Sample records for 2001-2009 2008-2009 alabama

  1. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  2. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  3. NERSC Annual Report 2008-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Vu, Linda; Wylie, Margie; Risbud, Aditi; Chen, Allen

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the years 2008-2009. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services as well as activities of NERSC staff.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    08-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report 2008-2009fuelstechnologies.pdf More Documents &...

  5. Office of University Planning, Budgeting, and Analysis The University of Montana _______________________________________________________________ 2008-2009 Data Digest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    _______________________________________________________________ 2008-2009 Data Digest QUICK FACTS Founded: 1893 Location: 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 University

  6. Forestry Policies (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alabama's Forests are managed by the Alabama Forestry Commission. The Commission has organized biomass market resources including a number of publications with regard to biomass energy...

  7. ENG EC505 Stochastic Processes 2008-2009 Catalog Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENG EC505 Stochastic Processes 2008-2009 Catalog Data: Prereq: ENG EC 401, CAS MA 142 or equivalent: "Course Notes on Stochastic Processes" by D. A. Castanon & W. C. Karl available from the class web site, Prentice-Hall, 1986. K. Sam Shanmugan, Random Signals: Detection, Estimation, and Data Analysis, Wiley

  8. 2008-2009 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2008-2009 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year Communication and Information 150 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 3 ___ Communication and Information 150 English 101, 102 6 Arts and Humanities Elective 3 ___ General Elective 1 ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies

  9. Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering D. Chimenti: Invited plenary Base, Florida H. Hu: 2009 AIAA Best Paper Award, AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee A. Laws: Deans' Staff Excellence Award, College of Engineering, ISU V. Levitas: Einstein Award for Scientific

  10. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. StateAlabama

  11. 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Alabama 314 320 330 343 347 379 21%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    116 MN 196 MI 490 ME 126 LA 213 NH 169 NY 1,988 NM 143 NC 2,375 OH 643 ND 13 NV 196 TX 1,957 TN 790 SD,657 1,728 1,734 1,957 24% Utah 68 66 69 73 77 93 37% Vermont 68 63 63 68 71 78 15% Virginia 1,106 1,128 1,160 1,196 1,199 1,303 18% Washington 405 415 433 444 452 513 27% West Virginia 87 83 88 86 86 106

  12. State 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Alabama 16 13 6 9 7 7 -56%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    3 CA 50 OR 5 WA 13 WY 0 ND 5 SD 0 NE 9 KS 5 OK 7 MN 14 WI 12 MI 43 IA 7 MO 19 IL 55 AR 4 AL 7 AK 2 5 6 200% Vermont 5 6 6 5 6 9 80% Virginia 38 40 41 45 49 52 37% Washington 8 8 6 12 13 13 63% West Virginia 6 7 4 2 6 7 17% Wisconsin 10 13 17 18 19 12 20% Wyoming 0 0 0 1 0 0 0% Total States 26,166 26

  13. Taller de Probabilidad y Simulacion Probabilidad I, curso 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

    Taller de Probabilidad y Simulaci´on Probabilidad I, curso 2008-2009 Departamento de Matem describen). #12;Taller de Probabilidad y Simulaci´on Probabilidad I, curso 2008-2009, UAM Para moverse por distinto de 2. Pablo Fern´andez Gallardo 2 #12;Taller de Probabilidad y Simulaci´on Probabilidad I, curso

  14. The PeTroleum InsTITuTe Annual report 2008 -2009 The PeTroleum InsTITuTe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The PeTroleum InsTITuTe Annual report 2008 - 2009 The PeTroleum InsTITuTe Annual report - Academic Year 2008 - 2009 online version #12;The PeTroleum InsTITuTe Annual report 2008 - 2009 #12;The PeTroleum InsTITuTe Annual report 2008 - 2009 ConTenTs 1. InTroduCTIon offICe of The PresIdenT 4 2. ACAdemIC de

  15. Alabama - SEP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Huntsville program fact sheet Sample Energy Performance Score report Facebook: Nexus Energy Center Alabama Program Takes a Dual Approach to Energy Efficiency Upgrades Alabama...

  16. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  17. School of Law Catalog 2008-2009 Vol. 2009, No. 2, June 30, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School of Law Catalog 2008-2009 Vol. 2009, No. 2, June 30, 2008 Periodical postage paid at Lawrence ........................................................ 3 The University of Kansas Administration .................................. 3 School of Law Administration ...................................................... 3 The School of Law and Its Programs

  18. Water Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

  19. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys Conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report presents results of a 2008/2009 survey of hydrogen and fuel cell awareness conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 2008/2009 survey follows up on a similar DOE survey conduc

  20. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors IDS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350 Financial Accounting FIN 321: Managerial Economics FIN 325: Intermediate Finance FIN 323 with a C FIN 327

  1. 276 Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    276 Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin Drug-Free Policy Policy Statement as a Drug-Free Institution The University of Kentucky is committed to providing a healthy and safe to the unlawful possession, use, dispensa- tion, distribution or manufacture of alcohol or illicit drugs. Conduct

  2. Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article establishes a program, to be implemented, maintained, and administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, to encourage the voluntary cleanup and the reuse and...

  3. Recovery Act State Memos Alabama

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    two graduate students throughout its duration. MontgoMery Hurricanes, tornadoes, jobs and energy efficiency in Montgomery, Alabama Warm, humid climate and proximity to the Gulf of...

  4. Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing 1. What NDT testing methods for concrete materials, concrete pavements, and overlays are you trying? · We perform pavement smoothness testing, pavement friction testing and FWD testing · We are currently using GPR on the I-59 project to locate voids

  5. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Alabama Applies to States or Provinces Alabama Name Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type...

  6. South Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Alabama Electric Cooperative (SAEC) is a part owner of Alabama Electric Cooperative which has a generation facility in Andalusia, Alabama. The Energy Resources Conservation Loan (ERC) helps...

  7. AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) is now offering an energy efficiency and renewable energy revolving loan fund called AlabamaSAVES. The funds are available to...

  8. 85College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    85College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin M. Scott Smith, Ph.D., is Dean and Director of the College of Agriculture; Nancy M. Cox of Agriculture are combined into a coordinated, mutually supporting program of undergraduate

  9. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  10. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Alabama as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  11. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  12. Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to environmental covenants arising from environmental response projects conducted under any of the following Alabama Department of Environmental Management programs: Scrap...

  13. Finales Ranking Club Apollo 13 (2008/2009) Bei Rckfragen bitte Mail an: leydecker@unikik.uni-hannover.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Finales Ranking Club Apollo 13 (2008/2009) Bei Rckfragen bitte Mail an: leydecker Helmstedt 17 10 18 22 3 57 12 69 #12;Apollo-Crew 5 12, 13 Leibnizschule Hannover Kthe-Einstein-Gymnasium Hameln 18 7 17 21,5 4 56,5 9 65,5 Apollo911 3 11 Gymnasium "In Der Wste" 21 10 22 53 9 62 Die heimlichen

  14. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy efficiency, lack of financing options, lack of community support for energy efficiency programs, and

  15. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

  16. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.D. (J.R. Holland and Associates, Northport, AL (US)); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Alabama, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  18. Alabama successes spur interest in eastern Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redden, J.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow waters of the eastern fringe of the Gulf of Mexico are becoming a world-class offshore gas play. Spurred by the success ratio offshore Alabama, the water off Mississippi and Florida are drawing intense interest as oil companies attempt to extend the prolific Norphlet formation. Sitting at the heart of the recent interest in the eastern Gulf are the state and federal waters off Alabama. Exploration and drilling activity in the area are discussed.

  19. Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil

  20. This is archived information. Please visit http://maths.manchester.ac.uk for current course unit information. MATH37012 -2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    This is archived information. Please visit http://maths.manchester.ac.uk for current course unit information. MATH37012 - 2008/2009 General Information · Title: Markov Processes · Unit code: MATH37012 · Credits: 10 · Prerequisites: MATH20701 · Co-requisite units: None · School responsible: Mathematics

  1. SNRE MS and MLA Career Information From 2008-2009 the School of Natural Resources and Environment graduated 84 MS and MLA students.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Corps (Protected Areas Management Advisor) USDA Forest Service Sierra National Forest (Natural Resource (Research Assistant) Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum (Natural Areas Manager) Michigan StateSNRE MS and MLA Career Information From 2008-2009 the School of Natural Resources and Environment

  2. Committees 2008-2009 as of August 8, 2008 Building Hughes,Blumberg,N.Andrei(S),Thomson, Ransome(F),Koller(S),Cheong,Horton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Mei-Fang

    Sheet1 Committees 2008-2009 as of August 8, 2008 Building Hughes(F),N.Andrei(S) Lucent Zimmermann, Oh, E.Andrei Newsletter Gilman, Baker Outreach Baker, Croft, Schnetzer, Matilsky Recruit Kalelkar Undergrad Studies Kalelkar,Baker(F),Bergman, Keeton(S), Horton,Leath, Shapiro Page 1 #12;

  3. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  4. Alabama's Hatter's Pond called a classic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaslin, J.C.

    1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Delineation of the combination (structural-stratigraphic) hydrocarbon traps in southern Alabama's Hatter's Pond field demands a thorough understanding of the facies distribution, diagenesis, and structural relations of the area. The field's trapping mechanism is highly complex. In addition to the salt movement associated with normal faulting, the porosity distribution - and hence reservoir development - is facies-selective and is significantly altered by the field's diagenetic changes. Hatter's Pond is one of the most important fields in the Smackover and Norphlet producing areas. The Jurassic section of southwest Alabama probably holds most of that state's oil and gas.

  5. DATA COLLECTION, QUALITY ASSURANCE, AND ANALYSIS PLAN FOR THE 2008/2009 HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELLS KNOWLEDGE AND OPINIONS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Survey, conducted for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program will measure the levels of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies within five target populations: (1) the general public, (2) students, (3) personnel in state and local governments, (4) potential end users of hydrogen fuel and fuel cell technologies in business and industry, and (5) safety and code officials. The ultimate goal of the surveys is a statistically valid, nationally based assessment. Distinct information collections are required for each of the target populations. Each instrument for assessing baseline knowledge is targeted to the corresponding population group. While many questions are identical across all populations, some questions are unique to each respondent group. The biggest data quality limitation of the hydrogen survey data (at least of the general public and student components) will be nonresponse bias. To ensure as high a response rate as possible, various measures will be taken to minimize nonresponse, including automated callbacks, cycling callbacks throughout the weekdays, and availability of Spanish speaking interviewers. Statistical adjustments (i.e., sampling weights) will also be used to account for nonresponse and noncoverage. The primary objective of the data analysis is to estimate the proportions of target population individuals who would respond to the questions in the various possible ways. Data analysis will incorporate necessary adjustments for the sampling design and sampling weights (i.e., probability sampling). Otherwise, however, the analysis will involve standard estimates of proportions of the interviewees responding in various ways to the questions. Sample-weight-adjusted contingency table chi-square tests will also be computed to identify differences between demographic groups The first round of Knowledge and Opinions Surveys was conducted in 2004. Analysis of these surveys produced a baseline assessment of technical knowledge about hydrogen and fuel cells and a statistically valid description of opinions about safety and potential usage in the United States. The current surveys will repeat the process used in 2004. In addition the 2008/2009 survey results will be compared with the 2004 baseline results to assess changes in knowledge levels and opinions. In 2011/2012, the surveys will be repeated, and changes in knowledge and opinions will again be assessed. The information gained from these surveys will be used to enhance and update the DOE Hydrogen Program's education efforts.

  6. Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  7. Alabama High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

  8. Central Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Alabama Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, offers the Touchstone Energy Home Program. Touchstone Energy Homes with a dual-fuel or geothermal heat pump qualify for...

  9. Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Summary of Reported Data More Documents & Publications Virginia -- SEP Summary of Reported Data NYSERDA Summary of Reported Data Michigan -- SEP Summary of Reported Data...

  10. Two Alabama Elementary Schools Get Cool with New HVAC Units ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    campaign. Winston's HVAC replacement project received a boost from the Alabama State Energy Program, which granted the school district a little more than 82,000 in Recovery...

  11. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    financing products, and stakeholder education and training. Managed by Nexus Energy Center, AlabamaWISE achieved success through high involvement from contractors to...

  12. Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act money to weatherize homes has resulted in much lower energy bills for Alabama families, including Mary, whose bill is about $300 cheaper now.

  13. Exploration pace fast in Mississippi, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration in northern and southern Mississippi and adjacent northwestern Alabama is off to a fast start in 1991. A sample of activity in the area includes a potentially significant Cambro-Ordovician Knox dolomite play building in northern Mississippi and west of the Black Warrior basin. In northeastern Mississippi, two companies are kicking off a Knox exploratory program on a spread of more than 200,000 net acres.

  14. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  15. Energy Incentive Programs, Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFact Sheet EnergyEnergy ExportsAlabama

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Alabama | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom:EnergyJoshuaThisAgency-Energy |Alabama.

  17. Trapping styles in Mississippi, Alabama Haynesville reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sticker, E.E. (Office of Geology, Jackson, MI (United States))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic Haynesville formation of Mississippi and Alabama has historically been just another stratigraphic unit to be penetrated before the underlying Smackover-Norphlet potential could be evaluated. But with recent production tests at rates in excess of 3,000 b/d of oil and individual wells that have produced more than 3 million bbl of oil equivalent, assuming a 6 Mcf/bbl ratio, many operators have reclassified the objectives status of the Haynesville from secondary to primary. The paper describes the structure and stratigraphy, the simple anticline, a complexly faulted anticline, a salt-breached anticline, depositional termination, and production projections.

  18. The Corporate Headquarters for Alabama Power Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reardon, J. G.; Penuel, K. M.

    of the "product", and also helps to delay require ments for future generating capacity. Therefore, cooling for the complex will be provided by a state of-the-art refrigeration plant and ice storage system which is capable of producing and storing one and a... 16-18, 1987 I Typical Peak Demand Breakdown Commercial Building LIGHTING (39.4%) AIR HANDLING (10.8%) / COOLING AUX (5.2%) Figure 1 DESIGN APPROACH Specific objectives established by Alabama Power for the project include: - Reduce peak...

  19. Addison, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington, Oklahoma: Energy ResourcesAlabama:

  20. Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airwaysource History View New PagesAlabama:

  1. Alabama Municipal Elec Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:Akuo EnergyFuelAlabama

  2. Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008EnergyAlabama/Wind Resources <

  3. Headland, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegal Document-Headland, Alabama: Energy

  4. Ozark, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  5. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry

  6. Save Energy Now Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment ofEnergy SummarySarahSeniorofAlabama

  7. Central Alabama Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: China Datang CorporationCenterCentraisCentral Alabama

  8. Gordon, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEFLakes,GoliadGordon, Alabama: Energy

  9. Enterprise, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolis JumpESLEnergyEnphase EnergyEnterprise, Alabama:

  10. Newville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchNewton,Newville, Alabama:

  11. Madrid, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:Madison GasMadisonburg,Alabama:

  12. Cottonwood, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis AtSystems |CostaCottonAlabama: Energy

  13. Dothan, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan, Alabama: Energy Resources

  14. Ariton, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,DelhiArdmore,Ariton, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump

  15. Ashford, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansasAshford, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  16. Rehobeth, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreviewAl., 2005) |RGGIRehobeth, Alabama:

  17. Alabama Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgoura Hills,OesteAkrong Machine ServicesAlabama

  18. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  19. Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 8, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis ZF North America used Alabama E3 funding to create a recycling program that saves more than 100,000 a year in trash pickup and landfill fees....

  20. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  1. Universit degli Studi di Udine, Corso di Laurea Triennale in Biotecnologie (Interfacolt) Esempi di domande per l'esame del Corso di Fisica 3 -A.A. 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    di domande per l'esame del Corso di Fisica 3 - A.A. 2008-2009 Termodinamica · Dare l'enunciato della I (o II) legge della Termodinamica e scrivere il suo significato · Durante una trasformazione termodinamica di un sistema, sotto quali condizioni l'entropia rimane invariata ? · Come sono definite le

  2. Gulf of Mexico-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper ThousandGulf(Million2008 2009

  3. SEP Success Story: Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - 9:44am Addthis The Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind is replacing almost 2,900 lights in 19 buildings across its campuses.| Photo courtesy of Alabama Institute for Deaf and...

  4. Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

    to enact legislation intended to deter unauthorized immigration. South Carolina, Utah, and Alabama have all followed Arizona, which was the first state to enact such a law. This study evaluates House Bill (HB) 56, Alabamas anti-unauthorized immigration...

  5. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from Proof of Concept to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  6. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  7. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET 1. Price Summary The cost estimate raises. These increases are MERIT, not cost-of-living, raises. Percentage of time is estimated. Salaries on Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC). Equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care and tuition

  8. The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

  9. A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    CAVT A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration y Research Center OBJECTIVE Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to H2 tank Loads Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to respond to rapid load changes MOTIVATION Fuel cell Automotive cycles include rapid load changes (passing

  10. Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama Angela Marie Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama by Angela Marie Jackson for the Degree of Master of Science Auburn, Alabama August 6, 2011 Keywords: White-tailed deer, fawn survival, coyote, predator-prey theory Copyright 2011 by Angela Marie Jackson Approved by Stephen S. Ditchkoff

  11. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  12. Lake View, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:Lake Region ElectricShore,Alabama: Energy

  13. Lamar County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:LakeIowa: EnergyClub,New Jersey:Alabama:

  14. Lowndes County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole,Lotsee,EnergyAlabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  15. Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway Heights,Akins,Akun StraitJumpAlabama Pine

  16. Alabama's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway Heights,Akins,Akun StraitJumpAlabama

  17. Alabama, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway Heights,Akins,AkunInformationAlabama,

  18. Chambers County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI Jump to:CerionChagrin Falls,Alabama:

  19. Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million Cubic

  20. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (MillionGrossFeet)

  1. Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in AlabamaGross Withdrawals

  2. Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in AlabamaGross

  3. Fayette County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway,FarmersFastcapAlabama: Energy Resources

  4. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf1.pdfALABAMA

  5. Henry County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategyHayesHeliofiles JumpNevada:Alabama:

  6. Houston County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to: navigation,Alabama: Energy

  7. Pickens County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonikaPhoenicia,PhycalPiattAlabama: Energy

  8. City of Dothan, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton, IowaDothan, Alabama

  9. City of Elba, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton,City of EastElba, Alabama

  10. City of Luverne, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCityLongmont, ColoradoLuverne, Alabama

  11. Greene County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder Jump to:Greenburgh, New York: EnergyAlabama:

  12. South Alabama Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan Inc Jump to:Sound(FIRM) |South Alabama

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Alabama Ordnance Works - AL 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyoming WyomingAeroprojects IncAlabama

  14. Crenshaw County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCp Holdings LlcCrenshaw County, Alabama: Energy

  15. Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstracts Chemical Sciences,DOE124Alabama

  16. Autauga County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to:Auriga Energy JumpTexas:Texas:Alabama: Energy

  17. Montgomery County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County, California: Energy ResourcesAlabama: Energy

  18. Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM - Building Americaof42.2Air-Source Heat PumpAlabama

  19. Baldwin County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 JumpBalch Springs, Texas:Alabama: Energy

  20. Barbour County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003Vermont:SolarfilmsAlabama: Energy Resources

  1. Randolph County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name:Rancia 2 Geothermal Power StationAlabama:

  2. Russell County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont: EnergyEasementsRushville,RusniAlabama:

  3. Franklin County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbsSalonga,FrancisAlabama: Energy Resources Jump

  4. Geneva County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGeneva County, Alabama: Energy

  5. City of Lafayette, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville, Louisiana (UtilityEnergyAlabama (Utility

  6. Colbert County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: EnergyCoeur d Alene FiberColbert County, Alabama:

  7. Annual Report 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    against the dollar and the euro indicated the impact that exchange rates can have on the Librarys ability to meet its readers needs. But if things had looked difficult in 200708, those difficulties were trivial compared to the year under review... directly involving staff from the Darwin Correspondence Project and others. OPTIMISING THE ENVIROMENT FOR STUDY AND RESEARCH Following the announcement of funding through HEFCEs Capital Investment Framework (CIF), the construction of Phase 6...

  8. Minors by College 2008 -2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    6652 Non-Profit Leadership HEHD 6655 Park and Protected Area Management HEHD 6660 Therapeutic 5640 Russian Area Studies AAH 7100 Science and Technology in Society AAH 7755 Screenwriting AAH 7400 Spanish-American Area Studies AAH 7750 Theatre AAH 8000 Women's Studies AAH 8210 Writing (Business

  9. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Alabama.

  11. History of coastal Alabama natural gas exploration and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.W.; Plater, J.R.; Kelley, J.Q.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study documents the development and growth of the natural gas industry offshore Alabama. This report provides a full account of natural gas discover, Mobile Bay leasing, industry exploration, industry development projects and production history. A gas production forecast is developed for the Mobile Bay region with and without proposed development of the Destin Dome OCS in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Coastal Alabama Norphlet and Miocene production will rise to 1.4 BCFD by 2000. Destin Dome`s production came online after Mobile Bay production from discovered reserves reaches peak, thereby sustaining supplies to interstate markets in the 1.4--1.6 BCFD through 2005. Combining both the Alabama state and federal OCS offshore production, the Alabama-Destin Dome production forecast reaches and sustains 1.6 BCFD between 2002--2004.

  12. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Alabama.

  13. Depositional history of Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama is the product of an overall Middle Jurassic transgression. However, significant lateral variation in lithologic sequence reflects the effects of Smackover paleotopography. Paleozoic ridges and Mesozoic horst blocks defined a number of paleohighs, which separated southwestern Alabama into a series of subbasins or embayments. The Smackover lithologic sequence differs significantly from basin to paleohigh. Initial transgression of Smackover seas reworked the upper surface of the underlying Norphlet clastics and resulted in deposition of intertidal to shallow subtidal algally laminated mudstones and peloidal and oncoidal wackestones and packstones. These lower Smackover rocks are common dolomitized and locally anhydritic. Initial lower Smackover deposition was restricted to paleolows, and subaerial clastic deposition continued over the still emergent paleohighs. As sea level continued to rise, these lower Smackover deposits graded upward into skeletal and peloidal wackestones that contain a sparse, somewhat restricted, faunal assemblage. These wackestones are interbedded with argillaceous organic-rich mudstones that reflect deeper, more restricted depositional conditions. By the early Oxfordian, the sea level rise had inundated most of the paleohighs. Ooid and oncoidal grainstone shoals developed across paleohighs and along the updip margin. In the basin centers, skeletal and peloidal wackestone/packstones were being deposited. As the rate of sea level rise decreased, the shoals began to prograde basinward and lagoonal environments developed behind the shoals in some areas. Sea level fluctuations led to the formation of stacked shallowing-upward sequences. Evaporitic sabkhas developed along the updip margin and prograded basinward behind the shoals, eventually terminating carbonate deposition.

  14. Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81 JOHN M. WARD and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Reports of ice shortages during the shrimp fishing season prompted a Na- tional closure regulation on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening

  15. Subsidence history of the Alabama promontory in response to Late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita thrusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitting, B.M.; Thomas, W.A. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alabama promontory of North American continental crust was framed during late Precambrian-Cambrian rifting by the northeast-striking Blue Ridge rift and the northwest-striking alabama-Oklahoma transform fault. A passive margin persisted along the western side of the promontory from Cambrian to Mississippian time, but the eastern side was affected by the Taconic and Acadian orogenies. Prior to initiation of Ouachita and Appalachian (Alleghanian) thrusting, the outline of the rifted margin of continental crust on the Alabama promontory remained intact; and the late paleozoic thrust belt conformed to the shape of the promontory, defining northwest-striking Ouachita thrust faults along the southwest side of the promontory, north-striking Appalachian (Georgia-Tennessee) thrust faults on the east, and northeast-striking Appalachian (Alabama) thrust faults across the corner of the promontory. Subsidence profiles perpendicular to each of the strike domains of the thrust belt have been constructed by calculating total subsidence from decompacted thickness of the synorogenic sedimentary deposits. The profile perpendicular to the Ouachita thrust belt shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the thrust front, indicating the classic signature of an orogenic foreland basin. The profile perpendicular to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust belt similarly shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the orogenic hinterland. These quantitative results support the conclusion that Black Warrior basin subsidence is tectonically rather than sedimentologically driven, and the timing of subsidence events reported here has implications for regional tectonic models.

  16. Upper Carboniferous Insects from the Pottsville Formation of Northern Alabama (Insecta: Ephemeropterida, Palaeodictyopterida, Odonatoptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    coal zone, in northern Alabama from localities associated with strip mines. All the sites are in the Black Warrior coal basin (Murrie et al., 1976); two are in Walker County and one in Tuscaloosa County (Fig. 1). Most of the fossils...

  17. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering) that are administratively supported by the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. In the last ten degrees in environmental engineering and architectural engineering. At the graduate level, the department

  18. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  19. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  20. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  1. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  2. Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Ting

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector...

  3. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  4. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  5. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  6. North Blowhorn Creek oil field - a stratigraphic trap in Black Warrior basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.; Reeves, P.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama contains shallow oil and gas prospects. To date more than 1000 wells have been drilled in the region and more than 90 petroleum fields and pools have been discovered. Mississippian sandstone reservoirs are the most productive horizons for hydrocarbons in the basin, and the Carter sandstone is the most prolific. Identification of stratigraphic traps will enhance petroleum exploration by delineating sand body geometry. Definition reservoir thickness and extent is critical for identifying successful prospects. The North Blowhorn Creek field in Lamar County, Alabama, which produces from the Carter sandstone, is a prime example of a stratigraphic trap. As of March 1983, this field has produced a total of 657,678 bbl of oil and 972,3 mmcf of gas. The Carter sandstone there was deposited as part of a delta which prograded from northwest to southeast across the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. Primary and secondary porosity in the Carter sandstone ranges from 10 to 16% with an average of 13.5%. Permeability ranges from approximately .01-29 md with an average of 10 md. The Parkwood shales interbedded with the Carter sandstone are probably the primary petroleum source beds of the Mississippian hydrocarbons.

  7. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  9. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

  10. Fact Booklet 2008 -2009 Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    Radiologic Facility, the Center for Applied Energy Research, and the Schmidt Vocal Arts Center. Other

  11. MAINZ Excellence 2 SUMMARY > 2008 > 2009 > 2010 >

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    students the option of spending a research period of up to one year in an academic insti- tute or corporate properties of layered magnetic metals will aid in the development of improved materials for constructing University Mainz (JGU), Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research and University of Kaiserslautern together

  12. college activities Annual Report 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Introduction by The Provost 4 College Activities 1: Academic Developments 9 Times Higher Education-QS World Matters 12 Student Body 12 Admissions Statistics/ Entrance Exhibitioners 12 Scholarships 12 The Curriculum Development Programme 36 Completed Projects 36 Construction Projects 37 Energy Conservation 38 8. Fundraising

  13. college activities Annual Report 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Developments 8 Times Higher Education-QS World University Rankings 8 Quality 8 Academic Year Structure 9 TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance 9 2. Educational Matters 10 Student Body 10 Admissions Statistics/ Entrance Exhibitioners Energy Conservation 30 8. Fundraising 31 9. Financial Position 32 Appendix I Income and Expenditure

  14. 2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Largest Decreases in Satisfaction The largest decreases in satisfaction over last year's survey are Franklin batch wait time, computer and network operations 24 by 7 support, and...

  15. 2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6,December 2008 Wed,

  16. Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment Using Catalyst/Zeolite-II-collaborative UAB/UA project funded by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment of Alabama to study the effectiveness of low-cost zeolite catalytic materials for treating diesel exhaust of an electrostatic diesel injector. Micro-Pilot Ignition Studies for Alternative Fueled Engines- five-year project

  17. Paleotopographic control of basal Chesterian sedimentation in the black warrior basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Rindsberg, A.K. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the start of the Chesterian (Upper Mississippian), the Ouachita orogeny began along the southwestern edge of the Alabama promontory. The orogeny ended the upwelling circulation system of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp that persisted from the Osagian to the Meramecian. These events established the Black Warrior foreland basin, where carbonate and siliciclastic sedimentation were controlled by flexural tectonism and sea level variation. These factors governed deposition of the petroleum source rocks and reservoir rocks that account for most of the conventional hydrocarbon resources in the basin. The Lewis interval is a thin (<100 ft), widespread veneer of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that forms the base of the Chesterian Series in Alabama and contains significant gas, oil, and asphalt resources. Although thin, the Lewis interval is heterogeneous and represents a spectrum of marginal- and open-marine environments, suggesting that depositional topography affected facies distribution. To test the effect of paleotopography on sedimentation, data from wells, outcrops, and cores were analyzed to model the relationship between the Fort Payne Tuscumbia ramp and the Lewis interval. Sandstone bodies in the Lewis interval typically are elongate parallel to strike of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia ramp. Along the lower ramp, siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentation took place exclusively in open-marine environments and sand was deposited in sand waves and patches by storms. Topographic irregularity was especially pronounced on the upper ramp and gave rise to complex facies patterns. Exposure, reworking, and beach formation took place on topographic highs, whereas storm-driven marine sedimentation prevailed in topographic lows. Although inception of the Ouachita orogeny in the Alabama promontory had a marked effect on marine circulation, facies distribution in the basal part of the Chesterian Series was dominated by the ramp topography developed prior to orogenesis.

  18. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. (Northeast Louisiana Univ., Monroe (USA)); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  19. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 Table 6. Sales of fossil fuel production from federal and Indian lands by statearea, FY 2003-13 trillion Btu State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Alabama...

  20. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents the operating results for Run 252 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode (CC-ITSL) using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability in the CC-ITSL mode with catalytic-catalytic reactors and with ash recycle. Run 252 began on 26 November 1986 and continued through 3 February 1987. During this period 214.4 MF tons of Illinois No. 6 coal were fed in 1250 hours of operation. 3 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  2. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) YearNetperMTBE (Oxygenate)Alabama

  3. Alabama Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million CubicThousand

  4. Alabama Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million

  5. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (MillionGross

  6. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama

  7. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  8. Mineralogy of Alabama coals. Annual report for the 1983-84 Project Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.H.; Donahoe, J.L.; Grow, A.G.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty-one coal samples collected from the Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama were (low-temperature) plasma ashed to yield minerals. These lta ashes were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by x-ray diffraction techniques. The major minerals are kaolinite, illite, mixed-layer clays, pyrite, quartz, and gypsum. Trace amounts of feldspars, siderite, marcasite, calcite, and dolomite were also found. Chlorite, in variable amounts, is found in most samples. Quantitative analysis was carried out by the internal standard method for nonclay minerals. For clay minerals, a modified Schultz's method was employed. The relative abundances of the major minerals are variable - total clays range from 63 to 91%; quartz, from 1 to 21%; pyrite, from trace amount to as much as 64%, due to pyrite nodules. Among clay minerals, kaolinite ranges from 29 to 70% (of the total clay); illite from 14 to 57%; mixed-layer clays from 10 to 34%. Smectite is found only in three samples, and chlorite is quite common, ranging from trace amount to 11%. Coal minerals are genetically classified into: syngenetic (detrital) and epigenetic (diagenetic). Syngenetic minerals, especially pyrite and clays, are not only important geologically, but also technologically in terms of coal preparation. Mineral analysis of coal ash helps identify some of the problems associated with sulphur and ash removal from coal. Some further studies are suggested in order to better understand the Alabama coal from the geological and technological points of view. 14 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics - The University of Alabama invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure track visiting faculty position in geophysics geophysical sub-disciplines, preference will be given to candidates who will enhance our existing geophysics

  10. Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tisdell, Chris

    Massachusetts University Massey University McGill University McMaster University Melbourne University Michigan State University Michigan University Minnesota University Monash University Montpellier UniversityAachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta

  11. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an integrated study of mature carbonate oil reservoirs (Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation) undergoing gas injection in the Little Cedar Creek Field located in Conecuh County, Alabama. This field produces from two reservoirs...

  12. Ourcrop characterization of sandstone heterogeneity in Carboniferous reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Osborne, E.W.; Rindsberg, A.K.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Where production is currently declining, improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling may be used to increase production of liquid hydrocarbons from reservoir sandstone in the Black Warrior basin. Characterizing reservoir heterogeneity provides information regarding how those strategies can best be applied, and exceptional exposures of asphaltic sandstone in north Alabama enable first-hand observation of such heterogeneity. This report identifies heterogeneity in Carboniferous strata of the Black Warrior basin on the basis of vertical variations, lithofacies analysis. Results of lithofacies analysis and depositional modeling were synthesized with existing models of sandstone heterogeneity to propose methods which may improve hydrocarbon recovery in Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin. 238 refs., 89 figs. 2 tabs.

  13. Controls on deposition of the Pratt seam, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenfluh, G.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of regional, subregional and local variations in the Pratt seam of northern Alabama has generated a geological model which depicts the internal and external geometry of the coal seams and adjoining rocks of the Pratt group and suggests the controlling factors for deposistion of thick and thin coal. In addition to primary structural controls of peat accumulation, differential compaction of peat and other detrital sediments was an important factor governing the topographic setting within the fault blocks. Within a minable coal body, seam thickness is relatively constant (aside from local variations), but when the margins of the body are approached, the number of benches and partings will increase shortly before the seam splits into a number of unminable thin seams. This zone of transition which marks the boundary of the coal body is narrow (on the order of 500 to 1000 feet); consequently efforts in estimating minable tonnages should be directed toward defining this line more precisely.

  14. Petroleum source rock potential of Mesozoic condensed section deposits in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A; Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because condensed section deposits in carbonates and siliclastics are generally fine-grained lithologies often containing relatively high concentrations of organic matter, these sediments have the potential to be petroleum source rocks if buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. In the Mesozoic deposits of southwestern Alabama, only the Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.1 cycle have realized their potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. These carbonate mudstones contain organic carbon concentrations of algal and amorphous kerogen of up to 1.7% and have thermal alteration indices of 2- to 3+. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa marine claystones of the condensed section of the UZAGC-2.5 cycle are rich (up to 2.9%) in herbaceous and amorphous organic matter but have not been subjected to burial conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. The Jurassic Pine Hill/Norphlet black shales of the condensed section of the LZAGC-3.1 cycle and the Upper Jurassic Haynesville carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.2 cycle are low (0.1%) in organic carbon. Although condensed sections within depositional sequences should have the highest source rock potential, specific environmental, preservational, and/or burial history conditions within a particular basin will dictate whether or not the potential is realized as evidenced by the condensed sections of the Mesozoic depositional sequences in southwestern Alabama. Therefore, petroleum geologists can use sequence stratigraphy to identify potential source rocks; however, only through geochemical analyses can the quality of these potential source rocks be determined.

  15. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  16. Sedimentary facies and history of Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation in Conecuh embayment of south Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is an important petroleum-bearing unit in the deep subsurface of the gulf rim. The authors studied the sedimentary facies and sedimentary history of the Smackover in Escambia County, Alabama. The wells studied form an east-west strike section across the Conecuh embayment in south Alabama. In the central part of the embayment, the Smackover is 350 ft (107 m) thick and consists of a vertical sequence of the following correlative sedimentary facies. In stratigraphic order, they are: (1) basal, shallow-water facies that rests conformably on the underlying Norphlet and forms a discontinuous interval a few feet thick, consisting of algal-laminated mudstones, sandy packstones and grainstones, and clast horizons; (2) basinal, deep-water facies, 175 ft (53 m) thick, consisting of resedimented debris beds (oolitic-pisolitic-graded beds, 8 in or 24 cm thick) intercalated with laminated, very argillaceous mudstone and wackestone; (3) parallel and wavy-laminated, sparsely fossiliferous packstone and wackestone, 80 ft (24 m) thick, interpreted as a carbonate slope deposit that accumulated below storm wave base; (4) bioturbated oolitic, pelletal, and fossiliferous packstone with faint relict laminations, 45 ft (14 m) thick, containing abundant Thalassinoides and Zoophycus traces and interpreted as below normal wave base deposits; and (5) oolitic and fossiliferous grainstone, 50 ft (15 m) thick, interpreted as deposits formed above wave base (shelf-platform deposits). The above sequence suggests progradation of a carbonate shelf. This progradation probably followed the rapid eustatic sea-level rise of the Oxfordian.

  17. Operating experience and lessons learned at Alabama Electric Cooperative`s 110-MW 26-hour CAES plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, L.; Davis, L.; Schainker, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage options for utilities technologies using hydrostatic-head-, compressed air-, battery-, superconducting-magnet-, and flywheel-based power generation. Among these technologies, compressed-air energy storage (CAES) offers specific cost advantage in its range of capacity and stored energy. Partly because of this cost advantage, Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC), with assistance from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), now operates the first CAES power plant in the United States. This 110-MW, 26-hour CAES plant is located on top of the McIntosh salt dome, approximately 40 miles north of Mobile, Alabama. Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Inc. (ESPC) is Technical Engineering Support Contractor to EPRI on the project. This paper addresses operating statistics, narrates problems that influenced power generation, and provides selected lessons learned. Unit availability and reliability are noted and major events that affected them identified.

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-213-2123, G. T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Inc. , Birmingham, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittleman, J.; Estacio, P.; O'Brien, D.; Montopoli, M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request for technical assistance from the Alabama Health Department, possible hazardous working conditions at the G.T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Company (SIC-5093), Birmingham, Alabama were evaluated. The company employed 15 persons in battery breaking and recycling. Twelve of the workers had blood lead (7439921) levels over 60 micrograms/deciliter (microg/dl) and the average of the last three blood levels exceeded 50microg/dl for 13 of the employees. Blood lead levels greater than 60 were associated with biochemical evidence of impaired heme synthesis and impaired renal function. Fourteen workers had elevated zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels over 100microg/dl consistent with moderate lead poisoning. Three had ZPPs over 600 microg/dl, consistent with severe lead poisoning. The authors conclude that a health hazard existed from overexposure to lead. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures.

  19. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  20. Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 -2005 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2005 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 1997 1998 Tested #12;Alaska Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 1997 1998 1999 2000;Arizona Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 1997 1998

  1. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  2. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  3. Small to large-scale diagenetic variation in Norphlet sandstone, onshore and offshore Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detrital composition of Norphlet sandstone is relatively uniform on a regional scale, consisting of quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and rock fragments comprised of these minerals. However, the diagenetic character of the sandstones is variable on a scale ranging from the individual laminations to single hydrocarbon-producing fields to regions encompassing several fields or offshore blocks. Small-scale variation results primarily from textural differences related to depositional processes in eolian and shallow marine systems. Degree of feldspar alteration and types of authigenic clay and carbonate minerals vary on a regional scale. Illite, dolomite, ferroan dolomite, and ferroan magnesite (breunnerite) are common in onshore wells in Alabama, whereas magnesium-rich chlorite and calcite are present in offshore Alabama and Florida. However, diagenetic character is more variable on a fieldwide scale than previously recognized. In Hatter's Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama, breunnerite, which has not been described previously in these sandstones, is the dominant cement in some wells but is absent others. Although illite is the most common authigenic clay throughout the field, chlorite is the most abundant clay in some wells. Because of uniformity of detrital composition, diagenetic variations cannot be related to differences in provenance, particularly on the scale of a single field. Factors that must account for variations in diagenesis include (1) differences in burial history relative to thermal sulfate reduction; (2) variation in fluid flow relative to subbasins, structural highs, fault systems, depositional texture, and early diagenetic character of the sandstones; and (3) variation in composition of underlying Louann evaporites.

  4. Analysis of coal and coal bed methane resources of Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, D.E.; McFall, K.S.; Malone, P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior basin in Alabama is the most active area in the US producing natural gas from coal beds. As of 1986, 300 coal-bed methane wells were producing from eight degasification fields, mainly from the Pennsylvanian coal seams along the eastern margin of the basin. Despite difficult market conditions, drilling and expansion are continuing. A detailed geologic analysis of Warrior basin coal-bed methane targets the areas of the basin that show the most promise for future gas production. The geologic analysis is based on extensive well and core data and basin-wide correlations of the Pennsylvanian coal groups. Four detailed cross sections were constructed, correlating the target coal groups in the basin, namely the Cobb, Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek. They estimate that the Warrior basin contains nearly 20 tcf of in-place coal-bed methane, mainly in three of the target coal groups - the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coals, with 4, 7, and 8 tcf, respectively. The east-central area of the basin contains the greatest volume of natural gas resource due to its concentration of thicker, higher ranked coals with high gas content. The geologic analysis also provided the underlying framework for the subsequent engineering analysis of economically recoverable gas reserves. For example, analysis of structure and tectonics showed the east-central area to be promising for gas recovery due to its proximity to the Appalachian structural front and consequent structural deformation and permeability enhancement.

  5. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  6. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  7. Barrier island depositional systems in Black Warrior basin, lower Pennsylvanian (Pottsville) in northwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, C.A.; Gastaldo, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basal Pennsylvanian lower Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama is part of a southwestward-thickening wedge of terrigenous sediments consisting of orthoquartzitic sandstone, siltstone, and shales with discontinuous coals. The present study delineates each lower Pottsville lithofacies, to confirm or refute a barrier-island model. Preliminary interpretation of lithofacies using lithologic criteria, sedimentary structures, and fossil assemblages confirms a barrier deposition system. Exposures along I-65 in southern Cullman County are interpreted to represent lagoonal deposits based on the high percentage of mud-sized material, massive and structureless washover sandstone beds, and highly rippled interbedded sandstones and silty shales that contain microcross-stratification. Exposures in northern Cullman County are interpreted to represent tidal channel-fill deposits, flood tidal sequences, and possible foreshore sandstone deposits. Tidal channel-fill deposits are recognized by coarse sandstone textures with pebble lags, large-scale cross-bedding, and their geometry. Flood tidal sequences are recognized by stacked cross-bedded sets and additional sedimentary structures. Foreshore deposits are interpreted based on the orientation of low-angle planar bedding.

  8. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Three. Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Alabama governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  9. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and Norphlet eolian sandstones. The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones, middle Smackover mudstones and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites. The sequence has an upper Type 2 unconformity indicating relative sea-level fall in the Oxfordian. The upper depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Oxfordian. This sequence includes lower Haynesville evaporites and clastics (transgressive deposits), middle Haynesville carbonate mudstones and shales (condensed section), and upper Haynesville updip continental sandstones and downdip shales, limestones, and anhydrites (progradational highstand regressive deposits). The sequence has an upper Type 1 unconformity indicating abrupt sea-level fall in the late Kimmeridgian. In these depositional sequences, progradational highstand regressive deposits are the principal petroleum reservoirs. Condensed section deposits have the potential to be source rocks if subjected to proper burial conditions; however, only the lower and middle Smackover mudstones were deposited and buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. An understanding of sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to identifying potential hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  10. Diagenesis of fluvial sands in Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic), Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keighin, C.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important hydrocarbon reservoir in Baldwin and Mobile Counties and offshore in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The formation is not productive in the Little Escambia Creek field, Escambia County, but underlies the productive Smackover Formation at a depth of approximately 15,500 ft (4725 m). The Norphlet sandstones examined in cores from two drill holes are largely fluvial in origin and consist of moderately to well-sorted, very fine to coarse-grained feldspathic sandstones extensively altered by a complex sequence of diagenetic reactions. Visible evidence of chemical and mechanical compaction is relatively minor in the sandstones. Paucity of compaction suggests that extensive early cementation by anhydrite and/or calcite reduced compaction; these cements were subsequently removed by migrating fluids. Porosity, both intergranular and intragranular, is generally well developed. Intergranular pores are due primarily to partial to complete dissolution of cements and mineral grains, especially feldspar. Intragranular pores are largely the result of partial leaching of rock fragments and of microporosity formed by precipitation of clay minerals in earlier dissolution pores.

  11. Boron mineralization in Louann Salt and Norphlet Shale, Clarke County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, W.B.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of unusual boron minerals is present in the upper Louann Salt and immediately overlying Norphlet Shale in Clarke County, Alabama. Core samples come from a depth of about 12,000 ft in a well located on the flank of a nonpiecement salt dome. The suite consists of calcium and magnesium borates similar to those occurring in the Zechstein salt deposits of Germany. Well-developed micron-size to millimeter-size crystals were recovered from water-insoluble residue from the salt. The minerals identified include boracite (modified pseudoisometric cubes), hilgardite (prismatic crystal aggregates), szaibelyite (acicular crystal aggregates), and volkovskite (plates, rare prisms). Associated minerals are anhydrite, gypsum, magnesite, phlogopite, tlc, and quartz. Boracite and hilgardite have boron isotopic compositions indicative of marine evaporite deposits. Danburite occurs in irregular nodules up to 2 cm in diameter in the overlying Norphlet Shale. The nodules constitute up to 30% of the Norphlet immediately adjacent to the Louann but disappear within about 1 m from the contact. The danburite appears to be the result of boron-rich fluids derived from the underlying marine evaporite sequence, infiltrating and reacting with the shale.

  12. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  13. Model for isopaching Jurassic-age Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, L.F.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep gas was discovered in the Norphlet Sandstone of Mobile Bay Alabama in 1979. Sixteen wells, of which Exxon Company, U.S.A. has had an interest in eight, have tested gas from depths greater than 20,000 ft and at an average rate of 19 million ft/sub 3/ of gas per day. The dominant structural features in Mobile Bay are large east-west-trending salt-supported anticlines associated with salt pull-apart listric normal faulting. Throws on these faults measure up to 1000 ft. Individual structures have dimensions as large as 15 mi in an east-west strike direction and 8 mi in a north-south dip direction. The Jurassic age (Callovian) Norphlet of Mobile Bay is characterized by eolian dune sand deposits up to 700 ft thick. An important factor affecting future development drilling is the accurate prediction of reservoir thickness. This presentation shows that an integrated study of seismic and well data has facilitated the development of a geological model for isopaching the Norphlet Formation. The isopach exhibits a strong north-northwest-south-southeast orientation of parallel thicks and thins. These trends are believed to be the result of original eolian deposition of complex linear dunes in the Norphlet Sandstone. The major east-west structural grain of faults and anticlines overprints this preserved depositional trend.

  14. Petroleum system evolution in the Conecuh Embayment southwest Alabama U.S. Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J. [LSS International, Woodlands, TX (United States)]|[Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of hydrocarbon maturation trends in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama indicates that crude oils in updip reservoirs of the Conecuh Embayment are anomalously mature for their present temperature-depth regimes. It is inferred that these mature oils equilibrated to depth-temperature conditions in deeper reservoirs downdip, and subsequently remigrated to their present positions. Burial history reconstructions, regional structure, and reservoir distributions support a model in which these mature oils leaked from the Jay-Flomaton-Big Escambia Creek field complex during Tertiary time, migrated through the Norphlet Formation, and accumulated in updip Smackover and Haynesville traps associated with basement knobs. Geochemical evidence suggests that hydrocarbon leakage from the Jay-Flomaton-Big Escambia Creek complex may have been triggered by an influx of very mature gas condensates with high non-hydrocarbon gas contents from failed reservoirs still farther downdip. This scenario has potential implications for (1) predicting potential migration pathways and preferential areas of crude oil accumulation in the updip portions of the Conecuh Embayment; and (2) reinterpreting organic-inorganic burial diagenetic reactions in the Norphlet Formation reservoirs of offshore Mobile Bay.

  15. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOEs high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  16. Relationships of seismic amplitudes and gas content of the Miocene Amos Sand, Mobile Bay area, offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, L.T. (Mobil Oil Company, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Kinsland, G.L. (Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil Oil Company has collected three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data over Mary Ann field in the Mobile Bay area, Alabama. Although the survey was designed and collected so as to image the deeper Norphlet Sands, amplitude anomalies in the image of the shallow Miocene Amos Sand are evident. Relationships are developed between the seismic amplitudes and net feet of gas in the Amos Sand at the few existing wells. These relationships are used to predict net feet of gas everywhere in the area of the seismic survey. The result is a contoured map of net feet of gas in the Miocene Amos Sand in Mary Ann field.

  17. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this secondary oil recovery project involving the Carter sandstone in northwest Alabama are: (1) To increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from the Carter reservoirs, thereby increasing domestic reserves and lessening US dependence on foreign oil; (2) To extensively model, test, and monitor the reservoirs so their management is optimized; and (3) To assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered to other US oil companies to encourage them to attempt similar projects. Start-up water injection began on 0 1/12/93 at the Central Bluff Field, and daily operations began on 01/13/93. These operations include monitoring wellhead pressures at the injector and two producers, and injection water treatment. Water injection was running 200-300 bbl/day at the end of February. Once the unit is pressured-up well testing will be performed. Unitization was approved on 03/01/93.b. For the North Fairview Field correlations and log analyses were used to determine the fluid and rock properties. A summary of these properties is included in Table 1. The results of the log analysis were used to construct the hydrocarbon pore volume map shown on Figure 1. The map was planimetered to determine original oil-in-place (OOIP) values and the hydrocarbon pore volume by tract. The OOIP summed over an tracts by this method is 824.7 Mbbl (Figure 2). Original oil-in-place was also calculated directly: two such independent calculations gave 829.4 Mbbl (Table 1) and 835.6 Mbbl (Table 2). Thus, the three estimates of OOIP are within one percent. The approximately 88% of OOIP remaining provides an attractive target for secondary recovery. Injection start-up is planned for mid-June.

  18. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  19. Heterogeneity in Mississippi oil reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Irvin, G.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Mississippian sandstone units produce oil in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama: (1) Lewis; (2) Carter; (3) Millerella, and (4) Gilmer. Reservoir geometries differ for each producing interval, reflecting variation in depositional style during the evolution of a foreland basin. Widespread strike-elongate bodies of Lewis sandstone with complex internal geometry were deposited during destruction of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp and represent inception of the foreland basin and initial forebulge migration. Synorogenic Carter sandstone is part of the first major deltaic foreland basin fill and accounts for more than 80% of oil production in the basin. Millerella sandstone was deposited as transgressive sand patches during the final stages of delta destruction. Gilmer sandstone occurs as imbricate sandstone lenses deposited in a constructive shoal-water delta and is part of the late relaxational basin fill. Interaction of siliciclastic sediment with ancestral and active carbonate ramps was a primary control on facies architecture and reservoir heterogeneity. Patterns of injection and reservoir fluid production, as well as field- to basin-scale depositional, petrological, petrophysical and geostatistical modeling reveal microscopic to megascopic controls on reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon producibility. At a megascopic scale, isolation or continuity of reservoir bodies is a function of depositional topography and the degree of marine reworking of genetically coherent sandstone bodies. These factors result in amalgamated reservoir bodies or in compartments that may remain uncontacted or unconnected during field development. Within producing fields, segmentation of amalgamated sandstone bodies into individual lenses, grain size variations, depositional barriers, and diagenetic baffles further compartmentalize reservoirs, increase tortuosity of fluid flow, and affect sweep efficiency during improved recovery operations.

  20. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  1. Major discoveries in eolian sandstone: facies distribution and stratigraphy of Jurassic Norphlet sandstone, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, J.B.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent exploratory and development drilling in Mobile Bay, southwest Alabama, has proven prolific gas production from the Norphlet sandstone at depths greater than 20,000 ft with individual well tests of 10-27 MMCFGD. Excellent reservoir qualities are a function of preserved primary porosity and permeability developed in an eolian setting. In Mobile Bay, thick eolian sediments (200-600 ft) lie directly on Pine Hill or Louann evaporites. Three facies of the Norphlet have been recognized: (1) a thin (20-30 ft) basal wet sand flat or sabkha facies, (2) a massive dune facies, and (3) a thin (30-40 ft) upper marine reworked facies. The wet sand flat or sabkha facies is characterized by irregular to wavy horizontally bedded sandstone associated with adhesion ripples. It is probably sporadically developed in response to localized wet lows during earliest Norphlet deposition. The majority of the Norphlet section is characterized by massive wedge-planar and tabular-planar cross-stratified sandstone, interpreted to be stacked dune and dry interdune deposits. Individual dune sets range in height from a few feet to 90 ft. Cross-bed sets exhibit internal stratification patterns similar to large- and small-scale dunes described by G. Kocurek and R. Dott, Jr. The marine reworked facies is characterized by structureless to diffuse or wavy laminated sandstone that reflects a reworking of the dune deposits by the ensuing Smackover transgression. Reservoir quality is affected by textural properties determined by depositional processes associated with these various facies. Diagenetic patterns further reducing reservoir quality occur in the depositionally less-porous sediments. Dune facies sediments exhibit the best reservoir qualities. Variations of reservoir quality within the dune facies are related to dune height and dune versus interdune accumulations.

  2. Controls on H sub 2 concentration and hydrocarbon destruction in Smackover Formation, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Hanor, J.S.; Sassen, R. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H{sub 2}S generated by thermal sulfate reduction and oxidation of hydrocarbons in deeply-buried Smackover reservoirs is preferentially destroyed by reaction with metal ions to form sulfide minerals in the underlying Norphlet Formation. Resulting H{sub 2}S concentrations differences can be described by calculated molecular diffusion profiles within the Smackover Formation. Theoretical H{sub 2}S diffusion coefficients extrapolated for 45 Alabama Smackover fields and measured H{sub 2}s concentrations from those fields are in agreement with model steady-state profiles. Factors controlling reservoir H{sub 2}S concentration in this model are porosity, permeability, tortuosity, and thickness of the Smackover Formation. Lesser factors are nature of pore phase (oil, gas, or formation water), temperature (in excess of critical reaction temperature), and pressure. Although calculated H{sub 2}S diffusion profiles can successfully describe or predict H{sub 2}S concentration gradients, rates of molecular diffusion are insufficient to account for observed reservoir concentrations of H{sub 2}S. It is thus probable that advective dispersion resulting from convective overturn is the means by which the inferred steady-state profiles are maintained. The rate of destruction of hydrocarbons by thermal sulfate reduction is partly dependent on H{sub 2}S flux, which may be estimated from the H{sub 2}S concentration gradient, convection rate, and temperature. Economic basement for Smackover reservoirs therefore varies. Reliable estimates of porosity, permeability, and thickness trends allow (1) prediction of H{sub 2}S concentrations in the Smackover Formation with reasonable accuracy, and (2) estimation of local economic basement for Smackover reservoirs.

  3. Comparison of geology of Jurassic Norphlet Mary Ann field, Mobile Bay, Alabama, to onshore regional Norphlet trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzono, M.; Pense, G.; Andronaco, P.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology of the Mary Ann field is better understood in light of regional studies, which help to establish a depositional model in terms of both facies and thickness variations. These studies also illustrate major differences between onshore and offshore Norphlet deposits concerning topics such as diagenesis, hydrocarbon trapping, and migration. The Jurassic Norphlet sandstone was deposited in an arid basin extending from east Texas to Florida by a fluvial-eolian depositional system, prior to the transgression of the Smackover Formation. Until discovery of the Mary Ann field in 1979, Norphlet production was restricted to onshore areas, mostly along the Pickens-Pollard fault system in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The Mary Ann field is a Norphlet dry-gas accumulation, and was the first offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico to establish economic reserves in the Jurassic. The field is located in Mobile Bay, approximately 25 mi (40 km) south of Mobile, Alabama. Formed by a deep-seated (more than 20,000 ft or 6096 m) faulted salt pillow, Mary Ann field produces from a series of stacked eolian dune sands situated near the Norphlet paleocoastline. Five lithofacies have been recognized in cores from the Mobil 76 No. 2 well. Each lithofacies has a distinct reservoir quality. Optimum reservoir faces are the dune and sheet sands. Nonreservoir facies are interdune (wet and dry), marine reworked, and evaporitic sands. Following deposition, these sediments have undergone varying amounts of diagenesis. Early cementation of well-sorted sands supported the pore system during compaction. However, late cementation by chlorite, silica, and alteration of liquid hydrocarbons to an asphaltic residue have completely occluded the pore system in parts of the reservoir.

  4. Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $168 for the 2009 IECC and $462 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Regional stratigraphy, depositional environments, and tectonic framework of Mississippian clastic rocks between Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones in Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, D.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed correlations in the subsurface and outcrop of northern Alabama document that Mississippian clastic rocks between the Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones are thickest along a band across the northern and eastern parts of the Black Warrior basin. The interval thins markedly southeastward across a northeast-trending line in Monroe County, Mississippi, and Lamar County, Alabama, from more than 350 ft to less than 150 ft. The thickness distribution suggests synsedimentary differential subsidence of crustal blocks. The northeast-trending block boundary in the Black Warrior basin nearly parallels an interpreted northeast-trending late Precambrian rift segment farther southeast. The northwest-striking boundary closely parallels an interpreted northwest-trending transform fault farther southwest. The block boundaries are interpreted as basement faults that originated during late Precambrian rifting. Subsequently, the older faults were reactivated by convergenced during the Mississippian, simultaneously with the initial dispersal of clastic sediment into the Black Warrior foreland basin.

  6. Robust regression analysis of growth in basal area of natural pine stands in Georgia and Alabama, 1962-1972 and 1972-1982. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueng, C.Y.; Gadbury, G.L.; Schreuder, H.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Net growth and gross growth in basal area of selected plots of natural pin stands in Georgia and Alabama are examined under previously used models. We use a procedure based on a linear model that is resistant to the influence of outliers. Our objective is to determine if the results of a previously used model hold when a linear model is fit to the data using our robust procedures. The data are drawn for forest inventory analysis measurements over two period (cycle 4 and cycle 5). The analysis includes a bootstrap testing procedure. Growth of the three species studied in Georgia consistently showed a significant decline from the first period to the second period. A similar but less consistent decline in growth was observed in Alabama.

  7. Gnomhaochta An Choliste Tuarascil Bhliantil 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    (2005-2010)** An Dr. Kieran J McGinley (2005-2008) Peggy Murphy(2008-2012) Ionadaithe na Mac Linn Sweeney, ainmnithe ag Coliste na Tronide, Baile tha Cliath (2005-2010) Geraldine Clarke, ainmnithe ag

  8. Universite Denis Diderot L3 Equations Differentielles 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauray, Maxime

    t PP = I2 et t P = P, et donc P2 = I2 ou encore P-1 = P. Finalement, on peut dire que etA = PetP, avec

  9. 2008-2009 15 2009-2010 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degree Program Economics Contact Name Timothy J. Gronberg Contact Phone Number 979/845-7358 1 Number, and fellowships. Does not include tuition or benefits. 8 Percentage Full-Time Students with Institutional 2008 4.0 Fall 2009 3.2 Fall 2010 3.1 1.2 8 $ 176,522.00 $ 1,412,179.00 34.5 Male Female White 12 5

  10. Matematica Discreta Matematicas UAM, curso 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

    indicatriz es JC4 (y1, . . . , y20) = 1 4 y20 1 + y10 2 + 2y5 4 . Y, por tanto, el inventarios de, x2 = a y x3 = v, el inventario de coloraciones es I(r, a, v) = 1 4 (r + a + v)20 + (r2 + a2 + v2 )10

  11. Advanced Workshop in Regulation and Competition 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    of Carbon: China, US & EU" 11:15-11:55 Tom Kloc, KPMG, "Carbon Management and Climate Change - Federal and Competitive Forces January 15, 2010 Impact of Carbon and Recession at Rutgers University Newark Campus 1 Policy Development and Actions" 11:55-12:20 Colin Loxley, PSE&G, "Carbon Allowances and the New Jersey

  12. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Solar Energy Winter SemiConductor Physics I PV Systems I Solar Thermal I Tutorial Renewable Energy Basics Electr. Powersystems Energy Meteorology I Storage Technology Energy Collector (Lab) Module Title Term Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind

  13. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    Solar Energy Winter SemiConductor Physics I PV Systems I Solar Thermal I Tutorial Renewable Energy Basics Electr. Powersystems Energy Meteorology I Storage Technology Energy of Oldenburg (Core Provider) Univ. of Zaragoza (Specialisation Provider: Biomass Energy) #12; EUREC

  14. 2008-2009 Graduate Coordinators Program Contact Person Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    & Design Ms. Patricia Mink , Coordinator 5739 MINK@etsu.edu 70708 Biological Sciences: Microbiology Dr. Bert Lampson, Coordinator 4572 LAMPSON@etsu.edu 70673 Biological Sciences: Biology Dr. Mike Zavada, Chair & Coordinator 6919 ZAVADAM@etsu.edu 70703 Biological Sciences: Paleontology Dr. Blaine Schubert

  15. Annual Review Review of the Year 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , looking after the nation's expanding woodlands and the rich and spectacular habitats they provide a net contributor to the taxpayer. In addition, Forestry Commission Scotland is positioned to make

  16. Lirmheas na Bliadhna Lirmheas na Bliadhna 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's expanding woodlands and the rich and spectacular habitats they provide. This is my last year as Chairman estate operations to become not only self-financing for the first time ever, but also a net contributor

  17. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

  18. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Energy Winter SemiConductor Physics I PV Systems I Solar Thermal I Tutorial Solar) Module Title Term Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab) Excursion/Wind/DEWI Module Title Term Titel Hydro Energy Winter Micro

  19. PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE SERIES: PROBES/124/2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Landfill without Liner. 11 -Records and Inspection 12 -Schematic drawings 13 5. Landfills in India 22 Landfills proposals with Information on existing landfills August, 2008 CENTRAL POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD/provision of MSW landfill 1 3. Landfills as per MSW Rules 2 4. A Checklist for MSW landfills -Assessment

  20. Calculo Diferencial e Integral II Semestre 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natrio, Jos

    . Marsden e A. J. Tromba, Freeman (2003) - Calculus (Vol. II), T. Apostol, John Wiley (1976) - Exercicios;FUNCIONAMENTO DAS AULAS PRATICAS Havera uma lista bi-semanal de exercicios propostos. Estes exercicios devem ser resolvidos pelos alunos antes das respectivas aulas praticas. Durante as aulas praticas os

  1. Universit Paris VI LG301 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    Kepler pour qu'il dérive ses trois lois ? a) Ptolémée. b) Galilée. c) Tycho Brahe. d) Johann Stöffler. e expliquer les mouvements des planètes autour du Soleil ? a) Newton. b) Tycho Brahe. c) Johannes Kepler. d) Tycho Brahé c) Nicolas Copernic. d) Johannes Kepler. e) Aucune de ces réponses. #12;5) Où apparaissent

  2. Bulletin 2008 2009 P.O. Box 751

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Graduate Studies College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Native American Studies; Anthropology; Applied Affairs Undergraduate Admissions and Programs University Studies; University Honors; Military Science Linguistics; Biology; Black Studies; Chemistry; Chicano/Latino Studies; Communication; Conflict Resolution

  3. Annual Review 2008/2009 www.ed.ac.uk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Peter

    in the fields of energy conservation, recycling and green transport schemes. Our partnerships with the student and international excellence 14 From campus to community: university societies come of age 16 Safer mountains: cracking the avalanche code 18 Gene hunting: tracking down the causes of disease 20 Research excellence

  4. Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdf MoreRevisedProgramCostFWPActFossil Energy

  5. FY 2008-2009 Report on Uncosted Balances

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartmentofof EnergyOverview46|8 Report to

  6. Outreach and Collaboration Program Status and Accomplishments 2008-2009 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal and Solar EnergyEnergy Outreach

  7. HSS Outreach and Collaboration - Progress Assessment 2008-2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopmentHEADQUARTERSOutreach & Collaboration Program

  8. Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartment of EnergyUpdatedFossil Energy

  9. Outreach and Collaboration Program Status and Accomplishments 2008-2009 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment

  10. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Blog Archive 2008-2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT26,go!(RMP)08 - 2009

  11. Geologic setting, petrophysical characteristics, and regional heterogeneity patterns of the Smackover in southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3 of DOE contract number DE-FG22-89BC14425, entitled ``Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity.`` This volume constitutes the final report on Subtask 3, which had as its primary goal the geological modeling of reservoir heterogeneity in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama. This goal was interpreted to include a thorough analysis of Smackover reservoirs, which was required for an understanding of Smackover reservoir heterogeneity. This report is divided into six sections (including this brief introduction). Section two, entitled ``Geologic setting,`` presents a concise summary of Jurassic paleogeography, structural setting, and stratigraphy in southwest Alabama. This section also includes a brief review of sedimentologic characteristics and stratigraphic framework of the Smackover, and a summary of the diagenetic processes that strongly affected Smackover reservoirs in Alabama. Section three, entitled ``Analytical methods,`` summarizes all nonroutine aspects of the analytical procedures used in this project. The major topics are thin-section description, analysis of commercial porosity and permeability data, capillary-pressure analysis, and field characterization. ``Smackover reservoir characteristics`` are described in section four, which begins with a general summary of the petrographic characteristics of porous and permeable Smackover strata. This is followed by a more-detailed petrophysical description of Smackover reservoirs.

  12. Diagenetic control on permeability baffles and barriers, Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian (Chesterian) Carter sandstone is the most productive oil reservoir in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. In North Blowhorn Creek oil unit, very fine- to medium-grained quartzarenite and sublitharenite occur in an elongate, isolated northwest-southeast trending body, surrounded by shale. The sandstone was deposited in a beach-barrier environment. Most production is from ripple-laminated and horizontal- to low-angle-planar laminated shoreface and foreshore deposits in the central part of the reservoir body. Uneven distribution of diagenetic features creates permeability baffles and barriers at several scales within the reservoir, ranging from microscopic to macroscopic, and increases tortuosity of fluid flow. Early authigenic calcite and ferroan calcite occur only in shell lags deposited in channels within the reservoir body. These originally porous and permeable layers are completely cemented by calcite, ferroan calcite, and ferroan dolomite. Carbonate-cemented shell lags form discontinuous permeability barriers that may be laterally continuous between adjacent wells. Ferroan dolomite is the most abundant cement in Carter sandstone and occludes all pores near the margins of the reservoir body. The pore system within the high-quality portion of the reservoir consists of modified primary and secondary intergranular porosity and microporosity within patches of kaolinite. Porosity and permeability relationships are controlled by the distribution of quartz overgrowths, kaolinite, deformed mudstones fragments, intergranular pressure solution, and stylolite seams. The lateral extent of baffles and barriers created by these diagenetic features is related to depositional texture and ranges from micrometers to meters.

  13. Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A. Jr.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and synthesis, using 11 key drill cores, show that the Smackover platform was profoundly affected by two rapid sea level rises during the Oxfordian transgression, as well as the late Oxfordian regression. The first rapid rise drowned in the inherited Norphlet clastic ramp, including the Smackover intertidal algal mudstone (facies 1). Subsequently, a Tubiphytes-rimmed shelf developed and its bypass-margin slope deposits (facies 3 and 4) and coeval basinal facies (facies 2) prograded in the basin. The second rapid sea level rise drowned the rimmed shelf, creating a distally steepened ramp. Facies developed on the ramp were distal-ramp deposits (facies 5) and higher energy updip oolitic shoals (facies 6). The late Oxfordian rapid regression caused widespread progradation of the oolitic shoals and coeval sabkha facies of the overlying Buckner anhydrite.

  14. AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The WISE Home Energy Program provides up to $750 in energy efficiency rebates for homeowners in Cullman, Madison, Jefferson, Shelby, Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties. A $350 rebate is...

  15. Coalbed methane produced water management guide treatment and discharge to surface waters: Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report, April 1991-May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.A.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist coalbed methane in their efforts to manage produced waters in an environmentally acceptable manner, GRI, in cooperation with the member companies of the Coalbed Methane Association of Alabama, developed a guidance manual that presents the state-of-the-art methodology for managing Black Warrior Basin produced water through the use of treatment ponds and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Six treatment pond systems were studied to develop information for the manual. Topics included in the manual are produced water characteristics, NPDES permit requirements, sample collection and testing, pond based treatment methods, treatment pond management, and process troubleshooting.

  16. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

  17. Atmospheric methane flux from coals - preliminary investigation of coal mines and geologic structures in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L.; Leventhal, J.S.; Rice, D.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mosher, B.; Czepiel, P. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas whose concentration in the atmosphere is increasing. Although this increase in atmospheric methane is correlative with growth in human population and activities, the exact causes for the increase are not fully understood. Because of increasing energy demand, particularly in developing countries where population is increasing, coal production is likely to increase over the next few decades and this could further increase the flux of atmospheric methane. In addition, no data are currently available on methane flux from coalbeds as a result of natural processes such as leakage at outcrops, or along faults and fractures that could provide avenues for methane migration upward from coal at depth. To better understand the global methane cycle and the role of fossil fuels in methane emissions, field measurements of methane emissions are needed from coalbeds, from areas of active mining, from coalbed gas production, and from undisturbed coals. In this paper, we report results of field measurements of CH[sub 4] emissions from surface and underground mines, fault zones, and coreholes in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Ventilation of underground mines in Mary Lee group coals (of economic usage) gave the highest methane emissions rates - about 71,480,000 m[sup 3]/yr (2.5 Bcf or billion cubic feet) from one ventilation shaft. In contrast, very low emissions occurred from active or abandoned coreholes and from Brookwood group coals (of economic usage) exposed by surface mining (about 81 m[sup 3]/yr (2.9 Mcf or thousand cubic feet)). Methane flux of as much as about 500 m[sup 3]/yr occurs from a small section of a normal fault and associated joints exposed at Bankhead Lock and Dam. The carbon isotopic composition of CH[sub 4] collected at the Bankhead Fault ([delta][sup 13]C -49.3 permil) indicates a coalbed origin. 50 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  19. LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, July-Sep 1980. [Hoe Creek and Gorgas, Alabama tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olness, D.U. (ed.)

    1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal have continued. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition to obtaining a qualitative comparison of the forward burn characteristics of two coals, we obtained information on the influence of bedding plane/cleat structure orientation on the early-time shape of the burn cavity in the Roland coal. We have improved our model of the coal drying rate during underground coal gasification (UCG) by adding refinements to the model. To aid in analyzing and predicting the performance of UCG tests, we have developed a simple gas-compositional model. When the model was tested against experimental data from the three Hoe Creek experiments, it was able to match very closely the observed gas compositions, energy fractions, and water influxes. This model can be used to make performance predictions consistent with the material and energy balance constraints of the underground system. A postburn coring and wireline-logging study is under way at the Hoe Creek No. 3 site to investigate the overall effect of the directionally-drilled, horizontal linking hole to better estimate the amount of coal gasified and the shape of the combustion front, and to provide additional information on subsurface deformation and thermal effects. The site reclamation work was completed, including the dismantling of all surface equipment and piping and the plugging and sealing of process and diagnostics wells. Final grading of the reclaimed land has been completed, and the area is ready for disk-seeding. Our survey of the UCG literature has continued with a review of the extensive tests at Gorgas, Alabama, carried on by the US Bureau of Mines from 1947 to 1959.

  20. Diagenesis of Eolian and fluvial feldspathic sandstones, Norphlet formation (upper Jurassic), Rankin County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.; Land, L.S.; Mack, L.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Norphlet sandstones in seven cores from Mississippi and Alabama are arkoses and subarkoses deposited in eolian-dune, interdune, and fluvial environments. Similar to the deeply buried (> 5 km) Tertiary feldspathic sandstones of the Gulf basin, all detrital plagioclase that survived dissolution has been albitized. Fluvial red sandstone lost all initial porosity by the introduction of preburial pedogenic calcite and compaction. Initial porosity of eolian sands was reduced by compaction to an average of 29%; and later by cementation by quartz, carbonates, anhydrite, halite, K-feldspar, and illite. Quartz and anhydrite cements precipitated between 90/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C (approximately 2.3 km deep), carbonates and halite cements formed below 120/sup 0/C (< 3 km), and late-stage illite cement formed between 130/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C (4-5 km deep). Cements are patchy, and some, especially quartz and anhydrite, are texture-selective, being more abundant in coarser laminae. Secondary porosity, which makes up approximately half the porosity in thin sections, formed by dissolution of detrital grains (feldspar, rock fragments) and cements (anhydrite, carbonate, halite). Reservoir bitumen records an early phase of oil entrapment. Reservoir quality is influenced by the abundance of reservoir bitumen and thread-like illite, both of which bridge pores. Isotopic data suggest that during the first 30 to 40 m.y. of burial, subsurface diagenesis of the Norphlet Formation was dominated by deep-circulating, hot, meteoric water. This phenomenon may be characteristic of the early diagenetic history of rifted basins. 10 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Depositional texture-dependent and independent diagenetic control of petrophysical properties, Norphlet sandstone, onshore and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.I. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagenetic factors influencing reservoir heterogeneity vary significantly throughout the region of Norphlet hydrocarbon production. Distribution of some diagenetic components in these eolian reservoirs is controlled by depositional texture. The distribution of these diagenetic components, which create local of widespread barriers and baffles to fluid flow, can be determined by depositional modeling. However, the distribution of other diagenetic components in Norphlet reservoirs, including quartz, clay minerals and pyrobitumen, is independent of depositional texture and cannot be determined by similar modeling. Factors controlling the distribution of texture-independent diagenetic components include the availability of chemical constituents from external sources, past and present positions of hydrocarbon-water contacts, and the time available for diagenetic reactions to proceed. In onshore fields, such as Hatter's Pond field, the position of fluid contacts influences reservoir quality. Permeability is highest above the hydrocarbon-water contact where authigenic illite is less abundant. The opposite relationship occurs in offshore fields in Alabama coastal waters and Federal outer continental shelf areas where sandstone below paleo-hydrocarbon-water contacts or present hydrocarbon-water contacts has the highest reservoir quality. Up to four diagenetic zones may occur stratigraphically. In descending order they are (1) the dominantly quartz-cemented tight zone at the top of the Norphlet; (2) an interval above palo-fluid contacts or present fluid contacts in which pyrobitumen grain coast reduce pore volume and constrict pore throats; (3) an interval between paleo-fluid contacts or present fluid contacts that lacks pyrobitumen and has the highest reservoir quality; and (4) an interval similar to interval 3 that lies below the present gas-water contact. Delineation of controls on the distribution of these intervals is critical to evaluating gas reserves in offshore areas.

  2. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

  3. Birmingham folio, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butts, Charles, 1863-1946.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is deposited moderately even and is quite concentrated throughout the exposure. The middle fan outcrops contain approximately 72.6% sandstone and show similar patterns, except that the amalgamated sandstone beds are not as thick, 5-15m and contain more shale...

  4. Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

  5. Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

  6. Solid Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties.

  7. Alabama Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercialThousand Cubic2009

  8. Alabama Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercialThousand

  9. Alabama Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1 2 2

  10. Domestic* Foreign* Total Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic8 Final May 2010 2008 of U.S./

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet)4.32 4.46 1967-2010

  12. Observation of induced fractures intercepted by mining in the Warrior Basin, Alabama. Topical report. Rock Creek methane from multiple coal seams completion project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steidl, P.F.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research and inspection of induced fractures that have been intercepted by mining. Induced fractures from 13 wells intercepted by mining were inspected at the Jim Walter Resources' (JWR) No. 4 and 5 Mines in Tuscaloosa County, and the Oak Grove Mine in Jefferson County, Alabama. In this area the Mary Lee and Blue Creek coalbeds average 1.3 ft and 4 to 5.5 ft, respectively at depths of about 2,000 ft at the JWR mines and 1,000 ft in the Oak Grove Mine. These seams are usually separated by 2 to 10 ft of rock parting. The wells were completed open hole from 1982 to 1986. Hydraulic fracture treatments were used to stimulate production. Some expected results include: in general, the fractures followed the coal face cleat direction; they were vertical, and were sandpacked close to the wall. Other observations include the following: (1) most of the fractures and proppant were present in the parting and roof rock, (2) results were similar in the JWR and Oak Grove Mines even though there is 1,000 ft less overburden at the Oake Grove Mine, and (3) no horizontal fractures were observed in the study; though other stimulations have propagated horizontal fractures at Oak Grove.

  13. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Naney, Michael {Mike} T [ORNL; Blencoe, James {Jim} G [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Pashin, Jack C. [Geological Survey of Alabama; Carroll, Richard E. [Geological Survey of Alabama

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  14. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  15. Recognition of two distinctive diagenetic facies trends as aid to hydrocarbon exploration in deeply buried Jurassic Smackover carbonates of southern Alabama and southern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petrological investigations from wells drilled in the southern Mississippi Interior Salt basin and in the northern Gulf Coast Salt basin have revealed regionally predictable diagenetic-facies trends within the deeply buried (19,000-22,500 ft) Smackover Formation. Within deeply buried Smackover trends, calcitic facies and dolomitic facies are recognized. The calcitic facies is areally widespread and exhibits diagenetic intensities ranging from well-preserved grainstones to pervasive neomorphism. Petrographic evidence of multistage cementation, solution compaction, replacement fabrics, and cement-occluded secondary porosity is common. The calcitic facies is characterized by low porosity and low permeability. The dolomitic facies is less abundant, and its distribution can be related to the Jurassic paleotopography. The Wiggins uplift, a prominent basement element extending across southern Alabama and southern Mississippi, exerted significant control on the areal distribution of this facies. Porous and permeable intervals in the deeply buried Smackover are restricted to this facies. The most significant textural parameter of the dolomitic facies is crystal size. Finely crystalline dolostone is normally of low porosity and low permeability, whereas coarsely crystalline dolostone exhibits more-favorable reservoir properties. The distribution of these diagenetic facies has important implications on future hydrocarbon exploration in the deeply buried Smackover Formation.

  16. Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy: Proceedings of IEA, Bioenergy, Task 17 Meeting in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6-9, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the results of the third meeting of Task 17 (Short-Rotation Crops for Bioenergy) within the framework of International Energy Agency (IEA), Bioenergy. (Minutes from the meeting can be seen at page 91.) The meeting was held in Auburn, Alabama, USA, September 6--9, 1999. The meeting was held soon after President Clinton of the United States signed Executive Order No.13134: DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING BIOBASED PRODUCTS AND BIOENERGY on August 12, 1999. Executive orders in the US are official documents, through which the President of the US manages the operation of the Federal Government. This order outlines the administration's goal of tripling the use of biomass products and bioenergy in the US by the year 2010. During the time of this meeting, it was also known from sources in Europe that the European Union (EU) commission was working on draft instructions to its member countries on how to increase the use of renewable energy from six to twelve percent in Europe within 10 years. The objectives of Task 17 support the goals of member countries for bioenergy production and use. These objectives are as follows: to stimulate the full-scale implementation of energy crops in the participating countries; to strengthen the contacts and co-operation between participating countries, scientists, biomass producers, machine developers, entrepreneurs, and end users to select the most urgent research and development areas and suggest projects of co-operation; to inform Ex-Co- members; and to deliver proceedings from the meetings.

  17. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields -- Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anderman/Smith Operating Co. is operating a secondary oil recovery project involving the Carter sandstone in northwest Alabama. The project objectives are: (1) to increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from the Carter reservoirs, thereby increasing domestic reserves and lessening US dependence on foreign oil; (2) to extensively model, test, and monitor the reservoirs so their management is optimized; and (3) to assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered to other US oil companies to encourage them to attempt similar projects. As a result of waterflood operations at the Central Buff unit, oil production from the Fowler Brasher 7--9 well increased to 40--50 stb/d in late October, and averaged about 45 stb/d in November with no measurable water production. Production at the Fowler Dodson 8--12 was more erratic during the same period. In October, the oil rate for this well increased to nearly 17 stb/d with no reported water production. However, in November the oil production rate declined to about 9 stb/d with an associated average water rate of nearly 17 bpd. Water analysis showed that this produced water was significantly fresher than the connate water produced prior to waterflood operations. This provides evidence for early breakthrough of water injected at the Jones 7--16 well and will be an important consideration in the reservoir modeling study being performed for the unit. There has been essentially no change in the waterflood response at the North Fairview Unit during the last quarter. Oil production rates from the three producing wells have remained unchanged; that is, 3 stb/d for Smith 33-6, 2 stb/d for Perkins 33--11, and 1 stb/d for the Perkins Young 33--10 well.

  19. Criteria to aid in the establishment of genetic boundaries within a carboniferous basin: Mary Lee Coal Zone, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, T.W.; Gastaldo, R.A. (Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper part of the Mary Lee coal zone of the Lower Pennsylvanian (Westphalian A) Pottsville Formation in northwestern Alabama is composed of the Mary Lee and the Newcastle coal seams. The Mary Lee coal seam has been economically significant in terms of both mining and coal-bed methane production. A sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical investigation of the lithologies associated with this coal zone was done to define the changes that occur in facies changing from terrestrial into marine facies. A ravinement bed, ranging in thickness from 13.0 deposits. Fifteen surficially exposed sections were observed and sampled in the study area. Geochemical analyses were done on samples collected from seven sections along the perimeter of the study area. The analyses conducted involved inductively coupled atomic plasma spectrometry (ICAP) for seven elemental oxides that include aluminum, iron, silica, calcium, potassium, magnesium and manganese. Atomic absorption was used to determine sodium content. Carbonate carbon was determined by weight percent difference after hydrochloric acid treatment, whereas organic carbon content was determined by use of a carbon analyzer on a LECO[sup TM] induction furnace. Sulfur content was also determined by a LECO induction furnace equipped with a sulfur analyzer. Loss-on-ignition (LOI) percentage was based upon change in weight of samples after a period of 30 min in a muffle furnace at a temperature of 1000[degrees]C. The combination of sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical characteristics were used to better understand the depositional setting of the upper Mary Lee coal zone in terms of a transgressive event. These criteria can be used in similar basin systems to better understand the depositional history of those settings.

  20. Alliance for Computational Science Collaboration: HBCU Partnership at Alabama A&M University Continuing High Performance Computing Research and Education at AAMU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Xiaoqing; Deng, Z. T.

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) project DE-FG02-06ER25746, entitled, "Continuing High Performance Computing Research and Education at AAMU". This three-year project was started in August 15, 2006, and it was ended in August 14, 2009. The objective of this project was to enhance high performance computing research and education capabilities at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), and to train African-American and other minority students and scientists in the computational science field for eventual employment with DOE. AAMU has successfully completed all the proposed research and educational tasks. Through the support of DOE, AAMU was able to provide opportunities to minority students through summer interns and DOE computational science scholarship program. In the past three years, AAMU (1). Supported three graduate research assistants in image processing for hypersonic shockwave control experiment and in computational science related area; (2). Recruited and provided full financial support for six AAMU undergraduate summer research interns to participate Research Alliance in Math and Science (RAMS) program at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL); (3). Awarded highly competitive 30 DOE High Performance Computing Scholarships ($1500 each) to qualified top AAMU undergraduate students in science and engineering majors; (4). Improved high performance computing laboratory at AAMU with the addition of three high performance Linux workstations; (5). Conducted image analysis for electromagnetic shockwave control experiment and computation of shockwave interactions to verify the design and operation of AAMU-Supersonic wind tunnel. The high performance computing research and education activities at AAMU created great impact to minority students. As praised by Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) in 2009, ?The work on high performance computing that is funded by the Department of Energy provides scholarships to undergraduate students as computational science scholars. This is a wonderful opportunity to recruit under-represented students.? Three ASEE papers were published in 2007, 2008 and 2009 proceedings of ASEE Annual Conferences, respectively. Presentations of these papers were also made at the ASEE Annual Conferences. It is very critical to continue the research and education activities.

  1. Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Peter; Pashin, Jack; Carlson, Eric; Goodliffe, Andrew; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Thompson, Mason

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants produce large quantities of carbon dioxide. In order to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions from these power plants, it is necessary to separate and store the carbon dioxide. Saline formations provide a potential sink for carbon dioxide and delineating the capacity of the various known saline formations is a key part of building a storage inventory. As part of this effort, a project was undertaken to access the storage capacity of saline reservoirs in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama. This basin has been a productive oil and gas reservoir that is well characterized to the west of the two major coal-fired power plants that are north of Birmingham. The saline zones were thought to extend as far east as the Sequatchie Anticline which is just east of the power plants. There is no oil or gas production in the area surrounding the power plants so little is known about the formations in that area. A geologic characterization well was drilled on the Gorgas Power Plant site, which is the farthest west of two power plants in the area. The well was planned to be drilled to approximately 8,000 feet, but drilling was halted at approximately 5,000 feet when a prolific freshwater zone was penetrated. During drilling, a complete set of cores through all of the potential injection zones and the seals above these zones were acquired. A complete set of openhole logs were run along with a vertical seismic profile (VSP). Before drilling started two approximately perpendicular seismic lines were run and later correlated with the VSP. While the zones that were expected were found at approximately the predicted depths, the zones that are typically saline through the reservoir were found to be saturated with a light crude oil. Unfortunately, both the porosity and permeability of these zones were small enough that no meaningful hydrocarbon production would be expected even with carbon dioxide flooding. iv While this part of the basin was found to be unsuitable for carbon dioxide injection, there is still a large storage capacity in the basin to the west of the power plants. It will, however, require pipeline construction to transport the carbon dioxide to the injection sites.

  2. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  3. Universit`a degli Studi di Trieste SSIS A.A. 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portelli, Dario

    concentrico ) `e con- tenuto in una retta. Tale retta `e perpendicolare all' asse radicale. Se un fascio ( non concentrico ) `e privo di punti base, il suo asse radicale passa per il punto medio del segmento i cui estremi, fuori dall' asse radicale. Potenza di un punto rispetto ad una circonferenza. Caratterizzazione dell

  4. Dean's List 2008-2009 NAME FALL 2008 HONORS SPRING 2009 HONORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Brown, Laura M. Highly Distinguished Highly Distinguished Browne, Katherine E. Highly Distinguished Cairco, Victoria L. Highly Distinguished Highly Distinguished Campbell, Eric M. Highly Distinguished Distinguished Christensen, Kimberly D. Highly Distinguished Highly Distinguished Clack, Anthony S. Highly

  5. Kursplan fr lsret 2008/2009 (Genererad 2008-07-17.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design Project A Antal högskolepoäng: 4. Betygskala: TH. Nivå: G1 (Grundnivå). Undervisningsspråk: Kursen. Studenterna får sedan i ett flertal korta övningsuppgifter möjlighet att utvecklaq förmågan att föra en idé

  6. CURSOS DE POSTGRADO DEL CSIC 2008-2009 CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGA DE LOS MATERIALES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Director: ISABEL SOFIA ASCENSION MONTERO HERRERO ICMMSede del curso: Codirector: 40 02/02/2009Horas

  7. ERST 480 Greening the Campus Fall/Winter Session 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    stewardship of ecologically significant natural areas. It uses resources--energy, water, paper, etc, such as contractors (including Aramark), as well as the City of Peterborough and the Trent-Severn Waterway, affect environmental decisions are made: how interest groups interact, and how the balance between economic viability

  8. Repertori curs 2008-2009 primer trimestre segon trimestre tercer trimestre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    a viol i orquestra de corda en Re menor I. Allegro II. Andante III. Allegro Solista: David Veiga Sonata n.1 per a cordes en Sol M G. Rossini (1792-1868) I Moderato II Andante III Allegro Serenata en Mi menor, op. 20 E. Elgar (1857-1935) I. Allegro piacevole II. Larghetto III. Allegretto Divertimento per

  9. FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review Table 1. Proposal Metadata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rainbow trout, the investigation of how winter ecology of each present life history is associated rainbow trout over the study period. This critical missing information on life histories and ecology, mining, and cattle grazing and the impacts can be observed in the San Poil through cemented sediments

  10. Fachbereich Mathematik WiSe 2008/2009 Prof. Dr. Andreas Meister

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birken, Philipp

    tritt genau dann ein, wenn f? ur jedes i # 1, . . . , n entweder y i = 0 oder x i = #x## · sign (y i

  11. ENG EC516 Digital Signal Processing 2008-2009 Catalog Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and their properties in relation to application requirements such as real-time, low bandwidth, and low-power operation. Optimal FIR filter design; time-dependent Fourier transform and filterbanks; Hilbert transform relations this course, students should be able to design DSP solutions involving the following topics: 1. Optimal FIR

  12. Institut fur Theoretische Informatik WS 2008/2009 Dr. Olaf Beyersdorff 3. Dezember 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    : YOUR NAME 1 Overview In the last lecture we . . . . In this lecture we . . . . 2 Main Section We begin

  13. Institut fur Theoretische Informatik WS 2008/2009 Dr. Olaf Beyersdorff 26. November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    and we2 = (Ee Eg2) /h. We denote : (*) Laboratoire assoc16 au C.N.R.S, et l'Universit6 Pierre et Marie Curie. #12;580 JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE II N4 St = wL, wet b2 = wL2 we2 (1.I) the corresponding detuningsLi and wL2. 81 " wLi wet and 82 " wL2 we2 are the two detunings; Ti and T2 are, respectively, the two

  14. Call for Papers 2008/2009 Special Issue for the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine entitled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinking water filtration, waste treatment (low cost, effective yet without adverse environmental impact) o Electricity generation, wind and solar power, solar cooker, lighting (renewable energy sources, low

  15. Centre for Telematics and Information Technology CTIT PROGRESS REPORT 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    &ICT) 20 Interviews n ICT against the quality-of-life yardstick 22 n Brain games `the direct way' 24 n to its promise to drive economic growth and prosperity as it contributed significantly to the development towards a prosperous future for all would almost completely revert into a worldwide pessimistic feeling

  16. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2008-2009 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the issue. Composting for residences students are not composting. The SDAG group will consider a new

  17. abstract 2008-2009 progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kepler pour qu'il drive ses trois lois ? a) Ptolme. b) Galile. c) Tycho Brahe. d) Johann Stffler. e expliquer les mouvements des plantes autour du...

  18. Cours de C++ 2008/2009 ELI 5 -Polytech'UPMC Introduction au C++

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braunstein, Ccile - Fachbereich 3

    le nom de l'tudiant puis sa note de partiel, sa note de l'exam nal et son ensemble de notes de% exam). Question 3 Le manipulateur setprecision fait partie de la bibliothque iomanip. Il permet de convertie en bool. Si x est un nombre : vrai pour toutes valeurs = 0 ; faux sinon Si x est une adresse

  19. Universite de Bordeaux I 2008-2009 Master de Mathematiques 1`ere annee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulangeon, Renaud

    ´eaux premiers pi ainsi que des entiers ni mi 0 tels qu'on ait : I = rY i=1 pmi i et A = rY i=1 pni i . L, on fait choix d'un ´el´ement bi pmi i \\ pmi+1 i . Prouver qu'il existe alors un I qui v´erifie les r congruences : bi mod pmi+1 i , pour 1 i r. C'est le lemme chinois : les id´eaux pmi+1 i ´etant deux `a

  20. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The 20082009 survey includes these four groups and adds a fifth group, safety and code officials. The same survey methods were used for both surveys; the 20082009 survey...

  1. Region 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 New England 183 140 138 140 127 136 -26%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    17% Plains 45 48 50 60 53 59 31% Rocky Mountains 18 18 27 21 21 19 6% Southwest 56 61 61 57 64 83 48 Region Florida Atlantic University CO TX NMAZ UT NV CA OR WA WY ND SD NE KS OK MN WI MI IA MO IL AR AL AK New England Great Lakes Plains Rocky Mountains Far West Florida South west #12;

  2. FOIA Backlog Reduction Goals, fiscal years 2008,2009 and 2010. | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|JulyR--FOIA Support Services for the U.S.of

  3. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys conducted for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S. Department of Energy

  4. Jefferson Lab Invites Classes, Groups to 2008-2009 Physics Fests |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman ResourcesJefferson Lab

  5. Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy ScoreEnergyFuel2008 |4: January

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department of EnergyEnergyVehicle Data| Department of

  7. The 2008/2009 World Economic Crisis: What It Means for U.S. Agriculture

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,ProductionMarketed Production (MillionGrossOutlook for

  8. Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act gives the Environmental Management Commission the authority to establish emission control requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control...

  9. Alabama Property Tax Exemptions (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Revenue. Relevant exemptions to energy generation facilities are abatements for air and water pollution control device and industrial purposes. There is no minimum amount...

  10. 1CAVT -University of Alabama A University of Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    injectors enablers for advanced combustion schemes (HCCI, stratified) ­ Currently known shape-memory alloys

  11. Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame

  12. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051

  13. Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember

  14. Alabama Offshore-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May(Million Cubic

  15. Alabama Onshore-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  16. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  17. Rome folio, Georgia-Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, C. W. (Charles Willard), 1859-1916.

    1902-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and structural characteristics of the field. The Upper Wilcox is divided into the following units, in ascending order, "First Lower Massive" sandstones and "D", "C", "B", "A", "Second Wilcox" and "First Wilcox" interbedded sandstones and shales. The reservoir... and are generally abruptly overla1n by sandstones with sharp or erosional bases. The sandstones change laterally to thin sandstones interlaminated with thick shales. The thick sandstones are submarine, constructional- channel deposits with associated thin...

  18. Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the...

  19. Gas Pipeline Safety Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All public utilities and persons subject to this rule shall file with the commission an operating and maintenance plan as well as an emergency plan. All construction work involving the addition and...

  20. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Alabama Nuclear Profile - All Fuels

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind...

  3. Water Pollution Control Authority (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Pollution Control Revolving Loan Fund, is maintained in perpetuity and operated by the department as agent for the authority for the purposes stated herein. Grants from the federal...

  4. ALABAMA DOT State Report Answers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Content Slump Temperature 2. Identify any differences in QC/QA requirements on projects and payment adjustment clauses related to QC/QA requirements. PRICE ADJUSTMENT BASED ON RIDEABILITY Profile Index Inches/mile/section Contract Price Adjustment Percent of Pavement Unit Contract Price Under 10

  5. Brownfield Development Tax Abatements (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brownfield Development Tax Abatements gives cities and counties the ability to abate, non-educational city and county sales and use taxes, non-educational state, city and county property taxes ...

  6. Alabama Nuclear Profile - All Fuels

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame Monthtotal electric

  7. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame Monthtotal

  8. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame MonthtotalJoseph

  9. Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)Sales (BillionIndustrial53,028 248,232 242,444

  10. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  11. 189,"Alabama Electric Coop Inc",1,"Lowman","Chatom",100,19.94,"OH","AC",230,230,1351.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wooden H-Frame",500

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary 189,"Alabama Electric Coop

  12. 189,"Alabama Electric Coop Inc",1,"Lowman","Chatom",100,19.94,"OH","AC",230,230,1351.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wooden H-Frame",500

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary 189,"Alabama Electric

  13. "FERC423",2005,1,195,"Alabama Power Co",3,"Barry","AL","C",,"Coal","BIT",45,"IM","SU","County Unknown",999,"MINA PRIBBENOW",358990,22.722,0.6,6.1,209.8

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996.......... 2.4Origin andFuel5,1,195,"Alabama

  14. Golden Chain Members Member Induction Graduation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Lindsey Robinson 2007 2008 Marilynn Angell 2008 2009 Robert Bradley 2008 2009 Esmeralda Luna-Ramos 2008

  15. Alg`ebre et Arithmetique Mathematiques L3 Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Annee 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    bataille avec 386 soldats. A la fin du combat, il souhaite compter ses troupes. Il leur ordonne de se mettre en rang de p soldats et il note le nombre de soldats formant la derni`ere rangee. Puis il proc`ede de m^eme mais en les faisant se mettre en rang de q soldats. Quelles valeurs de p et q doit

  16. The University of Tennessee FACULTY SENATE Membership 2007-2008 http://web.utk.edu/~senate/ 2008 2009 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    --Alternate Rupy Sawhney--Alternate Doug Birdwell 5468 Lee Han 7707 Lynne Parker 4394 Roberto Benson 5347 Toby

  17. Tutor's List 2008/2009 Updates to: Senior Tutor's Office (stosec@tcd.ie) or (01-8962551)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    . James's Hospital, D 8 cremink@tcd.ie 01-8963813 CK D'Arcy, Dr. Deirdre School of Pharmacy Centre, St. James's Hospital, D 8 jgormley@tcd.ie 01-8962121 AF Gormley, Dr. Michael Psychology Room 1 bbradby@tcd.ie 01-8961296 Q8 Brady, Dr. Michael Computer Science Room G41, O'Reilly Institute brady

  18. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam 2008-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2008 and early spring 2009, respectively. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). Operating the sluiceway reduces the potential for hydropower production. However, this surface flow outlet may be the optimal non-turbine route for fallbacks in late fall after the sluiceway is typically closed for juvenile fish passage and for overwintering summer steelhead and kelt passage in the early spring before the start of the voluntary spill season. The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines, and their movements in front of the sluiceway at TDA to inform fisheries managers and engineers decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study periods were from November 1 to December 15, 2008 (45 days) and from March 1 to April 9, 2009 (40 days). The study objectives were to 1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA during the two study periods, respectively, and 2) assess the behavior of these fish in front of sluice entrances. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics and fish behavior data using acoustic imaging. For the overwintering summer steelhead, fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. We estimated that a total of 1790 250 (95% confidence interval) summer steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices during November 1 to December 15, 2008. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, without the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of steelhead may have fallen back through turbines. Run timing peaked in late November, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for overwintering steelhead fallbacks was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. Therefore, sluiceway operations should not be based on diel distribution. For the early spring study, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 40-day study period. A total of 1766 277 (95% confidence interval) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, as with steelhead fallback, not having the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of overwintering steelhead and kelts may use the turbines for downstream passage before the start of the spill season. Run timing peaked in late March; however, relatively large numbers of kelt-sized targets passed the dam on March 2 and March 6 (162 and 188 fish, respectively). Horizontal distribution indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Again, no clear pattern was seen for diel distribution of overwintering steelhead and early out-migrating kelt passage.

  19. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob Rose Contact email brose@yakama.com A. Abstract Goal: The long-term goal of the Status and Trend

  20. LOUIS DE LA PARTE FLORIDA MENTAL HEALTH INSTITUTE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2008/2009 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Marc J.

    Institute's mission is to improve the lives of people with mental, addictive and developmental disorders and health care profes- sionals, the Florida legislature, administrators, policy makers, consumers are available to treat and prevent many behavioral health problems. Students will be exposed to treatment ap

  1. I neutrini solari Corso di Astrofisica e Particelle, prof. B. Borgia ( A.A. 2008-2009 )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    solari · Borexino reazioni termonucleari Standard Solar Models spettro in energia dei neutrini solari Homestake GALLEX/GNO e SAGE Kamiokande e Super-Kamiokande SNO #12;Introduzione NEUTRINI SOLARI : Solar processi di fusione nucleare Energia media ~ 1 MeV Flusso sulla Terra ~ 6?1010 cm-2s-1 ~10-45 cm2

  2. Prova scritta finale 19 giugno 2009 Istituzioni di Fisica della Materia Prof. Lorenzo Marrucci anno accademico 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    direzione positiva dell'asse x (siamo in 1D) in una regione in cui l'energia potenziale è nulla (regione I in tale regione. Ad un certo istante l'elettrone emette un fotone e "salta" ad un'energia E = 0. Calcolare. Determinare (c) l'espressione della funzione d'onda nelle tre regioni I, II e III, esprimendola in termini di

  3. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    among life histories. Specific project objectives include identification of spatiotemporal patterns: technical and/or scientific background At least two genetically distinct subspecies of rainbow trout in the San Poil River Basin exhibit the fluvial or fluvial-adfluvial life history strategy, for the purposes

  4. State Service ALABAMA 0.86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    AREA Navy 0.86 REDSTONE ARSENAL Army 0.86 ALASKA 1.78 ANCHORAGE Army 1.67 FAIRBANKS Army 1.89 ADAK NAVAL STATION Navy 4.41 CG - JUNEAU Navy 2.53 CG - KETCHIKAN Navy 2.70 CG - KODIAK Navy 3.43 CG - PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND Navy 2.90 CLEAR AIR FORCE BASE Air Force 2.00 EARECKSON AIR FORCE BASE Air Force 4

  5. Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

  6. ,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  7. alabama: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil spill, benthic secondary productivity and salt marsh habitats along Florida's Panhandle marsh habitat by constructing breakwaters and planting salt marsh vegetation....

  8. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Joseph M Farley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

  10. Alabama State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heat recovery devices, including desuperheater water heaters, condensing heat exchangers, heat pump and water heating heat recovery systems, and other energy recovery equipment k....

  11. Adamsville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, CaliforniaIAdamstown, Pennsylvania:

  12. Akron, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway Heights,Akins, Oklahoma: Energy

  13. Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway

  14. Alabama/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airwaysource History View New Pages Recent

  15. Alabaster, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airwaysource History View New

  16. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w3,290 2,871 2,629

  17. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases (Billion29

  18. Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases4 1657,237

  19. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame MonthtotalJoseph M

  20. Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1 2

  1. Brookwood, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and InnovativeBrookmont, Maryland:

  2. Webb, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to:Ohio: EnergyWebGen Systems Jump to:

  3. Alabama Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N

  4. Alabama Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) YearThousand

  5. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) YearThousandDecade

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) YearThousandDecadeYear

  7. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore

  8. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. State

  9. Abbeville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40

  10. Clean Cities: Alabama Clean Fuels coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLE POWERPropaneof

  11. Kinsey, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:KimbleKinnelon, New Jersey:

  12. Holt, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation,Jersey:Heights, NewOhio:

  13. Huntsville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: Energy ResourcesMontana: Energy Resources

  14. Woodstock, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy ResourcesWoods County, Oklahoma:Woodson

  15. Pinckard, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy ResourcesPicketGeothermal Project Jump to:PilotPinch,

  16. Alabama Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  17. Alabama Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Aprper Thousand0 1 2

  18. Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Aprper Thousand0 16,900

  19. Grimes, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrderNebraska:Gridley, California:

  20. Haleburg, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville ElectricControlon| OpenHaitiHaleakala

  1. Alabama -- SEP Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystemsProgram OverviewAdvocate - Issue 55-JulyBurden RFI | TS NOTData

  2. North Alabama Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen

  3. Newton, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent

  4. Northport, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNew Jersey: EnergyNorthgrid

  5. Birmingham, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirch Creek Village Elec Util Jump

  6. Cowarts, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core AnalysisCouncil,Mississippi: EnergyTexas:Cowarts,

  7. Daleville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources11-DNA JumpRenewables Consulting Jump

  8. Taylor, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0InformationBPLake Village, Texas:Taylor,

  9. Tennessee Valley Authority (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumericTenino, Washington: Energy

  10. Theodore, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands, Texas: Energy

  11. Summerdale, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL ElecStrategicStories HomeSumco TechxivSummerdale,

  12. Moundville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill, California:Morse,Wave Group Jump

  13. Avon, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to:Auriga EnergyAuxin Solar

  14. Birmingham, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEI Community(Redirected from Birmingham,

  15. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships Jump to: navigation,

  16. Vance, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies andVacantVan Buren County,

  17. Clayhatchee, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClay Electric Cooperative, Inc Jump

  18. Coaling, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: Energy Resources JumpCloverCounty,CCS Jump

  19. Coker, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: EnergyCoeur d Alene Fiber FuelsCoherentCoker,

  20. Columbia, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s EnergyColquittWashington:River

  1. "FERC423",2007,1,195,"Alabama Power Co",3,"Barry","AL","C","application/vnd.ms-excel","Coal","BIT",45,"IM","SU","County Unknown",999,"MINA PRIBBENOW",289050,22.732,0.5,5.2,217.3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996.......... 2.4Origin7,1,195,"Alabama Power

  2. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:Akuo

  3. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:AkuoEnergy

  4. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:AkuoEnergyEnergy

  5. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:AkuoEnergyEnergyEnergy

  6. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |

  7. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |Energy Information 81

  8. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |Energy Information 81Energy

  9. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |Energy Information

  10. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |Energy

  11. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |EnergyInformation 0840

  12. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2009 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 |EnergyInformation

  13. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008

  14. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008Energy Information Co for

  15. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - October 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008Energy Information Co forEnergy

  16. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - September 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008Energy Information Co

  17. A Spectral Analysis of World GDP Dynamics: Kondratieff Waves, Kuznets Swings, Juglar and Kitchin Cycles in Global Economic Development, and the 20082009 Economic Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotayev, Andrey V; Tsirel, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Significance of Kuznets Cycles. Economic Development andUniversity Press. Kuznets S. 1930. Secular Movements inSchumpeter and Kuznets: Trend Periods Revisited. Journal of

  18. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  19. Master Outils et Syst`emes de l'Astronomie et de l'Espace 2008-2009 Observatoire de Paris, Universites Paris 6, 7 & 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Tycho Brahe

  20. Licence IF -Fondements de l'informatique II -Anne 2008/2009 I. Briquel/I.Morel TD 8 -Calcul des prdicats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portier, Natacha

    le symbole R= est interprt par l'galit ? Soit Teg l'ensemble suivant d'noncs de L (appels Teg. 2. Soit un ensemble d'noncs de L. Montrer que admet un modle galitaire si et seulement si Teg admet un modle. 1 #12;3. En dduire que a un modle galitaire si et seulement si l'ensemble d

  1. TheDean'sHonorList 2008-2009 The Faculty of Science congratulates the following students who have earned a place on the Dean's List. To be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    have earned an A average, with no failures. Mathew Maroun Abado Ali Abbas Babak Aberumand D. Menaka Alexander Carducci Karen Shaylynn Carlton Rachel Jessica Carr Michael Cassels Jill Cates Lauren Nicole Chad

  2. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys Conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy; Chew, Andrea [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCT) conducts comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of fuel cells in diverse sectors of the economy - with emphasis on applications that will most effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment. Expanding the use of fuel cells requires a sustained education effort to lay the foundation for future commercial market introduction. The FCT education subprogram seeks to facilitate fuel cell demonstrations and support future commercialization by providing technically accurate and objective information to key target audiences both directly and indirectly involved in the use of fuel cells today. These key target audiences include a public that is familiar and comfortable with using a new fuel, state and local government officials who understand the near-term realities and long-term potential of the technology, an educated business and industry component, and trained safety and codes officials. With this in mind, the DOE FCT program established an education key activity to address the training and informational needs of target audiences that have a role in the near-term transition and the long-term development of a hydrogen economy. Whether or not changes can be attributed to the program, designing and maintaining an effective education program entails measuring baseline awareness and periodically measuring what has been learned. The purpose of this report is to document the data and results of statistical surveys undertaken in 2008 and 2009 to measure and establish changes in understanding and awareness about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies since a baseline survey was conducted in 2004. This report is essentially a data book, a digest of the survey data and an exposition of changes in knowledge of and opinions about hydrogen and fuel cell technology since 2004. Many conclusions can be made from the survey data. However, the purpose here is not to draw the conclusions, but rather to summarize the data in a way that facilitates drawing them. It is envisioned that the same statistical surveys will be fielded again in approximately three years.

  3. Fonaments matem`atics i estadistics. Curs 2008-2009. Grup 1. Professora responsable del grup 1: Nat`alia Castellana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellana, Natàlia

    `alia Castellana, Merc`e Farr´e, Andreu Huizinga, Isabel Serra. Programaci´o de les pr`actiques i de les

  4. This is archived information. Please visit http://maths.manchester.ac.uk for current course unit information. MATH45122 -2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    the differences in the solution properties and physics of physical systems governed by the kinematic wave equation. Waves in other physical systems. 3. Shallow water wave theory; the nonlinear equations; wave breaking irrotational theory. 4. Irrotational water wave theory to obtain the Boussinesq equations; steady solutions

  5. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  6. Copyright 1995,1997,2001,2003,2004,2005,2008, 2009 2012 CSUF Small Business Institute. All Rights Reserved-WEB 2012 Request for Consulting Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    ): Street Address: City: Zip: Fax #: E-mail: (print) Company Website: Cell #: Describe your products and blocks to solve challenges in areas such as productivity, motivation, retention, restructuring, team/Leadership: Improve bottom line by optimizing and aligning human resources. Conduct an organizational audit to solve

  7. Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of commercial and industrial waste. A separate chapter lists limits for the control of particulate emissions and fuel burning equipment. Standards for sulfur compound...

  8. alabama usa continuing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-RAY COUNTERPART TO SGR 20771. 3 Universities Space Research Association at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ES-84, Huntsville, AL 35812. 4 NASA Marshall Space Flight...

  9. Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to commemorate a National Day of Prayer and Remembrance in honor of victims of Hurricane Katrina. "On this day of prayer and remembrance, our thoughts and prayers are with...

  10. Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    also available for converting the fuel source of this equipment. Please visit program web site to access rebate forms and application instructions. Customers must include a...

  11. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is not filling with sediment to any apparent degree. The U. S. Corps of Engineers maintains ths Mobile Ship Channel to a depth of thirty-two feet. Dredging operations proceed during most of the year since this depth is some twenty-two f'eet below the mean bay... ~ ~ ~ ~ ix ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ 4 6 9 10 E. Meteorological III. TIDAL FLUSHING THEORY 15 A. Ketchum's Tidal Prism Theory B. Stommel's and Arons' Ydxing Length Theory. of Tidal Flushing IV. THE HYDROGRAPHIC SURVEY 22 27 A. Planning B...

  12. A study of oyster production in Alabama waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Joe O

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reef is continuous from Cedar Point to Pass Drury, w1th a width of 1. 25 miles 1n the area between Cedar Point and the north tip of Little Dauphin Island. East of the oyster reef, the bottom was found to be soft mud and the water depth was 7 to 12... f is con- tinuou with the one deecribeii above anil extenils as far south as the mouth of' Pace Drury. The total crea ie '. 01 acres. Dense growth of' oysters covore 271 acres and 2~0 acres hae decoleted or scattered =- ro?th. The denleted bottom...

  13. Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commission, is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations governing underground storage tanks and is authorized to seek the approval of the United States Environmental...

  14. General Chair Yang Xiao, University of Alabama, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    with emerging technologies. In particular, this workshop will bring together leading researchers, industry Wei, South China University of Technology, China Gyu Myoung Lee, Institut TELECOM SudParis, France, University of Tsukuba, Japan Ilangko Balasingham, Rikshospitalet Univ.Hospital, Norway Jelena Misic

  15. alabama argillacea huebner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil spill, benthic secondary productivity and salt marsh habitats along Florida's Panhandle marsh habitat by constructing breakwaters and planting salt marsh vegetation....

  16. alabama volume ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening Texas closure. ABSTRACT-This report presents thefind- ings of the 1980-8 survey of ice...

  17. Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    no money down and can be used to finance an air source, geothermal or dual-fuel heat pump. The loans can also be used to cover associated water heating costs and wiring...

  18. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    Control Classification Number ITAR International Traffic in Arms Regulations NSC National Security Council Control OSP Office of Sponsored Projects PI Principal Investigator SDN List Specially Designated Nationals) and the Department of Commerce's Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to control the export of certain information

  19. EECBG Success Story: Alabama Justice Center Expands its Solar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    costs and help the environment by installing renewable energy projects, including solar panels on the center's roof and on poles around the property, thanks to funding from...

  20. SEP Success Story: Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo...

  1. alabama eastern gulf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The angiosperm flora of eastern Asia (EAS) is roughly twice as rich as that of eastern North America (ENA), in spite of similar area and climate. Using provincestate-level...

  2. Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

  3. Woody biomass resource of Alabama. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.; Thomas, C.E.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent of total live biomass in a forest ecosystem is summarized by an equation. If forest biomass becomes a substantial component of fuel supply, certain resource supply/demand issues become evident. This, in effect, will impact on the future of forest biomass as a renewable-resource element. To supply a growing demand for biomass fuel, certain limited management options are available to managers. It is clear that benefits and risks are associated with all phases of any form of energy production. The direct and indirect costs and benefits of utilizing biomass for energy need to be identified and evaluated. The first step in the process involves identification of the resource and its quantity, composition, distribution, and potential availability.

  4. Phase III Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , two making approximately three trips per day, for approximately 15 weeks during peak tourist season to be reduced during the off-peak winter season. To support the project, passenger queuing areas one Horizon oil spill. ESTIMATED COST The estimated amount of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill early restoration

  5. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W W W W W W Colorado Iowa - W - W W W - W Colorado Kentucky W W W W W W W W Colorado Michigan - 38.75 - 72.63 53.4% 881 - 100.0% Colorado Mississippi W 49.97 W 81.80 61.1%...

  6. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    W - - - - - - - Colorado Kentucky W 21.37 W 61.79 34.6% 1,760 W 100.0% Colorado Michigan - 46.69 - 83.89 55.7% 506 - 91.3% Colorado Mississippi W 42.82 W 75.97 56.4%...

  7. Quark Coalescence at High Energies University of Alabama in Huntsville/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    : ZWL,Ko&Pal, PRL89(02) v4, v6, ...: Chen,Ko&ZWL, PRC69(04) Flavor ordering of v2 at high Pt: ZWL&Ko, PRL89(02) Amplification of quark v2 and ordering: Voloshin, NPA715(03); Molnar&Voloshin, PRL91 et al, PRL90(03); Greco,Ko&Levai, PRL90(03); ... #12;Near hadronization, gluons may decouple (serve

  8. alabama army ammunition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: US Army Corps of Engineers ENGINEERING AND DESIGN Inspection, Evaluation, and Repair of Hydraulic No. 1110-2-6054 1 December 2001 Engineering and Design...

  9. Lauderdale County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy Development JumpLars EnviroLatahLatimerLatty

  10. Lawrence County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy DevelopmentLaurentian EnergyLawnton,7428°,

  11. Lee County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana: EnergyLands inLechee, Arizona:Lee

  12. Level Plains, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:New York:NewLeupp, Arizona:

  13. Limestone County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Macon County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  15. Madison County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. EECBG Success Story: Alabama Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  17. EECBG Success Story: Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  18. Diagenesis and porosity evolution, Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lock, B.E.; Broussard, S.W.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major deposits of natural gas were discovered in the Norphlet Formation beneath Mobile Bay in 1979. The reservoirs are in arkosic sandstones at depths greater than 20,000 ft, yet the productive interval has porosities up to 25%. Overlying the porous zone is a tight cap of thoroughly cemented sandstone of variable thickness, which poses problems for exploration and production. The tight zone, which together with overlying basal Smackover forms the reservoir seal, may be so thick that the underlying productive interval is substantially reduced. The upper parts of the Norphlet, in common with many other eolian sands, were reworked during a subsequent transgression. There is not a full correspondence, however, between the tight rock and the reworked facies. The origin of the impermeable zone is better understood as a function of the diagenetic history only partially related to depositional facies. It is proposed that, at an early stage of diagenesis, brines derived from the underlying Louann Salt and Werner Formation deposited anhydrite and possibly halite cements in the lower part of the Norphlet Formation. Marine working of the upper sands may have helped to disperse these brines from the upper part of the Norphlet, and the depth of reworking may even have been partially influenced by incipient cementation. The zones not already cemented by evaporites were subsequently cemented by quartz and feldspar overgrowths. At a very late stage, deep in the subsurface, the evaporite cements were flushed from the lower parts of the Norphlet, and locally abundant small feldspar crystals randomly nucleated in the pores. Gas migrated into the formation shortly afterward. Evaporites may play another important role in the petroleum geology of the deep Norphlet: the source of the gas may have been the underlying evaporites.

  19. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  20. Replacement geometry and fabrics of Smackover (Jurassic) dolomite, southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of dolomitization and associated reservoir development in the Smackover Formation, Conecuh Ridge-Wiggens arch areas, is not predictable by comparison with time-temperature index methods or porosity-depth curves. Major alteration patterns and associated dolomite fabrics reflect the early paleotopographic settings, where high fluid flux and massive replacement are associated with Late Jurassic basement highs. This large-scale replacement is most important in the lowermost Smackover section overlying the Norphlet sandstone from Chunchula field into the Manila Embayment. The heterogeneous nature of dolomite reservoir development is evident in Chunchula field, where local pods of permeable dolomite cut across sedimentary facies boundaries. Predicting the orientation of a dolomite permeability barrier where there is little well control can be facilitated by mapping the regional thickness variations; the extension of impermeable dolomite trends is generally parallel to isopach trends.

  1. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  2. Smackover-Norphlet stratigraphy, South Wiggins Arch, Mississippi and Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cagle, J.W.; Khan, M.A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesozoic rocks of the Gulf were deposited on a wide coastal plain which was punctuated transversely by major positive and negative warpings. Two of the positive elements (Sabine and Monroe uplifts) underlie giant hydrocarbon accumulations. The Wiggins arch is notable because, although the flanks are productive, the crestal area is barren. This condition has led to a paucity of well control, especially deep well control. Only three wells on the arch have penetrated the entire sedimentary sequence (20,000 ft, 6,100 m) and reached basement rock (2 granite, 1 metamorphic) dated at 300 +/- m.y. These three wells are reported to have a normal stratigraphic sequence except that the Jurassic Haynesville Formation lies on the basement, and the Buckner, Smackover, Norphlet, and Louann are missing. Careful analysis of these wells indicates the lower part of the reported Haynesville is time-correlative with the Smackover. Thus, the Smackover is not missing, but is represented by a Haynesville-like facies deposted on a block of granitic basement. This block must have been barely emergent and led to a complex set of cays during Smackover deposition. Careful analysis of seismic records indicates the proposed cays are surrounded by areas of very different reflective character. These reflections may indicate the presence of high-energy Smackover carbonate and Norphlet sand that is missing from the wells.

  3. EIS-0165: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal. The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic. Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL I 01-383 and PL 101-512). Storage capacity would he developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine.

  4. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For each of the twenty-eight station positions, curves vere then drawn for temperature-depth and salinity&epth for the different ob- served tidal stages. From these curves temperature-depth sections (Figure V) and salinity-depth sections (Figures VI, VII...) vere oon- structed 1' or six cross-sections of Mobile Bay and for the ship channel length, for the different tidal stages. Current velocity vectors were plotted by station for surface and bottom at ebb and flood tidal stages. From these data surface...

  5. Alabama Oil and Gas Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Alabama's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

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  7. Alabama's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Alabama's 6th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Alabama's 7th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Alabama/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  12. Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  13. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w3,290 2,871

  14. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  15. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  16. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w3,290Extensions

  17. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  18. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  19. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases (Billion

  20. Alabama Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases4 16 18 19 18

  1. Alabama Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  2. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  3. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  4. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  5. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  6. Alabama Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  7. Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  8. Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  9. Alabama Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  10. Alabama Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  11. Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  12. Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  13. Alabama Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  14. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  15. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  16. Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial Deliveries

  17. Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial

  18. Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial (Million Cubic

  19. Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial (Million

  20. Alabama Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial (MillionFuel

  1. Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o fCommercial

  2. Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o

  3. Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2

  4. Alabama Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0 Year-1

  5. Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0 Year-1DecadeYear

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0

  7. Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0Decade Year-0

  8. Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0Decade Year-0Year

  9. Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0Decade

  10. Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade Year-0DecadeYear Jan

  11. Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecade

  12. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame Month

  13. Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame MonthtotalJoseph

  14. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051 146,751

  15. Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per Thousand

  16. Alabama Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1 2 2

  17. Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1 2 2

  18. Alabama--Onshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1

  19. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per Thousand604

  20. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per