoemission results also support the electron diffraction outcome.

  9. Geometric structures of thin film: Pt on Pd(110) and NiO on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, O.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is divided into 3 papers: dynamical low-energy electron- diffraction investigation of lateral displacements in topmost layer of Pd(110); determination of (1{times}1) and (1{times}2) structures of Pt thin films on Pd(110) by dynamical low-energy electron-diffraction analysis; and structural determination of a NiO(111) film on Ni(100) by dynamical low-energy electron-diffraction analysis.

  10. Project Work Plan: Hanford 100-D Area Treatability Demonstration - In Situ Biostimulation for Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan supports a new, integrated approach to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This new approach will provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the ISRM barrier by directly treating chromium and other oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen), thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier and protecting the ecological receptors and human health at the river boundary.

  11. A two-stage 100 l/min circumferential slot virtual impactor system for bioaerosol concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCroix, Daniel Edward

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A TWO-STAGE 100 L/min CIRCUMFERENTIAL SLOT VIRTUAL IMPACTOR SYSTEM FOR BIOAEROSOL CONCENTRATION A Thesis by DANIEL EDWARD LACROIX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Andrew McFarland Committee Members, Yassin Hassan...

  12. Ambient aerosol sampling inlet for flow rates of 100 and 400 l/min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baehl, Michael Matthew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    tunnel, where three different speeds were employed; namely 2, 8, and 24 km/hr. The aerosol particles used in these tests were generated from ethanol dilutions of a master solution containing 90% ethanol, 9% oleic acid and 1% sodium fluorescein... AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLING INLET FOR FLOW RATES OF 100 AND 400 L/MIN A Thesis by MICHAEL MATTHEW BAEHL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  13. 100% Clean Energy For and By the People | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment of Energy Information Protection TaskEnergy100%

  14. Design and Development of a 100 MVA HTS Generator for Commercial Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: (1) identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator; (2) develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology; (3) perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE's proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept; and (4) design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables. The design for the HTS generator was based on GE's warm iron rotor concept in which a cold HTS coil is wound around a warm magnetic iron pole. This approach for rotating HTS electrical machinery provides the efficiency benefits of the HTS technology while addressing the two most important considerations for power generators in utility applications: cost and reliability. The warm iron rotor concept uses the least amount of expensive HTS wire compared to competing concepts and builds on the very high reliability of conventional iron core stators and armature windings.

  15. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on Si (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu; Prater, John T. [Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Punugupati, Sandhyarani; Hunte, Frank; Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report on the epitaxial integration of room temperature lead-free ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} thin (?1050?nm) films on Si (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique through a domain matching epitaxy paradigm. We employed MgO and TiN as buffer layers to create BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3}/MgO/TiN/Si (100) heterostructures. C-axis oriented and cube-on-cube epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} is formed on Si (100) as evidenced by the in-plane and out-of-plane x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray photoemission spectroscopic measurements show that Ti is in 4(+) state. Polarization hysteresis measurements together with Raman spectroscopy and temperature-dependent x-ray diffraction confirm the room temperature ferroelectric nature of BaTiO{sub 3}. Furthermore, laser irradiation of BaTiO{sub 3} thin film is found to induce ferromagnetic-like behavior but affects adversely the ferroelectric characteristics. Laser irradiation induced ferromagnetic properties seem to originate from the creation of oxygen vacancies, whereas the pristine BaTiO{sub 3} shows diamagnetic behavior, as expected. This work has opened up the route for the integration of room temperature lead-free ferroelectric functional oxides on a silicon platform.

  16. Long-Lived Sleptons at the LHC and a 100 TeV Proton Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jonathan L; Shadmi, Yael; Tarem, Shlomit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the prospects for long-lived charged particle (LLCP) searches at current and future LHC runs and at a 100 TeV pp collider, using Drell-Yan slepton pair production as an example. Because momentum measurements become more challenging for very energetic particles, we carefully treat the expected momentum resolution. At the same time, a novel feature of 100 TeV collisions is the significant energy loss of energetic muons in detectors. We use this to help discriminate between muons and LLCPs. We find that the 14 TeV LHC with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 1.2 TeV, and a 100 TeV pp collider with 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 4 TeV, using time-of-flight measurements. These searches will have striking implications for dark matter, with the LHC definitively testing the possibility of slepton-neutralino co-annihilating WIMP dark matter, and with the LHC and future hadron colliders having a strong potential for discovering LLCPs in models with super...

  17. Long-Lived Sleptons at the LHC and a 100 TeV Proton Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan L. Feng; Sho Iwamoto; Yael Shadmi; Shlomit Tarem

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the prospects for long-lived charged particle (LLCP) searches at current and future LHC runs and at a 100 TeV pp collider, using Drell-Yan slepton pair production as an example. Because momentum measurements become more challenging for very energetic particles, we carefully treat the expected momentum resolution. At the same time, a novel feature of 100 TeV collisions is the significant energy loss of energetic muons in detectors. We use this to help discriminate between muons and LLCPs. We find that the 14 TeV LHC with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 1.2 TeV, and a 100 TeV pp collider with 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 4 TeV, using time-of-flight measurements. These searches will have striking implications for dark matter, with the LHC definitively testing the possibility of slepton-neutralino co-annihilating WIMP dark matter, and with the LHC and future hadron colliders having a strong potential for discovering LLCPs in models with superWIMP dark matter.

  18. Epitaxial europium oxide on Ni(100) with single-crystal quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foerster, Daniel F.; Klinkhammer, Juergen; Busse, Carsten; Altendorf, Simone G.; Michely, Thomas; Hu Zhiwei; Chin Yiying; Tjeng, L. H.; Coraux, Johann; Bourgault, Daniel [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln, Germany and Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzerstr. 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25 rue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality epitaxy of EuO on Ni(100) is developed in an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. A careful selection of the initial growth parameters is decisive to obtain a surface oxide suitable for the subsequent epitaxy of single phase EuO(100). After the creation of a three layer thick coalesced oxide film for the subsequent growth a distillation technique is applied. Appropriate annealing of films with up to 100 nm thickness generates sufficient conductivity for STM and electron spectroscopies. Oxygen vacancies are directly imaged by STM. They are of decisive importance for the metal-to-insulator transition around the temperature of the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition. A fast relaxation of the initial biaxial strain observed by LEED leaves little hope for an increase of the Curie temperature through epitaxial compression. Ex situ x-ray adsorption spectroscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy measurements of thicker films are consistent with the stoichiometric single phase EuO with bulk properties.

  19. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth, where people share their experience with others, which leads to others to take action; and 2. Self-herding, where people follow past behavior, which leads to deeper and deeper actions within individual households.

  20. Hanford 100N Area Apatite Emplacement: Laboratory Results of Ca-Citrate-PO4 Solution Injection and Sr-90 Immobilization in 100N Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Moore, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Girvin, Donald C.; McKinley, James P.; Truex, Michael J.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes laboratory scale studies investigating the remediation of Sr-90 by Ca-citrate-PO4 solution injection/infiltration to support field injection activities in the Hanford 100N area. This study is focused on experimentally testing whether this remediation technology can be effective under field scale conditions to mitigate Sr-90 migration 100N area sediments into the Columbia River. Sr-90 is found primarily adsorbed to sediments by ion exchange (99% adsorbed, < 1% in groundwater) in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer and lower vadose zone. Although primarily adsorbed, Sr-90 is still considered a high mobility risk as it is mobilized by seasonal river stage increases and by plumes of higher ionic strength relative to groundwater. This remediation technology relies upon the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution forming apatite precipitate [Ca6(PO4)10(OH)2], which incorporates some Sr-90 during initial precipitation and additionally slowly incorporates Sr-90 by solid phase substitution for Ca. Sr substitution occurs because Sr-apatite is thermodynamically more stable than Ca-apatite. Once the Sr-90 is in the apatite structure, Sr-90 will decay to Y-90 (29.1 y half-life) then Zr-90 (64.1 h half-life) without the potential for migration into the Columbia River. For this technology to be effective, sufficient apatite needs to be emplaced in sediments to incorporate Sr and Sr-90 for 300 years (~10 half-lives of Sr-90), and the rate of incorporation needs to exceed the natural groundwater flux rate of Sr in the 100N area. A primary objective of this study is to supply an injection sequence to deliver sufficient apatite into subsurface sediments that minimizes initial mobility of Sr-90, which occurs because the injection solution has a higher ionic strength compared to groundwater. This can be accomplished by sequential injections of low, then high concentration injection of Ca-citrate-PO4 solutions. Assessment of low concentration Ca-citrate-PO4, citrate-PO4, and PO4 solutions show greater Sr and Sr-90 incorporation during initial precipitation and less initial mobilization with solutions with low Ca2+ concentration. While all solutions showed nearly the same Sr uptake into apatite (14 to 17% by 2 weeks, 21% to 30% by 5 weeks), the incorporation efficiency (i.e., mM Sr incorporated per mM PO4 injected) was higher for solutions containing citrate. The Sr incorporation rate into apatite during initial precipitation (by 1 month) averaged 4.64 ± 1.9 x 10-4 h-1 (half-life 1500 ± 430 h, 8.85 x 10-7 mg Sr/day/mg apatite). The injection solution used in field injections #3 to #18 (10 mM PO4, 1 mM Ca, 2.5 mM citrate), which is deficient in Ca (a total of 16.7 mM needed to form apatite with 10 mM of PO4), resulted in the initial Sr and Ca peak (24 h) at 4.7x groundwater. By 30 days, the aqueous Sr concentration was 0.28x groundwater and Ca 0.43x groundwater, as both Sr and Ca are used to form initial apatite precipitates. Reactive transport simulation of the complex ion exchange, biodegradation, and precipitation processes showed that the initial Sr groundwater increase mobilized only 1.5% of the Sr mass in sediments. Citrate biodegradation, a necessary step in Ca-citrate-PO4 solutions forming apatite, had an average half-life of 50 h (at aquifer sediment/water ratio and temperature), and decreased an order of magnitude with sediment depth as the microbial biomass decreased five orders of magnitude. The rate of citrate biodegradation was relatively invariant with biomass and water saturation (50% to 100%, for vadose zone infiltration) possibly due to significant microbial injection using river water and subsurface microbial mobilization.

  1. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on the results of the pilot study, the recommendations for the revision of the work plan are as follows: • characterize the surface soil using field portable XRF measurements with confirmatory inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy sampling for the remedial investigation • establish decision units of similar defined areas • establish a process for field investigation of soil concentrations exceeding the screening criteria at the border of the 100-OL-1 OU • define data quality objectives for the work plan using the results of the pilot study and refining the sampling approach for the remedial investigation.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

  4. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yawen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the manifold was filled with 40 Torr CO (Praxair, UHP), 100Torr O 2 (Praxair, UHP), and abalance of He (Praxair, UHP) initially at atmospheric

  5. 100kW Energy Transfer Multiplexer Power Converter Prototype Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Merrill Skeist; Richard H. (Dick) Baker; Anthony G.P. Marini; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Final Report for "100kW Energy Transfer Multiplexer Power Converter Prototype Development Project" prepared under DOE grant number DE-FG36-03GO13138. This project relates to the further development and prototype construction/evaluation for the Energy Transfer Multiplexer (ETM) power converter topology concept. The ETM uses a series resonant link to transfer energy from any phase of a multiphase input to any phase of a multiphase output, converting any input voltage and frequency to any output voltage and frequency. The basic form of the ETM converter consists of an eight (8)-switch matrix (six phase power switches and two ground power switches) and a series L-C resonant circuit. Electronic control of the switches allows energy to be transferred in the proper amount from any phase to any other phase. Depending upon the final circuit application, the switches may be either SCRs or IGBTs. The inherent characteristics of the ETM converter include the following: Power processing in either direction (bidirectional); Large voltage gain without the need of low frequency magnetics; High efficiency independent of output load and frequency; Wide bandwidth with fast transient response and; Operation as a current source. The ETM is able to synthesize true sinusoidal waveforms with low harmonic distortions. For a low power PM wind generation system, the ETM has the following characteristics and advantages: It provides voltage gain without the need of low frequency magnetics (DC inductors) and; It has constant high efficiency independent of the load. The ETM converter can be implemented into a PM wind power system with smaller size, reduced weight and lower cost. As a result of our analyses, the ETM offers wind power generation technology for the reduction of the cost and size as well as the increase in performance of low power, low wind speed power generation. This project is the further theoretical/analytical exploration of the ETM converter concept in relationship to PM wind power generator applications in the 100kW and under power range. The theoretical/analytical and bench scale work focuses on simplifying the basic ETM converter topology (in terms of parts count and complexity) for the specific application of the low power PM system. The project goals and objectives were for Spellman HV will develop a 100kW prototype ETM power converter based on paralleled lower ratings converters. The proposed configuration of this prototype is a 100kW rated converter comprised of four (4) 34kW rated modules connected in parallel (the fourth converter is included to demonstrate N+1 fault tolerance). This approach is more viable as there is lower technological risk involved in developing a 34kW-rated converter than a single 100kW unit. The modular system approach should have a lower deployment and service cost over a single unit system, because of the economics of scale (smaller units at a higher volume means lower manufacturing cost) and because of improved serviceability (a non-redundant power system with one failed module will still operate at a lower power level). There is also the added benefit that greater commercial application and acceptance should be achieved by having a modular system available in which fault tolerance (N+1 or 2N) is a feature. This modular approach would allow the output power to be increased by adding more paralleled converters. Thus, the maximum output power of the overall power system is a function of the interconnection medium (the hot swap connection subsystem), rather than the ratings of a single module. The project was implemented with Spellman HV acting as the program management and production assembly and test facility; The Baker Company acting as a technical consultant and resource when required; and dtm Associates acting as the design/development resource for the hardware development of the 100kW ETM converter prototype.

  6. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

  7. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  8. Discovering Higgs boson pair production through rare final states at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Higgs boson pair production at a future proton collider with centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV, focusing on rare final states that include a bottom-anti-bottom quark pair and multiple isolated leptons: $hh \\rightarrow (b\\bar{b}) + n \\ell + X$, $n = \\{2,4\\}$, $X = \\{ E_T^\\mathrm{miss}, \\gamma, -\\}$. We construct experimental search strategies for observing the process through these channels and make suggestions on the desired requirements for the detector design of the future collider.

  9. 100-kW class applied-field MPD thruster component wear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantenieks, M.A.; Myers, R.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Component erosion and material deposition sites were identified and analyzed during tests of various configurations of 100 kW class, applied-field, water-cooled magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Severe erosion of the cathode and the boron nitride insulator was observed for the first series of tests, which was significantly decreased by reducing the levels of propellant contamination. Severe erosion of the copper anode resulting from sputtering by the propellant was also observed. This is the first observation of this phenomenon in MPD thrusters. The anode erosion indicates that development of long life MPD thrusters requires the use of light gas propellants such as hydrogen, deuterium, or lithium.

  10. 100-kW class applied-field thruster component wear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantenieks, M.A. (M.S. SPTD-1, NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)); Myers, R.M. (M.S. SPTD-1, Sverdrup Technology Inc., NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States))

    1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Component erosion and material deposition sites were identified and analyzed during tests of various configurations of 100 kW class, applied-field, water-cooled magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Severe erosion of the cathode and the boron nitride insulator was observed for the first series of tests, which was significantly decreased by reducing the levels of propellant contamination. Severe erosion of the copper anode resulting from sputtering by the propellant was also observed. This is the first observation of this phenomenon in MPD thrusters. The anode erosion indicates that development of long life MPD thrusters requires the use of light gas propellants such as hydrogen, deuterium, or lithium.

  11. Surface and interfacial reaction study of InAs(100)-crystalline oxide interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Laukkanen, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Turku FI-20014 (Finland)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Turku FI-20014 (Finland); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Galatage, R. V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystalline oxide film on InAs(100) is investigated with in situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction before and after in situ deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as well as upon air exposure. The oxidation process leads to arsenic and indium trivalent oxidation state formation. The grown epitaxial oxide-InAs interface is stable upon ALD reactor exposure; however, trimethyl aluminum decreases oxidation states resulting in an unreconstructed surface. An increase in oxide concentration is also observed upon air exposure suggesting the crystalline oxide surface is unstable.

  12. Pseudospin symmetry and structure of nuclei with $Z\\ge$ 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Jolos; V. V. Voronov

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Relativistic Mean Field Approach a pseudospin dependence of the residual forces in nuclei is considered. It is shown that this dependence is relatively weak. As a consequence, a pseudospin dependence of the particle--core coupling is weak as well. This leads to a small splitting of the pseudospin doublets produced by a vector coupling of an odd particle pseudospin and a pseudo--orbital momentum of the core. Some possibilities for experimental investigations of the manifestations of the pseudospin symmetry in the spectra of odd nuclei with $Z\\ge$ 100 are indicated.

  13. Adsorption and thermal treatments of 1-dodecene on Si(100) investigated by STM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, H. W. [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Sadowski, J. T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fujikawa, Y. [Department of Advanced Physics, Hirosaki University (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xue, Q. -K. [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Sakurai, T. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing; Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the atomic behaviour of long-chain 1-dodecene adsorbed on Si(100) using a scanning tunnelling microscope with an exposure of 30 to 2.4 Langmuirs. Unlike previous reports on short-chain molecules, remarkable self-ordered assembly of molecules is not observed at room temperature, which is possibly attributed to the asymmetric molecular structure with long chains of 1-dodecene. After annealing at 500–580 °C, ordered patterns form with a c(4 × 4) structure, accompanied with thermal decomposition of molecules.

  14. Operating characteristics and modeling of the LLNL 100-kV electric gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osher, J.E.; Barnes, G.; Chau, H.H.; Lee, R.S.; Lee, C.; Speer, R.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the electric gun, the explosion of an electrically heated metal foil and the accompanying magnetic forces drive a thin flyer plate up a short barrel. Flyer velocities of up to 18 km/s make the gun useful for hypervelocity impact studies. The authors briefly review the technological evolution of the exploding-metal circuit elements that power the gun, describe the 100-kV electric gun designed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in some detail, and present the general principles of electric gun operation. They compare the experimental performance of the LLNL gun with a simple model and with predictions of a magnetohydrodynamics code.

  15. Positive and negative chirping of laser pulses shorter than 100 fsec in a saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, R.S.; Jacobovitz, G.R.; Brito Cruz, C.H.; Scarparo, M.A.F.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the chirp generated in laser pulses shorter than 100 fsec on propagation through a saturable absorber (DODCI in ethylene glycol). The calculation takes into account the absorber saturation and the solvent nonlinear refractive index. At pulse energies greater than 10 nJ the chirp tends to be predominantly positive, and it increases rapidly as the pulse duration becomes shorter than 50 fsec. At pulse energies in the 1--7-nJ range the chirp is mostly negative for pulses longer than 30 fsec.

  16. Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

  17. 100 years of elementary particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, issue 1, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K.H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  18. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  19. MCA 37-43-100 Water Well Contractors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to: navigation,Remains |37-43-100

  20. File:Whiskey flats 100k.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdf JumpNotificationWhiskey flats 100k.pdf Jump to:

  1. Spatial distribution of MnS inclusions in HY-100 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, R.K. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Multifunctional Materials Branch] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Multifunctional Materials Branch; Geltmacher, A.B. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    High strength steels have been shown to fail by a ductile fracture process which includes void nucleation, growth, and linking by coalescence and void sheeting. Since the voids are thought to nucleate at MnS inclusions and initial void nucleating strains are considered small, some relationship between the inclusion spatial distribution and the initial void spatial distribution appears reasonable. The initial void spatial distribution is desired for improved models of void growth and coalescence behavior. This paper reports on the density, and size and spatial distributions of MnS inclusions in an HY-100 steel.

  2. 100Gbps Science Network | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the ImpactSCDOE Office ofThe LifeUserWork 100Gbps

  3. Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011DryTop 100 Oil and GasTop

  4. Los Alamos County is among 100 Best Communities for Young People

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking down the road aheadchange100 Best

  5. R&D 100: Lab Researchers Contribute to Public Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide: Power Purchase AgreementsR&D 100: Lab

  6. S M Stoller Star Center-B100 Monthly/Effluent; Largo, FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100 7030-226/MonthlyB1001/06

  7. S M Stoller Star Center-B100 Monthly/Effluent; Largo, FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100

  8. Using Dielectric Losses to De-Ice Power Transmission Lines with 100 kHz High-Voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Dielectric Losses to De-Ice Power Transmission Lines with 100 kHz High-Voltage Excitation J DIELECTRIC LOSSES TO DE-ICE POWER TRANSMISSION LINES . . . 1 Using Dielectric Losses to De-Ice Power Transmission Lines with 100 kHz High-Voltage Excitation Joshua D. McCurdy, Charles R. Sullivan and Victor F

  9. Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    ?) ·Fine print: You will also reduce Global Warming pollution. Over its lifetime, a "100W" Compact will prevent global warming pollution equal to 100 to 150 gallons of gasoline AND reduce poisons like mercury bulb but lasts THIRTEEN times longer! The Compact bulb will save you $90 just in electricity cost over

  10. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

  11. Theoretical Study of Adsorption of Water Dimer on the Perfect MgO(100) Surface: Molecular Adsorption versus Dissociative Chemisorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Theoretical Study of Adsorption of Water Dimer on the Perfect MgO(100) Surface: Molecular Adsorption versus Dissociative Chemisorption Yan Wang and Thanh N. Truong* Henry Eyring Center on the mode of adsorption of the water dimer on the perfect MgO(100) surface using the ab initio embedded

  12. BRITTLE FRACTURE IN HEAT-AFFECTED ZONES OF GIRTH WELDS OF MODERN LINE PIPE STEEL (X100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stress ,: minimum diameter of AE specimens Introduction Gas field development requires cost reduction fracture is built, adapted to the girth welds of new X100 steels, and a crack initiation criterion strength steels of grade X100 are potentially good candidates for these new applications [1

  13. Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution-slicing Structural dynamics Myoglobin a b s t r a c t Here we report sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart rearrangement [27]. In this work, we extend the time-slicing scheme to a protein, horse heart myoglobin (Mb

  14. Laser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    of electromagnetic fields in plasma, isotopes production or hadron therapy. The 100 TW class laser systemLaser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system. To characterize the plasma expansion, we monitor it with an imaging technique using a femtosecond laser probe

  15. Feasibility study 100 K East Area water purification pools fish-rearing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betsch, M.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the feasibility study, a design analysis was conducted to determine the usefulness of the existing sand filters and associated media for reuse. The sand filters which were studied for potential reuse are located on the northern end of the 100-K East Area water filtration plant on the Hanford Site. This plant is located about one- half mile from the Columbia River. The sand filters were originally part of a system which was used to provide cooling water to the nearby plutonium production K Reactors. This Cold War operation took place until 1971, at which time the K Reactors were closed for eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Recently, it was decided to study the concept of putting the sand filter structures back into use for fish-rearing purposes. Because the water that circulated through the water purification pools (K Pools) and associated sand filters was clean river water, there is little chance of the structures being radioactively contaminated. To date, separate K Pools have been used for raising a variety of cold water fish species, including white sturgeon and fall chinook salmon, as well as for providing potable water to the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site for fire and service water purposes.

  16. Enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers to search for $0 \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barabash, A S; Danevich, F A; Giuliani, A; Ivanov, I M; Makarov, E P; Mancuso, M; Marnieros, S; Nasonov, S G; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Shlegel, V N; Tenconi, M; Tretyak, V I; Vasiliev, Ya V; Velazquez, M; Zhdankov, V N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUMINEU project aims at performing a demonstrator underground experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope $^{100}$Mo embedded in zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) scintillating bolometers. In this context, a zinc molybdate crystal boule enriched in $^{100}$Mo to 99.5\\% with a mass of 171 g was grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The production cycle provided a high yield (the crystal boule mass was 84\\% of initial charge) and an acceptable level -- around 4\\% -- of irrecoverable losses of the costy enriched material. Two crystals of 59 g and 63 g, obtained from the enriched boule, were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers. They showed a high detection performance, equivalent to that of previously developed natural ZnMoO$_4$ detectors. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMINEU technology, capable to approach and explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass p...

  17. The First 100 LAT Gamma-Ray Bursts: A New Detection Algorithm and Pass 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vianello, Giacomo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Fermi Large Area Telescope have prompted theoretical advances and posed big challenges in the understanding of such extreme sources, despite the fact that GRB emission above 100 MeV is a fairly rare event. The first Fermi/LAT GRB catalog, published a year ago, presented 28 detections out of ~300 bursts detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) within the LAT field of view. Building on the results from that work and on recent development in the understanding of the systematic errors on GBM localizations, we developed a new detection algorithm which increased the number of detections by 40 %. Even more recently the development of the new event analysis for the LAT ("Pass 8") has increased the number of detections within the first 3 years of the mission to 45, up 50 % with respect to the published catalog. The second LAT GRB catalog, in preparation, will cover more than 6 years of the mission and will break the barrier of 100 detected GRBs, a more than 20-fold ...

  18. HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

  19. A 50-100 kWe gas-cooled reactor for use on Mars.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Curtis D. (.)

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the space exploration field there is a general consensus that nuclear reactor powered systems will be extremely desirable for future missions to the outer solar system. Solar systems suffer from the decreasing intensity of solar radiation and relatively low power density. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators are limited to generating a few kilowatts electric (kWe). Chemical systems are short-lived due to prodigious fuel use. A well designed 50-100 kWe nuclear reactor power system would provide sufficient power for a variety of long term missions. This thesis will present basic work done on a 50-100 kWe reactor power system that has a reasonable lifespan and would function in an extraterrestrial environment. The system will use a Gas-Cooled Reactor that is directly coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (GCR-CBC) power system. Also included will be some variations on the primary design and their effects on the characteristics of the primary design. This thesis also presents a variety of neutronics related calculations, an examination of the reactor's thermal characteristics, feasibility for use in an extraterrestrial environment, and the reactor's safety characteristics in several accident scenarios. While there has been past work for space reactors, the challenges introduced by thin atmospheres like those on Mars have rarely been considered.

  20. The Transportation Energy and Carbon Footprints of the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present estimates of the automobile and truck travel based energy and carbon footprints of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas. The footprints are based on the estimated vehicle miles traveled and the transportation fuels consumed. Results are presented on an annual basis and represent end use emissions only. Total carbon emissions, emissions per capita, and emissions per dollar of gross metropolitan product are reported. Two years of annual data were examined, 2000 and 2005, with most of the in-depth analysis focused on the 2005 results. In section 2 we provide background data on the national picture and derive some carbon and energy consumption figures for the nation as a whole. In section 3 of the paper we examine the metropolitan area-wide results based on the sums and averages across all 100 metro areas, and compare these with the national totals and averages. In section 4 we present metropolitan area specific footprints and examine the considerable variation that is found to exist across individual metro areas. In doing so we pay particular attention to the effects that urban form might have on these differences. Finally, section 5 provides a summary of major findings, and a list of caveats that need to be borne in mind when using the results due to known limitations in the data sources used.

  1. Cool Gas and Massive Stars - the Nuclear Ring in M100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emma L. Allard; Reynier F. Peletier; Johan H. Knapen

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAURON integral field spectrograph was used to observe the central area of the barred spiral galaxy M100 (NGC 4321). M100 contains a nuclear ring of star formation, fueled by gas channeled inward by the galaxy's bar. We present maps of emission line strengths, absorption line strength indices, and the gas velocity dispersion across the field. The H beta emission is strongest in the ring, along two curved bar dustlanes and at the ends of the bar. The Mg b absorption line strength shows a younger population of stars within the ring as compared to the surrounding area. The gas velocity dispersion is notably smaller than elsewhere in the field both in the ring and along the leading edge of the dustlanes. Low gas dispersion is correlated spatially with the H beta emission. We thus see stars being formed from cold (low dispersion) gas which is being channeled inward along the dustlanes under the influence of a large bar, and accumulated into a ring near the location of the inner Lindblad resonances. This lends further strong support to the interpretation of nuclear rings in barred galaxies as resonance phenomena.

  2. Department of Health application for approval of construction SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following Application For Approval of Construction is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site, which will provide a new source of radioactive emissions to the atmosphere. The US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Defense have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. It is proposed that the SP-100 test reactor be tested in the existing decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment building (309 Building). The reactor will be operated for at least three months and up to 2 yr. Following the test, the 309 Building will be decontaminated for potential use in other programs. It is projected this new source of emissions will contribute approximately 0.05 mrem/yr dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual. This application is being submitted in response to those projected emissions that would provide the described offsite dose. 28 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to evaluate the extent and persistence of hexavalent chromium in the deeper zones. Use data collected to refine the current conceptual model for the 100-H Area unconfined aquifer and the RUM in this area. (5) Evaluate the concentration 'rebound' in the unconfined aquifer of hexavalent chromium and the contaminants of concern during shutdown of the extraction wells. Measure co-contaminants at the beginning, middle, and end of each pumping test. The RUM is generally considered an aquitard in the 100-HR-3 OU; however, several water-bearing sand layers are present that are confined within the RUM. The current hydrogeologic model for the 100-H Area aquifer system portrays the RUM as an aquitard layer that underlies the unconfined aquifer, which may contain permeable zones, stringers, or layers. These permeable zones may provide pathways for chromium to migrate deeper into the RUM under certain hydrogeologic conditions. One condition may be the discharge of large volumes of cooling water that occurred near the former H Reactor, which caused a mound of groundwater to form 4.9 to 10.1 m (16 to 33 ft) above the natural water table. The cooling water reportedly contained 1 to 2 mglL of hexavalent chromium for corrosion prevention. Three alternate hypotheses for the introduction of hexavalent chromium into the RUM are as follows: (1) Local groundwater with higher concentrations of hexavalent chromium originating from reactor operations at H Reactor was driven by high heads from groundwater mounding in the unconfined aquifer into the RUM via permeable pathways in the upper surface of the RUM. (2) Local groundwater with hexavalent chromium was introduced from the unconfined aquifer via well boreholes, either during drilling or as a result of poor well construction, allowing hydraulic communication between the unconfined aquifer and the RUM. (3) Hexavalent chromium migrated across the Hom area within the more permeable zones of the RUM. The three wells used for the aquifer pumping tests (199-H3-2C, 199-H4-12C, and 199-H4-15CS) exhibit hexavalent chromium contamination in confined aqu

  4. Nuclear Half-Lives for Alpha Radioactivity of Elements with 100 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Roy Chowdhury; C. Samanta; D. N. Basu

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical estimates for the half lives of about 1700 isotopes of heavy elements with Z from 100 to 130 are tabulated using theoretical Q-values. The quantum mechanical tunneling probabilities are calculated within a WKB framework using microscopic nuclear potentials. The microscopic nucleus-nucleus potentials are obtained by folding the densities of interacting nuclei with a density dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The alpha-decay half lives calculated in this formalism using the experimental Q-values were found to be in good agreement over a wide range of experimental data spanning about twenty orders of magnitude. The theoretical Q-values used for the present calculations are extracted from three different mass estimates viz. Myers-Swiatecki [MS], Muntian-Hofmann-Patyk-Sobiczewski [M] and Koura-Tachibana-Uno-Yamada [KUTY].

  5. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit first quarter 1994 groundwater sampling data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggerstaff, R.L.

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit First Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling Investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of twenty-four samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The samples were analyzed by Thermo-Analytic Laboratories (TMA) and Roy F. Weston Laboratories (WESTON) using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CLP protocols. Sample analyses included: inorganics; and general chemical parameters. Forty-two samples were validated for radiochemical parameters by TMA and Teledyne.

  6. Sodium Based Heat Pipe Modules for Space Reactor Concepts: Stainless Steel SAFE-100 Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S. [Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pipe cooled reactor is one of several candidate reactor cores being considered for advanced space power and propulsion systems to support future space exploration applications. Long life heat pipe modules, with designs verified through a combination of theoretical analysis and experimental lifetime evaluations, would be necessary to establish the viability of any of these candidates, including the heat pipe reactor option. A hardware-based program was initiated to establish the infrastructure necessary to build heat pipe modules. This effort, initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory and referred to as the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) project, set out to fabricate and perform non-nuclear testing on a modular heat pipe reactor prototype that can provide 100-kWt from the core to an energy conversion system at 700 deg. C. Prototypic heat pipe hardware was designed, fabricated, filled, closed-out and acceptance tested. (authors)

  7. Modal analysis and SHM investigation of CX-100 wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deines, Krystal E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marinone, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Ryan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the dynamic characterization of a CX100 blade using modal testing. Obtaining a thorough dynamic characterization of these turbine blades is important because they are complex structures, making them difficult to monitor for damage initiation and subsequent growth. This dynamic characterization was compared to a numerical model developed for validation. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques involving Lamb wave propagation, frequency response functions, and impedance based methods were also used to provide insight into blade dynamic response. SHM design parameters such as traveling distance of the wave, sensing region of the sensor and the power requirements were examined. Results obtained during modal and SHM testing will provide a baseline for future damage detection and mitigation techniques for wind turbine blades.

  8. Modal analysis and SHM investigation of CX-100 wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deines, Krystal E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marinone, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Ryan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the dynamic characterization of a CX-100 wind turbine blade using modal testing. Obtaining a thorough dynamic characterization of turbine blades is important because they are complex structures, making them very difficult to accurately model without supplementing with experimental data. The results of this dynamic characterization can be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. Also covered is an exploration into Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques employed on the blade surface to detect changes in the blade dynamic properties. SHM design parameters such as traveling distance of the wave were examined . Results obtained during modal and SHM testing will provide a baseline for future work in blade damage detection and mitigation.

  9. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report - July 2007 to December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. T. Stankovich

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the 105-NB, 163-N, 183-N, 183-NA, 183-NB, 183-NC, 184-N, 184-NA, 184-NB, 184-NC, 184-ND, 184-NE, 184-NF, 1312-N, 1330-N, 1705-N, 1705-NA, 1706-N, 1712-N, 1714-N, 1714-NA, 1714-NB, 1802-N, MO-050, MO-055, MO-358, MO-390, MO-900, MO-911, and MO-950 facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 activities for these facilities include utility disconnection, planning, characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiological contaminated materials, equipment removal, decommissioning, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs.

  10. Liquid-lithium cooling for 100-kW ISOL and fragmentation targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolen, J. A.; Reed, C. B.,Hassanein, A.,Gomes, I. C.

    2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced exotic beam facilities that are currently being developed will use powerful driver accelerator for the production of short-lived rare isotopes. Multi-beam-drivers capable of producing high power beams from very light to very heavy ions are now technically feasible. A challenge for such facilities is the development of production targets to be used for a variety of reaction mechanisms with beam powers of about 100 kilowatts. This paper presents engineering concepts that have been developed recently for using liquid lithium coolant for two types of targets, one for use with light-ion beams on high atomic number (Z) targets and the other for heavy-ion beams on low-Z targets.

  11. Fast atom diffraction from a ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, M.; Meyer, E.; Winter, H. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Irmscher, K.; Galazka, Z. [Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung, Max-Born-Straße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gärtner, K. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast H, He atoms, and H{sub 2} molecules with projectile energies ranging from 200?eV up to 3?keV were scattered under a grazing angle of incidence from a clean and flat ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) surface. The bulk single crystal was grown by the Czochralski method and prepared via annealing under ultra-high vacuum conditions. For scattering along low-index directions, we observed defined diffraction patterns in the angular distributions for scattered projectiles. From the analysis of diffraction patterns, we derive the surface unit cell in good accord with the parameters b and c for the lattice of the bulk crystal and derive information on the termination of the surface.

  12. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  13. Level structure of /sup 101/Ru from the /sup 100/Ru(d,p) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Dietzsch, O.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy levels of /sup 101/Ru have been studied by the /sup 100/Ru(d,p)/sup 101/Ru reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 12 MeV. Outgoing particles were momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrograph and detected in nuclear emulsion plates, with an energy resolution of 7.5 keV. A total of 68 levels up to 3.2 MeV excitation energy was identified, about two-thirds of them reported for the first time. Experimental angular distributions were compared to distorted-wave Born approximation predictions and reduced spectroscopic factors obtained. The total l = 2 and 75% of l = 0, 4, and 5 spectroscopic strengths were located. Attention is drawn to transitions to low-lying states in /sup 101/Ru (below E/sub exc/ = 0.75 MeV) with l = 3 and l = 1 character.

  14. Spectrally dependent photovoltages in Schottky photodiode based on (100) B-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ermák, Jan, E-mail: cermakj@fzu.cz; Rezek, Bohuslav [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnická 10, 16200 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Koide, Yasuo [Sensor Materials Center, National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally and spatially resolved photovoltages were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on a Schottky photo-diode made of a 4?nm thin tungsten-carbide (WC) layer on a 500?nm oxygen-terminated boron-doped diamond epitaxial layer (O-BDD) that was grown on a Ib (100) diamond substrate. The diode was grounded by the sideways ohmic contact (Ti/WC), and the semitransparent Schottky contact was let unconnected. The electrical potentials across the device were measured in dark (only 650?nm LED of KPFM being on), under broad-band white light (halogen lamp), UV (365?nm diode), and deep ultraviolet (deuterium lamp) illumination. Illumination induced shift of the electrical potential remains within 210?mV. We propose that the photovoltage actually corresponds to a shift of Fermi level inside the BDD channel and thereby explains orders of magnitude changes in photocurrent.

  15. From peaks to continua: the study of delayed proton decay among light nuclei (A < 100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, J C

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed proton precursors among nuclei with A100 are discussed in terms that describe their average properties. The 'gross theory' of beta-decay is seen to apply reasonably well both to the heavier precursors in the T/sub z/=+1/2 series and, perhaps unexpectedly, to some of the lightest in the T/sub z/=-3/2 series. New experimental results are also given for the T/sub z/=+1/2 series which yield average partial widths and level densities. A new method for measuring the lifetimes of proton emitting levels in the 10/sup -16/ s region is described and applied to the decay of /sup 69/Se. (19 refs).

  16. First principles investigation of Ti adsorption and migration on Si(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briquet, Ludovic G. V.; Wirtz, Tom; Philipp, Patrick, E-mail: philipp@lippmann.lu [Department of Science and Analysis of Materials (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The titanium adsorption on Si(100) is investigated using first principles computer modelling methods. Two new subsurface adsorption sites are described. They are located at the edge of the cavity topped by a surface silicon dimer. The migration of the titanium from the surface to the subsurface sites is facilitated when occurring via one of these sites. The ejection of one of the silicon atoms forming the surface dimer is also investigated. The actual step of the ejection requires more energy than previously thought although, when considering the global picture of a titanium atom on the surface leading to the ejection of a silicon atom, the overall rate is compensated by the facilitated migration of the titanium to the subsurface sites. The consecutive adsorption of a second and third titanium atom is also investigated. It is shown that titanium grows evenly on the surface in normal condition, showing no intermixing of the titanium and silicon beyond the silicon layer.

  17. Latest results of NEXT-DEMO, the prototype of the NEXT 100 double beta decay experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serra, L; Martin-Albo, J; Sorel, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NEXT-DEMO is a 1:4.5 scale prototype of the NEXT100 detector, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC that will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe. X-ray energy depositions produced by the de-excitation of Xenon atoms after the interaction of gamma rays from radioactive sources have been used to characterize the response of the detector obtaining the spatial calibration needed for close-to-optimal energy resolution. Our result, 5.5% FWHM at 30 keV, extrapolates to 0.6% FWHM at the Q value of $^{136}$Xe. Additionally, alpha decays from radon have been used to measure several detection properties and parameters of xenon gas such as electron-ion recombination, electron drift velocity, diffusion and primary scintillation light yield. Alpha spectroscopy is also used to quantify the activity of radon inside the detector, a potential source of background for most double beta decay experiments.

  18. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Qiao, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL] [ORNL; Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  19. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikat, I. A., E-mail: ihsanas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Jerash University, Jerash-26150 (Jordan); Hamad, B. A. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75?ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  20. Prevention of significant deterioration application for approval to construct SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following application is being submitted by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352, pursuant to WAC 173-403-080, and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing a Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for a new source of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The new source, the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Test Site, will be located in the 309 Building of the 300 Area. The US Department of Energy (DOE), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Defense (DOD) have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. The DOE has primary responsibility for developing and ground testing the nuclear subsystem. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. The SP-100 GES Test Site will provide a location for the operation and testing of a prototype space-based, liquid metal-cooled, fast flux nuclear reactor in an environment closely simulating the vacuum and temperature conditions of space operations. The purpose of the GES is to develop safe, compact, light-weight and durable space reactor power system technology. This technology will be used to provide electric power, in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts, for a variety of potential future civilian and military space missions requiring long-term, high-power level sources of energy. 20 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. 100-D Area In Situ Redox Treatability Test for Chromate-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability test was conducted for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology at the 100 D Area of the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The target contaminant was dissolved chromate in groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a permeable subsurface treatment zone to reduce mobile chromate in groundwater to an insoluble form. The ISRM permeable treatment zone is created by reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron within the aquifer sediments, which is accomplished by injecting aqueous sodium dithionite into the aquifer and then withdrawing the reaction products. The goal of the treatability test was to create a linear ISRM barrier by injecting sodium dithionite into five wells. Well installation and site characterization activities began in spring 1997; the first dithionite injection took place in September 1997. The results of this first injection were monitored through the spring of 1998. The remaining four dithionite injections were carried out in May through July of 1998.These five injections created a reduced zone in the Hanford unconfined aquifer approximately 150 feet in length (perpendicular to groundwater flow) and 50 feet wide. The reduced zone extended over the thickness of the unconfined zone. Analysis of post-emplacement groundwater samples showed concentrations of chromate, in the reduced zone decreased from approximately 1.0 mg/L before the tests to below analytical detection limits (<0.007 mg/L). Chromate concentrations also declined in downgradient monitoring wells to as low as 0.020 mg/L. These data, in addition to results from pre-test reducible iron characterization, indicate the barrier should be effective for 20 to 25 years. The 100-D Area ISRM barrier is being expanded to a length of up to 2,300 ft to capture a larger portion of the chromate plume.

  2. AMoRE: Collaboration for searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope of {sup 100}Mo with the aid of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} as a cryogenic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanbekov, N. D., E-mail: xanbekov@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) Collaboration is planning to employ {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} single crystals as a cryogenic Scintillation detector for studying the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope {sup 100}Mo. A simultaneous readout of phonon and scintillation signals is performed in order to suppress the intrinsic background. The planned sensitivity of the experiment that would employ 100 kg of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} over five years of data accumulation would be T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} yr, which corresponds to values of the effective Majorana neutrino mass in the range of Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket m{sub {nu}} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {approx} 0.02-0.06 eV.

  3. Step and kink correlations on vicinal Ge,,100... surfaces investigated by electron diffraction C. Tegenkamp, J. Wollschlager, H. Pfnur,* F.-J. Meyer zu Heringdorf,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Step and kink correlations on vicinal Ge,,100... surfaces investigated by electron diffraction C in low-energy electron diffraction, we have investigated vicinal Ge 100 surfaces, which were miscut by 2 direction. In contrast to vicinal Si 100 surfaces with similar miscut angles, the Ge 100 surfaces still show

  4. Draft genome sequence of strain HIMB100, a cultured representative of the SAR116 clade of marine Alphaproteobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, Jana

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain HIMB100 is a planktonic marine bacterium in the class Alphaproteobacteria. This strain is of interest because it is one of the first known isolates from a globally ubiquitous clade of marine bacteria known as SAR116 ...

  5. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment Spring 2006 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Queen; S. G. Weiss

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the sampling approaches, modifications made to the 100 Area and 300 Area component of the RCBRA Sampling and Analysis Plan, summarize validation efforts, and provide sample identification numbers.

  6. Dr. Mae Jemison is the principal for the 100 Year Starship Project, which envisions human travel beyond our solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , such as projects using satellite technology for healthcare delivery in West Africa and solar dish Stirling engines beyond our solar system to another star within the next 100 years. Her leadership and vision provide

  7. 100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617 Driving Directions to the Beckman Center near the Campus of UC Irvine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617 Driving Directions to the Beckman Center near the Campus of UC for the Beckman Center Turn left at the light at California Avenue. Turn right onto Academy Way. The Beckman

  8. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  9. mm-WAVE Op-Amps FOR LOW DISTORTION AMPLIFICATION WITH HIGH OIP3/PDC RATIO > 100 AT 2 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    mm-WAVE Op-Amps FOR LOW DISTORTION AMPLIFICATION WITH HIGH OIP3/PDC RATIO > 100 AT 2 GHz Zach in bandwidth for an op-amp of any kind, as well as 3Ã? betterment in OIP3/PDC ratio at fs = 2-3 GHz, when dissipation PDC. This very high ratio of third-order-intercept power to DC power consumption POIP 3/PDC > 100

  10. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

  11. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

  12. 2013 R&D 100 Award: New tech could mean more power for fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, Jay

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An LLNL team of six physicists has developed a new technology that is a stepping stone to enable some of the limitations on high-power fiber lasers to be overcome. Their technology, dubbed "Efficient Mode-Converters for High-Power Fiber Amplifiers," allows the power of fiber lasers to be increased while maintaining high beam quality. Currently, fiber lasers are used in machining, on factory floors and in a number of defense applications and can produce tens of kilowatts of power.The conventional fiber laser design features a circular core and has fundamental limitations that make it impractical to allow higher laser power unless the core area is increased. LLNL researchers have pioneered a design to increase the laser's core area along the axis of the ribbon fiber. Their design makes it difficult to use a conventional laser beam, so the LLNL team converted the beam into a profile that propagates into the ribbon fiber and is converted back once it is amplified. The use of this LLNL technology will permit the construction of higher power lasers for lower costs and increase the power of fiber lasers from tens of kilowatts of power to about 100 kilowatts and potentially even higher.

  13. Data validation report for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit, third round groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayres, J.M.

    1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-FR-3 operable Unit Third Round Groundwater sampling investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of 51 samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The report is broken down into sections for each chemical analysis and radiochemical analysis type. Each section addresses the data package completeness, holding time adherence, instrument calibration and tuning acceptability, blank results, accuracy, precision, system performance, as well as the compound identification and quantitation. In addition, each section has an overall assessment and summary for the data packages reviewed for the particular chemical/radiochemical analyses. Detailed backup information is provided to the reader by SDG No. and sample number. For each data package, a matrix of chemical analyses per sample number is presented, as well as data qualification summaries.

  14. The 100,000 amp dc power supply for a staged hadron collider superferric magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, Steven L.; Claypool, Bradley; Foster, G.William; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.5 volt 100,000 amp DC switcher power supply was developed for testing a superferric magnet string at FNAL. This supply was used during testing as both the ramping supply and holding supply powering a single magnet load with a total load resistance of 0.7{micro} Ohms. The supply consists of ten paralleled switcher cells, powered by a 400 volt/600 Amp DC power supply. Each cell consists of an IGBT H-bridge driving a step-down transformer at a switching frequency of 2 kHz. The transformer has an effective turns ratio of 224:1. The secondary consists of 32 parallel single-turn full wave rectifier windings. The rectification is done with 64 Shottky diodes. Each cell is rated at 1.5 volts/10,000 amps. During this test each cell was operated as a constant power source without load current or field feedback. This paper will describe the design of the switcher cell and control system used during testing. We will also describe the next level of improvements to the current feedback system to improve the ramp control.

  15. 2013 R&D 100 Award: New tech could mean more power for fiber lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dawson, Jay

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An LLNL team of six physicists has developed a new technology that is a stepping stone to enable some of the limitations on high-power fiber lasers to be overcome. Their technology, dubbed "Efficient Mode-Converters for High-Power Fiber Amplifiers," allows the power of fiber lasers to be increased while maintaining high beam quality. Currently, fiber lasers are used in machining, on factory floors and in a number of defense applications and can produce tens of kilowatts of power.The conventional fiber laser design features a circular core and has fundamental limitations that make it impractical to allow higher laser power unless the core area is increased. LLNL researchers have pioneered a design to increase the laser's core area along the axis of the ribbon fiber. Their design makes it difficult to use a conventional laser beam, so the LLNL team converted the beam into a profile that propagates into the ribbon fiber and is converted back once it is amplified. The use of this LLNL technology will permit the construction of higher power lasers for lower costs and increase the power of fiber lasers from tens of kilowatts of power to about 100 kilowatts and potentially even higher.

  16. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  17. TEM and SIMS Analysis of (100), (110), and (111) Single Crystal Niobium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. D. Batchelor; D. N. Leonard; P. E. Russell; F. A. Stevie; D. P. Griffis; G. R. Myneni

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystal niobium specimens of (100), (110) and (111) crystal orientations have been analyzed using TEM and SIMS. The TEM specimens were prepared using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and show niobium oxide thicknesses ranging from 4.9 to 8.3 nm for the three specimens after buffer chemical polishing. The oxide layers appear uniform and no significant sub-oxide region was noted. SIMS analysis was made for all three orientations on hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen before and after heat treatments at 90, 600, and 1250ºC. Hydrogen is at a high level between the oxide layer and niobium, but at a relatively low level in the oxide. No high oxygen concentration region was noted in the niobium below the oxide. C contamination on the surface is detected mainly at the surface. Analysis after heat treatments showed some decrease in hydrogen after the 600ºC heat treatment, and significant oxidation of the niobium after the 1250ºC heat treatment.

  18. Trials with a 100% pellet burden in blast furnace No. 6 at Hoogovens IJmuiden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoone, E.; Toxopeus, H.; Vos, D. [Hoogovens IJmuiden (Netherlands). Ironmaking and Raw Materials Div.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The burden consists of 50% high basicity sinter and 50% home made olivine pellets. Two coke oven plants produce the required coke, about 340 kg/t (680 lb/NT). The average pulverized coal injection rate is 150 kg/t (300 lb/NT). To anticipate the aging coke oven plant No. 2 the coal injection capacity will e increased by 50% in 1996, by the installation of a third coal grinding line. In the Netherlands environmental issues have a high impact on further developments. In particular the environmental regulations require a significant decrease of dust, SO{sub 2} and dioxins emitted by the sinter plant. The appropriate measures must be concluded in the second part of this decade. To avoid costly conventional solutions Hoogovens has been testing since April, 1994 the Emission Optimized Sintering (EOS). In case of failure of EOS, the situation of a (partially) closed sinter plant was tested. Purchased pellets replaced sinter, leading to a 100% pellet and an 80% pellet/20% sinter trial. The trials were executed in the first half of 1994 at blast furnace No. 6, equipped with a PW-bell less top. Results are described.

  19. Temperature dependence of magnetoelastic properties of Fe100?xSix (5 < x < 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petculescu, G.; Lambert, P.K.; Clark, A.E.; Hathaway, K.B.; Xing, Qingfeng; Lograsso, Tom; Restorff, J.B.; Wun-Fogle, M.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetragonal magnetostriction (??,2) and elastic constants (c?, c44, and c11) for Fe100?xSix were measured as a function of temperature (T). Compositions corresponding to the disordered A2 (x?=?5), ordered D03 (x?=?19.8), and mixed (x?=?11.6) phases, were investigated. The magnetoelastic coupling (?b1) was determined for 77 < T < 300?K and compared with those of Fe-Ga, Fe-Ge, and Fe-Al. Both ??,2(T) and ?b1(T) of Fe-Si behave similarly to those of Fe-Ge, while other notable differences exist between the measured properties of Fe-Si and those of the other three alloys. Due to the early establishment of short range order, Fe-Si exhibits a positive, although small, slope in ??,2(T) at 5 at. % Si, and a remarkable drop in ?b1 before the solubility limit. The weaker softening of the tetragonal shear modulus with the addition of Si and the lack of strong anharmonic effects in the Fe-Si lattice inferred from the weak T-dependence of all the moduli suggest that Fe-Si exhibits more structural stability than the other three alloys. The distinctive behavior is likely due to the smaller size of Si compared to the sizes of Ga, Ge and Al, and therefore to the effect of the larger size difference between Fe and Si in the Fe-Si lattice.

  20. Trimble field, Smith Co. , MS: 100 bcf of bypassed pay at minus 7000 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Schneeflock Corp., Jackson, MS (USA)); Cook, P.L. Jr.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 TCFG since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to Trimble field, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in Mississippi was at Maxie-Pistol Ridge in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt Basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field will likely develop into at least 20 wells with reserves in excess of 100 BCFG and a flow rate of 40 MMCFGPD. The Trimble discovery was made on a faulted structural closure that had been drilled twice before. Both operators drilled excellent locations but failed to detect low resistivity pay The discovery of gas on the third attempt by Cobra and Paramount was facilitated by the 1987 accidental discovery of Eutaw gas at Gitano field where a flow test of 2 MMCFGPD from an EPA-permitted salt water disposal well proved a new gas pay zone for the field. A petrophysical examination of the Gitano discovery and its implications to the dry holes at Trimble has resulted in a renewed Eutaw play in Mississippi. The history of the Eutaw play and current field development, as well as applied seismic and log analysis techniques, are presented herein to document our exploratory efforts to date.

  1. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  2. Performance of a High-Concentration Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier with 100 nm Amplification Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajireza, P.; Shahabuddin, N. S.; Abbasi-Zargaleh, S.; Emami, S. D.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z. [Center for Advanced Devices and Systems, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for higher bandwidth has driven the need for higher Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) channels. One of the requirements to achieve this is a broadband amplifier. This paper reports the performance of a broadband, compact, high-concentration and silica-based erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier optimized to a 2.15 m long erbium-doped fiber with erbium ion concentration of 2000 ppm. The gain spectrum of the amplifier has a measured amplification bandwidth of 100 nm using a 980 nm laser diode with power of 150 mW. This silica-based EDFA shows lower noise figure, higher gain and wider bandwidth in shorter wavelengths compared to Bismuth-based EDFA with higher erbium ion concentration of 3250 ppm at equivalent EDF length. The silica-based EDF shows peak gain at 22 dB and amplification bandwidth between 1520 nm and 1620 nm. The lowest noise figure is 5 dB. The gain is further improved with the implementation of enhanced EDFA configurations.

  3. Search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Mo 100 with the NEMO-3 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; A. J. Caffrey

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for the neutrinoless double-ß decay (0?ßß ) of Mo 100 , using the NEMO-3 detector to reconstruct the full topology of the final state events. With an exposure of 34.7??kg·y , no evidence for the 0?ßß signal has been found, yielding a limit for the light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism of T 1/2 (0?ßß)>1.1×10 24 years (90% C.L.) once both statistical and systematic uncertainties are taken into account. Depending on the nuclear matrix elements this corresponds to an upper limit on the Majorana effective neutrino mass of ?m ? ?<0.3–0.9??eV (90% C.L.). Constraints on other lepton number violating mechanisms of 0?ßß decays are also given. Searching for high-energy double electron events in all suitable sources of the detector, no event in the energy region [3.2–10] MeV is observed for an exposure of 47??kg·y .

  4. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  5. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC, Cadarache F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  6. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  7. 80 and 100 Meter Wind Energy Resource Potential for the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Flowers, L.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate information about the wind potential in each state is required for federal and state policy initiatives that will expand the use of wind energy in the United States. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and AWS Truewind have collaborated to produce the first comprehensive new state-level assessment of wind resource potential since 1993. The estimates are based on high-resolution maps of predicted mean annual wind speeds for the contiguous 48 states developed by AWS Truewind. These maps, at spatial resolution of 200 meters and heights of 60 to 100 meters, were created with a mesoscale-microscale modeling technique and adjusted to reduce errors through a bias-correction procedure involving data from more than 1,000 measurement masts. NREL used the capacity factor maps to estimate the wind energy potential capacity in megawatts for each state by capacity factor ranges. The purpose of this presentation is to (1) inform state and federal policy makers, regulators, developers, and other stakeholders on the availability of the new wind potential information that may influence development, (2) inform the audience of how the new information was derived, and (3) educate the audience on how the information should be interpreted in developing state and federal policy initiatives.

  8. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  9. Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

  10. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory met the performance objective during the continuous operational testing. Effluent hexavalent chromium analyzed by the field laboratory met the performance goal in over 90 percent of the samples. All effluent hexavalent chromium samples during the batch testing with high influent hexavalent chromium concentrations ({approx}2000 {micro}g/L) met the performance objective. Although the EC system was able to meet the performance goal, it must be noted that it was not uncommon for the system to be operated in recycle mode to achieve the performance goal. The EC unit was sometimes, but not always, capable of a single pass treatment efficiency high enough to meet the performance goal, and recycling water for multiple treatment passes was effective. An operational objective was to determine the volume and composition of the waste streams to enable proper waste designation. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) concentrations, pH, and free liquids were determined for solid material from the EC electrodes (mechanically removed scale), the filter press, and the tank bottoms for the effluent and waste collector tanks. These data met all data quality requirements. All solid-phase secondary waste streams were found to be below the TCLP limits for the toxicity characteristic, and a pH value within the limits for the corrosivity characteristic. Out of three samples, two (one of scale from the EC unit and one from filter press solids) failed the free liquid (paint filter) test, which is one of the acceptability criteria for Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The solid-phase waste generation rate was about 0.65-gallon of solid waste per 100 gallons of water treated. It is concluded that the solid-phase secondary waste generated from this technology under the conditions at the test site will meet the toxicity and corrosivity criteria for disposal. It is also concluded that with engineering and/or operational improvements, a solid-phase secondary waste could be produced that would meet the free liquid disposal requirements. The second oper

  11. Livermore's 2004 R&D 100 Awards: Magnetically Levitated Train Takes Flight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    the 1960s, transportation industry planners have sought an energy-efficient design for a train that can glide through air at speeds up to 500 kilometers per hour. This type of train, called a magnetically levitated (maglev) train, is thought to be a viable solution to meet the nation's growing need for intercity and urban transportation networks. However, despite some promising developments, unresolved concerns with the operation and safety of maglev trains has prevented the transition from demonstration model to commercial development. Inductrack, a maglev system originally conceived by Livermore physicist Richard Post, is designed to address these issues. Post's work on Inductrack began with funding from Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, and in 2003, the technology was licensed to General Atomics (GA) in San Diego for train and transit system applications. This year, members of the Livermore-GA team received an R&D 100 Award for Inductrack's development. Inductrack uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic fields that levitate the train and provides economic and operational advantages over other maglev systems. It can be adapted to both high-speed and urban-speed environments. In the event of a power failure, the train slows gradually until it comes to rest on its auxiliary wheels. The maintenance requirements for Inductrack are also lower than they are for other systems, plus it has a short turning radius and is designed for quiet operation. Previous designs for maglev systems did not offer the energy efficiency or safety protections that are in the Inductrack design. Electromagnetic systems (EMS) use powered electromagnets to levitate the train. However, these systems are based on magnetic attraction rather than repulsion and thus are inherently unstable. In EMS trains, the levitation gap--the separation between the magnet pole faces and the iron rail--is only about 10 millimeters and, during operation, must be maintained to within {+-}1 millimeter. Position sensors and electronic feedback systems are required to control the magnetic current and to compensate for the inherent instability. This requirement, plus the onboard source of emergency power required to ensure operational safety during a sudden power loss, increases the complexity of EMS trains. In contrast, in electrodynamic systems (EDS), large superconducting magnet coils mounted on the sides of the train generate high-intensity magnetic field poles. Interaction of the current between the coils and the track levitates the train. At operating speeds (above a liftoff speed of about 100 kilometers per hour), the magnetic levitation force balances the weight of the car at a stable position. EDS trains do not require the feedback control systems that EMS trains use to stabilize levitation. However, the superconducting magnetic coils must be kept at temperatures of only 5 kelvins, so costly electrically powered cryogenic equipment is required. Also, passengers, especially those with pacemakers, must be shielded from the high magnetic fields generated by the superconductors.

  12. Tables and graphs of electron-interaction cross sections from 10 eV to 100 GeV derived from the LLNL Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), Z = 1--100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, S.T.; Cullen, D.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Seltzer, S.M. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Radiation Research)

    1991-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-dependent evaluated electron interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Fm (Z = 1 to 100). Data are given over the energy range from 10 eV to 100 GeV. Cross sections and average energy deposits are presented in tabulated and graphic form. In addition, ionization cross sections and average energy deposits for each shell are presented in graphic form. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL) as of July, 1991.

  13. Giga-z: A 100,000 OBJECT SUPERCONDUCTING SPECTROPHOTOMETER FOR LSST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, Danica W.; Mazin, Benjamin A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O'Brien, Kieran [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hirata, Chris [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate the performance of a new type of instrument, a Superconducting Multi-Object Spectrograph (SuperMOS), that uses microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs, a new detector technology, feature good quantum efficiency in the UVOIR, can count individual photons with microsecond timing accuracy, and, like X-ray calorimeters, determine their energy to several percent. The performance of Giga-z, a SuperMOS designed for wide field imaging follow-up observations, is evaluated using simulated observations of the COSMOS mock catalog with an array of 100,000 R{sub 423{sub nm}} = E/{Delta}E = 30 MKID pixels. We compare our results against a simultaneous simulation of LSST observations. In 3 yr on a dedicated 4 m class telescope, Giga-z could observe Almost-Equal-To 2 billion galaxies, yielding a low-resolution spectral energy distribution spanning 350-1350 nm for each; 1000 times the number measured with any currently proposed LSST spectroscopic follow-up, at a fraction of the cost and time. Giga-z would provide redshifts for galaxies up to z Almost-Equal-To 6 with magnitudes m{sub i} {approx}< 25, with accuracy {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.03 for the whole sample, and {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.007 for a select subset. We also find catastrophic failure rates and biases that are consistently lower than for LSST. The added constraint on dark energy parameters for WL + CMB by Giga-z using the FoMSWG default model is equivalent to multiplying the LSST Fisher matrix by a factor of {alpha} = 1.27 (w{sub p} ), 1.53 (w{sub a} ), or 1.98 ({Delta}{gamma}). This is equivalent to multiplying both the LSST coverage area and the training sets by {alpha} and reducing all systematics by a factor of 1/{radical}({alpha}), advantages that are robust to even more extreme models of intrinsic alignment.

  14. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  15. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  16. Pd Diffusion on MgO(100): The Role of Defects and Small Cluster Mobilit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lijun; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Campbell, Charles T.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Density functional theory is used to explore the energy landscape of Pd atoms adsorbed on the terrace of MgO(10 0) and at oxygen vacancy sites. Saddle point finding methods reveal that small Pd clusters diffuse on the terrace in interesting ways. The monomer and dimer diffuse via single atom hops between oxygen sites with barriers of 0.34 eV and 0.43 eV respectively. The trimer and tetramer, however, form 3D clusters by overcoming a 2D–3D transition barrier of less than 60 meV. The trimer diffuses along the surface either by a walking or flipping motion, with comparable barriers of ca. 0.5 eV. The tetramer rolls along the terrace with a lower barrier of 0.42 eV. Soft rotational modes at the saddle point lead to an anomalously high prefactor of 1.3 · 1014 s!1 for tetramer diffusion. This prefactor is two order of magnitude higher than for monomer diffusion, making the tetramer the fastest diffusing species on the terrace at all temperatures for which diffusion is active (above 200 K). Neutral oxygen vacancy sites are found to bind Pd monomers with a 2.63 eV stronger binding energy than the terrace. A second Pd atom, however, binds to this trapped monomer with a smaller energy of 0.56 eV, so that dimers at defects dissociate on a time scale of milliseconds at room temperature. Larger clusters bind more strongly at defects. Trimers and tetramers dissociate from monomer-bound-defects at elevated temperatures of ca. 600 K. These species are also mobile on the terrace, suggesting they are important for the ripening observed at P600 K during Pd vapor deposition on MgO(100) by Haas et al. [G. Haas, A. Menck, H. Brune, J.V. Barth, J.A. Venables, K. Kern, Phys. Rev. B 61 (2000) 11105].

  17. Crystallographically tilted and partially strain relaxed GaN grown on inclined (111) facets etched on Si(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansah Antwi, K. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Soh, C. B. [Singapore Institute of Technology, 10 Dover Drive, Singapore 138683 (Singapore); Wee, Q. [Singapore-MIT Alliance, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Tan, Rayson J. N.; Tan, H. R. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Yang, P. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, 117603 Singapore (Singapore); Sun, L. F.; Shen, Z. X. [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, SPMS-03-01, 21 Nanyang Link (Singapore); Chua, S. J., E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Singapore-MIT Alliance, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD), Photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscope measurements are reported for GaN deposited on a conventional Si(111) substrate and on the (111) facets etched on a Si(100) substrate. HR-XRD reciprocal space mappings showed that the GaN(0002) plane is tilted by about 0.63°?±?0.02° away from the exposed Si(111) growth surface for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate, while no observable tilt existed between the GaN(0002) and Si(111) planes for GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The ratio of integrated intensities of the yellow to near band edge (NBE) luminescence (I{sub YL}/I{sub NBE}) was determined to be about one order of magnitude lower in the case of GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate compared with GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The Raman E{sub 2}(high) optical phonon mode at 565.224?±?0.001?cm{sup ?1} with a narrow full width at half maximum of 1.526?±?0.002?cm{sup ?1} was measured, for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) indicating high material quality. GaN deposition within the trench etched on the Si(100) substrate occurred via diffusion and mass-transport limited mechanism. This resulted in a differential GaN layer thickness from the top (i.e., 1.8??m) of the trench to the bottom (i.e., 0.3??m) of the trench. Mixed-type dislocation constituted about 80% of the total dislocations in the GaN grown on the inclined Si(111) surface etched on Si(100)

  18. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the tetrahydrofuran/ethanol system at 25, 50, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, E.; Scholz, A.G.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium of the system tetrahydrofuran (THF)/ethanol at 25, 50, and 100 kPa has been determined experimentally by using an equilibrium still of the recirculation type. Data reduction based on the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models provides a correlation for ..gamma.. /SUB i/. The tetrahydrofuran/ethanol system forms an azeotrope above 53 kPa. At 100 and 150 kPa, the azeotropic mixtures contain respectively 0.908 and 0.844 mole fraction of tetrahydrofuran.

  19. Use of the nuclear model code GNASH to calculate cross section data at energies up to 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.; Bosoian, M.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear theory code GNASH has been used to calculate nuclear data for incident neutrons, protons, and deuterons at energies up to 100 MeV. Several nuclear models and theories are important in the 10--100 MeV energy range, including Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, spherical and deformed optical model, preequilibrium theory, nuclear level densities, fission theory, and direct reaction theory. In this paper we summarize general features of the models in GNASH and describe the methodology utilized to determine relevant model parameters. We illustrate the significance of several of the models and include comparisons with experimental data for certain target materials that are important in applications.

  20. Use of the nuclear model code GNASH to calculate cross section data at energies up to 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.; Bosoian, M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear theory code GNASH has been used to calculate nuclear data for incident neutrons, protons, and deuterons at energies up to 100 MeV. Several nuclear models and theories are important in the 10--100 MeV energy range, including Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, spherical and deformed optical model, preequilibrium theory, nuclear level densities, fission theory, and direct reaction theory. In this paper we summarize general features of the models in GNASH and describe the methodology utilized to determine relevant model parameters. We illustrate the significance of several of the models and include comparisons with experimental data for certain target materials that are important in applications.

  1. Comparison of inclusive inelastic scattering of. pi. sup + and. pi. sup minus from nuclei at 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, D.P.; Amann, J.F.; Boudrie, R.L.; Doss, K.G.R.; Drake, D.M.; Halpern, I.; Khandaker, M.A.; Nelson, J.; Storm, D.W.; Tieger, D.R.; Wood, S.A. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, FM-15 Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 0W0 (Canada) Bates Linear Accelerator Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Middleton, Massachusetts 01949 (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive inelastic scattering spectra from C, Ca, Sn, and Pb were measured for 100-MeV pions at a number of angles. The observed ratios of the {pi}{sup {minus}} and {pi}{sup +} total inelastic cross sections for the different targets are explained in terms of a simple model which is based on the assumption that the scattered pion has interacted with only one nucleon. This model also accounts for the ratio between normal and charge-exchange scattering cross sections at 100 MeV.

  2. Residency Program Influenza Algorithm: Updated 07/14/10 Symptomatic with Rapid Onset of Symptoms: Fevers> 100 F URI Symptoms no Fevers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    : Fevers> 100° F URI Symptoms no Fevers PLUS: Respiratory Symptoms (Cough with or without sore throat

  3. PLAN100%DIGITAL PLAN100%DIGITAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    en un conjunto d e servicios digitales. RAZONES DEL PLAN: Existe un nú mero importante de institu tos

  4. Study of Adsorption and Decomposition of H2O on Ge(100) Soon Jung Jung, Jun Young Lee, Suklyun Hong,*, and Sehun Kim*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Study of Adsorption and Decomposition of H2O on Ge(100) Soon Jung Jung, Jun Young Lee, Suklyun Hong Form: October 9, 2005 The adsorption and decomposition of water on Ge(100) have been investigated using results revealed two distinct adsorption features of H2O on Ge(100) corresponding to molecular adsorption

  5. CO-NO and CO-O2 Interactions on Cu(100) between 25 and 200 K Studied with Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    CO-NO and CO-O2 Interactions on Cu(100) between 25 and 200 K Studied with Infrared Reflection reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) has been used to study CO-NO and CO-O2 interactions on Cu(100) between 25 and 200 K. A strong repulsive interaction between CO and NO on Cu(100) at 25 K causes tilting

  6. Atomic imaging and modeling of H2O2(g) surface passivation, functionalization, and atomic layer deposition nucleation on the Ge(100) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    deposition nucleation on the Ge(100) surface Tobin Kaufman-Osborn, Evgueni A. Chagarov, and Andrew C. Kummel-ray photoemission study of the thermal stability of the Al2O3/Ge (100) interface as a function of surface.1116/1.3678206 Atomic imaging of nucleation of trimethylaluminum on clean and H2O functionalized Ge(100) surfaces J

  7. Adsorption, Diffusion, and Dissociation of H2S on Fe(100) from First Principles D. E. Jiang and Emily A. Carter*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Adsorption, Diffusion, and Dissociation of H2S on Fe(100) from First Principles D. E. Jiang-polarized periodic density functional theory (DFT) to characterize H2S and HS adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation on the Fe(100) surface. We investigate the site preference of H2S, HS, and S on Fe(100). H2S is predicted

  8. ENGINEERS DAYENGINEERS DAYThis year the University of Tennessee College of Engineering is celebrating the 100th Anniversary of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ENGINEERS DAYENGINEERS DAYThis year the University of Tennessee College of Engineering is celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Engineers Day. Each October, undergraduate engineering classes of potential engineering students from high schools across the region. Last year, close to 1,000 students from

  9. Electronic Friction Dominates Hydrogen Hot-Atom Relaxation on Pd(100) M. Blanco-Rey,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muiño, Ricardo Díez

    initio molecular dynamics simulations that include a friction force to account for the energy transfer February 2014; published 14 March 2014) We study the dynamics of transient hot H atoms on Pd(100 to the electronic system. We find that the excitation of electron-hole pairs is the main channel for energy

  10. Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    species. Recent re- search has indicated that raptor mortality from collisions with wind turbines variesWilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS ABSTRACT.-Grassland passerines were surveyed during summer 1995 on the Buffalo Ridge Wind Resource Area

  11. Optimisation of Accurate Rutile TiO2 (110), (100), (101) and (001) Surface Models from Periodic DFT Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Title Optimisation of Accurate Rutile TiO2 (110), (100), (101) and (001) Surface Models from of this study was to optimise accurate rutile TiO2 surfaces models that will be used in further calculations(1)69156869 Fax: +0033(1)69157150 Abstract In this paper, geometric bulk parameters, bulk moduli, energy gaps

  12. Analyzing power of the {sup 40}Ca(p-vector,p{alpha}) reaction at 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neveling, R.; Buthelezi, Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Steyn, G. F.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Cowley, A. A. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Fujita, H. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Hillhouse, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Botha, N. T. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Mudau, L. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Ntshangase, S. S. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Zululand, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing powers have been measured for the {sup 40}Ca(p-vector,p{alpha}){sup 36}Ar reaction at an incident energy of 100 MeV for coplanar scattering angles corresponding to zero recoil momentum of the residual nucleus. Predictions based on the distorted wave impulse approximation fail to reproduce the data.

  13. Development of CaMoO4 crystal scintillators for double beta decay experiment with 100-Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Annenkov; O. A. Buzanov; F. A. Danevich; A. Sh. Georgadze; S. K. Kim; H. J. Kim; Y. D. Kim; V. V. Kobychev; V. N. Kornoukhov; M. Korzhik; J. I. Lee; O. Missevitch; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; A. S. Nikolaiko; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; D. J. Sedlak; O. G. Shkulkova; J. H. So; I. M. Solsky; V. I. Tretyak; S. S. Yurchenko

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy resolution, alpha/beta ratio, pulse-shape discrimination for gamma rays and alpha particles, temperature dependence of scintillation properties, and radioactive contamination were studied with CaMoO4 crystal scintillators. A high sensitivity experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100-Mo by using CaMoO4 scintillators is discussed.

  14. Electron impact ionization: A new parameterization for 100 eV to 1 MeV electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    Electron impact ionization: A new parameterization for 100 eV to 1 MeV electrons Xiaohua Fang,1 2008; published 11 September 2008. [1] We present a new parameterization of the altitude profile of the ionization rate in the Earth's atmosphere due to precipitating energetic electrons. Precipitating electrons

  15. Fabrication of Sr silicate buffer layer on Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition using a SrO target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imanaka, Atsuhiro; Sasaki, Tsubasa [Department of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Hotta, Yasushi, E-mail: hotta@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Satoh, Shin-ichi [Department of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors fabricated 2?×?1 Sr-reconstructed Si(100) substrates using thin SrO layers, and used them to direct growth of crystalline perovskite oxide on Si. The SrO layers used to reconstruct the Si(100) substrates were grown by pulsed laser deposition from a SrO single crystal target, followed by postdeposition-annealing (PDA) of the SrO/Si(100) structure. In situ observations of reflective high-energy electron diffraction during PDA confirmed a 2?×?1 reconstruction of the Si surface and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the annealed samples confirmed the existence of Sr atoms in a silicate phase, which indicated that a 2?×?1 Sr-reconstructed Si surface was achieved. The optimal fabrication conditions were annealing at 720?°C for 1?min and an equivalent SrO layer thickness (ML{sub eq}) of 2.5 ML{sub eq}. The temperature condition was very narrow, at 720?±?20?°C, for an acceptable product. Subsequently, the authors demonstrated the growth of crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} films on the 2?×?1 Sr-reconstructed Si(100) surfaces.

  16. Low energy electron-enhanced etching of Si(100) in hydrogen/helium direct-current plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dove, Patricia M.

    Low energy electron-enhanced etching of Si(100) in hydrogen/helium direct-current plasma H. P of a dc plasma reactor, and thus receives a large flux of low-energy electrons and hydrogen molecules-0269 Received 7 September 1994; accepted for publication 6 March 1995 Low energy electron-enhanced etching of Si

  17. Distance (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    Distance (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 Frequency 0.0 0.1 0.2 0 nests Expected G(d) Distance (m) 0 150 300 450 600 750 900 1050 1200 1350 Frequency 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0

  18. The 8 bits 100 MS/s Pipeline ADC for the INNOTEP Project TWEPP-09 S. Crampon a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of coincidence (line of response, or LOR). PET scanners should make use of low-noise and rapid electronics in this paper the design of an Analog to Digital Converter for this application. The proposed circuit is based and holds and amplifiers. It runs at 100MSamples/s and has 8 bits resolution. The stages used two lines

  19. Collective Modes and Fast Particle Confinement in ITER A. Jaun, NADA, Euratom-VR Association, KTH, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    -VR Association, KTH, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden S. Briguglio, G. Fogaccia, C. Gormezano, F. Zonca, G. Vlad, ENEA C. Introduction Ions in the MeV energy range are generated as «-particles by DT fusion reactions, and can be created by additional heating, such as ICRH on the fuel ions. To confine the heat and sustain the burn

  20. Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol Photoelectrochemical Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol of corrosion of the cell on the PL-V profile is examined in detail. It is found that the inclusion of the redox couple gives some protection from corrosion, but the addition of a small amount of water

  1. A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

    A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute December 2009 We describe a general-purpose thermoelectric temperature controller with 1 mK stability, 10 m elements and thermoelectric modules to heat or cool in the 40 to 40 °C range. A schematic of our controller

  2. ER 100/200, PP C184/284 GSI Section Notes Energy & Society Section Week 5: Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    . Property Diagrams and Power Cycles V. Additional Material, Terms, and Variables VI. Practice Problems I form to another. As an equation, this is simply: Esystem = 0 = Ein ­ Eout #12;ER 100/200, PP C184 system its change in energy will be the balance between the heat transferred to (Qin) and the work done

  3. MATH 240; EXAM # 2, 100 points, November 8, 2002 (R.A.Brualdi) TOTAL SCORE (10 problems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brualdi, Richard A.

    MATH 240; EXAM # 2, 100 points, November 8, 2002 (R.A.Brualdi) TOTAL SCORE (10 problems): Name, then s1 := 1. Else sn := sn-1 + n5 . (ii) Iterative Algorithm: s1 := 1 For i = 2, 3, . . . , n, si := si

  4. Efficient Spectral Broadening in the 100-W Average Power Regime Using Gas Filled Kagome HC-PCF and Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emaury, Florian; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gerome, Frederic; Suedmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a Kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static Argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100 W of average power and >100 MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100 MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very int...

  5. The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar Changwoo Nahm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar cells Changwoo Nahm,1 nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). At the optimum Au/TiO2 mass ratio of 0.05, the power nanoparticles were also introduced to the electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the solar-cell

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2000 100 Azimuth Variation in Microwave Scatterometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2000 100 Azimuth/Imager (SSM/I) [13] have broad application in atmospheric remote sensing over the ocean and provide essential. Radiative cooling of surface air masses over the in- terior ice sheet causes negative buoyancy and the air

  7. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    . Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

  8. BNL Model CRADA Patents Only 100% Funds In (5/1/06) STEVENSON-WYDLER (15 USC 3710)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    BNL Model CRADA ­ Patents Only ­ 100% Funds In (5/1/06) STEVENSON-WYDLER (15 USC 3710) COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (hereinafter "CRADA") No. __________ BETWEEN BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE in the performance of this CRADA. E. "Proprietary Information" means information which embodies (i) trade secrets

  9. Construction of an Ultra-Broad Preamplifier of a 100-TW Ultra-short Pulse Laser System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of an Ultra-Broad Preamplifier of a 100-TW Ultra-short Pulse Laser System duration to obtain ultra-short and high peak power laser pulses. The amplified pulse from the output) (laser preamplifier for contrast improvement) Chirped-pulse amplificationCPA (Pulse stretcher

  10. 30486 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 100 / Wednesday, May 23, 2012 / Proposed Rules Washington, DC or may be purchased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Petitions Filed: 3. Federal Communications Commission. Marlene H. Dortch, Secretary, Office of the Secretary30486 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 100 / Wednesday, May 23, 2012 / Proposed Rules Washington, DC or may be purchased from the Commission's copy contractor, Best Copy and Printing, Inc. (BCPI) (1

  11. REDUCING STRUCTURAL VARIATION TO DETERMINE THE GENETICS OF WHITE MATTER INTEGRITY ACROSS HEMISPHERES A DTI STUDY OF 100 TWINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    HEMISPHERES ­ A DTI STUDY OF 100 TWINS Neda Jahanshad1 , Agatha D. Lee1 , Natasha Lepore1 , Yi-Yu Chou1 , Margaret J. Wright3 , Guillermo Sapiro4 , Christophe Lenglet4,5 , Paul M. Thompson1 1 Laboratory of Neuro

  12. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 46 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident Coverage y 24-Hour Business Travel y

  13. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

  14. Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waqidi Falicoff

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light bulbs. In Phase II several new reflective remote phosphor systems were developed and patents applied for. This research included the development of reflective systems in which the short-pass filter operated at a nominal incidence angle of 15{sup o}, a major advancement of this technology. Another goal of the project was to show that it is possible to align multiple optics to multiple LEDs (spaced apart for better thermal management) to within an accuracy in the z-direction of 10 microns or less. This goal was achieved. A further goal was to show it is possible to combine and homogenize the output from multiple LEDs without any flux loss or significant increase in etendue. This goal also was achieved. The following color-coded computer drawing of the Phase 2 reflective remote phosphor prototype gives an idea of the accuracy challenges encountered in such an assembly. The actual setup has less functional clarity due to the numerous items of auxiliary equipment involved. Not only did 10 degrees of freedoms alignment have to be supplied to the LEDs and component prisms as well, but there were also micro-titrating glue dispensers and vacuum hoses. The project also utilized a recently introduced high-index glass, available in small customized prisms. This prototype also embodies a significant advance in thin-film design, by which an unprecedented 98% single-pass efficiency was attained over a 30 degree range of incidence angle (Patents Pending). Such high efficiency is especially important since it applies to the blue light going to the phosphor and then again to the phosphor's light, so that the 'system' efficiency associated with short-pass filter was 95.5%. Other losses have to be kept equally small, towards which a new type of ultra-clear injection-moldable acrylic was discovered and used to make ultra-transparent CPC optics. Several transmissive remote phosphor prototypes were manufactured that could replace screw-in type incandescent bulbs. The CRI of the white light from these prototypes varied from 55 to 93. The system efficiency achieved was between 27 to 29.5

  15. 4.5 A Carnot cycle uses 1.00 mol of a monatomic perfect gas as the working substance from an initial state of 10.0 atm and 600 K. It expands isothermally to a pressure of 1.00 atm (step 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    4.5 A Carnot cycle uses 1.00 mol of a monatomic perfect gas as the working substance from, w, )U, )H, )S and )Stot for each stage of the cycle and for the cycle as a whole. Express your L, in three ways: (a) isothermally and reversibly, (b) isothermally against a constant external

  16. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  17. fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p. 100 water) or meal in a 2 X3factorial design with 4 replicates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p week period for 8 M /D mash and meal diets were - 0.264 and — 6.218 g DI,G on 8 M /D pellets 12 M/D pellets, mash and meal were 33.10, 27.90 and z6.si g, respectively (SED ± 2.321 g

  18. Geophysical investigations of French Drain 116-B-9, and Dry Well 116-B-10, 100 B/C Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Fassett, J.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    French Drain 116-B-9 and Dry Well 116-B-10 are both located within the 100 B/C-2 Operable Unit, 100 B/C Area (Figure 1). The 116-B-9 French Drain is approximately 4 ft in diameter by 3 ft deep. The exact location or use of the drain in not clear. The 116-B-10 Dry Well is a 3 ft-diameter, tile-lined well on a concrete slab, 7 ft below the surface, overlain by a manhole cover (DOE-RL 1991). The exact location of the well is uncertain. The objective of the survey was to locate the Dry Well and the French Drain. The area to be investigated had several buildings in the area which subsequently have been torn down. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was the geophysical method chosen for the investigation.

  19. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with the {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface and subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Rodriguez, N.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.; Tejeda, A.; Michel, E. G.; Pedio, M.; Ottaviani, C.; Perfetti, P. [Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France and Departement de Physique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); ISM-CNR, Via del fosso del cavaliere 100, 00133, Rome (Italy) and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, 34012 Basovizza (Italy)

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate clean and atomic hydrogen exposed {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surfaces by synchrotron radiation-based Si 2p core-level photoemission spectroscopy. The clean 3x2 surface reconstruction exhibits three surface and subsurface components. Upon hydrogen exposures, those surface and subsurface components are shifted to lower binding energies by large values, indicating significant charge transfer to the surface and subsurface regions, in excellent agreement with the recently discovered H-induced {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface metallization. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen results in a large reactive component at Si 2p supporting an asymmetric charge transfer in the third plane below the surface, in agreement with previous experimental investigations. However, the results are inconsistent with recent ab initio theoretical ''frozen'' calculations predicting H atom to be in a bridge-bond position.

  20. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  1. Super-dense array of Ge quantum dots grown on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talochkin, A. B., E-mail: tal@isp.nsc.ru; Shklyaev, A. A. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Mashanov, V. I. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge layer grown on Si(100) at the low temperature of ?100?°C by molecular beam epitaxy is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that crystalline and pseudomorphic to the Si substrate Ge islands are formed at the initial growth stage. The islands acquire the base size of 1.2–2.6?nm and they form arrays with the super-high density of (5–8)?×?10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} at 1–2?nm Ge coverages. Such a density is at least 10 times higher than that of Ge “hut” clusters grown via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. It is shown that areas between the crystalline Ge islands are filled with amorphous Ge, which is suggested to create potential barrier for holes localized within the islands. As a result, crystalline Ge quantum dots appear being isolated from each other.

  2. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of Ge76, Se82, Mo100 and Xe136 to excited 0^+ states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Simkovic; M. Nowak; W. A. Kaminski; A. A. Raduta; Amand Faessler

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrinoless double beta decay transition to the first excited 0^+ collective final state is examined for A=76, 82, 100 and 136 nuclei by assuming light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange mechanisms as well as the trilinear R-parity violating contributions. Realistic calculations of nuclear matrix elements have been performed within the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation. Transitions to the first excited two-quadrupole phonon 0^+ state are described within a boson expansion formalism and alternatively by using the operator recoupling method. We present the sensitivity parameters to different lepton number violating signals, which can be used in planning the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay to the first excited state 0^+_1 is by a factor of 10 to 100 larger than that of the transition to the ground state.

  3. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  4. MA 547 Midterm Exam 1 02/14/2013 11:45am-1:00pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Tao

    MA 547 Midterm Exam 1 02/14/2013 11:45am-1:00pm Name: Student ID: Remark: This is a close-book test price can be doubled or decreased by one-fourth. In other words, Si+1 = 2Si or Si+1 = 3 4 Si for i = 0 is the optimal strategy to exercise the option? ­End of the Exam­ 2 #12;

  5. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabaldon, C.; Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for the water + 1-propanol system are reported at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The results were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak methods. The system shows a minimum boiling azeotrope, and the azeotropic composition is scarcely shifted with pressure. Results were compared with literature values. The data were correlated with Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC liquid-phase activity coefficient models.

  6. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  7. Structural effects on the oxidation of HCOOH by bismuth-modified Pt(111) electrodes with (100) monatomic steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.P.E.; Ben-Dor, K.F.; Abruna, H.D.

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant enhancements in the electrocatalytic oxidation of HCOOH are obtained on deliberately stepped platinum surfaces with (111) terraces and (100) monatomic steps when bismuth is deposited on terrace and/or step sites. The bismuth-modified surfaces with higher step densities/narrower terrace widths exhibit higher catalytic activity in the oxidation of HCOOH than surfaces with lower step densities/wider terrace widths, behavior which is opposite to that exhibited by the analogous bare (unmodified) surfaces. For Bi/Pt(544) and Bi/Pt(755), with nine- and six-atom wide (111) terraces, respectively, maximum catalytic behavior occurs when bismuth is deposited only on the steps, suggesting that a critical ensemble (critical size), two atoms wide, enhances the reactive intermediate pathway for the complete oxidation of HCOOH over the poisoning reaction pathway. Moreover, the potential for the onset of oxidation of HCOOH shifts to less positive potentials as the terrace width of the bismuth-modified surfaces becomes narrower, suggesting a diminution in the activation energy barrier as the ensemble size becomes smaller. Contrary to the behavior on the stepped surfaces, bismuth-modified, polyoriented spherical platinum electrodes, which contain a random distribution of (111), (100), and (110) faces, exhibit a continuous rise in catalytic activity for HCOOH oxidation with bismuth coverage, even at bismuth coverages approaching 100%.

  8. Characterization of electrical linewidth test structures patterned in (100) Silicon-on-Insulator for use as CD standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRESSWELL,M.W.; ALLEN,R.A.; GHOSHTAGORE,R.N.; GUILLAUME,N.M.P.; SHEA,PATRICK J.; EVERIST,SARAH C.; LINHOLM,L.W.

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the fabrication and measurement of the linewidths of the reference segments of cross-bridge resistors patterned in (100) Bonded and Etched Back Silicon-on-Insulator (BESOI) material. The critical dimensions (CD) of the reference segments of a selection of the cross-bridge resistor test structures were measured both electrically and by Scanning-Electron Microscopy (SEM) cross-section imaging. The reference-segment features were aligned with <110> directions in the BESOI surface material and had drawn linewidths ranging from 0.35 to 3.0 {micro}m. They were defined by a silicon micro-machining process which results in their sidewalls being atomically-planar and smooth and inclined at 54.737{degree} to the surface (100) plane of the substrate. This (100) implementation may usefully complement the attributes of the previously-reported vertical-sidewall one for selected reference-material applications. For example, the non-orthogonal intersection of the sidewalls and top-surface planes of the reference-segment features may alleviate difficulties encountered with atomic-force microscope measurements. In such applications it has been reported that it may be difficult to maintain probe-tip control at the sharp 90{degree} outside corner of the sidewalls and the upper surface. A second application is refining to-down image-processing algorithms and checking instrument performance. Novel aspects of the (100) SOI implementation that are reported here include the cross-bridge resistor test-structure architecture and details of its fabrication. The long-term goal is to develop a technique for the determination of the absolute dimensions of the trapezoidal cross-sections of the cross-bridge resistors' reference segments, as a prelude to developing them for dimensional reference applications. This is believed to be the first report of electrical CD measurements made on test structures of the cross-bridge resistor type that have been patterned in (100) SOI material. The electrical CD results are compared with cross-section SEM measurements made on the same features.

  9. Interaction of the S100A6 mutant (C3S) with the V domain of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Sepuru K., E-mail: mohansepuri@gmail.com; Gupta, Arun A., E-mail: ninja14gupta@gmail.com; Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •The halo human S100A6 (C3S) NMR chemical shifts were assigned. •The interactions between S100A6m and RAGE V domain was investigated by ITC. •The residues involved in the S100A6m–RAGE V domain binding were mapped by {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N HSQC titration. •S100A6–RAGE V domain tetrameric complex model was generated from NMR studies. •The S100A6–RAGE V domain interface regions were elucidated based on HADDOCK model. -- Abstract: S100A6 is involved in several vital biological functions, such as calcium sensing and cell proliferation. It is a homodimeric protein that belongs to the S100 protein family. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been shown to play a role in the progression of various disease conditions, such as diabetes and immune/inflammatory disorders. Information regarding the association of RAGE with S100 proteins at a molecular level is useful to understand the diversity of the RAGE signaling pathways. In this report, biomolecular NMR techniques were utilized for the resonance assignment of the C3S mutation in human S100A6 and characterizing its interaction with the RAGE V domain. Further binding affinity between S100A6m and the RAGE V domain was determined by isothermal titration calorimetric studies. HADDOCK was used to generate a heterotetramer model of the S100A6m–RAGE V domain complex. This model provides an important insights into the S100–RAGE cellular signaling pathway.

  10. Growth of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) on Y-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}(100) by O-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourlange, A.; Payne, D. J.; Egdell, R. G.; Foord, J. S.; Edwards, P. P.; Jones, M. O. [Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Schertel, A. [Carl Zeiss SMT AG, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, 73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Dobson, P. J. [Oxford University Begbroke Science Park, Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Kidlington, Oxon OX5 1PF (United Kingdom); Hutchison, J. L. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been grown on Y-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}(100) by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy with a substrate temperature of 650 deg. C. Ordered epitaxial growth was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The position of the valence band onset in the x-ray photoemission spectra of the epitaxial films is found to be inconsistent with the widely quoted value of 3.75 eV for the fundamental bandgap of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and suggests a revised value of 2.67 eV.

  11. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test FY09 Status: High Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test FY09 Status: High Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization INTERIM LETTER REPORT

  12. Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the best core performance characteristics for each of them. With the exception of the fuel type and enrichment, the reference AFR-100 core design characteristics were kept unchanged, including the general core layout and dimensions, assembly dimensions, materials and power rating. In addition, the mass of {sup 235}U required was kept within a reasonable range from that of the reference AFR-100 design. The core performance characteristics, kinetics parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated using the ANL suite of fast reactor analysis code systems. Orifice design calculations and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed using the SE2-ANL code. The thermal margins were evaluated by comparing the peak temperatures to the design limits for parameters such as the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature. The inherent safety features of AFR-100 cores proposed were assessed using the integral reactivity parameters of the quasi-static reactivity balance analysis. The design objectives and requirements, the computation methods used as well as a description of the core concept are provided in Section 2. The three major approaches considered are introduced in Section 3 and the neutronics performances of those approaches are discussed in the same section. The orifice zoning strategies used and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic performance are provided in Section 4. The kinetics and reactivity coefficients, including the inherent safety characteristics, are provided in Section 5, and the Conclusions in Section 6. Other scenarios studied and sensitivity studies are provided in the Appendix section.

  13. HOT WATER IN THE INNER 100 AU OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F., E-mail: visserr@umich.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporation of water ice above 100 K in the inner few 100 AU of low-mass embedded protostars (the so-called hot core) should produce quiescent water vapor abundances of {approx}10{sup -4} relative to H{sub 2}. Observational evidence so far points at abundances of only a few 10{sup -6}. However, these values are based on spherical models, which are known from interferometric studies to be inaccurate on the relevant spatial scales. Are hot cores really that much drier than expected, or are the low abundances an artifact of the inaccurate physical models? We present deep velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the 3{sub 12}-3{sub 03} lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (1097 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 249 K) in the low-mass Class 0 protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A. A spherical radiative transfer model with a power-law density profile is unable to reproduce both the HIFI data and existing interferometric data on the H{sub 2}{sup 18}O 3{sub 13}-2{sub 20} line (203 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 204 K). Instead, the HIFI spectra likely show optically thick emission from a hot core with a radius of about 100 AU. The mass of the hot core is estimated from the C{sup 18}O J = 9-8 and 10-9 lines. We derive a lower limit to the hot water abundance of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, consistent with the theoretical predictions of {approx}10{sup -4}. The revised HDO/H{sub 2}O abundance ratio is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, an order of magnitude lower than previously estimated.

  14. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  15. Finite element simulation for ultraviolet excimer laser processing of patterned Si/SiGe/Si(100) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S.; Gontad, F.; Gonzalez, P. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Martin, E. [Dpto. Mecanica, Maquinas, Motores Termicos y Fluidos, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Serra, C. [CACTI, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) Excimer laser assisted processing is an alternative strategy for producing patterned silicon germanium heterostructures. We numerically analyzed the effects caused by pulsed 193 Excimer laser radiation impinging on patterned amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) and germanium (a-Ge:H) bilayers deposited on a crystalline silicon substrate [Si(100)]. The proposed two dimensional axisymmetric numerical model allowed us to estimate the temperature and concentration gradients caused by the laser induced rapid melting and solidification processes. Energy density dependence of maximum melting depth and melting time evolution as well as three dimensional temperature and element distribution have been simulated and compared with experimentally obtained results.

  16. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugrain, Vincent; Reichel, Jakob [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, UPMC, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Rosenbusch, Peter [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 av de l’Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  17. Contributions of the S100A9 C-Terminal Tail to High-Affinity Mn(II) Chelation by the Host-Defense Protein Human Calprotectin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    Human calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein that coordinates Mn(II) with high affinity in a Ca(II)-dependent manner at an unusual histidine-rich site (site 2) formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface. We present ...

  18. Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,, Soon Jung Jung, Suklyun Hong,*, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,,§ Soon of methanol (CH3OH) on Ge(100) surface has been studied using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy-resolution experimental STM shows that methanol undergoes O-H bond dissociative adsorption on a single Ge-Ge dimer

  19. CO Oxidation over AuPd(100) from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near-Atmospheric Pressures: CO Adsorption-Induced Surface Segregation and Reaction Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    ; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: July 7, 2009 Polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorptionCO Oxidation over AuPd(100) from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near-Atmospheric Pressures: CO Adsorption vacuum (UHV) and near-atmospheric pressures.28 AuPd(100) is a good choice for the study since

  20. Carbon Tax and 100% Dividend No Alligator Shoes! The charts for my talk (Climate Threat to the Planet: Implications for Energy Policy) on 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Carbon Tax and 100% Dividend ­ No Alligator Shoes! The charts for my talk (Climate ThreatPACON_20080603.ppt The "Carbon Tax and 100% Dividend" chart warrants discussion. Tax and dividend is the policy complement that must accompany recognition of fossil carbon reservoir sizes for strategic solution of global

  1. Small Pd Clusters, up to the Tetramer At Least, Are Highly Mobile on the MgO(100) Surface Graeme Henkelman,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkelman, Graeme

    Small Pd Clusters, up to the Tetramer At Least, Are Highly Mobile on the MgO(100) Surface Lijun Xu on the MgO(100) surface with the tetramer having the largest diffusion rate at room temperature--larger than

  2. SP-100 thermionic technology program annual integrated technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, J.W. (ed.)

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermionic technology program addresses the feasibility issues of a seven-year-life thermionic fuel element (TFE) for the SP-100 Thermionic Reactor Space Power System. These issues relate to the extension of TFE lifetime from three to seven years, one of the SP-100 requirements. The technology to support three-year lifetimes was demonstrated in the earlier TFE development program conducted in the late-1960s and 1970s. Primary life-limiting factors were recognized to be thermionic emitter dimensional increases due to swelling of the nuclear fuel and electrical structural damage from fast neutrons. The 1984-85 technology program is investigating the fueled emitter and insulator lifetime issues, both experimentally and analytically. The goal is to analytically project the lifetime of the fueled emitter and insulator and to experimentally verify these projection methods. In 1984, the efforts were largely devoted to the design and building of fueled emitters for irradiation in 1985, validation of fuel-emitter models, development of irradiation-resistant metal-ceramic seal and sheath insulator, modeling of insulator lifetime, and development of wide-spread, high-performance thermionic converters.

  3. Development and testing of 100-kW/ 1-minute Li-ion battery systems for energy storage applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Clark, Nancy H.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 100 kW min{sup -1} (1.67 kW h{sup -1}) Li-ion battery energy storage systems (BESS) are described. The systems include a high-power Li-ion battery and a 100 kW power conditioning system (PCS). The battery consists of 12 modules of 12 series-connected Saft Li-ion VL30P cells. The stored energy of the battery ranges from 1.67 to 14 kW h{sup -1} and has an operating voltage window of 515-405 V (dc). Two complete systems were designed, built and successfully passed factory acceptance testing after which each was deployed in a field demonstration. The first demonstration used the system to supplement distributed microturbine generation and to provide load following capability. The system was run at its rated power level for 3 min, which exceeded the battery design goal by a factor of 3. The second demonstration used another system as a stand-alone uninterrupted power supply (UPS). The system was available (online) for 1146 h and ran for over 2 min.

  4. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  5. High sensitivity double beta decay study of 116-Cd and 100-Mo with the BOREXINO Counting Test Facility (CAMEO project)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bellini; B. Caccianiga; M. Chen; F. A. Danevich; M. G. Giammarchi; V. V. Kobychev; B. N. Kropivyansky; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; A. S. Nikolayko; L. Oberauer; O. A. Ponkratenko; V. I. Tretyak; S. Yu. Zdesenko; Yu. G. Zdesenko

    2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique features (super-low background and large sensitive volume) of the CTF and BOREXINO set ups are used in the CAMEO project for a high sensitivity study of 100-Mo and 116-Cd neutrinoless double beta decay. Pilot measurements with 116-Cd and Monte Carlo simulations show that the sensitivity of the CAMEO experiment (in terms of the half-life limit for neutrinoless double beta decay) is (3-5) 10^24 yr with a 1 kg source of 100-Mo (116-Cd, 82-Se, and 150-Nd) and about 10^26 yr with 65 kg of enriched 116-CdWO_4 crystals placed in the liquid scintillator of the CTF. The last value corresponds to a limit on the neutrino mass of less than 0.06 eV. Similarly with 1000 kg of 116-CdWO_4 crystals located in the BOREXINO apparatus the neutrino mass limit can be pushed down to m_nu<0.02 eV.

  6. Endotaxially stabilized B2-FeSi nanodots in Si (100) via ion beam co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassidy, Cathal, E-mail: c.cassidy@oist.jp; Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Onna-Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Kioseoglou, Joseph [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lal, Chhagan [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan 302005 (India); Sowwan, Mukhles, E-mail: mukhles@oist.jp [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Onna-Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, Al-Quds University, East Jerusalem, P.O. Box 51000, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the formation of embedded B2-FeSi nanodots in [100]-oriented Si substrates, and investigate the crystallographic mechanism underlying the stabilization of this uncommon, bulk-unstable, phase. The nanodots were approximately 10?nm in size, and were formed by iron thin film deposition and subsequent annealing. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, energy loss spectroscopy mapping, and quantitative image simulation and analysis were utilized to identify the phase, strain, and orientational relationship of the nanodots to the host silicon lattice. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to analyze the surface composition and local bonding. Elasticity calculations yielded a nanodot residual strain value of ?18%. Geometrical phase analysis graphically pinpointed the positions of misfit dislocations, and clearly showed the presence of pinned (11{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}){sub Si}//(100){sub FeSi}, and unpinned (2{sup ¯}42){sub Si}//(010){sub FeSi}, interfaces. This partial endotaxy in the host silicon lattice was the mechanism that stabilized the B2-FeSi phase.

  7. National emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval of construction SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following Application for Approval of Construction is being submitted by the US Department of Energy --- Richland Operations Office, for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site, which will provide a new source of radioactive emissions to the atmosphere. The US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Defense have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. It is proposed that the SP-100 test reactor be tested in the existing decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment building (309 Building). The reactor will be operated for at least three months and up to 2 yr. Following the test, the 309 Building will be decontaminated for potential use in other programs. It is projected that this new source of emissions will contribute approximately 0.05 mrem/yr dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual. This application is being submitted in response to those projected emissions that would provide the described offsite dose. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. First detection of >100 MeV gamma rays associated with a behind-the-limb solar flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice; Chen, Qingrong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first detection of >100 MeV gamma rays associated with a behind-the-limb solar flare, which presents a unique opportunity to probe the underlying physics of high-energy flare emission and particle acceleration. On 2013 October 11 a GOES M1.5 class solar flare occurred ~ 9.9 degrees behind the solar limb as observed by STEREO-B. RHESSI observed hard X-ray emission above the limb, most likely from the flare loop-top, as the footpoints were occulted. Surprisingly, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected >100 MeV gamma-rays for ~30 minutes with energies up to GeV. The LAT emission centroid is consistent with the RHESSI hard X-ray source, but its uncertainty does not constrain the source to be located there. The gamma-ray spectra can be adequately described by bremsstrahlung radiation from relativistic electrons having a relatively hard power-law spectrum with a high-energy exponential cutoff, or by the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with an isotropic pitch-angle distri...

  9. MINI PROSPECTUS 100countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Study ­ with Materials Engineering Naval Architecture ­ and Marine Engineering ­ with Ocean Engineering-class departments Professionally accredited courses Scotland's largest Engineering Faculty High-value scholarship of Engineering www.strath.ac.uk/engineering #12;0706 Undergraduate Courses are offered at MEng and/or BEng or BSc

  10. Product Description (<100) Total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    -LA!(New) 17!x!22!mm,!low-pwr!ANTARIS® Module $!99.00 OEM GPS Module TIM-LA 16!ch,!low-pwr!ANTARIS® ,!no!Flash $!99.00 Surface!mount TIM-LC 16!ch,!low-pwr!ANTARIS® ,!no!Flash,!no!LNA $!99.00 machine!assembly TIM-LF 16!ch,!low-pwr!ANTARIS® ,!no!LNA $!99.00 TIM-LH!(New) 16!ch!ANTARIS® SuperSenseTM!Indoor!GPS $!124

  11. 1 100 cw () MANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    to learn about the leading institution in Japan. I was particularly interested in collaboration" (June 3-7, 2008, Tokyo, Japan) as well as present the results of my work at ISSP colloquium, theory, and the Museum of Science and technology at Ueno park), aqua-park. The mountain hiking could be done at various

  12. Was Einstein 100% right ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The confrontation between General Relativity and experimental results, notably binary pulsar data, is summarized and its significance discussed. The agreement between experiment and theory is numerically very impressive. However, some recent theoretical findings (existence of non-perturbative strong-field effects, natural cosmological attraction toward zero scalar couplings) suggest that the present agreement between Einstein's theory and experiment might be a red herring and provide new motivations for improving the experimental tests of gravity.

  13. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love torwpprecipmom DocumentationDatastreamsaosacsm

  14. ARM - Datastreams - noaaaosccn100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492airDatastreamsncepgfsnausfc Documentation XDC documentation DataDatastreamsnoaaaos

  15. PDF Document (100k)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview P

  16. Document (100k)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfiresImpurity Transport,12, 20103,University of2, 2008

  17. PDF Document (100k)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andof Fuels P - . . - - 4PBA2007

  18. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn100

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR SEPARATION BY PRESSURE

  19. CX-100 Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0 -CURRICULUM VITAE

  20. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with Well-Bore Cement Researcher00

  1. 100G Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with Well-Bore Cement Testbed

  2. PDF Document (100k)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB -Reports|7/%2AAdministration/%2AM

  3. PDF Document (100k)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB -Reports|7/%2AAdministration/%2AM

  4. PDF Document (100k)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB -Reports|7/%2AAdministration/%2AM

  5. MSExcel Document (100k)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15Liquid Fuels and Natural

  6. Absolute calibration of image plates for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Back, Norman L.; Eder, David C.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Ping Yuan; Song, Peter M.; Throop, Alan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bartal, Teresa; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Link, Anthony J.; Van Woerkom, Linn [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV and 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate photon stimulated luminescence per electron at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energy depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of our absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  7. Low-temperature magnetization in Ni-rich gamma-Ni100-x-yFexVy alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, S.; Mukherjee, GD; Rathnayaka, KDD; Naugle, Donald G.; Majumdar, AK.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition-metal alloys have PRB 620163-1829/2000/62~1!/476~5!/$15.00 Ni-rich g-Ni100?x?yFexVy alloys G. D. Mukherjee , Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India and D. G. Naugle , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 r? , Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India... 83-10-7 48662 8.60 56.7 3 80.5-10.5-9 41763 8.54 64.5 4 77-12-11 39361 8.45 47.2 5 82.5-5.5-12 36263 8.54 41.2 2BT 6 77-7-16 15561 8.38 26.7 7 79-5-16 6260.5 8.40 16.2 8 78-4-18 4360.5 8.35 13.9 PRB 62 LOW-TEMPERATURE MAGNETIZATIO present set...

  8. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

  9. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

  10. Magnetic anisotropies in epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GaAs(100) patterned structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W., E-mail: xiaotur@gmail.com; Zhang, D.; Yuan, S. J.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y. [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Wong, P. K. J. [NanoElectronics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Wu, J. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Xu, Y. B. [Spintronics and Nanodevice Laboratory, Department of Electronics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies on epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rings in the context of spin-transfer torque effect have revealed complicated and undesirable domain structures, attributed to the intrinsic fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the ferrite. In this Letter, we report a viable solution to this problem, utilizing a 6-nm-thick epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin film on GaAs(100), where the fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is negligible. We demonstrate that in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} planar wires patterned from our thin film, such a unique magnetic anisotropy system has been preserved, and relatively simple magnetic domain configurations compared to those previous reports can be obtained.

  11. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distillation is perhaps the separation process most widely used in the chemical processing industry. The correct design of distillation columns requires the availability of accurate and, if possible, thermodynamically consistent vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) data. The present work is part of a project studying the effect of pressure on the behavior of the azeotropic point in mixtures in which at least one component is an alcohol. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were obtained for the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent by the methods of Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak. The data were correlated with five liquid phase activity coefficient models (Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC).

  12. Dual baseline search for muon antineutrino disappearance at 0.1 eV²100 eV²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.; Huelsnitz, W.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Franke, A. J.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Giganti, C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Grange, J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jover-Manas, G.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobayashi, Y. K.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kubo, H.; Kurimoto, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Masuike, S.; Matsuoka, K.; McGary, V. T.; Metcalf, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mirabal, J.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyachi, Y.; Mizugashira, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Napora, R.; Nienaber, P.; Orme, D.; Osmanov, B.; Otani, M.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sanchez, F.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sorel, M.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Takei, H.; Tanaka, H.-K.; Tanaka, M.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I. J.; Tesarek, R. J.; Uchida, Y.; Van de Water, R. G.; Walding, J. J.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; White, H. B.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Yokoyama, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE and SciBooNE collaborations report the results of a joint search for short baseline disappearance of ?¯? at Fermilab’s Booster Neutrino Beamline. The MiniBooNE Cherenkov detector and the SciBooNE tracking detector observe antineutrinos from the same beam, therefore the combined analysis of their data sets serves to partially constrain some of the flux and cross section uncertainties. Uncertainties in the ?? background were constrained by neutrino flux and cross section measurements performed in both detectors. A likelihood ratio method was used to set a 90% confidence level upper limit on ?¯? disappearance that dramatically improves upon prior limits in the ?m²=0.1–100 eV² region.

  13. Spin-dependent studies of the dynamics of He{sup +} ion neutralization at a Au(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, D.L.; Lancaster, J.C.; Kontur, F.J.; Nordlander, P.; Walters, G.K.; Dunning, F.B. [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin labeling techniques, specifically the use of electron-spin-polarized He{sup +} ions coupled with energy-resolved measurements of the ejected electron polarization, are used to study the dynamics of He{sup +} neutralization at a Au(100) surface. A marked correlation in the spins of the electrons involved in the Auger neutralization process is observed that is particularly pronounced at the highest ejected electron energies. A theoretical model is presented that explains the general characteristics of the data by considering the perturbation in the surface electronic structure induced by the presence of the (polarized) He{sup +} ion. This model, which includes the effects of ion velocity parallel to the surface, shows that the induced density of states is spin dependent, the spin dependence being most pronounced in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428 at 100 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, D A; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Gordo, J B; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P; Espigat, P; Holder, J; Jacholkowska, A; Lavalle, J; Le Gallou, R; Lott, B; Manseri, H; Munz, F; Nuss, E; Piron, Frédéric; Reposeur, T; Sako, T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the gamma-ray fluxes of the blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 in the energy range between 50 and 350 GeV (1.2 to 8.3 x 10^25 Hz). The detector, called CELESTE, used first 40, then 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis" in the French Pyrenees to collect Cherenkov light generated in atmospheric particle cascades. The signal from Mrk 421 is often strong. We compare its flux with previously published multi-wavelength studies and infer that we are straddling the high energy peak of the spectral energy distribution. The signal from Mrk 501 in 2000 was weak (3.4 sigma). We obtain an upper limit on the flux from 1ES 1426+428 of less than half that of the Crab flux near 100 GeV. The data analysis and understanding of systematic biases have improved compared to previous work, increasing the detector's sensitivity.

  15. Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428 at 100 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Smith; E. Brion; R. Britto; P. Bruel; J. Bussons Gordo; D. Dumora; E. Durand; P. Eschstruth; P. Espigat; J. Holder; A. Jacholkowska; J. Lavalle; R. Le Gallou; B. Lott; H. Manseri; F. Munz; E. Nuss; F. Piron; R. C. Rannot; T. Reposeur; T. Sako

    2006-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the gamma-ray fluxes of the blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 in the energy range between 50 and 350 GeV (1.2 to 8.3 x 10^25 Hz). The detector, called CELESTE, used first 40, then 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis" in the French Pyrenees to collect Cherenkov light generated in atmospheric particle cascades. The signal from Mrk 421 is often strong. We compare its flux with previously published multi-wavelength studies and infer that we are straddling the high energy peak of the spectral energy distribution. The signal from Mrk 501 in 2000 was weak (3.4 sigma). We obtain an upper limit on the flux from 1ES 1426+428 of less than half that of the Crab flux near 100 GeV. The data analysis and understanding of systematic biases have improved compared to previous work, increasing the detector's sensitivity.

  16. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  17. Small Pd Clusters, up to the Tetramer At Least, Are Highly Mobile on the MgO(100) Surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lijun; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Campbell, Charles T.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Density functional theory calculations predict that small clusters of Pd atoms, containing up to at least four atoms, are highly mobile on the MgO(100) surface with the tetramer having the largest diffusion rate at room temperature—larger than the monomer. Surface vacancies are found, however, to bind the larger clusters strongly enough to trap them. These are important considerations when analyzing the growth and sintering of metal islands on oxide surfaces, in particular, the role of point defects.

  18. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CYGNUS X-1 ABOVE 100 MeV IN THE HARD AND SOFT STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Del Monte, E.; Giusti, M.; Striani, E. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [INAF/IAPS-Roma, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Coppi, P. [Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)] [Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Pooley, G. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Chen, A.; Giuliani, A. [INAF/IASF-Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [INAF/IASF-Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bulgarelli, A. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)] [INAF/IASF-Bologna, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cattaneo, P. W. [INFN-Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)] [INFN-Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Colafrancesco, S. [INAF-OAR, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy)] [INAF-OAR, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Longo, F. [Dip. Fisica and INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Dip. Fisica and INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Morselli, A. [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Pellizzoni, A. [INAF-OAC, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)] [INAF-OAC, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Pilia, M. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands)] [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of multi-year gamma-ray observations by the AGILE satellite of the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1. In a previous investigation we focused on gamma-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 in the hard state during the period mid-2007/2009. Here we present the results of the gamma-ray monitoring of Cygnus X-1 during the period 2010/mid-2012 which includes a remarkably prolonged 'soft state' phase (2010 June-2011 May). Previous 1-10 MeV observations of Cyg X-1 in this state hinted at a possible existence of a non-thermal particle component with substantial modifications of the Comptonized emission from the inner accretion disk. Our AGILE data, averaged over the mid-2010/mid-2011 soft state of Cygnus X-1, provide a significant upper limit for gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of F{sub soft} < 20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , excluding the existence of prominent non-thermal emission above 100 MeV during the soft state of Cygnus X-1. We discuss theoretical implications of our findings in the context of high-energy emission models of black hole accretion. We also discuss possible gamma-ray flares detected by AGILE. In addition to a previously reported episode observed by AGILE in 2009 October during the hard state, we report a weak but important candidate for enhanced emission which occurred at the end of 2010 June (2010 June 30 10:00-2010 July 2 10:00 UT) exactly coinciding with a hard-to-soft state transition and before an anomalous radio flare. An appendix summarizes all previous high-energy observations and possible detections of Cygnus X-1 above 1 MeV.

  19. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX

  20. Countries with Estimated or Reported Tuberculosis Incidence, 2009 "High Incidence" areas are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000 population Afghanistan Cook China India Namibia Sri Lanka Colombia Indonesia Nepal Sudan Comoros Iraq Nicaragua Suriname Congo Japan

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-44:2, Discovery Pipeline Near 108-F Building, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-F-44:2 waste site is a steel pipeline that was discovered in a junction box during confirmatory sampling of the 100-F-26:4 pipeline from December 2004 through January 2005. The 100-F-44:2 pipeline feeds into the 100-F-26:4 subsite vitrified clay pipe (VCP) process sewer pipeline from the 108-F Biology Laboratory at the junction box. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:12, 1.8-m (72-in.) Main Process Sewer Pipeline, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-034

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-F-26:12 waste site was an approximately 308-m-long, 1.8-m-diameter east-west-trending reinforced concrete pipe that joined the North Process Sewer Pipelines (100-F-26:1) and the South Process Pipelines (100-F-26:4) with the 1.8-m reactor cooling water effluent pipeline (100-F-19). In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  3. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  4. EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 23 31.6 19.9 44.0 96.2 3.0 48.1 4.0 N00762 VISTA/MACKINAC//N94080 3 31.5 18.6 43;EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS

  5. MSU Recycling recycle.msu.edu 517-355-1723 MARCH 15, 2014 9:00A.M.1:00P.M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MSU Recycling · recycle.msu.edu · 517-355-1723 MARCH 15, 2014 · 9:00A.M.­1:00P.M. RECYCLINGLn Green Way Public Recycling Drop-o Center E-Waste Drop-o MSU Surplus Store & Recycling Center Service Rd Service Rd RecyclingDr NORTH Public Electronics Recycling March 15, 2014 · 9:00A.M.­1:00P.M. MSU Surplus

  6. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering CALCULATIONAL ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL ACTIVATION INDUCED BY 20-100 MEV PROTON BEAM LOSS IN HIGH-POWER LINEAR ACCELERATORS A Thesis...) Carl A. Beard (Member) / John . Poston (Head of Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT Calculational Analysis of Structural Activation Induced by 20-100 MeV Proton Beam Loss in High-Power Linear Accelerators. (August...

  7. Density functional theory study of first-layer adsorption of ZrO2 and HfO2 on Ge(100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Density functional theory study of first-layer adsorption of ZrO2 and HfO2 on Ge(100) T.J. Grassman on the Ge(100)-4 Â 2 surface. Surface binding geometries of metal-down (O­M­Ge) and oxygen-down (M­ O­Ge) were considered, including both adsorbate and displacement geometries of M­O­Ge. Calculated enthalpies

  8. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-50:5 Process Sewers (183-DR Sedimentation Basin Drains), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D-50:5 subsite encompasses the southern process sewers formerly servicing the 183-DR coagulation and sedimentation basins and proximate surface runoff collection drains. The results of confirmatory sampling of pipeline sediments and underlying soils at the 100-D-50:5 subsite demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  9. Materials for light-induced water splitting: In situ controlled surface preparation of GaPN epilayers grown lattice-matched on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supplie, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.supplie@tu-ilmenau.de [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Physik, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); May, Matthias M.; Stange, Helena [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Physik, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Höhn, Christian [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); California Institute of Technology, Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Hannappel, Thomas [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage is a key challenge in solar-driven renewable energy conversion. We promote a photochemical diode based on dilute nitride GaPN grown lattice-matched on Si(100), which could reach both high photovoltaic efficiencies and evolve hydrogen directly without external bias. Homoepitaxial GaP(100) surface preparation was shown to have a significant impact on the semiconductor-water interface formation. Here, we grow a thin, pseudomorphic GaP nucleation buffer on almost single-domain Si(100) prior to GaPN growth and compare the GaP{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02}/Si(100) surface preparation to established P- and Ga-rich surfaces of GaP/Si(100). We apply reflection anisotropy spectroscopy to study the surface preparation of GaP{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02} in situ in vapor phase epitaxy ambient and benchmark the signals to low energy electron diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. While the preparation of the Ga-rich surface is hardly influenced by the presence of the nitrogen precursor 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), we find that stabilization with UDMH after growth hinders well-defined formation of the V-rich GaP{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02}/Si(100) surface. Additional features in the reflection anisotropy spectra are suggested to be related to nitrogen incorporation in the GaP bulk.

  10. Bonding Structure of Phenylacetylene on Hydrogen-Terminated Si(111) and Si(100): Surface Photoelectron Spectroscopy Analysis and Ab Initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Kondo; T Mates; D Fischer; F Wudl; E Kramer

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between phenylacetylene (PA) monolayers and two silicon surfaces, Si(111) and Si(100), are probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and the results are analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The monolayer systems are prepared via the surface hydrosilylation reaction between PA and hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. The following spectral features are obtained for both of the PA-Si(111) and PA-Si(100) systems: a broad {pi}-{pi}* shakeup peak at 292 eV (XPS), a broad first ionization peak at 3.8 eV (UPS), and a low-energy C 1s {yields} {pi}* resonance peak at 284.3 eV (NEXAFS). These findings are ascribed to a styrene-like {pi}-conjugated molecular structure at the PA-Si interface by comparing the experimental data with theoretical analysis results. A conclusion is drawn that the vinyl group can keep its {pi}-conjugation character on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) [H:Si(100)] surface composed of the dihydride (SiH{sub 2}) groups as well as on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) having the monohydride (SiH) group. The formation mechanism of the PA-Si(100) interface is investigated within cluster ab initio calculations, and the possible structure of the H:Si(100) surface is discussed based on available data.

  11. Single Channel Testing for Characterization of the Direct Gas Cooled Reactor and the SAFE-100 Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Propulsion Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kapernick, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Godfroy, T.J. [Propulsion Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been designed to characterize the coolant gas flow in two space reactor concepts that are currently under investigation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory: the direct-drive gas-cooled reactor (DDG) and the SAFE-100 heatpipe-cooled reactor (HPR). For the DDG concept, initial tests have been completed to measure pressure drop versus flow rate for a prototypic core flow channel, with gas exiting to atmospheric pressure conditions. The experimental results of the completed DDG tests presented in this paper validate the predicted results to within a reasonable margin of error. These tests have resulted in a re-design of the flow annulus to reduce the pressure drop. Subsequent tests will be conducted with the re-designed flow channel and with the outlet pressure held at 150 psi (1 MPa). Design of a similar test for a nominal flow channel in the HPR heat exchanger (HPR-HX) has been completed and hardware is currently being assembled for testing this channel at 150 psi. When completed, these test programs will provide the data necessary to validate calculated flow performance for these reactor concepts (pressure drop and film temperature rise)

  12. Structural and optical properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}/Si(100) prepared by laser ablation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakemoto, H.; Makita, Y.; Obara, A.; Tsai, Y.; Sakuragi, S.; Ando, S.; Tsukamoto, T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} is a promising material for the application of various electronic, optoelectronic and energy devices. The authors present here the semiconducting properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} films on Si(100) substrate prepared by laser ablation method. Samples were grown using poly-crystalline bulk {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} prepared by horizontal gradient freeze method. For the monitoring of growth, in-situ observation of ablation plume was made through fluorescence spectroscopy. Reflection of high-energy electron beam diffraction (RHEED) was also made in-situ to see the surface morphology. Characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction presented purely {beta}(220) orientation. Raman scattering measurements at room temperature also indicated that the grown films are semiconducting {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}. Optical absorption spectra at room temperature showed absorption coefficient higher than 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}1} above the band-gap ({approximately}1.2 eV). It was revealed that high quality semiconducting {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} films can be fabricated by laser ablation method without post-annealing.

  13. Impact ionization of excitons in Ge/Si structures with Ge quantum dots grown on the oxidized Si(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shklyaev, A. A. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Shegai, O. A. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Nakamura, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Ichikawa, M. [Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoconductivity (PC) of Si/Ge structures with Ge quantum dots (QDs) grown on the Si(100) surfaces covered with the ultrathin, about 0.3–0.5?nm thick, SiO{sub 2} films is studied as a function of the interband light intensity under various lateral voltages. The structures exhibit PC with steps and a step with a peak at the step edge for low- and high-temperature grown structures, respectively. These PC features are associated with the impact ionization of QD-related excitons. The PC at step edges increases by several orders of magnitude for a certain value which is governed by the balance between rates of photo-generation, recombination, and impact ionization of excitons. The electron localization deeper in Si from the Ge QD layer in conjunction with a narrow binding-energy distribution of excitons is suggested to be the main reason that provides the sharpness of PC steps. The PC appears to be very sensitive to the impact ionization and QD preparation conditions. This allows revealing the specific characteristics of QD structures, related to their electronic and structural properties.

  14. Hydrothermal investigation of SYNROC formulations from 150/sup 0/ to 610/sup 0/ at 100-MPa water pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, L.E.; Bazan, C.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Smith, G.S.; Wootton, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The static leaching behavior of seven formulations of SYNROC and two preparations of hollandite have been investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Each formulation was tested at several times (1 to 60 days) and temperatures (150 to 610/sup 0/C) at 100-MPa water pressure, using distilled water as the fluid. Both cored and powdered samples were employed in the hydrothermal experiments. Leach rates (g SYNROC/m/sup 2/ day) were calculated on the basis of element concentrations observed in the leachate. Postrun SEM and XRD observations of some core specimens revealed crystalline precipitates occurring on core surfaces, which are interpreted to be metastable phases and/or precipitates that were formed during quenching. As a result, calculated leach rates based on some elements in the fluid phase are not true leach rates. The temperature dependence of apparent leach rate was erratic. The time dependence of apparent leach rate was consistent and well defined for all SYNROC formulations; it decreased as a function of time. Analysis of hydrothermal results suggests that runs of 30 to 60 days are required to approach, or to attain, steady-state apparent leach rates. Sample form appears to have a demonstrable effect on leaching behavior. For comparable run conditions, powders generally have lower apparent leach rates but have a higher percentage of material leached than cores. The mineral hollandite appears to be very resistant to hydrothermal leaching, with only titanium found in the leachate.

  15. Mechanistic studies of the thermal decomposition of metal carbonyls on Ni(100) surfaces in connection with chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, M.; Zaera, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}, Cr(CO){sub 6}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, and W(CO){sub 6} on Ni(100) surfaces and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions was studied by using temperature programmed desorption and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The initial adsorption of those metal carbonyls is mostly molecular at low temperatures, but complete decarbonylation to the naked metal takes place in all cases upon thermal activation. Experiments with coadsorbed isotopically labeled {sup 13}CO provided indirect evidence for a stepwise mechanism for Fe(CO){sub 5} which may include the formation of tetra- and tricarbonyl intermediates on the surface. For Cr(CO){sub 6}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, and W(CO){sub 6}, on the other hand, complete decomposition occurs in a narrow range of temperature, and no intermediate could be isolated on the surface. The deposition of metal films via metal carbonyl activation was studied under steady state conditions as well. Continuous deposition was seen at substrate temperatures as low as 300 K, but the grown films were found to incorporate both carbon and oxygen under most conditions tested and to change their morphology depending on the substrate temperature during deposition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  16. Trimble field, Mississippi; 100 bcf of bypassed, low resistivity cretaceous Eutaw pay at 7,000 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, P.L. Jr. (Cook Energy Inc., Jackson, MS (US)); Schneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Paramount Petroleum Co., Jackson, MS (US))

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Eutaw formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 tcf of gas since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to Trimble field, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in the state was Maxie-Pistol Ridge field in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field will likely develop into at least 20 wells with combined reserved in excess of 100 bcf of gas and a production rate of 40 MMcfd. The Trimble discovery was made on a faulted structural closure drilled twice before. Both operators drilled excellent locations but failed to detect low resistivity pay. The discovery of gas on the third attempt was facilitated by the 1987 accidental discovery of Eutaw gas at Gitano field, where a flow test of 2 MMcfd from an Environmental Protection Agency permitted salt water disposal well proved a new gas pay zone for the field. A petrophysical examination of the Gitano discovery and its implications to the dry holes at Trimble has initiated intensive industry activity in a renewed Eutaw play in Mississippi.

  17. Cross-field diffusion of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa Jr, Edio da [Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais-IFMG, Ouro Preto, MG, 35400-000 (Brazil); Tsurutani, Bruce T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alves, Maria Virgínia; Echer, Ezequiel [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, São José dos Campos, SP, 12227-010 (Brazil); Lakhina, Gurbax S., E-mail: edio.junior@ifmg.edu.br, E-mail: costajr.e@gmail.com [Indian Institute for Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai 410 218 (India)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic field magnitude decreases (MDs) are observed in several regions of the interplanetary medium. In this paper, we characterize MDs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft instrumentation over the solar south pole by using magnetic field data to obtain the empirical size, magnetic field MD, and frequency of occurrence distribution functions. The interaction of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons with these MDs is investigated. Charged particle and MD interactions can be described by a geometrical model allowing the calculation of the guiding center shift after each interaction. Using the distribution functions for the MD characteristics, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the cross-field diffusion coefficients as a function of particle kinetic energy. It is found that the protons under consideration cross-field diffuse at a rate of up to ?11% of the Bohm rate. The same method used in this paper can be applied to other space regions where MDs are observed, once their local features are well known.

  18. Performance and energy costs associated with scaling infrared heater arrays for warming field plots from 1 to 100 m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimball B. A.; Lewin K.; Conley, M. M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the likely effects of global warming on open-field vegetation, hexagonal arrays of infrared heaters are currently being used for low-stature (<1 m) plants in small ({le}3 m) plots. To address larger ecosystem scales, herein we show that excellent uniformity of the warming can be achieved using nested hexagonal and rectangular arrays. Energy costs depend on the overall efficiency (useable infrared energy on the plot per electrical energy in), which varies with the radiometric efficiency (infrared radiation out per electrical energy in) of the individual heaters and with the geometric efficiency (fraction of thermal radiation that falls on useable plot area) associated with the arrangement of the heaters in an array. Overall efficiency would be about 26% at 4 ms{sup -1} wind speed for a single hexagonal array over a 3-m-diameter plot and 67% for a 199-hexagon honeycomb array over a 100-m-diameter plot, thereby resulting in an economy of scale.

  19. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  20. Improvement design study on steam generator of MHR-50/100 aiming higher safety level after water ingress accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyama, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Minatsuki, I.; Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been studying on MHI original High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR), namely MHR-50/100, for commercialization with supported by JAEA. In the heat transfer system, steam generator (SG) is one of the most important components because it should be imposed a function of heat transfer from reactor power to steam turbine system and maintaining a nuclear grade boundary. Then we especially focused an effort of a design study on the SG having robustness against water ingress accident based on our design experience of PWR, FBR and HTGR. In this study, we carried out a sensitivity analysis from the view point of economic and plant efficiency. As a result, the SG design parameter of helium inlet/outlet temperature of 750 deg. C/300 deg. C, a side-by-side layout and one unit of SG attached to a reactor were selected. In the next, a design improvement of SG was carried out from the view point of securing the level of inherent safety without reliance on active steam dump system during water ingress accident considering the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011. Finally, according to above basic design requirement to SG, we performed a conceptual design on adapting themes of SG structure improvement. (authors)

  1. Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

  2. Prospective Assessment of Optimal Individual Position (Prone Versus Supine) for Breast Radiotherapy: Volumetric and Dosimetric Correlations in 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lymberis, Stella C.; Wyngaert, John Keith de; Parhar, Preeti; Chhabra, Arpit M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Chang Jengwha [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hochman, Tsivia [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States) [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States) [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Damage to heart and lung from breast radiotherapy is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and lung cancer development. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate which position is best to spare lung and heart from radiotherapy exposure. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive Stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients consented to participate in a research trial that required two computed tomography simulation scans for planning both supine and prone positions. The optimal position was defined as that which best covered the contoured breast and tumor bed while it minimized critical organ irradiation, as quantified by the in-field heart and lung volume. The trial was designed to plan the first 100 patients in each position to study correlations between in-field volumes of organs at risk and dose. Results: Fifty-three left and 47 right breast cancer patients were consecutively accrued to the trial. In all patients, the prone position was optimal for sparing lung volume compared to the supine setup (mean lung volume reduction was 93.5 cc for right and 103.6 cc for left breast cancer patients). In 46/53 (87%) left breast cancer patients best treated prone, in-field heart volume was reduced by a mean of 12 cc and by 1.8 cc for the other 7/53 (13%) patients best treated supine. As predicted, supine-prone differences in in-field volume and mean dose of heart and lung were highly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient for left breast cancer patients was 0.90 for heart and 0.94 for lung and 0.92 for right breast cancer patients for lung). Conclusions: Prone setup reduced the amount of irradiated lung in all patients and reduced the amount of heart volume irradiated in 87% of left breast cancer patients. In-field organ volume is a valid surrogate for predicting dose; the trial continued to the planned target of 400.

  3. 100-D Area In Situ Redox Treatability Test for Chromate-Contaminated Groundwater: FY 1998 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.D.; Vermeul, V.R.; Szecsody, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability test was conducted for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology at the US Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington 100D Area. The target contaminant was dissolved chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater. The ISRM technology involves creating a permeable subsurface treatment zone to reduce mobile chromate in groundwater to an insoluble form. The ISRM permeable treatment zone is created by reducing ferric iron [Fe(III)] to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] within the aquifer sediments. This is accomplished by injecting aqueous sodium dithionite into the aquifer and withdrawing the reaction products. The goal of the treatability test was to create a linear ISRM barrier by injecting sodium dithionite into five wells. Well installation and site characterization activities began in the spring of 1997. The first dithionite injection took place in September 1997. The results of this first injection were monitored through the spring of 1998; the remaining four dithionite injections were carried out in May through July of 1998. These five injections created a reduced zone in the Hanford unconfined aquifer 150 feet in length (perpendicular to groundwater flow) by 50 feet wide. The reduced zone extended over the thickness of the unconfined zone, which is approximately 15 feet. Analysis of recent groundwater sampling events shows that the concentrations of chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater in the reduced zone have been decreased from starting concentrations of approximately 900 ppb to below analytical detection limits (<7 ppb). Chromate concentrations are also declining in some downgradient monitoring wells. Laboratory analysis of iron in the soil indicates that the barrier should remain in place for approximately 20 to 25 years. These measurements will be confirmed by analysis of sediment cores in FY 1999.

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:1 Main Process Sewer Collection Line, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-C-9:1 main process sewer pipeline, also known as the twin box culvert, was a dual reinforced process sewer that collected process effluent from the 183-C and 190-C water treatment facilities, discharging at the 132-C-2 Outfall. For remedial action purposes, the 100-C-9:1 waste site was subdivided into northern and southern sections. The 100-C-9:1 subsite has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-B2 Septic System and 100-B-14:2 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-B-14:2 subsite encompasses the former sanitary sewer feeder lines associated with the 1607-B2 and 1607-B7 septic systems. Feeder lines associated with the 185/190-B building have also been identified as the 100-B-14:8 subsite, and feeder lines associated with the 1607-B7 septic system have also been identified as the 100-B-14:9 subsite. These two subsites have been administratively cancelled to resolve the redundancy. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  6. Performance and Emissions Characteristics of Bio-Diesel (B100)-Ignited Methane and Propane Combustion in a Four Cylinder Turbocharged Compression Ignition Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, N. T.; Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Krishnan, S. R.; Srinivasan, K. K.

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Different combustion strategies and fuel sources are needed to deal with increasing fuel efficiency demands and emission restrictions. One possible strategy is dual fueling using readily available resources. Propane and natural gas are readily available with the current infrastructure and biodiesel is growing in popularity as a renewable fuel. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel combustion of methane (as a surrogate for natural gas) and propane as primary fuels with biodiesel pilots in a 1.9 liter, turbocharged, 4 cylinder diesel engine at 1800 rev/min. Experiments were performed with different percentage energy substitutions (PES) of propane and methane and at different brake mean effective pressures (BMEP/bmep). Brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions (NOx, HC, CO, CO2, O2 and smoke) were also measured. Maximum PES levels for B100-methane dual fuelling were limited to 70% at 2.5 bar bmep and 48% at 10 bar bmep, and corresponding values for B100-propane dual fuelling were 64% and 43%, respectively. Maximum PES was limited by misfire at 2.5 bar bmep and the onset of engine knock at 10 bar bmep. Dual fuel BTEs approached straight B100 values at 10 bar bmep while they were significantly lower than B100 values at 2.5 bar bmep. In general dual fuelling was beneficial in reducing NOx and smoke emissions by 33% and 50%, respectively from baseline B100 levels; however, both CO and THC emissions were significantly higher than baseline B100 levels at all PES and loads.

  7. EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS.9 50.0 4.1 #12;EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100*6/CN49-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 3 25.8 17.9 42.7 88.8 2.0 50.0 3.9 N05305 N00838/B98304//N00792 44 25

  8. Study of O/Ni(100) with LEED (low-energy electron diffraction) and AES (auger electron spectroscopy) from chemisorption to oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wen-Di.

    1990-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures formed on the Ni(100) surface during oxygen adsorption, leading to oxidation, are studied with Video-LEED (low-energy electron diffraction) and AES (Auger electron spectroscopy). The temperature- and exposure-dependence in the development of LEED patterns observed during oxidation of Ni(100), at oxidation temperatures of 80 to 400 K, are investigated extensively. Integrated diffraction spot intensities and fractional spot profiles are measured quantitatively and continuously, allowing unambiguous correlation of various surface processes. AES is used to measure the oxidation onset during adsorption and the final relative thickness of the oxide. 48 figs., 79 refs.

  9. Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of properties of a-Al2O3 /vacuum and a-ZrO2 /vacuum vs a-Al2O3/Ge,,100...,,21...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    -Al2O3/Ge,,100...,,2Ã1... and a-ZrO2/Ge,,100...,,2Ã1... interfaces Evgueni A. Chagarova and Andrew C The local atomic structural properties of a-Al2O3, a-ZrO2 vacuum/oxide surfaces, and a-Al2O3/Ge 100 2 1 , a-ZrO2/Ge 100 2 1 oxide/semiconductor interfaces were investigated by density-functional theory DFT

  11. Catecholase Activity Associated with Copper-S100B SueAnn Z. Senior, Laura L. Mans, Heather D. VanGuilder, Kimberly A. Kelly, Michael P. Hendrich, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrich, Mike

    distinct from the type III dinuclear copper proteins, catechol oxidase and tyrosinase. S100B is a small

  12. Rice University Centennial Celebration Graphic Standards Rice University celebrates its 100th year in October 2012. To establish the recognition of such a milestone, a special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Rice University Centennial Celebration Graphic Standards #12;Rice University celebrates its 100th the years. Rice University Centennial Celebration Graphic Standards In addition to the centennial mark Celebration Graphic Standards Black-and-white version Two-color version (Pantone 295 Blue and 425 Gray) White

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 100, NO. 84, PAGES 6313-6327, APRIL 10, 1995 Far-field tilting of Laurentia during the Ordovician

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 100, NO. 84, PAGES 6313-6327, APRIL 10, 1995 Far continent Bernard Coakley1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, Madison Michael Observatory, Palisades, New York. Copyright 1995 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 941B02916

  14. Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} oxide film on epitaxial (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, Mantu K.; Zhu Yan [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge layers were grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by in situ growth process using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. The band alignment properties of atomic layer hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v} values of HfO{sub 2} relative to (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge orientations were 2.8 eV, 2.28 eV, and 2.5 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variation in valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge, was obtained related to Ge orientation. Also, the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c} relation, {Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge related to Ge orientations was obtained using the measured bandgap of HfO{sub 2} on each orientation and with the Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters for carrier confinement would offer an important guidance to design Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor for low-power application.

  15. Study and Analysis 100-car Naturalistic Driving Data Amanda Justiniano (Dr. Eliza Y. Du), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Study and Analysis 100-car Naturalistic Driving Data Amanda Justiniano (Dr. Eliza Y. Du), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering, Indianapolis, IN 46202 Every uses facilities such as car simulators, Drive Safety DS-600c, directed towards the research

  16. AFTER HOURS CARE Coulter Student Health Center is open 8:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AFTER HOURS CARE Coulter Student Health Center is open 8:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm applicable co-pays/co- insurance and deductibles when accessing care outside of the Health Center. URGENT, Monday through Friday. The Health Center is closed Saturday and Sundays, and during official CSM holidays

  17. Guidelines for using the UCPL Template v 1.00 Page 1 of 4 This document is the property of the University of Canterbury.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    for using the UCPL Template v 1.00 Page 1 of 4 © This document is the property of the University version refer to the UC Policy Library. Guidelines for Using the UC Document Template [Add a subtitle here Survey Policy would be better titled Survey Policy and Application Procedures for Online Student Surveys

  18. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2006) 100, 867--873 available at www.sciencedirect.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2006) 100, 867--873 available. © 2005 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved% of all 0035-9203/$ -- see front matter © 2005 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published

  19. PRACTICE MATH 18.100B, ANALYSIS I You may freely use Rudin's book Principles of Mathematical Analysis, your problem sets and your class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coskun, Izzet

    the exam. The exam has TWO pages and will be graded over a 100 points. The total sum of points is 110, so, ANALYSIS I (4) The set of rational numbers that are finite sums N i=1 si2-i , where each si is 0 or 1. (5

  20. Archaeological Excavation Report for Proposed Well 199-K-131 in Support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woody, Dave M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An archaeological excavation was conducted at the site of proposed groundwater monitoring well 199-K-131 in support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project between June 2 and 3, 2004. Excavations confirmed that there were no intact cultural deposits at the proposed well location. This report was prepared to document the findings of the test excavation.