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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

2

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

3

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convert utility bills to BTUs? All fuels can be measured in terms of BTU content. Natural gas has a million BTUs per thousand cubic feet; propane - 92,000 BTUs per gallon; fuel oil - 140,000 BTUs per gallon; electricity - 3,413 BTUs per KW hour... BTU ACCOUNTING FOR INDUSTRY Robert O. Redd-CPA Seidman & Seidman Grand Rapids, Michigan Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most criti cal resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

5

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

Vallery, S. J.

6

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

7

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

8

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

9

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

10

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

11

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

12

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Method for producing low and medium BTU gas from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing low and medium BTU gas from carbonizable material is described which comprises: partly devolatizing the material and forming hot incandescent coke therefrom by passing a bed of the same part way through a hot furnace chamber on a first horizontally moving grate while supplying a sub-stoichiometric quantity of air to the same and driving the reactions: C + O/sub 2/ = CO/sub 2/; 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO discharging the hot incandescent coke from the end of the first grate run onto a second horizontally moving grate run below the first grate run in the same furnace chamber so as to form a bed thereon, the bed formed on the second grate run being considerably thicker than the bed formed on the first grate run, passing the hot incandescent coke bed on the second grate run further through the furnace chamber in a substantially horizontal direction while feeding air and stream thereto so as to fully burn the coke and in ratio of steam to air driving the following reactions: 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO; C + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO; C + 2H/sub 2/O = 2H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/; CO + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ taking off the ash residue of the burned coke and taking off the gaseous products of the reactions.

Mansfield, V.; Francoeur, C.M.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

15

Toxicological characterization of the process stream from an experimental low Btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples were obtained from selected positions in the process stream of an experimental low Btu gasifier using a five-stage multicyclone train and...Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay) and forin vit...

J. M. Benson; J. O. Hill; C. E. Mitchell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mutagenicity of potential effluents from an experimental low btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential waste effluents produced by an experimental low Btu coal gasifier were assessed for mutagenic activity inSalmonella...strain TA98. Cyclone dust, tar and water effluents were mutagenic, but only followin...

J. M. Benson; C. E. Mitchell; R. E. Royer

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

19

"U.S. Energy Information Administration"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" . World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" "quadrillion Btu" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2010-2040" ,2009,2010,,2015,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",117.032,120.167,,121.347,126.134,129.743,132.898,137.196,143.577,,0.5950602735 " United Statesa",94.939,97.944,,97.266,100.482,101.781,102.288,103.92,107.173,,0.3006124841 " Canada",13.666,13.465,,14.216,14.754,15.633,16.535,17.306,18.232,,1.015402463 " Mexico/Chile",8.427,8.759,,9.864,10.899,12.329,14.074,15.97,18.173,,2.462686049 " OECD Europe",79.984,82.475,,82.145,85.475,88.599,90.874,92.792,94.618,,0.4588914155

20

"U.S. Energy Information Administration"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" "(Quadrillion Btu)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2010-2040" ,2009,2010,,2015,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",11.892,11.915,,13.707,14.992,15.871,16.838,18.288,20.771,,1.869798074 " United Statesa",6.875,7.032,,8.074,8.889,9.299,9.586,10.298,11.949,,1.782963121 " Canada",4.176,4.019,,4.469,4.786,5.107,5.512,5.939,6.407,,1.566672379 " Mexico/Chile",0.841,0.865,,1.164,1.316,1.465,1.74,2.052,2.414,,3.480226811 " OECD Europe",9.4,10.36,,12.612,14.653,16.37,17.222,17.891,18.533,,1.957583184

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

22

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 1. World energy consumption by country grouping, 2010-2040 quadrillion Btu Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD 242 244 255 263 269 276 285 0.5 Americas 120 121 126 130 133 137 144 0.6 Europe 82 82 85 89 91 93 95 0.5 Asia 40 41 43 44 45 46 46 0.5 Non-OECD 282 328 375 418 460 501 535 2.2 Europe and Eurasia 47 50 53 57 61 65 67 1.2 Asia 159 194 230 262 290 317 337 2.5 Middle East 28 33 37 39 43 46 49 1.9 Africa 19 20 22 24 27 31 35 2.1 Central and South America 29 31 33 35 39 42 47 1.6 World 524 572 630 680 729 777 820 1.5 Source: History: EIA, International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies. Projections: EIA, World Energy Projection System Plus (2013)

23

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

24

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

25

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

26

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

27

An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the production of low-BTU gas from a coal gasification reactor for combustion before introduction to the topping cycle gas turbine (Minchener, 1990). Most low-BTU gases are heavily loaded with sulfur-containing compounds which appear to be a major problem... with direct combustion of coal and low-BTU gases (Caraway, 1995). Environmental standards require the removal of these compounds which can be expensive and hazardous when removed from coal in post-combustion processes. However, gasification of coal results...

Carney, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19. World transportation sector delivered energy consumption by region, 2010-2040 19. World transportation sector delivered energy consumption by region, 2010-2040 quadrillion Btu Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD 57.9 56.0 55.9 54.8 54.5 54.8 55.5 -0.1 Americas 32.7 32.5 32.5 32.0 31.7 32.0 32.9 0.0 Europe 18.0 16.3 16.2 15.8 15.7 15.8 15.7 -0.5 Asia 7.1 7.2 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.0 -0.1 Non-OECD 43.1 50.3 56.4 62.3 68.3 75.6 83.9 2.2 Europe and Eurasia 6.7 8.0 8.5 8.9 9.5 10.1 10.6 1.5 Asia 19.9 23.5 28.0 32.5 37.0 42.6 49.2 3.1 Middle East 6.0 7.4 8.1 8.3 8.6 9.0 9.5 1.5 Africa 3.8 4.0 4.1 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.8 0.8 Central and South America 6.6 7.3 7.7 8.1 8.8 9.3 9.8 1.3 World 101.0 106.2 112.2 117.0 122.8 130.4 139.5 1.1

29

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

30

The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... ? Flammability limit data for three actual samples of low-BTU gas obtained from an in-situ coal gasification experiment (Heffington, 1981). The HHC are higher LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd) PAGE hydrocarbons orimarily C H and C H . ----- 34 I 2 6 3 8' TABLE 5...

Gaines, William Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 17. Commercial sector delivered energy consumption by region, 2010-2040 quadrillion Btu Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD 20.2 20.9 22.0 23.2 24.4 25.5 26.5 0.9 Americas 9.8 10.1 10.5 10.9 11.5 12.0 12.6 0.8 Europe 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.6 9.0 1.1 Asia 3.9 3.9 4.2 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 0.8 Non-OECD 8.8 9.9 11.7 13.9 16.5 19.4 22.5 3.2 Europe and Eurasia 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 1.8 Asia 4.2 4.9 6.0 7.4 9.1 11.0 13.1 3.9 Middle East 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.9 14.8 2.4 Africa 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 2.0 3.5 Central and South America 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 1.2 3.1 World 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 2.4 1.8 Source: Derived from EIA, International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies

33

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 18. World industrial sector delivered energy consumption by region and energy source, 2010-2040 quadrillion Btu Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD 71.9 72.9 77.5 80.4 82.2 84.4 87.1 0.6 Petroleum and other liquidsa 27.4 27.5 29.3 30.3 31.0 31.7 32.6 0.6 Natural gas 19.4 20.2 21.7 22.7 23.5 24.3 25.2 0.9 Coal 8.7 8.7 9.0 9.2 9.2 9.2 9.2 0.2 Electricity 11.0 11.3 12.0 12.4 12.6 12.9 13.2 0.6 Renewablesb 5.3 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.0 6.3 7.0 0.9 Non-OECD 128.1 148.5 169.2 186.0 201.3 213.5 219.8 1.8 Petroleum and other liquidsa 29.8 34.1 37.1 39.8 43.2 46.5 49.5 1.7 Natural gas 26.1 28.7 32.6 36.3 40.0 43.6 46.6 2.0 Coal 44.2 53.0 61.1 67.0 71.0 72.6 70.4 1.6

34

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

35

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 7 percent in the AEO2013 Reference case, from 98 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 104 quadrillion Btu in 2035-2.5 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2012-and continues to grow at a rate of 0.6 percent per year, reaching about 108 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 7). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82 percent in 2011 to 78 percent in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels falls, largely as a result of the incorporation of new fuel efficiency standards for LDVs. figure dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in 2040, and its share of

36

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 12% in the AEO2014 Reference case, from 95 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 106 quadrillion Btu in 2040-1.3 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2013 (Figure 8). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82% in 2012 to 80% in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels declines, largely as a result of slower growth in VMT and increased vehicle efficiency. figure dataTotal U.S. consumption of petroleum and other liquids, which was 35.9 quadrillion Btu (18.5 MMbbl/d) in 2012, increases to 36.9 quadrillion Btu (19.5 MMbbl/d) in 2018, then declines to 35.4 quadrillion Btu (18.7 MMbbl/d) in 2034 and remains at that level through 2040. Total consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases slightly through 2022 and then

37

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification-assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burns and Roe Industrial Services Corporation and Public Service Electric and Gas in association with Scientific Design Company have completed a technical and economic evaluation of coal gasification. The evaluation also addressed the regulatory, institutional, and environmental issues of coal gasification. Two uses of coal-derived medium Btu (MBU) gas were explored: (1) substitute boiler fuel for electric generation and (2) substitute fuel for industrial customers using natural gas. The summary and conclusions of his evaluation are: The Sewaren Generating Station was selected as potentially the most suitable site for the coal gasification plant. The Texaco process was selected because it offered the best combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience; in addition, it is a pressurized process which is advantageous if gas is to be supplied to industrial customers via a pipeline. Several large industrial gas customers within the vicinities of Sewaren and Hudson Generating Stations indicated that MBG would be considered as an alternate fuel provided that its use was economically justified. The capital cost estimates for a 2000 tons/day and a 1000 tons/day gasification plant installed at Sewaren Generating Station are $115.6 million and $73.8 million, in 1980 dollars, respectively. The cost of supplying MBG to industrial customers is competitive with existing pipeline natural gas on a Btu heating value basis for gasifier capacity factors of 35% or higher.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that was generated from nonrenewable energy sources and -0.03 quadrillion Btu for hydroelectric pumped storage. Notes: Data are preliminary. Totals may not equal sum of...

39

Chinese Rural Vehicles: An Explanatory Analysis of Technology, Economics, Industrial Organization, Energy Use, Emissions, and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel fuel consumption in 2000 was 69.5 million metric tons (MMT) 79 (see Table 9-1) or 2.96 quadrillion BTU.

Sperling, Dan; Lin, Zhenhong; Hamilton, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Word Pro - S8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Flow, 2013 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Blast furnace gas and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Word Pro - S1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net Imports c Fossil...

42

Kosovo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Kosovo Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code XK 3-letter ISO code...

43

Falkland Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Falkland Islands Population 2,932 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FK 3-letter ISO code...

44

L:\\main\\pkc\\aeotabs\\aeo2009\\stim_all.wpd  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case 16 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply,...

45

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector grows from 27.6 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 28.8 quadrillion Btu in 2035 in the AEO2012 Reference case (Figure 7). Energy consumption by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) (including commercial light trucks) initially declines in the Reference case, from 16.5 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to 16.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035. The AEO2012 Reference case projections do not include proposed increases in LDV fuel economy standards-as outlined in the December 2011 EPA and NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for 2017 and

47

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix F Table F14. Delivered energy consumption in India by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.9 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 -0.1 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 2.4 Electricity 0.6 1.0 1.3 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.8 6.4 Total 1.7 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.6 4.2 5.0 3.7 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 3.0 Electricity 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.6 6.5 Total 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.7 2.0 5.5 Industrial Liquids 3.2 3.4 4.0 4.5 4.9 5.1 5.1 1.6 Natural gas 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.0 Coal 4.1 4.4 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.3 6.1 1.4 Electricity 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 1.4 Total 11.3 11.9 13.7 15.3 16.7 17.5 17.6 1.5 Transportation Liquids 2.3 2.8 3.6 4.8 6.2 8.1

48

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

49

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Appendix F Table F8. Delivered energy consumption in South Korea by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.9 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 2.3 Total 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.2 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.6 Natural gas 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 2.0 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 2.6 Total 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 2.1 Industrial Liquids 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 0.8 Natural gas 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.4 Coal 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.2 Electricity 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 Total 4.7 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 1.0 Transportation Liquids 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.0 2.0

50

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

51

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix F Table F2. Total OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 4.3 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.4 -0.8 Natural gas 12.0 11.9 12.2 12.5 12.8 12.9 12.9 0.3 Coal 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 -1.4 Electricity 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 1.1 Total 28.2 28.1 29.0 29.9 30.8 31.3 32.0 0.4 Commercial Liquids 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2 2.2 -0.7 Natural gas 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.2 8.4 0.7 Coal 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -0.9 Electricity 10.4 11.2 12.0 12.9 13.9 14.8 15.7 1.4 Total 20.2 20.9 22.0 23.2 24.4 25.5 26.5 0.9 Industrial Liquids 27.4 27.5 29.3 30.3 31.0 31.7 32.6 0.6 Natural gas 19.4 20.2 21.7 22.7 23.5 24.3 25.2 0.9 Coal 8.7 8.7 9.0 9.2 9.2 9.2 9.2 0.2 Electricity 11.0 11.3 12.0 12.4 12.6 12.9 13.2 0.6 Total 71.9 72.9

52

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.2 Total 2.1 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.6 2.7 Commercial Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.7 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 -- Electricity 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.9 Total 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.3 Industrial Liquids 4.8 4.7 5.5 6.2 7.1 8.2 9.6 2.4 Natural gas 3.3 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.2

53

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.9 Total 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.0 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 2.4 Total 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 2.2 Industrial Liquids 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.5 Natural gas 2.6 2.7

54

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Appendix F Table F18. Delivered energy consumption in Brazil by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.1 Total 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 2.2 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 1.1 1.4 3.9 Total 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 3.8 Industrial Liquids 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.3 1.6 Natural gas 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Coal 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 2.5 Electricity 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.9 Total 6.4 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.3 9.3 10.6 1.7 Transportation Liquids 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.7 3.8 4.1 1.2

55

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix F Table F6. Delivered energy consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 2.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.6 -0.8 Natural gas 5.6 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.5 6.6 6.8 0.7 Coal 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 -1.3 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 1.4 Total 11.7 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.5 13.7 13.9 0.6 Commercial Liquids 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 -1.0 Natural gas 2.2 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 0.9 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.0 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 1.7 Total 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.6 9.0 1.1 Industrial Liquids 9.6 9.0 9.5 10.1 10.5 10.9 11.3 0.5 Natural gas 6.6 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.8 0.1 Coal 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 0.0 Electricity 4.4 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.6 0.2 Total 25.4 24.1 24.9 25.8 26.3 26.8 27.4 0.3 Transportation Liquids

56

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

57

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

58

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix F Table F12. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.1 Natural gas 1.7 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 1.2 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.4 Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 2.4 Total 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 1.3 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.3 Natural gas 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.8 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 -0.1 Electricity 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 3.4 Total 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 2.1 Industrial Liquids 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 1.2 Natural gas 2.7 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.5 3.7 1.1 Coal 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 1.4 Electricity 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.2 Total 6.7 6.9 7.1 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 1.2 Transportation

59

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

60

Monthly energy review: September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during June 1996 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.5% decrease from the level of production during June 1995. Energy consumption during June 1996 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.7% above the level of consumption during June 1995. Net imports of energy during June 1996 totaled 1.6 quadrillion Btu, 4.5% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Statistics are presented on the following topics: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. 37 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

62

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

63

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9 22.3 22.5 22.6 22.4 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.8 14.8 15.6 16.6 1.4 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD

64

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

65

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6 22.2 21.4 -0.1 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.1 15.8 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD 234.7

66

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D D High Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 209 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0

67

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth case projections High Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 197 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9

68

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

69

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

70

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.4 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 10 percent in the AEO2012 Reference case, from 98.2 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 108.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035-6 quadrillion Btu less than the AEO2011 projection for 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 83 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2010 to 77 percent in 2035. Biofuel consumption has been growing and is expected to continue to grow over the projection period. However, the projected increase would present challenges, particularly for volumes of ethanol beyond the saturation level of the E10 gasoline pool. Those additional volumes are likely to be slower in reaching the market, as infrastructure and consumer demand adjust. In

71

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector remains relatively constant at about 27 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 6). Energy consumption by LDVs (including commercial light trucks) declines in the Reference case, from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to incorporation of the model year 2017 to 2025 GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs. Despite the projected increase in LDV miles traveled, energy consumption for LDVs further decreases after 2025, to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035, as a result of fuel economy improvements achieved through stock turnover as older, less efficient vehicles are replaced by newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Beyond 2035, LDV energy demand begins to level off

72

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

73

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

74

Addressing the problem with natural ventilation : producing a guide for designers to integrate natural ventilation into the early stages of building design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, the United States alone is responsible for approximately twenty percent of the world's total energy consumption. This consumption is equivalent to roughly 100 quadrillion Btu of energy, or in plainer terms, over ...

Fennessy, Kristian (Kristian M.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

76

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

77

Word Pro - S2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2013 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, September 2014 22 U.S....

78

USA Energy Demand and World Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the AEO95 model reference case scenario, the United States is projected to consume 104 quadrillion Btu of primary energy resources in 2010, 19 percent more than in 1993. Primary energy consumption includes ...

Charles E. Brown Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Annual Energy Review 1997  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in quadrillion Btu, 0.16 net imported electricity from nonrenewable sources; -0.04 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.10 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

80

Annual Energy Review 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in quadrillion Btu, 0.11 net imported electricity from nonrenewable sources; -0.06 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.11 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Information Administration/Annual Energy Review  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0.05 electricity net imports from fossil fuels. Includes, in quadrillion Btu, -0.09 hydroelectric pumped storage and -0.15 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

82

Annual Energy Review 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Includes, in quadrillion Btu, 0.10 electricity net imports from fossil fuels; -0.06 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.14 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

83

Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that time from about...

84

Faroe Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Faroe Islands Population 48,351 GDP 2,450,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FO 3-letter...

85

Monaco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

up":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Monaco Population 35,352 GDP 5,424,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MC 3-letter ISO...

86

American Samoa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name American Samoa Population 55,519 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AS 3-letter ISO...

87

Monthly energy review, July 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US total energy consumption in July 1990 was 6.7 quadrillion Btu Petroleum products accounted for 42 percent of the energy consumed in July 1990, while coal accounted for 26 percent and natural gas accounted for 19 percent. Residential and commercial sector consumption was 2.3 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector accounted for 35 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Industrial sector consumption was 2.4 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The industrial sector accounted for 36 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Transportation sector consumption of energy was 1.9 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 1 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector consumed 29 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Electric utility consumption of energy totaled 2.8 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. Coal contributed 53 percent of the energy consumed by electric utilities in July 1990, while nuclear electric power contributed 21 percent; natural gas, 12 percent; hydroelectric power, 9 percent; petroleum, 5 percent; and wood, waste, geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy, about 1 percent.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Trillion Cubic Feet Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Short Tons Quadrillion Btu Percent Quadrillion Btu Percent 2003 R 689 R 4.00 R 33.3 R 94 R 0.35 R 14.9 R 7.08 R 7.81 R 35.5 R 466 R 9.58 R 43.3 R 21.74 R 37.2 2004 R 680 R 3.94 R 33.8 R 105 R .39 R 16.0 R 6.68 R 7.38 R 34.0 R 484 R 9.89 R 43.9 R 21.60 R 37.0

89

7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The computers are operated by 4 adult men. 2 The computers consume 40 percent to the amount of electrical energy they consume. Therefore, AC Outside Computer room 4000 Btu/h ( ( ) ( Q Q Q Q. Analysis The unit that will cost less during its lifetime is a better buy. The total cost of a system

Bahrami, Majid

90

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix E Table E2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 46.5 48.1 48.1 48.4 49.4 51.5 0.3 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.0 34.1 36.0 37.8 39.7 41.7 1.1 Coal 21.3 22.5 20.2 20.8 21.2 21.5 22.0 22.4 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 10.8 10.9 0.5 Other 11.9 11.9 13.8 14.9 15.9 16.8 18.1 20.3 1.8 Total 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 28.4 30.0 30.5 31.2 32.0 32.7 0.2 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.6 21.6 22.0 23.5 24.9 26.4 0.9 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.3 12.2 11.9 11.7 11.4 11.1 -0.3 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.5 17.3 18.0 18.7 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia

91

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix A Table A2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.9 46.4 46.0 45.8 46.1 47.0 0.0 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.0 34.1 35.9 37.7 40.1 42.3 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.9 20.3 21.1 21.5 21.9 22.2 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 10.8 11.2 0.6 Other 11.9 11.9 13.7 15.0 15.9 16.8 18.3 20.8 1.9 Total 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 27.9 28.4 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 -0.2 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.3 21.0 21.4 22.7 23.9 25.2 0.7 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.3 11.0 10.7 -0.4 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia Liquids

92

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

93

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix D Table D2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.0 44.8 44.1 43.6 43.8 45.0 -0.1 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 31.9 34.0 36.2 38.4 40.7 43.0 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.3 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.2 22.6 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 11.1 12.4 0.9 Other 11.9 11.9 13.6 15.0 15.9 17.0 18.9 21.8 2.0 Total 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 27.3 27.1 27.1 27.3 27.6 27.8 -0.3 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 19.9 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.6 Coal 11.9 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.3 11.0 10.7 10.4 -0.5 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.3 14.6 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia

94

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix A Table A7. World coal consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 21.3 22.5 19.9 20.3 21.1 21.5 21.9 22.2 0.0 United States a 19.6 20.8 18.2 18.6 19.3 19.7 20.1 20.4 -0.1 Canada 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 -0.3 Mexico/Chile 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 1.2 OECD Europe 11.9 12.2 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.3 11.0 10.7 -0.4 OECD Asia 9.4 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.9 9.7 -0.1 Japan 4.2 4.8 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 4.3 -0.4 South Korea 2.7 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.4 3.5 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.0 2.0 -0.6 Total OECD 42.5 44.8 42.2 42.3 42.8 42.7 42.8 42.7 -0.2 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 7.7 8.9 8.9 9.5 10.0 10.4 10.7 10.8 0.6 Russia 3.7 4.8 4.9 5.2 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.6 0.5 Other 4.0 4.2 4.1 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.2 0.8

95

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix A Table A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 11.9 11.9 13.7 15.0 15.9 16.8 18.3 20.8 1.9 United States a 6.9 7.0 8.1 8.9 9.3 9.6 10.3 11.9 1.8 Canada 4.2 4.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.4 1.6 Mexico/Chile 0.8 0.9 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.7 2.1 2.4 3.5 OECD Europe 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 OECD Asia 2.1 2.3 2.9 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 1.8 Japan 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3 1.5 South Korea 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 3.0 Australia/NewZealand 0.7 0.7 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 2.3 Total OECD 23.4 24.6 29.2 33.0 35.9 37.8 40.1 43.3 1.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.1 1.5 Russia 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.8 1.6 Other 1.2 1.5

96

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix B Table B2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 46.3 47.9 48.2 48.4 49.4 51.1 0.3 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.1 34.8 37.2 39.5 42.0 44.1 1.3 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.7 21.5 22.4 22.7 23.2 23.9 0.2 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.2 11.6 13.2 1.1 Other 11.9 11.9 14.0 15.3 16.2 17.7 19.9 23.3 2.3 Total 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 28.0 28.5 28.6 28.8 29.2 29.5 -0.1 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.3 21.1 21.5 22.8 24.0 25.4 0.7 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.4 11.1 10.8 -0.4 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.3 18.0 18.7 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia

97

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

98

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

99

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

100

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

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101

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

102

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

103

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

104

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, coal remains the second largest energy source worldwide. World coal consumption rises at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year, from 147 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 180 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 220 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 70). The near-term increase reflects significant increases in coal consumption by China, India, and other non-OECD countries. In the longer term, growth of coal consumption decelerates as policies and regulations encourage the use of cleaner energy sources, natural gas becomes more economically competitive as a result of shale gas development, and growth of industrial use of coal slows largely as a result of China's industrial activities. Consumption is dominated by

105

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

106

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

107

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

108

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

109

DOE-EIA-0484(2010)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case-which reflects a scenario assuming that current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). The global economic recession that began in 2007 and continued into 2009 has had a profound impact on world energy demand in the near term. Total world marketed energy consumption contracted by 1.2 percent in 2008 and by an estimated 2.2 percent in 2009, as manufactur- ing and consumer

110

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, world energy consumption increases from 524 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 30-year increase of 56 percent (Figure 12 and Table 1). More than 85 percent of the increase in global energy demand from 2010 to 2040 occurs among the developing nations outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD), driven by strong economic growth and expanding populations. In contrast, OECD member countries are, for the most part, already more mature energy consumers, with slower anticipated economic growth and little or no anticipated population growth.7 Figure 12. World total energy consumption, 1990-2040.

111

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

112

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

113

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential from Market Trends Residential from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

114

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

115

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. The IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand from 2004 to 2030. Total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase from 447 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 quadrillion Btu in 2030-a 57-percent increase over the projection period (Table 1 and Figure 8). The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Generally, countries outside the OECD 3 have higher projected economic growth rates and more rapid population growth

116

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

117

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

118

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

119

DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

304 304 Survey of Large Combustors: Report on Alternative- Fuel Burning Capabilities of Large Boilers in 1979 U.S. Department of Energy Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division Introduction During recent years, total annual industrial energy consumption in the United States has been approximated at 25 to 26 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu).^- Manufacturin g is by far the largest components totaling 12.9 quadrillion Btu of purchased fuels and electricity for heat and power during 1979.2 QJ this amount, 10.5 quadrillion Btu was accounted for by purchased fuels alone (e.g., fuel oil, coal, natural gas, etc.). Other than fuel consumption by type and industrial classificati on, very little information existed on specific fuel consumption characterist

120

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.7 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 21 percent in the AEO2011 Reference case, from 94.8 quadrillion Btu in 2009 to 114.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035, to about the same level as in the AEO2010 projection in 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 84 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2009 to 78 percent in 2035, reflecting the impacts of CAFE standards and provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008), Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), and State legislation. Although the situation is uncertain, EIA's present view of the projected rates of technology development and market penetration of cellulosic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

122

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Energy Flow, 2011 0 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 3 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail

123

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and economic factors 2010 2011 AEO2013 AEO2012 AEO2013 AEO2012 AEO2013 Primary energy production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 14.37 15.05 18.70 17.69 17.27 16.82 17.01 Dry...

126

THERMAL BUILDING PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION USING SPATIAL ARCHETYPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is spent for heating and cooling systems, see Figure 1.2. Figure 1.1 Primary energy consumption by sector, 1970-2020 in quadrillion Btu (EIA, 2001) Figure 1.2 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by end use encouragement, love and support #12;1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1. Energy Consumption Energy conscious building

Papalambros, Panos

127

DuPont Energy Innovations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 1 6 2 9 9 U. S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion BTU) Source energy flat with 1990 levels. Progress: · Consumption down 7 percent overall as compared to 1990. · SinceDuPont Energy Innovations University of Delaware Energy Institute Inauguration September 19, 2008

Firestone, Jeremy

128

Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The estimated energy ultimate recoverable reserves (URR) from the logistic model is 2750 quadrillion BTU (2900, coal reserves, coal production forecast, peak coal, USA energy, non- linear fitting #12;3 1 reported coal reserves of any nation, containing approximately 28% of the world

Khare, Sanjay V.

129

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

130

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

131

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

132

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

133

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Per capita residential sector delivered energy consumption by region, 2010-2040 6. Per capita residential sector delivered energy consumption by region, 2010-2040 million Btu per person Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD 22.8 22.1 22.2 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.7 0.0 Americas 27.7 25.8 24.7 24.1 23.8 23.4 23.3 -0.6 Europe 21.0 20.9 21.6 22.2 22.7 22.8 23.1 0.3 Asia 16.3 16.5 17.3 18.0 18.6 19.1 19.5 0.6 Non-OECD 4.2 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.3 6.8 1.6 Europe and Eurasia 18.7 18.5 19.5 20.9 22.6 24.0 25.7 1.1 Asia 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.5 5.2 6.0 6.7 2.8 Middle East 16.1 17.0 16.6 16.4 16.2 15.5 14.8 -0.3 Africa 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1,8 0.5 Central and South America 4.3 4.6 4.8 1.5 5.6 6.0 6.5 1.3 World 7.6 7.6 7.8 8.2 8.6 8.9 9.3 0.7

134

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

135

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

136

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

137

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

138

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

139

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

140

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

142

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

143

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

144

Fumigation of a diesel engine with low Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 0.5 liter single-cylinder, indirect-injection diesel engine has been fumigated with producer gas. Measurements of power, efficiency, cylinder pressure, and emissions were made. At each operating condition, engine load was held constant, and the gas-to-diesel fuel ratio was increased until abnormal combustion was encountered. This determined the maximum fraction of the input energy supplied by the gas, E/sub MAX/, which was found to be dependent upon injection timing and load. At light loads, E/sub MAX/ was limited by severe efficiency loss and missfire, while at heavy loads it was limited by knock or preignition. Fumigation generally increased ignition delay and heat release rates, but peak pressures were not strongly influenced. Efficiency was slightly decreased by fumigation as were NO/sub X/ and particle emissions while CO emissions were increased.

Ahmadi, M.; Kittelson, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,025 1,023 2010's 1,028 1,025 1,026 1,024...

147

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,033 1,023 1,024 2010's 1,015 1,021 1,022 1,016...

148

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,010 1,010 1,007 2010's 1,006 1,009 1,014 1,029...

149

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,023 1,022 2010's 1,021 1,017 1,015 1,022...

150

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,024 1,024 1,025 1,027 1,026 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 2014 1,027 1,022 1,028 1,026 1,029 1,032 1,033...

151

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,050 1,049 1,047 1,048 1,048 1,046 1,041 1,044 1,043 1,045 1,044 2014 1,044 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,038 1,036 1,038...

152

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005...

153

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043...

154

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025...

155

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,037 1,040 1,041 2010's 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,037...

156

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,034 1,033 1,033 1,035 1,035 1,038 1,037 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,043 1,044 2014 1,044 1,042 1,041 1,050 1,047 1,048 1,053...

157

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,064 1,062 1,046 2010's 1,044 1,047 1,032 1,028...

158

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,032 1,039 1,031 2010's 1,033 1,024 1,029 1,034...

159

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,002 1,003 1,003 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,000 2014 1,002 1,004 1,001 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001...

160

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,018...

162

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,006 1,006 1,005 2010's 1,005 1,013 1,012...

163

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,039 1,037 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,033 1,039 1,032 1,029 1,034 2014 1,033 1,033 1,032 1,034 1,032 1,033 1,033...

164

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,010 1,012 1,011 1,017 1,020 1,020 1,023 1,021 1,014 1,013 1,013 2014 1,013 1,012 1,010 1,034 1,041 1,044 1,029...

165

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,052 1,059 1,044 2010's 1,045 1,038 1,043 1,046...

166

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

167

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

168

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends From 2009 to 2035, transportation sector energy consumption grows at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent (from 27.2 quadrillion Btu to 31.8 quadrillion Btu), slower than the 1.2 percent average rate from 1975 to 2009. The slower growth is a result of changing demographics, increased LDV fuel economy, and saturation of personal travel demand.[1] References [1] ↑ 1.0 1.1 AEO2011 Transportation Sector Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Transportation&oldid=378906" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

170

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-use Sector, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

171

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

172

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of generation and delivery to the customer) are estimated

173

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)- Energy Production and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production and Imports Production and Imports Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Production and Imports Figure 5. Total energy production and consumption, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 6. Energy production by fuel, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Net imports of energy are expected to continue to meet a major share of total U.S. energy demand (Figure 5). In the AEO2008 reference case, the net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2030 is 29 percent, slightly less than the 30-percent share in 2006. Rising fuel prices over the projection period are expected to spur increases in domestic energy

174

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

175

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources The renewable energy share of total world energy consumption is expected to remain unchanged at 8 percent through 2025, despite a projected 56-percent increase in consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable resources. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, moderate growth in the world’s consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy resources is projected over the next 24 years. Renewable energy sources are not expected to compete economically with fossil fuels in the mid-term forecast. In the absence of significant government policies aimed at reducing the impacts of carbon-emitting energy sources on the environment, it will be difficult to extend the use of renewables on a large scale. IEO2003 projects that consumption of renewable energy worldwide will grow by 56 percent, from 32 quadrillion Btu in 2001 to 50 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 69).

176

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

177

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.jpg (1776 bytes) coal.jpg (1776 bytes) Coal’s share of world energy consumption falls slightly in the IEO99 forecast. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia, but it is projected to lose market share to natural gas in some other areas of the world. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1996. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 30

178

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

179

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

180

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage HIGHLIGHTS World energy consumption is projected to increase by 60 percent from 1997 to 2020. Recent price developments in world oil markets and economic recovery in Southeast Asia have altered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000), world energy consumption increases by 60 percent over a 23-year forecast period, from 1997 to 2020. Energy use worldwide increases from 380 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1997 to 608 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 1999 are reflected in this year’s outlook. Shifting short-term world oil markets, the beginnings

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181

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

182

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

183

renewable electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity electricity Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

184

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 4. Coefficients of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Oil-Related Methane Emissions Emissions Sources Intercept Variable Name and Units Coefficient Variable Name and Units Coefficient Natural Gas -38.77 Time trend (calendar year) .02003 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet .02186 Natural Gas Processing -0.9454 Natural gas liquids production (million barrels per day) .9350 Not applicable Natural Gas Transmission and Storage 2.503 Pipeline fuel use (thousand cubic feet) 1.249 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet) -0.06614 Natural Gas Distribution -58.16 Time trend (calendar year) .0297 Natural gas consumption (quadrillion Btu) .0196 Oil production, Refining, and Transport 0.03190 Oil consumption (quadrillion Btu) .002764 Not applicable Source: Derived from data used in Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999, DOE/EIA-0573(99), (Washington, DC, October 2000).

185

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

186

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1997. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU). In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 33 percent between 1985 and 1997, displaced in considerable measure by

187

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

188

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2009 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 73 percent, compared with an increase of 15 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in the IEO2009 and IEO2008 Reference Cases, 1980-2030 (2007 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

189

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

190

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2002 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use in the IEO2005 reference case forecast is expected in the countries with emerging economies. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumptiion by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world marketed energy consumption is projected to increase on average by 2.0 percent per year over the 23-year forecast horizon from 2002 to 2025—slightly lower than the 2.2-percent average annual growth rate from 1970 to 2002. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 412 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2002 to 553 quadrillion Btu in

191

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Forum Renewable Energy Forum Beijing, China May 27, 2010 David Sandalow Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S. Department of Energy 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Quadrillion Btu China China and the United States together consume around 40% of the world's energy... 37% Rest of the world United States 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption (million MtCO 2 ) ...and together account for more than 40% of global GHG emissions. 42% China Rest of the world United States 2003 projection 2006 projection 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Quadrillion Btu 2010 projection Actual energy consumption China's energy demand

192

Renewable Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Renewable Energy Generation world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 37.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 43 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

193

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

194

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

195

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview Figure 65. World coal consumption by region, 1980-2035 figure dataIn the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, world coal consumption increases by 50 percent, from 139 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 209 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 65). Although world coal consumption increases at an average rate of 1.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, the growth rates by region are uneven, with total coal consumption for OECD countries remaining near 2008 levels and coal consumption in non-OECD countries increasing at a pace of 2.1 percent per year. As a result, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts for nearly all the growth in world coal consumption over the period. In 2008, coal accounted for 28 percent of world energy consumption (Figure

196

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this year’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

197

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2008 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030.Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent,compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in Two Cases, 1980-2030 (nominal dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

198

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

199

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World's Demand for World's Demand for Liquid Fuels A Roundtable Discussion A New Climate For Energy EIA 2009 Energy Conference April 7, 2009 Washington, DC 2 World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type 0 50 100 150 200 250 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Quadrillion Btu Liquids Natural Gas Coal Renewables Nuclear History Projections Source: EIA, IEO2008 36% 23% 6% 8% 29% 33% 24% 8% 6% 27% 3 World Liquids Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 0 50 100 150 200 250 2005 2015 2030 Quadrillion Btu Building Industrial Transportation Electric Power Source: EIA, IEO2008 4 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Light Sweet Crude Oil (2007 $/B) Reference Case High World Oil Price Low World Oil Price World Oil Prices in Three Price Cases, AEO2009 - Real Prices History Projections Source: EIA, AEO2009, NYMEX

200

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 5 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 6 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. 7 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

202

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

203

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy consumption increases by 53 percent, from 505 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Table 1). In the near term, the effects of the global recession of 2008-2009 curtailed world energy consumption.8 As nations recover from the downturn, however, world energy demand rebounds in the Reference case and increases strongly as a result of robust economic growth and expanding populations in the world's developing countries. OECD member countries are, for the most part, more advanced energy consumers.9 Energy demand in the OECD economies grows slowly over the projection period, at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent, whereas energy consumption in the non-OECD

204

Monthly energy review, May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

NONE

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Facility Automation Products--Systems--Applications--Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices depend on energy costs. This variable is further complicated by foreign competition subjected to a different set of regulations. ENERGY CONSUMPTION QUADRILLIONS OF BTU'S Figure 1 INTRODUCTION The task of managing energy within...), it is noted that the industrial portion is dropping at a faster rate than the total, which shows an admirable attention to the crisis. 76 ESL-IE-86-06-15 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 17...

Bynum, H. D.

206

Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

require. Recent figures for the distribution of energy indi cate that the industrial sector consumes about 44% of the total with about 2/3 of that for combustion and the remainder for raw materials. This repre sents about 24 quadrillion BTU's per year... 16 years to a possible 70 quqd rillion BTU's. The total energy consumption wi~l continue to grow over the next 16 years as shown in Figure 2. Again, under moderate economic growth, energy gnowth will average about 3 percent per year. For exa...

Davis, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

208

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

209

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Comparisons of coal projections, 2011-2040 (million short tons, except where noted) Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a ICF b IHSGI INFORUM IEA Exxon- Mobil c (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2025 Production 1,096 1,113 22.54 958 1,104 1,107 1,061 -- -- East of the Mississippi 456 447 -- 402 445 -- -- -- -- West of the Mississippi 639 666 -- 556 659 -- -- -- -- Consumption Electric power 929 929 17.66 786 939 864 -- -- 13 Coke plants 21 22 0.58 22 15 19 -- -- -- Coal-to-liquids -- 6 -- -- 36 -- -- -- -- Other industrial/buildings 49 53 1.69 d 29 72 44 1.96 d -- -- Total consumption (quadrillion Btu) 19.66 -- 19.35 -- -- 18.34 -- -- 13 Total consumption (million short tons) 999 1,010 -- 836 1,061 927 1,015 e -- -- Net coal exports (million short tons) 96 124 -- 118 43 181 46 -- --

210

Monthly energy review, July 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during April 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2-percent increase from the level of production during April 1993. Coal production increased 11.8 percent, petroleum production fell 4.0 percent, and natural gas production decreased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 2.9 percent from the level of production during April 1993. Energy consumption during April 1994 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 1.4 percent above the level of consumption during April 1993. Petroleum consumption increased 3.9 percent, coal consumption rose 1.1 percent, and natural gas consumption decreased 1.5 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during April 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 8.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 4.5 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 18.5 percent. Net exports of coal fell 9.2 percent from the level in April 1993.

Not Available

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

211

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels 5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels Total, 1980-2011 As Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1980-2011 By Fuel, 2011 By Petroleum Product, 2011 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases and pentanes plus are aggregated to avoid disclosure of proprie- tary information. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, waxes, and miscellaneous products. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Note: See Note 2, "Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels" at end of section. Source: Table 1.15. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 Percent Total Petroleum Products Coal 2.0 1.0 0.9 0.3 0.1 (s) 0.3 LPG¹ Petro- Asphalt Lubri- Petro- Special Other² 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Quadrillion Btu

212

Microsoft Word - I-5_Corridor_NWA_Screening_Study_12Jan2011.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 42 FIGURE 11. NWPCC SIXTH POWER PLAN FORECAST OF NATURAL GAS PRICES FOR AN ELECTRIC GENERATOR, WEST SIDE (2010 - 2040)...

213

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

214

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Million Nominal Dollars 4 Nominal Dollars 4 Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Real (2005) Dollars 5 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar 5 Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide per Million Real (2005) Dollars 5 1949 31.982 214 NA NA NA NA 267.2 NA R 1,843.1 R 17.35 R 1,197 1950 34.616 227 NA NA NA NA

215

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 (Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar) Note: See "Real Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.7. 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 1.7 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Quadrillion Btu Billion Chained (2009) Dollars Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar 1950 ............................ 19.284 15.332 34.616 2,181.9 8.84 7.03 15.86 1955

216

Annual Energy Review 1994. highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quadrillion Quadrillion Btu Highlights: Annual Energy Review 1994 At the halfway mark of this century, coal was the leading source of energy produced in the United States. Now, as we approach the end of the 20th century, coal is still the leading source of energy produced in this country (Figure 1). Between those points of time, however, dramatic changes occurred in the composition of our Nation's energy production. For example, crude oil and natural gas plant liquids production overtook coal production in the early 1950s. That source was matched by natural gas for a few years in the mid-1970s, and then, in the early 1980s, coal regained its prominence. After 1985, crude oil production suffered a nearly steady annual decline. While the fossil fuels moved up and down in their indi-

217

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

218

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

OpenEI - Nonelectric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/54 This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis.

License
Type of License: 

220

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transformational Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transformational Manufacturing Transformational Manufacturing Argonne's new Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program focuses on scalable process R&D to produce advanced battery materials in sufficient quantity for industrial testing. The U.S. manufacturing industry consumes more than 30 quadrillion Btu of energy per year, directly employs about 12 million people and generates another 7 million jobs in related businesses. Argonne is working with industry to develop innovative and transformational technology to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of domestic manufacturing while reducing its carbon footprint. The lab's efforts concentrate on sustainable manufacturing, applied nanotechnology and distributed energy, with an emphasis on transitioning science discoveries to the market.

222

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

223

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 xvii Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 30 60 90 120 Quadrillion Btu Figure 1. Energy Overview The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. The Nation imported more energy to fill the gap. In 2002, net imported energy accounted for 26 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (1996) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Over the second half of the 20th century, the rate at which energy was consumed per dollar of the economy's output of goods and services fell dramatically. By the end of the century, the rate was half of the mid-century

224

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

225

Energy Perspectives - AER 2004, August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 25 50 75 100 125 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2004, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (2000) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

226

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2007, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

227

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Review 2009 Annual Energy Review 2009 xix 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to meet its needs. In 2009, net imported energy accounted for 24 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Energy Perspectives Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

228

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Key Definitions Quad: Quadrillion Btu (10^15 or 1,000,000,000,000,000 Btu) Generic Quad for the Buildings Sector: One quad of primary energy consumed in the buildings sector (includes the residential and commercial sectors), apportioned between the various primary fuels used in the sector according to their relative consumption in a given year. To obtain this value, electricity is converted into its primary energy forms according to relative fuel contributions (or shares) used to produce electricity in the given year. Electric Quad (Generic Quad for the Electric Utility Sector): One quad of primary energy consumed at electric utility power plants to supply electricity to end-users, shared among various fuels according to their relative contribution in

229

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2006, net imported energy accounted for 30 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

230

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 80.2 80.8 87.1 91.9 96.2 100.8 106.5 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.7 82.4 89.1 93.9 98.2 103.1 108.9 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.2 100.7 98.5 96.7 95.6 94.6 93.9 -0.3%

231

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 Energy Expenditures, 1970-2010 Energy Consumption per Real Dollar² of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2011 Energy Consumption per Capita, Energy Expenditures per Capita, Energy Expenditures as Share of Gross 1949-2011 1970-2010 Domestic Product and Gross Output,³ 1987-2010 12 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 Billion Nominal Dollars¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar² ¹ See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. ² In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators

232

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sulfidation-oxidation of advanced metallic materials in simulated low-Btu coal-gasifier environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of structural alloys in complex multicomponent gas environments is of considerable interest for their effective utilization in coal conversion schemes. Little understanding...

T. C. Tiearney Jr.; K. Natesan

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Policy: Independence by 1985 My Be Unreachable Without Btu Tax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic oil production and the diffi-culties...Countries (OPEC). The decontrol...the Earth Day move-ment...indeed-high enough per-haps to...about by OPEC in late 1973 and early...of oil a day less than...18 miles per gallon by...of oil a day (mbd...consumption in 1973. The added...domestic production of energy...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1976-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

236

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...

Phillips, J. N.

237

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Total, 1949-2012 Petroleum Products Supplied as Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1949-2012 By Product, October 2013 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Percent d 0.074 0.002 0.708 0.244 0.001 0.258 0.022 1.462 0.061 0.033 0.302 Asphalt Aviation Distillate Jet Kerosene Liquefied Lubricants Motor Petroleum Residual Other 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Quadrillion Btu a Includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distil- late fuel oil. b Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. c Includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

238

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

239

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

< Introduction Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2014 and AEO2013 Reference case, 2011-2040 2025 2040 Energy and economic factors 2011 2012 AEO2014 AEO2013 AEO2014 AEO2013 Primary energy production (quadrillion Btu) Crude oil and natural gas plant liquids 15.31 17.08 23.03 18.70 19.99 17.01 Dry natural gas 23.04 24.59 32.57 29.22 38.37 33.87 Coal 22.22 20.60 22.36 22.54 22.61 23.54 Nuclear/Uranium 8.26 8.05 8.15 9.54 8.49 9.44 Hydropower 3.11 2.67 2.84 2.86 2.90 2.92 Biomass 3.90 3.78 5.08 5.27 5.61 6.96 Other renewable energy 1.70 1.97 3.09 2.32 3.89 3.84 Other 0.80 0.41 0.24 0.85 0.24 0.89 Total 78.35 79.15 97.36 91.29 102.09 98.46 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum and other liquid fuelsa 18.78 16.55 11.41 15.89 13.65 15.99

240

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2012 and AEO2011 Reference case, 2009-2035 2025 2035 Energy and economic factors 2009 2010 AEO2012 AEO2011 AE2012 AEO2011 Primary energy (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 13.93 14.37 17.48 16.19 16.81 16.72 Dry natural gas 21.09 22.10 26.63 24.60 28.51 27.00 Coal 21.63 22.08 22.51 23.64 23.51 26.01 Nuclear power 8.36 8.44 9.60 9.17 9.35 9.14 Hydropower 2.67 2.51 2.97 3.04 3.06 3.09 Biomass 3.72 4.05 6.73 7.20 9.68 8.63 Other renewable energy 1.11 1.34 2.13 2.58 2.80 3.22 Other 0.47 0.64 0.76 0.88 0.88 0.78 Total 72.97 75.52 88.79 87.29 94.59 94.59 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Liquid fuels 20.90 20.35 16.33 19.91 16.22 19.85

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Monthly energy review, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains statistical information and data analysis of energy production and consumption within the major energy industries of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy and oil and gas resource development. Energy production during October 1993 totaled 5.5-quadrillion Btu, a 3.0 percent decrease from the level of production during October 1992. Coal production decreased 5.6 percent, petroleum production decreased 3.4 percent, and natural gas production increased 1.9 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.0 percent from the level of production during October 1992. Energy consumption during October 1993 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.9 percent above the level of consumption during October 1992. Natural gas consumption increased 6.5 percent, coal consumption rose 2.9 percent, and petroleum consumption was down 1.3 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.5 percent from the level of 1 year earlier.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

John Maples John Maples 2011 EIA Energy Conference April 26, 2011 Transportation and the Environment Light-duty vehicle combined Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (CAFE) in three cases, 2005-2035 2 0 20 40 60 80 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 miles per gallon Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 CAFE6 CAFE3 Reference John Maples, April 26, 2011 Light-duty vehicle delivered energy consumption and total transportation carbon dioxide emissions, 2005-2035 3 0 5 10 15 20 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Reference CAFE3 CAFE6 quadrillion Btu 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 John Maples, April 26, 2011 Distribution of new light-duty vehicle sales by price, 2010 and 2025 (2009$) 4 Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

243

Microsoft PowerPoint - Sweetnam NG Disc Slides - April 7 2010 final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas: Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context 2010 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Johns Hopkins University - SAIS p y April 7, 2010 - Washington, DC Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 Richard Newell, March 2, 2010 1 Richard Newell, SAIS, December 14, 2009 1 April 7, 2010 Washington, DC Discussion Outline * Setting the context * Demand/supply outlook for 3 regions - United States United States - OECD Europe - China * Evolution of the global gas market - Expected trade flows - Pricing and contract issues - Key uncertainties Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 2 Natural gas is expected to provide about 23% of the world's energy needs 250 History Projections world energy consumption quadrillion Btu 200 Liquids (including biofuels)

244

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy in the Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors April 7 th , 2009 Energy Information Administration 2009 Energy Conference: A New Climate for Energy Energy Information Administration 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Nuclear Natural Gas Liquid Fuels Coal Renewables (excl liquid biofuels) Renewable energy to contribute a growing share of supply History Projections Liquid Biofuels quadrillion Btu Source: EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Renewable Energy in The Transportation and Power Sectors * David Humbird National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Bob Dineen Renewable Fuels Association * Denise Bode American Wind Energy Association * Bryan Hannegan Electric Power Research Institute Transportation Power 0 5 10 15 20 25 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Industrial Transportation

245

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

246

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

247

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

248

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

249

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

250

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

251

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

252

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

253

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

254

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum Welcoming Remarks David Danielson Assistant Secretary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary The 4th U.S. - China Energy Efficiency Forum 3 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 U.S. and China : World's Largest Energy Consumers and Emitters Total CO2 from Energy Consumption (Gt) Source: World Bank Indicators. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion (2012 Edition), IEA, Paris. U.S. 5.4 China 7.3 Global Energy Consumption - 100 200 300 400 500 600 Quadrillion Btu Rest of the World 38% 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200

255

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

256

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

257

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Monetary Fund International Monetary Fund January 14, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 14, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

258

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

259

East South Central | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East South Central East South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

260

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

262

Delta | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

263

West | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

264

undefined | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

undefined undefined Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

265

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2012 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-August By Source, a August 2013 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

266

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 78.99 79.28 85.71 89.73 93.56 96.99 100.37 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 28.13 28.24 30.55 32.18 33.98 35.82 37.61 1.0% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.58 6.41 5.70 5.46 5.29 5.14 5.03 -0.9% Total ................................................................. 113.70 113.93 121.96 127.38

267

Southeastern | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

268

Westchester | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westchester Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

269

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

270

Solar Thermal/PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal/PV Thermal/PV Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

271

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

272

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

273

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

274

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook 2 Howard Gruenspecht, Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook March 20, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8% 1% Shares of total U.S. energy Nuclear Oil and other liquids Liquid biofuels Natural gas

275

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New England New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

276

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

277

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0%

278

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.14 1.14 1.05 0.98 0.93 0.89 0.86 -1.0%

279

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 7 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2009 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2006 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for the OECD countries. Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure data Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels is projected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2009 reference case, the transportation share of

280

Energy Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview for CNA Panel Discussion May 8, 2013 | Crystal City, VA by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Non-OECD nations drive the increase in energy demand 2 world energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2011 0 100 200 300 400 500 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-OECD OECD 244 260 482 288 History Projections 2008 Howard Gruenspecht , CNA Panel May 8, 2013 Growth in income and population drive rising energy use; energy intensity improvements moderate increases in energy demand 3 average annual change (2008-2035) percent per year Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2011 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 U.S. OECD Europe Japan South Korea China India Brazil Middle East Africa Russia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

282

C:\WEBSHARE\WWWROOT\eppats\errataeppats.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology Scenarios 10/12/2001 The Gross Domestic Product rows in Tables C2 on pages 110 -111, and D2 on pages 164 -165 are corrected as follows: Table C2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Continued) (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source 1999 Projections 2005 2010 Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Total Energy Consumption Distillate Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.53 8.77 8.67 8.58 8.49 9.51 9.39 9.02 8.91 Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.15 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal On This Page Early declines in coal... Long-term outlook for coal... Growth in average... Substantial changes in coal... Concerns about GHG... Early declines in coal production are more than offset by growth after 2014 U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the AEO2011 Reference case, production does not return to its 2008 level until after 2025. Between 2008 and 2014 a potential recovery in coal production is kept in check by continued low natural gas prices and increased generation from renewables and nuclear capacity. After 2014, coal production grows at an average annual rate of 1.1 percent through 2035, with increases in coal use for electricity generation and for the production of synthetic liquids. figure data Western coal production increases through 2035 (Figure 101) but at a much

284

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

285

Commercial Building Research and Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research and Research and Development Commercial Building Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows,

286

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 1.4b Primary Energy Exports by Source and Total Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Exports Net Imports a Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels d Electricity Total Total Crude Oil b Petroleum Products c Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.786 0.010 0.027 0.202 0.440 0.642 NA 0.001 1.465 0.448 1955 Total ...................... 1.465 .013 .032 .067 .707 .774 NA .002 2.286 .504 1960 Total ...................... 1.023 .009 .012 .018 .413 .431 NA .003 1.477 2.710 1965 Total ...................... 1.376 .021 .027 .006 .386 .392 NA .013 1.829 4.063 1970 Total ...................... 1.936 .061 .072 .029 .520 .549 NA

287

Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy use is projected to grow rapidly over the next 25 years in the energy use is projected to grow rapidly over the next 25 years in the Reference case projection from EIA's latest International Energy Outlook 1 Howard Gruenspecht, Meeting China's Energy Demand, EIA Annual Conference Washington DC, April 27, 2011 energy consumption in China quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 1% 6% 70% 3% 20% Coal Nuclear Renewables Natural gas Petroleum and other liquids Projections History 2007 10% 3% 62% 6% 19% EIA projections over the past decade have tended to underestimate the

288

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Nonelectric Renewable Energy Consumption Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Non-Elec.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 27.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

289

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The energy consumption data is broken down by sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power) as well as source, and also provides total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

290

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Lighting Energy Use Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Lighting Energy Use Daylighting is the strategy of admitting light from the sun and sky to reduce the use of electric lighting in buildings. Since lighting energy use represents 13 percent of the total primary energy used by buildings in the United States (5.42 quadrillion Btu in 2010), these technologies can play a significant role towards meeting U.S. and state energy-efficiency and greenhouse gas emission-reduction goals. Conventional windows cannot provide useful daylight beyond about one to one-and-a-half times the head height of a window because interior shades, when lowered to control direct

291

Fuel | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

292

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

293

Reliability First Corporation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliability First Corporation Reliability First Corporation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

294

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Louis-Benoit Desroches In the last several years, there has been a significant growth in the activities of the Department of Energy's Appliance and Commercial Equipment Standards program. EETD's Energy Efficiency Standards group has been heavily involved in the analyses supporting recently published federal energy conservation standards, for a diverse set of appliances and commercial equipment. In this talk, I will review the EES group's efforts supporting these energy conservation standards. Collectively, they are estimated to save the nation between 14.15 to 15.17 quads (quadrillion Btu)

295

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

296

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

297

MSW Biogenic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MSW Biogenic MSW Biogenic Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

298

Other Biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Biomass Other Biomass Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

299

SERC Reliability Corporation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SERC Reliability Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

300

North | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

302

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

303

Western Electricity Coordinating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Electricity Coordinating Western Electricity Coordinating Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

304

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop Workshop Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences January 24, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case * Biofuels and fuel market segmentation * Biofuels in the context of multiple policy issues 2 Howard Gruenspecht January 24, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8%

305

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

306

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.51 0.51 0.42 0.40 0.38 0.36 0.35 -1.3% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -2.5% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.53 0.51 0.46 0.41 0.37 0.34 0.31 -1.7% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.05 1.02 0.89 0.82 0.75 0.70 0.66 -1.5%

307

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 Over the past three decades, the share of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics in U.S. homes has nearly doubled from 17 percent to 31 percent, growing from 1.77 quadrillion Btu (quads) to 3.25 quads. This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to 10.55 quads, and energy use per household fell 31 percent. Federal energy efficiency standards have greatly reduced consumption for home heating Total energy use in all U.S. homes occupied as primary residences decreased slightly from 10.58 quads in 1978 to 10.55 quads in 2005 as reported by the

308

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

309

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

310

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 85. Cellulose ethanol production, 2005-2030 (billion gallons per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 86. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Lower Costs, Greater Demand Could Spur Cellulose Ethanol Production For AEO2007, two alternative ethanol cases examine the potential impact on ethanol demand of lower costs for cellulosic ethanol production, in combination with policies that increase sales of FFVs [170]. The reference case projects that 10.5 percent of new light-duty vehicles will be capable

311

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Future of U.S. Domestic Oil and Gas Production For International Energy Forum January 21, 2013 | Riyadh, KSA By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 21, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu

312

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

313

mountain region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mountain region mountain region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

314

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

315

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

316

Upstate New York | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

317

Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Biogas with Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 6/11/2012 Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies U.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Renewable Electric Power Energy 8% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Industrial Residential & Commercial Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Transportation Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Electric Power 29% Residential 16% Commercial 13%

318

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Program Overview - - Program Overview - Sunita Satyapal Program Manager 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 14, 2012 Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Renewable Energy 8% Transportation Residential & Commercial Industrial Electric Power 2 U.S. Energy Consumption Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Residential 16% Commercial 13% Industrial 22% Transportation 20% Electric Power 29% Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors 3 Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean

319

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

320

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 EPA Criteria Pollutant Emissions Coefficients (Million Short Tons/Delivered Quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) All Buildings | SO2 0.402 0.042 | 0.130 NOx 0.164 0.063 | 0.053 CO 0.057 0.283 | 0.018 Note(s): Source(s): Electricity Electricity (1) Site Fossil Fuel (2) (per primary quad) (1) 1) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings energy consumption related SO2 emissions dropped 65% from 1994 to 2011. 2) Includes natural gas, petroleum liquid fuels, coal, and wood. EPA, 1970-2010 National Emissions Inventory, Average Annual Emissions, All Criteria Pollutants, October 2012; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 for energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

322

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

323

OpenEI - MSW Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

324

New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

England England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

325

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

326

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.60 6.54 6.45 6.60 6.75 6.88 7.02 0.2% Total ................................................................. 115.23 116.17 127.52 134.02 140.63 146.96 153.32

327

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

328

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

329

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

330

Nonelectric | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonelectric Nonelectric Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Nonelectric Renewable Energy Consumption Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Non-Elec.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 27.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2004 - 2008

331

Slide 0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This presentation was prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. exclusively for the benefit of the Energy This presentation was prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. exclusively for the benefit of the Energy Information Administration, Department of Energy. This presentation is incomplete without reference to, and should be viewed solely in conjunction with the oral briefing provided by Navigant Consulting. April 2008. 2 Table of Contents Energy Efficiency Challenges and Solutions New and Emerging Energy Efficient Technologies » Overview » Examples Market Acceptance of Technologies 3 Energy Efficiency Challenges and Solutions 4 Energy demand in the United States is projected to increase 21% by 2030, with the largest increase in the commercial sector. Forecast for Energy Demand Quadrillion Btu per Year Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 (Revised Early Release), http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/.

332

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

333

OpenEI - Other Biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

334

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP) works in partnership with industry, state, municipal, and other federal organizations to achieve the goals of marketable net-zero energy buildings. Such buildings are extremely energy efficient, ideally producing as much energy as they use over the course of a year. BTP also works with stakeholders and federal partners to meet any remaining energy needs for their buildings through on-site renewable energy systems. Drivers Population growth and economic expansion, along with an accompanying increase in energy demand, are expected to drive energy consumption in buildings to more than 50 quadrillion Btu (quads)

335

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

336

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

337

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Index (click to jump links) Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Energy Demand in Alternative Technology Cases Annual Growth in Energy Use Is Projected To Continue Net energy delivered to consumers represents only a part of total primary energy consumption. Primary consumption includes energy losses associated with the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity, which are allocated to the end-use sectors (residential, commercial, and industrial) in proportion to each sector’s share of electricity use [103]. Figure 45. Primary and delivered energy consumption, excluding transportation use, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

338

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Commercial Mkt trends Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

339

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

340

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description http://en.openei.org/w/skins/openei/images/ui-bg_gloss_wave-medium_40_d6...); background-attachment: scroll; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: rgb(214, 235, 225); line-height: 17px; width: 650px; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat; ">This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 3, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 115, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

342

West South Central | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West South Central West South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

343

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

344

South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlantic Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

345

Annual report to Congress on Federal Government energy management and conservation programs, Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides sinformation on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet statutory requirements of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. It also describes energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Implementation activities undertaken during FY94 by the Federal agencies under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Orders 12759 and 12902 are also described. During FY94, total (gross) energy consumption of the US Government, including energy consued to produce, process, and transport energy, was 1.72 quadrillion Btu. This represents {similar_to}2.0% of the total 85.34 quads used in US.

NONE

1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Combined heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) for saving energy and carbon in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems simultaneously deliver electric, thermal and mechanical energy services and thus use fuel very efficiently. Today's small-scale CHP systems already provide heat, cooling and electricity at nearly twice the fuel efficiency of heat and power based on power remote plants and onsite hot water and space heating. In this paper, the authors have refined and extended the assessments of small-scale building CHP previously done by the authors. They estimate the energy and carbon savings for existing small-scale CHP technology such as reciprocating engines and two promising new CHP technologies--microturbines and fuel cells--for commercial buildings. In 2010 the authors estimate that small-scale CHP will emit 14--65% less carbon than separate heat and power (SHP) depending on the technologies compared. They estimate that these technologies in commercial buildings could save nearly two-thirds of a quadrillion Btu's of energy and 23 million tonnes of carbon.

Kaarsberg, T.; Fiskum, R.; Romm, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Koomey, J.; Teagan, W.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

351

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

352

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

353

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

354

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

355

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 99, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Florida Fuel Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

356

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 4, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

357

Gateway | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

358

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

359

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

360

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

middle atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

middle atlantic middle atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

362

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

363

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption by End Use, Selected Years, Household Energy Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 1978-2005¹ Household Energy Consumption for Space Heating by Fuel 2005 Appliances, Electronics, and Lighting Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 52 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Distillate fuel oil and kerosene. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. Source: Table 2.5. 55 63 76 83 87 97 98 110 124 136 160 201 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Dollars² 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Space Heating 1978 1980 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005

364

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 By Energy Source By North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 6 46 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. 2 Natural gas liquids. 3 See "Breeze" in Glossary. 4 Includes all other types of energy that respondents indicated were consumed or allocated. 5 Energy sources produced onsite from the use of other energy sources but sold or trans- ferred to another entity. 6 See Table 2.2 for Manufacturing Group titles of industries that correspond to the 3-digit NAICS codes. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.2. 5.9 2.9 2.4 1.4 0.3 0.3 0.1 8.4 -0.6 Natural Gas Net LPG¹ and NGL² Coal Residual Coal Coke Distillate Other Shipments

365

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

366

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d = standard deviation INTRODUCTION The United States' vast lignite reserves' energy po- tential, while not commanding the public interest as much as the more "exotic" forms of energy conversion (solar, geothermal, wave energy, etc. ), has been... viewed with in- creasing interest by the technical community. Although a tremendous amount of energy is totalled in this country' s lignite coal reserves (Texas deposits alone are estimated at 100 billion tons [1] ), the energy is low-grade; i. e...

Blacksmith, James Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Table 1. Summary of results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Summary of results Table 1. Summary of results Energy/Economic Factors 2000 2001 2025 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.14 14.94 15.05 14.38 15.45 14.12 15.92 Natural Gas 19.50 19.97 27.47 25.24 28.72 26.99 27.99 Coal 22.58 23.97 29.29 27.81 31.08 29.18 29.74 Nuclear Power 7.87 8.03 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 Renewable Energy 5.96 5.33 8.78 8.26 9.38 8.82 8.76 Other 1.09 0.57 0.80 0.80 0.83 0.81 0.82 Total Primary Production 72.15 72.81 89.83 84.93 93.90 88.36 91.66 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum (including SPR) 22.28 23.29 41.23 37.63 45.82 44.06 37.97 Natural Gas 3.62 3.73 7.93 6.93 9.29 7.63 8.01 Coal/Other (- indicates export) -0.84 -0.54 0.27 0.22 0.38 0.26 0.27 Total Net Imports 25.06 26.48 49.43 44.78 55.49 51.96 46.25 Discrepancy -2.18 1.99 0.19

371

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 Table 1. Summary of results for five cases Sensitivity Factors 1999 2000 2020 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.06 15.04 15.95 15.52 16.39 14.40 17.73 Natural Gas 19.20 19.59 29.25 27.98 29.72 28.54 30.03 Coal 23.15 22.58 28.11 26.88 30.08 27.58 29.04 Nuclear Power 7.74 8.03 7.49 7.38 7.49 7.31 7.58 Renewable Energy 6.69 6.46 8.93 8.59 9.37 8.90 8.97 Other 1.66 1.10 0.93 0.91 0.73 0.40 1.06 Total Primary Production 73.50 72.80 90.66 87.26 93.79 87.13 94.40 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu)

372

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 4.79 30% 1.72 11% 0.03 0% 0.85 5% 2.45 5.89 8.33 53% 15.72 100% - 1981 4.57 30% 1.52 10% 0.03 0% 0.87 6% 2.46 5.77 8.24 54% 15.23 100% - 1982 4.68 30% 1.42 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.49 5.89 8.38 54% 15.48 100% - 1983 4.45 29% 1.33 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.56 6.03 8.59 56% 15.38 100% - 1984 4.64 29% 1.51 10% 0.04 0% 0.98 6% 2.66 6.07 8.73 55% 15.90 100% - 1985 4.51 28% 1.55 10% 0.04 0% 1.01 6% 2.71 6.21 8.92 56% 16.02 100% - 1986 4.38 28% 1.52 10% 0.04 0% 0.92 6% 2.79 6.27 9.07 57% 15.94 100% -

373

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 Total U.S. Government Energy Consumption By Major Energy Source By Selected Petroleum Product 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Jet Fuel 1 Distillate fuel oil and residual fuel oil. 2 Includes ethanol blended into motor gasoline. Note: U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.12. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 Quadrillion Btu 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Quadrillion Btu 1.57 1.38 1.40 1.36 1.38 1.37 1.42 1.45 1.43 1.48 1.45 1.41 1.47 1.36 1.46 1.44 1.46 1.29 1.25 1.18 1.13 1.11 1.09 1.04 1.01 0.99 1.00 1.04 1.14 1.19 1.16 1.07 1.09 1.12 1.09

374

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan 52.7 53.2 57.2 54.1 53.3 52.8 52.2 51.8 -0.1 South Korea 52.8 53.7 50.7 48.1 47.2 45.4 46.0 45.8 -0.5 Australia/NewZealand 67.1 66.3 63.1 60.9 60.1 59.5 58.7 58.0 -0.4

375

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kaya Identity factor projections Kaya Identity factor projections * Carbon dioxide intensity * Energy intensity * GDP per capita * Population This page inTenTionally lefT blank 289 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan

376

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2012\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81.73 82.11 85.51 89.96 94.22 98.49 102.53 0.9% Multifamily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25.41 25.52 27.00 29.38 31.47 33.61 35.76 1.4% Mobile homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.65 6.56 6.28 6.66 6.99 7.20 7.31 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113.78 114.19 118.79 126.00 132.69 139.30 145.60 1.0% Average house square footage . . . . . . . . . . 1646 1653 1683 1704 1724 1743 1760 0.3% Energy intensity (million Btu per household) Delivered energy consumption . . . . . . . . . . . 97.8 102.1 95.1

377

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

378

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2012\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual Growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.0 79.3 82.4 87.1 91.9 96.2 100.7 1.0% New additions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 1.8 1.7 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 1.0% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80.3 81.1 84.1 89.1 93.9 98.2 103.0 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption . . . . . . . . . . . 106.0 107.3 105.0 103.2 101.3 101.2 100.3 -0.3% Electricity related losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117.0 117.3 111.2 111.7 112.3 111.9 111.1 -0.2% Total energy consumption . . . .

379

Microsoft PowerPoint - Energy Needs_rev2bg.pptx [Read-Only]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How much energy do we really need? How much energy do we really need? How much energy do we really need? Modern societies use an unbelievable amount of energy. Not just our houses and our gas tanks, but every thing we buy, eat, or use requires a lot of energy to make it available to us. Predicting future energy demand Information 1973 2011 Average Annual Growth Rate Energy - all types (million BTU per capita) 360 310 -0.36% Energy - all types (Quadrillion BTU) 76 97 0.66% Electrical energy (kW-hr per capita) 8,000 12,000 1.1% Electrical energy (GW-yr) 200 440 2.2% Population (million) 210 310 1.0% A lot of people with a lot of knowledge and expertise spend a lot of time trying to understand and predict this accurately in the near future. Their predictions vary widely. It doesn't take a crystal ball to understand roughly what we need decades from now. You only need to know the current situation and reasonable

380

METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 psi. ~Butanol is an alcohol that can be but does not have to be blended with fossil fuels. ~Butanol existing pipelines and filling stations. ~Hydrogen generated during the butanol fermentation process is expected to increase dramatically if green butanol can be produced economically from low cost biomass

Toohey, Darin W.

382

Second-Generation Biofuel Production from Corn-Ethanol Industry Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual global energy demand is about 500 quadrillion BTUs. US ... only consumes the highest amount of supplied global energy i.e.,~100 quadrillion BTUs; but...37...] that, by 2035, its annual liquid consumpti...

Prachand Shrestha; Anthony L Pometto III

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97 BTUs of refinery energy per BTU of dieseland hydrogen) per BTU of diesel produced, depending onof refinery energy per BTU of diesel fuel In the real world

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Appendix J Table J2. World energy intensity by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (thousand Btu per 2005 dollar of GDP) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 7.6 7.5 6.7 6.1 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.2 -2.0 United States a 7.4 7.5 6.6 6.0 5.4 4.8 4.3 3.9 -2.1 Canada 11.7 11.2 10.5 9.7 9.3 8.9 8.4 8.0 -1.1 Mexico/Chile 5.3 5.3 4.8 4.4 4.2 4.1 3.9 3.7 -1.1 OECD Europe 5.6 5.6 5.3 4.9 4.6 4.3 4.0 3.8 -1.3 OECD Asia 6.5 6.5 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.3 5.0 4.8 -1.0 Japan 5.6 5.6 5.2 5.1 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.7 -0.6 South Korea 8.1 8.2 7.4 6.7 6.0 5.6 5.1 4.6 -1.9 Australia/NewZealand 8.7 8.4 7.7 7.3 6.7 6.3 5.8 5.4 -1.5 Total OECD 6.6 6.6 6.0 5.6 5.2 4.8 4.4 4.1 -1.6 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 10.1 10.5 9.1 7.8 6.8 6.1 5.5 4.9 -2.5 Russia 13.9 14.7 12.7 11.2 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.8 -1.7 Other 6.9 7.1 6.2 5.1 4.4 3.8 3.3 2.9 -2.9 Non-OECD Asia

385

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

386

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

邝杰明 James Quinn 邝杰明 James Quinn 工业技术项目Industrial Technologies Program 能源效率和可再生能源 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 美国能源部U.S. Department of Energy 工业能源效率: 政策,项目和机遇 Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities 能源效率论坛 中国,北京 2010年5月26日 Energy Efficiency Forum Beijing, China May 26, 2010 2 | U.S. Department of Energy eere.energy.gov 美国和中国的能源消耗,2007年 U.S. and China Energy Consumption, 2007 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 United States China Commercial Residential Transportation Industrial 4,320 3,600 2,880 2,160 1,440 720 0 Quadrillion Btu Mtce 工业能源消耗预测 Projected Industrial Energy Use

387

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b b Primary Energy Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1949-2012 By Major Source, 1949-2012 Total, Monthly By Major Source, Monthly U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 9 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Coal Crude Oil a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 -5 Petroleum Products b Coal Natural Gas J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 -0.5 a Crude oil and lease condensate. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which began in 1977. b Petroleum products, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, and gasoline blending components. Does not include biofuels.

388

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total Coal b Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil c NGPL d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................. 14.060 6.233 11.447 0.823 32.563 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 35.540 1955 Total .................. 12.370 9.345 14.410 1.240 37.364 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.148 1960 Total .................. 10.817 12.656 14.935 1.461 39.869 .006 1.608 (s) NA NA 1.320 2.928 42.803 1965 Total .................. 13.055 15.775 16.521 1.883 47.235 .043 2.059 .002 NA NA 1.335 3.396 50.674 1970 Total .................. 14.607 21.666 20.401 2.512 59.186 .239 2.634 .006 NA NA 1.431 4.070 63.495 1975 Total ..................

389

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 30  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 17. Total delivered residential energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 10.96 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7

390

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2012\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Energy consumption Residential Liquefied petroleum gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.51 0.56 0.51 0.50 0.50 0.51 0.51 -0.4% Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -1.7% Distillate fuel oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.60 0.63 0.55 0.48 0.43 0.38 0.35 -2.3% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal . . 1.14 1.22 1.08 1.01 0.95 0.91 0.87 -1.3% Natural gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.90 5.06 4.99 4.95 4.88 4.84 4.76 -0.2% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.1% Renewable energy 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.43 0.42 0.43 0.43 0.43 0.44 0.44

391

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 32  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 19. Total delivered industrial energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2

392

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 Table C1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices 2009 Projections 2015 2025 2035 Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . 11.34 12.35 12.51 12.76 11.19 12.64 15.18 9.32 12.80 15.31 Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.88 2.86 2.90 3.50 3.55 3.62 3.85 3.92 3.86 Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.50 23.05 23.01 23.23 24.24 24.60 25.20 26.91 27.00 27.63 Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.58 20.63 20.94 20.83 23.30 23.64 24.98 23.82 26.01 30.33 Nuclear Power . . . . . . . .

393

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

394

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

395

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 33  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 20. Total delivered transportation energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9

396

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector AEO2013 Reference INFORUM IHSGI ExxonMobil IEA 2011 Residential 11.3 11.5 10.8 -- -- Residential excluding electricity 6.4 6.6 6.0 5.0 -- Commercial 8.6 8.6 8.5 -- -- Commercial excluding electricity 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.0 -- Buildings sector 19.9 20.1 19.3 -- 19.3a Industrial 24.0 23.6 -- -- 23.7a Industrial excluding electricity 20.7 20.2 -- 20.0 -- Lossesb 0.7 -- -- -- -- Natural gas feedstocks 0.5 -- -- -- -- Industrial removing losses and feedstocks 22.9 -- 21.7 -- -- Transportation 27.1 27.2 26.2 27.0 23.1a Electric power 39.4 39.2 40.5 37.0 37.2a Less: electricity demandc 12.7 12.8 12.7 -- 15.0a

397

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude O il and Lease Conden sate . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.18 12.40 14.02 15.64 15.98 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.52 2.50 2.52 2.56 2.55 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.87 20.83 22.02 23.81 24.28 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.56 24.41 25.05 26.79 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 9.00 9.05 9.44 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.97 3.23 4.20 5.16 6.49 7.86

398

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table A5. Commercial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Key Indicators and Consumption Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key Indicators Total Floorsp ace (billion sq uare feet) Surviving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.4 77.9 83.4 89.3 95.1 101.1 107.3 1.2% New Additions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 2.3 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.8 80.2 85.5 91.5 97.4 103.5 109.8 1.2% Energy Co nsum ption Intensity (thousand B tu per squa re foot) Delivered Energy Consumption . . . . . . . . . . 109.1 105.9 105.1 103.6 102.0 101.1 100.5 -0.2% Electricity Related Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125.0 120.6 116.2 117.0 117.7 118.2 118.3 -0.1% Total Energy Consumption . . . . . . . .

399

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels c Electricity Total Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.009 0.011 0.000 1.056 0.830 1.886 NA 0.007 1.913 1955 Total ...................... .008 .003 .011 1.691 1.061 2.752 NA .016 2.790 1960 Total ...................... .007 .003 .161 2.196 1.802 3.999 NA .018 4.188 1965 Total ...................... .005 .002 .471 2.654 2.748 5.402 NA .012 5.892 1970 Total ...................... .001 .004 .846 2.814 4.656 7.470 NA .021 8.342 1975 Total ...................... .024 .045 .978 8.721 4.227 12.948 NA .038 14.032 1980 Total ...................... .030 .016 1.006 11.195 3.463 14.658 NA .085 15.796 1985 Total

400

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 18. Total delivered commercial energy consumption, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0

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401

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2008\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2006-2030 (percent) 2005 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.99 10.80 12.71 13.05 13.76 12.89 12.12 0.5% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.33 2.36 2.21 2.22 2.27 2.24 2.18 -0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.60 19.04 19.61 19.91 20.28 20.24 20.41 0.3% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.19 23.79 23.31 24.33 25.61 28.43 31.16 1.1% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16 8.21 8.31 8.41 9.15 9.68 9.89 0.8% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 2.89 2.92 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.2% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.83 2.97 4.11 4.44

402

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 . 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 2012 2013 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Nuclear Electric Power Petroleum Coal 26.971 26.079 25.936 2011 2012 2013 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1.575 0.917 0.747 0.363 0.024 Coal Petroleum 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Renewable

403

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a a Primary Energy Imports and Exports (Quadrillion Btu) Imports by Source, 1949-2012 Exports by Source, 1949-2012 Imports by Source, Monthly Exports by Major Source, Monthly a Coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. b Includes coal coke. Sources: Tables 1.4a and 1.4b. 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Petroleum Other a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Petroleum Electricity Coal b Natural Gas J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Petroleum J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 Natural Gas Coal b Petroleum Natural Gas

404

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 1 Table C1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices 2011 Projections 2020 2030 2040 Low oil price Reference High oil price Low oil price Reference High oil price Low oil price Reference High oil price Production Crude oil and lease condensate .................... 12.16 15.22 15.95 16.61 11.89 13.47 15.07 9.99 13.12 14.63 Natural gas plant liquids ................................ 2.88 3.98 4.14 4.24 3.79 3.85 3.99 3.69 3.89 4.08 Dry natural gas .............................................. 23.51 26.44 27.19 27.61 28.09 30.44 31.87 30.91 33.87 36.61 Coal 1 ............................................................. 22.21

405

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 Table B1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices 2009 Projections 2015 2025 2035 Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . 11.34 12.53 12.51 12.55 12.44 12.64 12.62 12.13 12.80 12.87 Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.79 2.86 2.89 3.39 3.55 3.70 3.59 3.92 4.11 Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.50 22.50 23.01 23.30 23.58 24.60 25.54 24.92 27.00 30.16 Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

406

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

182 182 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - May 16, 2011 1 Table D1. Key Results for Residential and Commercial Sector Technology Cases Energy Consumption 2009 2015 2025 2010 Technology Reference High Technology Best Available Technology 2010 Technology Reference High Technology Best Available Technology Residential Energy Consumption (quadrillion Btu) Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . 0.53 0.50 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.49 0.48 0.45 0.45 Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 Distillate Fuel Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.61 0.57 0.56 0.55 0.52 0.48 0.44 0.41 0.37 Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum 1.16 1.09 1.07 1.05 1.02 0.99 0.94 0.88 0.83 Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.87 5.00 4.94 4.79 4.57 5.23 4.96 4.62 4.18 Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01

407

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Energy Consumption Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.52 0.53 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48 -0.4% Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -1.5% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.66 0.61 0.56 0.50 0.44 0.40 0.37 -1.9% Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Subtotal 1.20 1.16 1.07 0.99 0.94 0.90 0.87 -1.1% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 4.87 4.93 4.97 4.96 4.95 4.89 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.1% Renewable Energy 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.44 0.43 0.40 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 -0.1%

408

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A2. Energy consumption by sector and source A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.14 1.14 1.05 0.98 0.93 0.89 0.86 -1.0% Natural gas ......................................................... 4.89 4.83 4.62 4.54 4.46 4.34 4.23 -0.5%

409

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

410

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

411

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2010 Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients for Buildings (MMT CO2 per Quadrillion Btu) (1) All Residential Commercial Buildings Buildings Buildings Coal Average (2) 95.35 95.35 95.35 Natural Gas Average (2) 53.06 53.06 53.06 Petroleum Products Distillate Fuel Oil/Diesel 73.15 - - Kerosene 72.31 - - Motor Gasoline 70.88 - - Liquefied Petroleum Gas 62.97 - - Residual Fuel Oil 78.80 - - Average (2) 69.62 68.45 71.62 Electricity Consumption (3) Average - Primary (4) 57.43 57.43 57.43 Average - Site (5) 178.3 179.1 177.9 New Generation Gas Combined Cycle - Site (6) 112.5 112.5 112.5 Gas Combustion Turbine - Site (6) 171.4 171.4 171.4 Stock Gas Generator - Site (7) 133.9 133.9 133.9 All Fuels (3) Average - Primary 56.23 55.79 56.77 Average - Site 111.4 105.6 118.7 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. The

412

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

413

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Energy Consumption 2. Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, August 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial Commercial 2011 2012 2013 1.664 1.511 2.610 2.385 3.644 0.231 0.188 1.728 2.379 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation 0 1 2 3 4 Primary Consumption Total Consumption Electric Power Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#consumption. Source: Table 2.1. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013

414

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 2.4 Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) ...... 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas ........................................................ 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 .......................................................... 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene ......................... 2.19 1.71 1.52 1.28 1.20 1.26 1.22 1.04 1.07 1.07 .75 .88 .61 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................ .33 .31 .35 .31 .29 .31 .32 .28

415

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

416

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2012\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Production Crude oil and lease condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.35 11.59 13.46 14.46 13.80 13.69 13.15 0.5% Natural gas plant liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.78 3.30 3.63 3.68 3.71 3.65 1.1% Dry natural gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.09 22.10 24.23 25.81 26.63 27.43 28.51 1.0% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.63 22.08 20.50 21.18 22.51 22.78 23.51 0.3% Nuclear / uranium 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.36 8.44 8.68 9.28 9.60 9.55 9.35 0.4% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.67 2.51 2.90 2.94 2.97 3.01 3.06 0.8% Biomass 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.72 4.05

417

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source 7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................. 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.1%

418

Annual Energy Outlook 2008: With Projections to 2030-Appendixes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 115 Appendix A Reference Case Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2006-2030 (percent) 2005 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.99 10.80 12.76 13.25 13.40 12.99 12.04 0.5% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.33 2.36 2.27 2.29 2.31 2.17 2.11 -0.5% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.60 19.04 19.85 20.08 20.24 20.17 20.00 0.2% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.19 23.79 23.97 24.48 25.20 26.85 28.63 0.8% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16 8.21 8.31 8.41 9.05 9.50 9.57 0.6% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 2.89 2.92 2.99 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.2% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

419

Annual Energy Outlook 2009: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 109 Appendix A Reference Case Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.19 12.40 14.06 15.63 15.96 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.58 2.55 2.57 2.62 2.61 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.95 20.88 22.08 23.87 24.26 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.49 24.43 25.11 26.93 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 8.99 9.04 9.47 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

420

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K5. Total Reference Case energy consumption in IEO2013 and IEO2011, 2020 and 2035 K5. Total Reference Case energy consumption in IEO2013 and IEO2011, 2020 and 2035 quadrillion Btu 2020 2035 Region IEO2013 IEO2011 IEO2013 IEO2011 Difference between IEO2013 and IEO2011 OECD Americas 255 261 276 288 -6 -12 Americas 126 131 137 148 -5 -11 United States 100 105 104 114 -4 -10 Canada 15 16 17 19 -1 -1 Mexico/Chile 11 10 16 15 1 1 Europea 85 87 93 94 -1 -1 Asia 43 43 46 47 0 -1 Japan 23 23 23 24 -1 -1 South Korea 13 12 15 14 1 1 Australia/New Zealand 7 8 8 9 0 -1 Non-OECD 375 359 501 482 16 19 Non-OECD Europe and Eurasiaa 53 52 65 58 1 6 Russia 33 31 40 36 2 4 Other 20 21 25 23 -1 2 Non-OECD Asia 230 215 317 299 15 18 China 159 141 213 191 18 22

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421

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source 7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.54 0.45 0.46 0.45 0.44 0.43 0.42 -0.3% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 1.95 2.00 2.50 2.67 2.79 2.92 3.07 1.5% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................. 0.17 0.19 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.2%

422

Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis of the results of Federal incentives used to stimulate energy production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study enhances the formulation of a national incentive policy for renewable resource utilization by examining past incentives for traditional energy forms. The research summarized builds on an analysis which estimated that in the years between 1918 and 1977 the Federal government expended $217.4 billion (1977 dollars), representing 33 distinct incentives, for incentives to stimulate energy production. The energy types considered were nuclear, hydroelectricity, coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. The present study shows that extra production induced by the incentives considered was at least 61 quadrillion Btu (quad). A summary is presented of the results of the 33 incentives in terms of their effects on energy price and quantity as well as on nonquantifiable values such as Federal-state relations, competition, and capital formation. The findings are reported so that the dialog can continue to incorporate the lessons from past incentives to the production of energy from traditional sources into a Federal renewable resource energy policy. They are reported as a budget to serve as a point of departure for future debate centering on the cost of specific Federal actions over relatively short periods.

Cone, B.W.; Sheppard, W.J.; Cole, R.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The composition of a quad of buildings sector energy: Physical, economic, and environmental quantities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an analysis conducted for the US Department of Energy Office of Building Technologies (OBT), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined the fuel type composition of energy consumed in the US buildings sector. Numerical estimates were developed for the physical quantities of fuel consumed, as well as of the fossil fuel emissions (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) and nuclear spent fuel byproducts associated with that consumption. Electric generating requirements and the economic values associated with energy consumption also were quantified. These variables were quantified for a generic quad (1 quadrillion Btu) of primary energy for the years 1987 and 2010, to illustrate the impacts of a fuel-neutral reduction in buildings sector energy use, and for specific fuel types, to enable meaningful comparisons of benefits achievable through various OBT research projects or technology developments. Two examples are provided to illustrate how these conversion factors may be used to quantify the impacts of energy savings potentially achievable through OBT building energy conservation efforts. 18 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

Secrest, T.J.; Nicholls, A.K.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

World energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Responses of energy use to climate change: A climate modeling study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

[1] Using a general-circulation climate model to drive an energy-use model, we projected changes in USA energy-use and in corresponding fossil-fuel CO2 emissions through year 2025 for a low (1.2 XC) and a high (3.4 XC) temperature response to CO2 doubling. The low- T scenario had a cumulative (2003-2025) energy increase of 1.09 quadrillion Btu (quads) for cooling/heating demand. Northeastern states had net energy reductions for cooling/heating over the entire period, but in most other regions energy increases for cooling outweighed energy decreases for heating. The high-?T scenario had significantly increased warming, especially in winter, so decreased heating needs led to a cumulative (2003-2025) heating/cooling energy decrease of 0.82 quads. In both scenarios, CO2 emissions increases from electricity generation outweighed CO2 emissions decreases from reduced heating needs. The results reveal the intricate energy-economy structure that must be considered in projecting consequences of climate warming for energy, economics, and fossil-fuel carbon emissions.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Blasing, T J [ORNL; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L [ORNL; Broniak, C [Oregon State University

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary . Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 12.20 13.87 20.36 19.19 17.71 16.81 16.00 0.5% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 3.11 3.21 3.54 3.84 3.98 4.08 3.99 0.8% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 23.04 24.59 29.73 32.57 35.19 36.89 38.37 1.6% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.22 20.60 21.70 22.36 22.61 22.68 22.61 0.3% Nuclear / uranium 2 ................................................. 8.26 8.05 8.15 8.15 8.18 8.23 8.49 0.2%

428

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

429

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

430

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 (Quadrillion Btu) Residential and Commercial a Sectors, Selected Products Industrial a Sector, Selected Products Transportation Sector, Selected Products 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil LPG b 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Distillate Fuel Oil Asphalt and Road Oil 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Motor Gasoline c a Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. b Liquefied petroleum gases. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

431

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 1 Table B1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices 2011 Projections 2020 2030 2040 Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Production Crude oil and lease condensate .................... 12.16 15.95 15.95 15.99 12.93 13.47 13.79 12.69 13.12 13.37 Natural gas plant liquids ................................ 2.88 4.10 4.14 4.20 3.80 3.85 3.92 3.86 3.89 3.95 Dry natural gas .............................................. 23.51 26.58 27.19 27.80 29.33 30.44 31.92 32.46 33.87 35.32 Coal 1 ............................................................. 22.21

432

Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................... 17 5.2 Energy ­ Buildings and Transportation/person) ....................... 18 5.1.2 Renewable Energy Contribution (%)......................................................................................... 18 5.1.3 Building Energy Consumption (Btu, Btu/ft2 , Btu/person, Btu/ft2 /person

Eustice, Ryan

433

Nationwide: New Efficiency Standards for Power Supplies Anticipate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

effect in 2016. Over the next 30 years, the standards are expected to reduce national energy consumption by nearly one quadrillion British thermal units, reduce the energy...

434

Sup97a  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) 01 - New England 1995- 2015 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel . . . . . . . . . 0.268 0.281 0.273 0.277 0.271 0.269 0.266 0.264 0.262 0.261 0.259 0.256 0.254 0.254 0.251 0.250 0.249 0.249 0.248 0.248 0.248 -0.4% Kerosene . . . . . 0.010 0.012 0.010 0.009 0.009 0.009 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.007 0.007 0.007 0.007 0.007 0.006 0.006 0.006 0.006 0.006 -2.8% Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.023 0.024 0.023 0.022 0.021 0.021 0.021 0.020 0.020 0.020 0.020 0.019 0.019 0.019 0.019 0.018 0.018 0.018 0.018 0.018 0.017 -1.5% Petroleum Subtotal . . . . 0.302 0.317 0.306 0.307 0.301 0.299 0.295 0.292 0.290

435

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth 4. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 121.2 132.4 143.4 152.5 161.6 1.6 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 100.6 108.7 116.9 123.2 129.1 1.4 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 13.7 15.1 16.6 18.1 19.7 1.9 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.9 8.6 9.9 11.2 12.8 3.4 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 71.9 78.9 85.6 92.4 99.8 1.7 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 29.5 32.1 35.1 38.2 41.7 1.9 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 23.2 25.2 27.6 30.1 32.9 1.9 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.8 1.8

436

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released Date: February 2006 Released Date: February 2006 Next Release Date: February 2007 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) New England 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel 0.313 0.330 0.337 0.301 0.294 0.294 0.293 0.293 0.292 0.291 0.288 0.286 0.284 0.282 0.278 Kerosene 0.012 0.014 0.014 0.016 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.031 0.031 0.031 0.032 0.032 0.032 0.033 0.033 Petroleum Subtotal 0.354 0.375 0.381 0.346 0.338 0.339 0.338 0.338 0.337 0.337 0.334 0.332 0.330 0.328 0.325 Natural Gas 0.200 0.191 0.193 0.191 0.191 0.193 0.193 0.195 0.196 0.197 0.197

437

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted)-New England - 01 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0.025 0.024 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.026 0.026 0.027 0.027 0.028 0.029 0.029 Kerosene 0.015 0.012 0.015 0.015 0.014 0.014 0.013 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 Distillate Fuel Oil 0.316 0.259 0.302 0.291 0.282 0.276 0.277 0.278 0.277 0.277 0.277 0.277 0.276 Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Subtotal 0.356 0.295 0.342 0.331 0.321 0.315 0.316 0.318 0.318 0.318 0.318 0.320 0.319 Natural Gas 0.199 0.177 0.196 0.196 0.195 0.192 0.194 0.196 0.196 0.198 0.199 0.201 0.201 Coal 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Renewable Energy 1/ 0.028 0.023 0.027 0.027 0.026 0.025 0.025 0.024 0.024 0.024

438

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 2.5 Household 1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End Use, Selected Years, 1978-2005 Year Space Heating Air Conditioning Water Heating Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 LPG 5 Total Consumption (quadrillion Btu) 1978 4.26 0.40 2.05 0.23 6.94 0.31 1.04 0.29 0.14 0.06 1.53 0.28 1.46 0.03 1.77 1980 3.41 .27 1.30 .23 5.21 .36 1.15 .30 .22 .07 1.74 .36 1.54 .05 1.95 1981 3.69 .26 1.06 .21 5.22 .34 1.13 .30 .22 .06 1.71 .43 1.52 .05 2.00 1982 3.14 .25 1.04 .19 4.62 .31 1.15 .28 .15 .06 1.64 .43 1.50 .05 1.98 1984 3.51 .25 1.11 .21 5.08 .32 1.10 .32 .15 .06 1.63 .35 1.59 .04 1.98 1987 3.38 .28 1.05 .22 4.93 .44 1.10 .31 .17 .06 1.64 .34 1.72 .04 2.10 1990 3.37 .30 .93 .19 4.79 .48 1.16 .34 .11 .06 1.67 .33 1.91 .03 2.27 1993 3.67

439

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Reference Case, . World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Reference Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 119.8 128.1 136.5 142.1 147.1 1.2 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 99.8 105.8 112.2 115.7 118.6 1.1 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 13.3 14.3 15.4 16.4 17.5 1.5 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.6 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 2.8 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 69.7 74.5 79.0 83.4 88.1 1.2 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 28.4 30.1 32.1 34.1 36.3 1.3 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 22.3 23.5 25.1 26.7 28.5 1.3 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.4 7.8 1.4 Total Industrialized 184.7 199.1 205.8 217.9 232.8 247.6 259.6 271.5 1.2

440

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) New England 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel 0.313 0.330 0.337 0.301 0.294 0.294 0.293 0.293 0.292 0.291 0.288 0.286 0.284 0.282 0.278 Kerosene 0.012 0.014 0.014 0.016 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.031 0.031 0.031 0.032 0.032 0.032 0.033 0.033 Petroleum Subtotal 0.354 0.375 0.381 0.346 0.338 0.339 0.338 0.338 0.337 0.337 0.334 0.332 0.330 0.328 0.325 Natural Gas 0.200 0.191 0.193 0.191 0.191 0.193 0.193 0.195 0.196 0.197 0.197 0.198 0.199 0.201 0.201 Coal 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Renewable Energy 1/

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

593 593 Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) New England Sector and Source 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Transportation Distillate Fuel 8/ 0.155 0.158 0.157 0.163 0.168 0.172 0.177 0.182 0.188 0.194 0.200 0.205 0.210 Jet Fuel 9/ 0.079 0.075 0.074 0.074 0.073 0.074 0.076 0.077 0.079 0.081 0.082 0.084 0.086 Motor Gasoline 2/ 0.776 0.786 0.805 0.821 0.835 0.853 0.872 0.892 0.913 0.933 0.953 0.972 0.989 Residual Fuel 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.003 Other Petroleum 10/ 0.008 0.008 0.009 0.009 0.009 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.009 0.009 Petroleum Subtotal 1.020 1.030 1.047 1.069 1.088

442

Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth 7. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 118.3 123.6 129.3 131.3 132.7 0.8 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 98.9 102.6 106.9 107.7 107.7 0.7 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 12.9 13.6 14.2 14.8 15.5 1.0 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.4 7.4 8.2 8.8 9.5 2.2 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 67.6 70.4 72.9 75.3 77.8 0.7 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 27.3 28.2 29.4 30.5 31.6 0.7 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 21.3 22.0 22.9 23.7 24.6 0.7 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.7 7.0 0.9

444

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables 2-18  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Consumption: AEO Forecasts, Actual Values, and Total Energy Consumption: AEO Forecasts, Actual Values, and Absolute and Percent Errors, 1985-1999 Publication 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Average Absolute Error (Quadrillion Btu) AEO82 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.0 83.3 1.8 AEO83 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.8 84.6 89.5 1.2 AEO84 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.0 86.4 93.5 1.5 AEO85 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.6 83.3 84.2 85.2 85.9 86.7 87.7 1.3 AEO86 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.6 81.5 82.9 84.0 84.8 85.7 86.5 87.9 88.4 87.8 88.7 3.6 AEO87 78.9 80.0 81.9 82.8 83.9 85.3 86.4 87.5 88.4 1.5 AEO89 82.2 83.7 84.5 85.4 86.4 87.3 88.2 89.2 90.8 91.4 90.9 91.7 1.8

445

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outdoor temp. BTU meter, boiler & Pumps electrical power OneBTU meter, one electrical meter per boiler (e.g. 4), pumpsPlant BTU Meter $ 4000, boiler electrical meter $ 500 each,

Lanzisera,, Judy Lai, Steven M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Coal and the Present Energy Situation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heating value. High-Btu gas, commonly...substitute natural gas (SNG...ago, when natural gas was cheap and...cubic foot. High-Btu Gas...developed a high-pressure, stirred...low-Btu gas (14). A...

Elburt F. Osborn

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Case study of environmental protection agency (EPA) region 8 headquarters building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy utilization intensity (EUI) was 71 kBtu-sf/yr. Thesite energy use intensity (EUI) is 71 kBtu/ft 2 . yr. Figureenergy utilization intensity (EUI) was 71 kBtu-sf/yr. Since

Webster, Tom; Bauman, Fred; Dickerhoff, Darryl J; Lee, Yoon Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline; 137,800 BTU/gallon for diesel fuel) 3412 = BTU/kWhcontent of diesel fuel per gallon (137,800 BTU/gallon HHVBTU/gallon HHV), and 15% due to the higher compression ratio of diesel

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

2.1E Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECFD Efficiency of diesel engine (Btu/Btu) THLOF Ratio ofDIESEL-OIL COAL METHANOL OTHER-FUEL ELEC-NET-SALE ELEC-BUY/SELL calculated calculated English ENERGY/UNIT Btu

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United...

452

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.810 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 26.304 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short ton 23.651 Residential and commercial .................... million Btu per short ton 20.698 Electric power sector ............................... million Btu per short ton 19.370

453

2.1E Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TURBF Internal turbine efficiency (Btu/Btu) ELEFF Efficiencyspecifies the gas turbine conversion efficiency of fuel tospecifies the gas turbine conversion efficiency of fuel to

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Type Foot (thousand Btu) (1) (million Btu) Members...

455

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Coal (dollars per million Btu)",,, "Average heat value (Btu per...

456

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Coal (dollars per million Btu)",,,1.44,,, "Average heat value (Btu per...

457

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monthly energy use comparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heatinguse comparison Annual EUI, kBtu/sf-yr Lighting Heating

Lee, Eleanor S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

z = specific primary energy consumption of RF dryer (Btu/and specific primary energy consumption (240 Btu/lb. ) of RFenergy consumption of base technologies in 2020 (primary)

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. OECD and non-OECD net renewable electricity generation by energy source, 2010-2040 4. OECD and non-OECD net renewable electricity generation by energy source, 2010-2040 billion kilowatthours Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-2040 OECD Hydroelectric 1,338 1,412 1,497 1,574 1,661 1,749 1,841 1.1 wind 269 531 718 855 903 961 1,052 4.7 Geothermal 41 52 68 79 93 104 115 3.5 Solar 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Other 263 290 346 373 385 401 426 1.6 Total OECD 1,943 2,408 2,774 3,046 3,222 3,426 3,687 2.2 Non-OECD Hydroelectric 2,064 2,393 2,955 3,188 3,516 3,943 4,390 2.6 wind 73 235 418 527 641 733 787 8.3 Geothermal 25 60 65 67 78 91 105 4.9 Solar 1 34 95 124 146 183 199 18.6

460

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. World coal production by region, 2010-2040 0. World coal production by region, 2010-2040 million short tons Region 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 OECD Americas 1,171 1,138 1,174 1,217 1,256 1,272 1,283 0.3 United States 1,084 1,046 1,080 1,119 1,156 1,169 1,177 0.3 Canada 75 81 83 85 87 90 93 0.7 Mexico/Chile 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 0.3 OECD Europe 620 583 568 552 537 522 504 -0.7 OECD Asia 476 549 540 580 591 641 687 1.2 Japan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- South Korea 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 -0.9 Australia/New Zealand 473 547 537 578 589 638 685 1.2 Total OECD 2,267 2,271 2,282 2,349 2,384 2,434 2,474 0.3 Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 684 663 707 746 775 805 820 0.6 Russia 359 373 400 421 434 447 446 0.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2010-2040 quadrillion btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Advanced Design and Commissioning Tools for Energy-Efficient Building Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy utilization intensity (EUI) was 47 kBtu-sf/yr. TaskStar Energy Star Rating NA EUI 47.5 kBtu/sf/yr 71. kBtu/sf/Sensitivity Study Annual HVAC EUI (kBtu/sf/yr - source) Fans

Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel, or about 46,200 BTUs of diesel fuel per mile. 4.1.8BTU/bbl 3575 g/gal Diesel fuel 106 BTU/gal 106 BTU/bbl 3192gasoline or diesel vehicles (g/106-BTU) E NMOG = emissions

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.800 Coke Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 26.327 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.911 Residential and Commercial . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.284 Electric Power Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.536 Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton

465

Title Goes Here In This PositionMillersville University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity consumption is responsible for 66% of emissions 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 Scope 1 Consumption: 61,734 BTU/GSF UD's Electric Consumption: 59,396 BTU/GSF 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250 Consumption & Tech. Rating Total BTU/GSF Fossil Consumption: 29,362 BTU/GSF Electric Consumption: 77,495 BTU

Hardy, Christopher R.

466

Introducing Mira, Argonne's Next-Generation Supercomputer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mira, the new petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system installed at the ALCF, will usher in a new era of scientific supercomputing. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops machine is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second.

None

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

467

Socio-Economic Disequilibrium Catalyzed by Internet of Things (IoT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How will the tapestry of humanity and the ethos of civilization evolve when billions of devices and trillions of sensors with quadrillion end points can connect events in our daily lives to the world around us and monitor ...

Datta, Shoumen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy Department Announces $10 Million for Innovative Commercial...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

buildings consume more than 18 quadrillion British thermal units (quads) of primary energy use annually, or about 18% of all the energy used in the nation in 2012. If building...

469

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

470

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

471

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

58 58 Appendix A Table A2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Reference case, 2006-2035 (Quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2008-2035 2006 2007 2008 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 49.6 49.9 47.7 48.6 48.9 49.4 50.5 52.1 0.3 Natural gas 28.2 29.5 29.6 31.9 33.1 34.1 36.1 38.1 0.9 Coal 24.4 24.7 24.3 21.3 22.5 24.3 25.2 26.5 0.3 Nuclear 9.4 9.6 9.5 10.1 10.7 10.7 11.0 11.1 0.6 Other 10.7 10.7 11.8 14.2 15.8 17.3 18.8 19.9 2.0 Total 122.3 124.3 122.9 126.1 131.0 135.9 141.6 147.7 0.7 OECD Europe Liquids 32.5 32.1 32.0 29.7 30.1 30.4 30.5 30.6 -0.2- Natural gas 19.7 19.6 20.1 20.4 21.0 21.6 22.7 23.9 0.7 Coal 13.2 13.5 12.5 11.5 11.2 10.8 10.5 10.4 -0.7- Nuclear 9.7 9.2 9.1 10.0 10.3 11.1 11.5 11.8 1.0 Other 7.6 8.1 8.4 12.0 14.2 15.8 16.5 17.1 2.7 Total 82.8 82.3 82.2 83.6 86.9 89.7 91.8 93.8 0.5 OECD Asia Liquids

472

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

473

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

474

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix A Table A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2006-2035 (Quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2008-2035 2006 2007 2008 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 OECD OECD Americas 10.7 10.7 11.8 14.2 15.8 17.3 18.8 19.9 2.0 United States a 6.4 6.2 7.0 8.6 9.5 10.6 11.3 11.8 1.9 Canada 3.7 3.9 4.0 4.3 4.9 5.2 5.7 6.0 1.5 Mexico/Chile 0.6 0.6 0.7 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.8 2.1 4.0 OECD Europe 7.6 8.1 8.4 12.0 14.2 15.8 16.5 17.1 2.7 OECD Asia 2.0 1.9 1.9 3.1 3.6 3.9 4.1 4.3 3.1 Japan 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.6 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.9 South Korea 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 3.0 Australia/NewZealand 0.7 0.7 0.7 1.2 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.6 3.3 Total OECD 20.4 20.7 22.1 29.3 33.6 37.1 39.4 41.4 2.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 5.0 1.9 Russia 1.9 1.9 1.7 2.1 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 2.1 Other 1.4 1.2

475

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

476

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

477

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Appendix A Table A7. World coal consumption by region, Reference case, 2006-2035 (Quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2008-2035 2006 2007 2008 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 OECD OECD Americas 24.4 24.7 24.3 21.3 22.5 24.3 25.2 26.5 0.3 United States a 22.5 22.7 22.4 19.7 20.8 22.6 23.4 24.3 0.3 Canada 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 -0.7- Mexico/Chile 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.1 2.6 OECD Europe 13.2 13.5 12.5 11.5 11.2 10.8 10.5 10.4 -0.7- OECD Asia 9.2 9.6 9.9 9.7 9.5 9.4 9.5 9.7 -0.1- Japan 4.6 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.2 4.0 3.8 -0.8- South Korea 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.8 3.1 3.4 1.0 Australia/NewZealand 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 -0.1- Total OECD 46.8 47.8 46.8 42.6 43.1 44.6 45.3 46.7 0.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 8.8 8.6 8.9 8.5 8.2 8.0 8.1 8.5 -0.2- Russia 4.4 4.2 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.9 0.3 Other 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 -0.7-

478

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

479

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 19. Energy Intensity, Actual vs. Forecasts (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.6 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.6 AEO 1984 20.1 18.9 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.3 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.1 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.5 12.6 11.8 11.0 10.3 9.6 8.8 8.2 7.7 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.8 13.0 12.2 11.5 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 11.0 10.4 9.7 9.0 8.4 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 AEO 1994 14.1 13.5 13.1 12.6 12.1 11.6 11.1 10.6

480

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

482

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

483

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% | 1.01 1.06 4.8% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.18 0.43 3.7% | 0.57 0.81 3.7% Computers 0.17 0.17 1.5% | 0.53 0.53 2.4% Other (8) 0.00 0.16 0.01 0.20 0.37 3.2% | 0.63 0.80 3.6% Adjust to SEDS (9) 0.42 0.42 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.8% Total 5.06 0.63 0.56 0.04 0.45 4.95 11.69 100% | 15.34 22.07 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.42 quad), solar water heating (0.01

484

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% | 0.95 1.01 4.3% Cooking 0.23 0.02 0.15 0.40 3.3% | 0.44 0.69 2.9% Computers 0.27 0.27 2.2% | 0.79 0.79 3.3% Other (8) 0.00 0.22 0.07 1.48 1.77 14.6% | 4.35 4.64 19.6% Total 4.76 0.35 0.51 0.03 0.55 5.94 12.14 100% | 17.50 23.69 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.44 quad), solar water heating (0.02

485

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.10 0.68 0.26 0.09 0.55 0.59 7.27 35.9% | 1.77 8.45 21.5% Lighting 1.52 1.52 7.5% | 4.65 4.65 11.8% Space Cooling 0.04 0.54 0.57 2.8% | 4.60 4.63 11.8% Water Heating 1.79 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.57 2.55 12.6% | 1.71 3.70 9.4% Refrigeration (6) 0.81 0.81 4.0% | 2.43 2.43 6.2% Electronics (7) 1.54 1.54 7.6% | 1.94 1.94 4.9% Ventilation (8) 0.14 0.14 0.7% | 1.62 1.62 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.14 1.14 2.9% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.64 0.70 3.5% | 0.98 1.04 2.7% Cooking 0.41 0.03 0.33 0.76 3.8% | 0.41 0.85 2.2% Other (10) 0.33 0.01 0.31 0.05 0.06 1.76 2.52 12.4% | 5.30 6.06 15.4% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 7.4% | 1.90 2.77 7.1% Total 8.40 0.98 0.65 0.14

486

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% | 0.91 0.98 4.4% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.13 0.38 3.2% | 0.40 0.64 2.9% Computers 0.24 0.24 2.0% | 0.72 0.72 3.2% Other (8) 0.00 0.20 0.07 1.20 1.46 12.5% | 3.61 3.87 17.3% Total 4.88 0.43 0.50 0.03 1.00 5.30 11.69 100% | 16.00 22.39 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

487

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% | 0.98 1.04 5.0% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.11 0.36 3.1% | 0.34 0.59 2.8% Computers 0.19 0.19 1.7% | 0.57 0.57 2.7% Other (8) 0.00 0.17 0.05 0.94 1.17 10.2% | 2.85 3.07 14.6% Total 4.99 0.55 0.51 0.03 0.51 4.79 11.38 100% | 14.47 21.06 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

488

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

489

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.96 0.57 0.24 0.09 0.57 0.63 7.05 33.2% | 1.89 8.31 19.6% Space Cooling 0.03 1.64 1.67 7.9% | 4.94 4.97 11.7% Lighting 1.55 1.55 7.3% | 4.68 4.68 11.0% Water Heating 1.84 0.08 0.04 0.05 0.62 2.63 12.4% | 1.86 3.88 9.1% Refrigeration (6) 0.82 0.82 3.9% | 2.47 2.47 5.8% Electronics (7) 0.78 0.78 3.7% | 2.34 2.34 5.5% Ventilation (8) 0.60 0.60 2.8% | 1.80 1.80 4.2% Computers 0.44 0.44 2.0% | 1.31 1.31 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.30 0.37 1.7% | 0.91 0.98 2.3% Cooking 0.43 0.03 0.15 0.61 2.9% | 0.46 0.92 2.2% Other (10) 0.48 0.01 0.34 0.05 0.08 2.32 3.28 15.5% | 7.00 7.96 18.7% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 6.9% | 2.09 2.85 6.7% Total 8.39 0.84 0.65 0.15

490

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

491

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 7.42 28.2% 3.04 11.5% 0.15 0.6% 0.87 3.3% 4.35 10.47 14.82 56.4% 26.29 100% - 1981 7.11 27.5% 2.63 10.2% 0.17 0.6% 0.89 3.5% 4.50 10.54 15.03 58.2% 25.84 100% - 1982 7.32 27.8% 2.45 9.3% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.57 10.80 15.37 58.4% 26.31 100% - 1983 6.93 26.4% 2.50 9.5% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.68 11.01 15.68 59.6% 26.30 100% - 1984 7.20 26.4% 2.74 10.0% 0.21 0.8% 1.00 3.7% 4.93 11.24 16.17 59.2% 27.31 100% - 1985 6.98 25.4% 2.62 9.5% 0.18 0.6% 1.03 3.8% 5.06 11.59 16.65 60.6% 27.47 100% - 1986 6.74 24.5% 2.68 9.7% 0.18 0.6% 0.95 3.4% 5.23 11.75 16.98 61.7% 27.52 100% - 1987 6.87 24.4% 2.73 9.7% 0.17 0.6% 0.88 3.1% 5.44 12.04 17.48 62.2% 28.13 100% - 1988 7.44 25.0%

492

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Fuel Other Renw. Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.14 0.76 0.30 0.10 0.54 0.72 7.56 37.0% | 2.24 9.07 22.5% Space Cooling 0.04 1.92 1.96 9.6% | 5.94 5.98 14.8% Lighting 1.88 1.88 9.2% | 5.82 5.82 14.4% Water Heating 1.73 0.13 0.07 0.04 0.54 2.51 12.3% | 1.67 3.63 9.0% Refrigeration (6) 0.84 0.84 4.1% | 2.62 2.62 6.5% Electronics (7) 0.81 0.81 3.9% | 2.49 2.49 6.2% Ventilation (8) 0.54 0.54 2.6% | 1.66 1.66 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.19 1.19 2.9% Cooking 0.39 0.03 0.21 0.63 3.1% | 0.64 1.06 2.6% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.33 0.38 1.9% | 1.01 1.06 2.6% Other (10) 0.30 0.01 0.30 0.05 0.02 0.89 1.58 7.7% | 2.76 3.45 8.6% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.25 0.44 1.37 6.7% | 1.35 2.28 5.7% Total 8.35 1.14 0.70 0.15 0.59 9.49 20.43

493

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.84 0.49 0.22 0.09 0.57 0.66 6.87 30.5% | 1.93 8.15 17.9% Space Cooling 0.03 1.79 1.82 8.1% | 5.27 5.30 11.7% Lighting 1.63 1.63 7.3% | 4.81 4.81 10.6% Water Heating 1.81 0.07 0.03 0.06 0.63 2.60 11.6% | 1.86 3.83 8.4% Electronics (6) 0.90 0.90 4.0% | 2.66 2.66 5.8% Refrigeration (7) 0.88 0.88 3.9% | 2.60 2.60 5.7% Ventilation (8) 0.65 0.65 2.9% | 1.91 1.91 4.2% Computers 0.49 0.49 2.2% | 1.43 1.43 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.07 0.32 0.39 1.7% | 0.95 1.01 2.2% Cooking 0.45 0.02 0.17 0.65 2.9% | 0.50 0.98 2.2% Other (10) 0.81 0.01 0.38 0.06 0.08 2.94 4.28 19.0% | 8.65 9.99 21.9% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 6.0% | 2.28 2.86 6.3% Total 8.41 0.75 0.66 0.15

494

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

495

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

496

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 U.S. Buildings Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GSHP (4) Total 2010-Year 1980 0.867 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.867 - 1981 0.894 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.894 - 1982 0.993 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.993 - 1983 0.992 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.992 - 1984 1.002 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.002 - 1985 1.034 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.034 - 1986 0.947 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.947 - 1987 0.882 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.882 - 1988 0.942 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.942 - 1989 1.018 0.052 N.A. 0.008 1.078 - 1990 0.675 0.056 N.A. 0.008 0.739 - 1991 0.705 0.057 N.A. 0.009 0.771 - 1992 0.744 0.059 N.A. 0.010 0.813 - 1993 0.657 0.061 N.A. 0.010 0.728 - 1994 0.626 0.063 N.A. 0.010 0.700 - 1995 0.633 0.064 N.A. 0.011 0.708 - 1996 0.669 0.065 N.A. 0.012 0.746 - 1997 0.559 0.064 N.A. 0.013 0.636 - 1998 0.498 0.064 N.A. 0.015 0.577 - 1999 0.521 0.063 N.A. 0.016 0.599 - 2000 0.549 0.060 N.A. 0.016 0.625 - 2001

497

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

498

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

499

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

500

Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) 01 - New England 1996- 2020 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel . . . . . . . . . . 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 -0.7% Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -2.6% Liquefied Petroleum Gas . 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -0.9% Petroleum Subtotal . . . . . 0.32 0.32 0.31 0.31 0.31 0.30 0.30 0.29 0.29 0.29 0.29 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27